Talanb's colleague was well trained in best-practices. He knew it was a bad idea to hard code things and had a deep undesrtanding of code reuse. He also knew it was awfully silly to create different data structures for entities that were identical. Like a person's name and some coordinates. They're really the same thing if you think about it: firstname/lastname and longitude/lattitude, both just a simple Pair. Making two different structs would be as silly as hard coding your variable names ...

public class Pair
{
  public int PairID;
  public String field1;
  public String field2;
}

public class Triple
{
  public int TripleID;
  public String field1;
  public String field2;
  public String field3;
}

public class Quadruple
{
  public String QuadrupleID;
  public String field1;
  public String field2;
  public String field3;
  public String field4;
}

public class Quintuple
{
  public String Quintuple;
  public String field1;
  public String field2;
  public String field3;
  public String field4;
  public String field5;
}

Seeing a pattern yet? Can you guess the next one?

public class Struct6
{
  public String Struct6ID;
  public String field1;
  public String field2;
  public String field3;
  public String field4;
  public String field5;
  public String field6;
}

As it would turn out, Talanb's colleague spent all of his research time on best practices, instead of finding out what -tuple comes after quin- ...