Ah yes, the enum. It's a convenient way to give an integer a discrete domain of values, without having to worry about constants. But you see, therein lies the problem. What happens if you don't want to use an integer? Perhaps you'd like to use a string? Or a datetime? Or a char?

If that were the case, some might say just make a class that acts similarly, or then you clearly don't want an enum. But others, such as Dan Holmes' colleague, go a different route. They make sure they can fit chars into enums.

'******* Asc Constants ********
Private Const a = 65
Private Const b = 66
Private Const c = 67
Private Const d = 68
Private Const e = 69
Private Const f = 70
Private Const H = 72
Private Const i = 73
Private Const l = 76
Private Const m = 77
Private Const n = 78
Private Const O = 79
Private Const p = 80
Private Const r = 82
Private Const s = 83
Private Const t = 84
Private Const u = 85
Private Const x = 88

  ... snip ...

'******* Status Enums *********
Public Enum MessageStatus
  MsgError = e
  MsgInformation = i
  ProdMsg = p
  UpLoad = u
  Removed = x
End Enum

Public Enum PalletTable
  Shipped = s   'Pallet status code
  Available = a
End Enum