Yesterday, we learned about the latest programming paradigm, Vector Oriented Programming. Continuing that trend, I'd like to introduce the next big thing in data storage: the Column Separated Value DataBase. Discovered by Shaun, the CSVDB will do nothing short of revolutionizing the way we store, manage, and think about data ...

CREATE TABLE [Tab001]
(
  [Col001] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col002] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col003] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col004] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col005] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col006] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col007] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
    ... 
  [Col041] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col042] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col043] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col044] VARCHAR(8000) NULL,
  [Col045] VARCHAR(8000) NULL
)
CREATE TABLE [Tab002] ( ...)
CREATE TABLE [Tab003] ( ...)
...

As you can probably tell, the CSVDB combines the best parts of CSV (Comma Separated Value) files with a relational database. No longer do you need to be tied down with things like a data model -- just pick a column from the vast array of tables, and use it how ever you'd please. And on top of that, the CSVDB doesn't burden you with foreign keys, column names, data validation, table names, or even primary keys ...

Col001 | Col002   | Col003   | Col004        | Col005 | Col006 | Col007 | Col008      | ...
-------+----------+----------+---------------+--------+--------+----------------------+-----
3      | NULL     | NULL     | http://www... | NULL   | 5,6,7  | (really long string) | ...

... and yes, you saw right. The CSVDB, unlike CSV files, allows you to have comma-separated data within a cell of column-separated data.