Advantage Pricing

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  • Chronomium 2012-06-22 10:38
    [...] Yoshi writes [...]
    What's Yoshi doing in the software development industry?

    Well I guess he'd be good at detecting code smells.
  • frist 2012-06-22 10:38
    frist, not spam
  • iK the Alcoholic 2012-06-22 10:39
    I'd pay it to not have to deal with supermarket tracking.

    Frist?
  • kwan 2012-06-22 10:41
    Last!

    nisl
  • Coyne 2012-06-22 10:45
    Yes, they are pushy. "Get our 'advantage card' or else!"

    Of course, if they want to give you discounts, you know they're making it back some other way. Selling your email or your purchase information to some ad agency.
  • the beholder 2012-06-22 10:47
    frist:
    frist, not spam
    Doubly wrong, and you also missed the chance of doing at least something funnier out of it. At the very least you could write "frst,notspam"

    So yeah, try harder but with something useful or entertaining next time.
  • Recursive Reclusive 2012-06-22 10:57
    I'm not seeing the superpower connection on the previously expensive tshirt.
  • Mike 2012-06-22 11:04
    I'm not finding the core meltdown message anywhere on the Web.
  • Jack 2012-06-22 11:14
    I think the meltdown was probably in the 3D core. After all it is Visual Studio. Spellchecker probably screwed it up.
  • Larry 2012-06-22 11:17
    You just buy it with your card for $3.00 and then return it without your card, collecting $288.98. Plus tax.

    Rinse and repeat.
  • Yazeran 2012-06-22 11:20
    Jack:
    I think the meltdown was probably in the 3D core. After all it is Visual Studio. Spellchecker probably screwed it up.


    Well the alternatives are quite ghastly to consider, either on a normal computer or on a some types of power plants, so I hope you are correct....
    ;-)

    Yazeran

    Plan: To go to Mars one day with a hammer
  • C-Derb 2012-06-22 11:27
    Recursive Reclusive:
    I'm not seeing the superpower connection on the previously expensive tshirt.

    All cotton tagless t-shirts with a list price over $90,000 come with superpowers. You didn't know that?
  • Coyne 2012-06-22 11:35
    Get rid of those calories: Run a marathon!
  • Darth 2012-06-22 11:40
    C-Derb:
    Recursive Reclusive:
    I'm not seeing the superpower connection on the previously expensive tshirt.

    All cotton tagless t-shirts with a list price over $90,000 come with superpowers. You didn't know that?
    One of the superpowers is the ability (after donning the shirt) to strangle the shopkeeper/wholesaler using merely your mind. How else do you think my friends at Amazon could get the price down so low?
  • @Deprecated 2012-06-22 11:41
    The MSU one reminds me of a compression algorithm that was presented in my first C book, "C Primer Plus".

    It was a simple and efficient algorithm: discard every 2nd and 3rd character.

    It even came with an example:
    "So even Eddy came oven ready"
    Try it yourself... Stupid Akismet won't let me post the 'compressed' string.

    Reconstructing the original message is a real bitch, tho.
  • Joe 2012-06-22 11:45
    Jack:
    I think the meltdown was probably in the 3D core. After all it is Visual Studio. Spellchecker probably screwed it up.


    I can not think of a worse idea than running Spellchecker on source code.

    Oh, wait, yes I can. Visual Studio.
  • Anketam 2012-06-22 11:55
    Larry:
    You just buy it with your card for $3.00 and then return it without your card, collecting $288.98. Plus tax.

    Rinse and repeat.
    Except on the receipt it says what you actually paid. And I would love to see you even try to return meat to a store (specially without a receipt).
  • PiisAWheeL 2012-06-22 12:07
    Anketam:
    Larry:
    You just buy it with your card for $3.00 and then return it without your card, collecting $288.98. Plus tax.

    Rinse and repeat.
    Except on the receipt it says what you actually paid. And I would love to see you even try to return meat to a store (specially without a receipt).
    That and places that take returns without a reciept will usually give you the lowest price of the item in the last 30 days. And yes, the only time grocery stores will usually accept a return on perishables is with a reciept and if there is something wrong with it, and even then its usually an exchange.

    Also, you have to assume that since the meat is weighed and priced in the store, there probably isn't a rack of meat accidently overpriced like that.

    And I uploaded the 26 mile one in March ^__i_^ I thought it was forgotten.
  • Nagesh 2012-06-22 12:11
    In the India cow is sacred and of course such expensive.
  • pjt33 2012-06-22 12:11
    The VS one could well be generated by the code Fausto was developing. The basis of the VS designer is that it executes the code of "components" and "controls" to render them as they would be - but because they're not in the context in which they'd actually be used you might hit error conditions. In theory you can avoid this using
    if (!DesignMode)
    but in practice it's more complicated. And I have on occasion managed to get VS to hang or to die in response to an exception thrown inside the designer.
  • studog 2012-06-22 12:23
    What's really interesting is that both naive corrections for the over-priced meat, $7.22 and $7.46, are *cheaper* than the club price of $7.49.
  • area driver 2012-06-22 12:28
    Is "Hwy F" a real road in Milwaukee, or another variable name?
  • mpalecek 2012-06-22 12:36
    area driver:
    Is "Hwy F" a real road in Milwaukee, or another variable name?


    Yes it is, it is about %d miles west of the city
  • Nageshing 2012-06-22 12:39
    area driver:
    ...
    You don't drive an area, road hog, you drive a line. Stay in your own lane!
  • PiisAWheeL 2012-06-22 12:44
    mpalecek:
    area driver:
    Is "Hwy F" a real road in Milwaukee, or another variable name?


    Yes it is, it is about %d miles west of the city
    +%X
  • LieutenantFrost 2012-06-22 12:47
    In Wisconsin, highways that are created at the county level are labeled with letters. I grew up on County N, as an example.

    This leads to shenanigans such as people stealing their initials in road signs. YMMV
  • PedanticCurmudgeon 2012-06-22 13:47
    Coyne:
    Yes, they are pushy. "Get our 'advantage card' or else!"

    Of course, if they want to give you discounts, you know they're making it back some other way. Selling your email or your purchase information to some ad agency.
    Either that or the discounted price is the real price, and the other price has an anonymity premium built in.
  • da Doctah 2012-06-22 15:57
    ObOldJoke: "If that 4th core melts down, we'll be up here all day!"

    (Michigan State University: the school without eyes.)
  • Sayer 2012-06-22 16:02
    Nageshing:
    area driver:
    ...
    You don't drive an area, road hog, you drive a line. Stay in your own lane!


    I drive a car.

    damnum: an incredulous element.
  • José Tomás Pérez Rodríguez transverbero 2012-06-22 16:30
    Jack:
    I think the meltdown was probably in the 3D core. After all it is Visual Studio. Spellchecker probably screwed it up.

    That's what they get for using Nvidia.
  • Anonymoose 2012-06-22 17:02
    To be fair, freeway time in Milwaukee is always variable.
  • Spewin Coffee 2012-06-22 19:16
    "Appearently" MSU is TRWTF.
  • Anonymous 2012-06-22 19:32
    "I was building a Silverlight project,"

    Never before has there been a truer WTF.
  • dubbreak 2012-06-22 20:48
    I like the lack of spaces one. Reminds me of a friend that worked the computer help desk in the business building when we were in Uni. One of the students approached him about an issue with the keyboard on the computer he was using, the space bar didn't work.

    "Sorry we don't have any extra keyboards you'll have to move to another computer."

    Business student: "That's fine, but do you know how to add spaces?"

    Apparently he had written an entire essay with no spaces. It took some back and forth to figure out he wanted a way to automatically add the spaces. The answer he provided didn't go over well.

    WhoTF decides, "Oh.. I'll just write the entire essay with no spaces and figure it out after." Future CEO material there I tell ya.
  • norsetto 2012-06-23 01:59
    Am I the only one to think that TRWTF are the Safe Handling Instructions!?
  • Rodnas 2012-06-23 08:03
    So i could run from the north pole to the south pole with just a kilo of sugar in my backpack? Great news
  • I forget 2012-06-23 08:23
    Those "advantage" type cards are evil and aught to be illegal.
  • Watson 2012-06-23 09:44
    "So how do I get to the freeway from here?"
    "Oh, it's just a few minutes across from US 45 and a bit up from Hwy F."
  • P. Almonius 2012-06-23 15:22
    Recursive Reclusive:
    I'm not seeing the superpower connection on the previously expensive tshirt.

    I saw someone today in a tshirt with a logo saying "Zip". I wonder if it's slimming, and "Rar" brand is even more effective.
  • Jellineck 2012-06-23 15:47
    I forget:
    Those "advantage" type cards are evil and aught to be illegal.


    I know. I can't imagine what kind of junk mail the guy that lives at 666 Mulberry Lane is getting from 15 years of using my card at the grocery store.
  • Jack 2012-06-23 18:23
    Jellineck:
    I forget:
    Those "advantage" type cards are evil and aught to be illegal.

    I know. I can't imagine what kind of junk mail the guy that lives at 666 Mulberry Lane is getting from 15 years of using my card at the grocery store.
    Oooh! You're so clever lying to the store, its a wonder no one else ever thought of that before!

    Got news for you. You're still getting screwed. The reason those cards are so valuable to the marketers (aside from junk mail) is that by assigning a unique ID to each purchase and purchaser, they can figure out exactly how much you're willing to pay for a 12-pack of Diet Coke. Sure they can make it and sell it at a profit for $1.25 but why should they sell it to you at that price when they know that you are willing to pay $4.99?

    And how do they know that?

    Because when they have a sale most people load up but not you, no, you just keep buying your same 12 pack every week. And when the sale is over most people stop buying but you just keep grabbing that same 12 pack every week. The only week you didn't was when they let it go up to $5.29. That was a test. If you'd bought one that week you can be sure that price would come around again some day -- just for your benefit.

    And so on for every other product in the store.

    They use those cards to figure out how many people are in your house, and their approximate age and gender. They know whether you go for the cheap fatty ground beef or the premium steak. So they have a good idea of your income bracket too. Most likely they know more about your financial and consumption habits than you do. And they can do all of that without ever needing to know who you really are. They don't care who you really are. They only care that "customer 1985763278 can be regularly screwed out of $17.32 per week". That's why your data is valuable to them, and they're willing to pay you to hand it over.

    Why do you think the prices keep changing so often? It isn't because the costs are changing that much. They are testing you, and every other shopper, to see just how much you will swallow. It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.

    The OP is right. They're evil.
  • blank 2012-06-23 21:17
    Jack:
    Jellineck:
    I forget:
    Those "advantage" type cards are evil and aught to be illegal.

    I know. I can't imagine what kind of junk mail the guy that lives at 666 Mulberry Lane is getting from 15 years of using my card at the grocery store.
    Oooh! You're so clever lying to the store, its a wonder no one else ever thought of that before!

    Got news for you. You're still getting screwed. The reason those cards are so valuable to the marketers (aside from junk mail) is that by assigning a unique ID to each purchase and purchaser, they can figure out exactly how much you're willing to pay for a 12-pack of Diet Coke. Sure they can make it and sell it at a profit for $1.25 but why should they sell it to you at that price when they know that you are willing to pay $4.99?

    And how do they know that?

    Because when they have a sale most people load up but not you, no, you just keep buying your same 12 pack every week. And when the sale is over most people stop buying but you just keep grabbing that same 12 pack every week. The only week you didn't was when they let it go up to $5.29. That was a test. If you'd bought one that week you can be sure that price would come around again some day -- just for your benefit.

    And so on for every other product in the store.

    They use those cards to figure out how many people are in your house, and their approximate age and gender. They know whether you go for the cheap fatty ground beef or the premium steak. So they have a good idea of your income bracket too. Most likely they know more about your financial and consumption habits than you do. And they can do all of that without ever needing to know who you really are. They don't care who you really are. They only care that "customer 1985763278 can be regularly screwed out of $17.32 per week". That's why your data is valuable to them, and they're willing to pay you to hand it over.

    Why do you think the prices keep changing so often? It isn't because the costs are changing that much. They are testing you, and every other shopper, to see just how much you will swallow. It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.

    The OP is right. They're evil.


    agree.
    maybe use multiple (fake id) "loyalty" cards with each company?

    are they doing facial recognition from cctv too (yet)?
    i guess it's back to balaclavas for the 'noids and "it's 1984" brigade. or are they illegal now?

    *considers creating fake id email handling (spam rebound) service*
  • Jack 2012-06-23 22:58
    The MSU one looks old--we haven't used that shade of green (or that slogan) in years. Looks like someone in Admissions screwed the pooch good.
  • Will 2012-06-24 17:32
    Jack:
    It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.


    Wow I my grocery store is really old tech, they have a printed out prices. Where are these grocery stores that have systems that scan for your card and change the prices as you walk by, also with a system that makes sure that someone else is not watching? Or do they just not display prices?
  • Jim 2012-06-24 19:12
    blank:
    Jack:
    Jellineck:
    I forget:
    Those "advantage" type cards are evil and aught to be illegal.

    I know. I can't imagine what kind of junk mail the guy that lives at 666 Mulberry Lane is getting from 15 years of using my card at the grocery store.
    Oooh! You're so clever lying to the store, its a wonder no one else ever thought of that before!

    Got news for you. You're still getting screwed. The reason those cards are so valuable to the marketers (aside from junk mail) is that by assigning a unique ID to each purchase and purchaser, they can figure out exactly how much you're willing to pay for a 12-pack of Diet Coke. Sure they can make it and sell it at a profit for $1.25 but why should they sell it to you at that price when they know that you are willing to pay $4.99?

    And how do they know that?

    Because when they have a sale most people load up but not you, no, you just keep buying your same 12 pack every week. And when the sale is over most people stop buying but you just keep grabbing that same 12 pack every week. The only week you didn't was when they let it go up to $5.29. That was a test. If you'd bought one that week you can be sure that price would come around again some day -- just for your benefit.

    And so on for every other product in the store.

    They use those cards to figure out how many people are in your house, and their approximate age and gender. They know whether you go for the cheap fatty ground beef or the premium steak. So they have a good idea of your income bracket too. Most likely they know more about your financial and consumption habits than you do. And they can do all of that without ever needing to know who you really are. They don't care who you really are. They only care that "customer 1985763278 can be regularly screwed out of $17.32 per week". That's why your data is valuable to them, and they're willing to pay you to hand it over.

    Why do you think the prices keep changing so often? It isn't because the costs are changing that much. They are testing you, and every other shopper, to see just how much you will swallow. It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.

    The OP is right. They're evil.


    agree.
    maybe use multiple (fake id) "loyalty" cards with each company?

    are they doing facial recognition from cctv too (yet)?
    i guess it's back to balaclavas for the 'noids and "it's 1984" brigade. or are they illegal now?

    *considers creating fake id email handling (spam rebound) service*

    Hi Aksimet, would you please let me post a link that is vaguely related to some of the dissertation here...


    http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured-out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/


    Although the articlae doesn't say it, it turns out she lived at 666 Mulberry Lane....
  • Wfd 2012-06-24 19:30
    Actually my local supermarket will take everything back, no questions. Even if they have to just discard it.
  • Kuba 2012-06-25 07:04
    dubbreak:
    Apparently he had written an entire essay with no spaces. It took some back and forth to figure out he wanted a way to automatically add the spaces. The answer he provided didn't go over well.

    WhoTF decides, "Oh.. I'll just write the entire essay with no spaces and figure it out after." Future CEO material there I tell ya.
    Quite so. In the times of .com boom, it went like this "Oh, we'll just start this whole company on venture capital, and we'll hopefully figure out what to do before the money runs out". I really wonder who were those greedy venture capitalist idiots who thought rules of business don't apply anymore just because they don't dig technology.
  • Kuba 2012-06-25 07:11
    Jack:
    Got news for you. You're still getting screwed. The reason those cards are so valuable to the marketers (aside from junk mail) is that by assigning a unique ID to each purchase and purchaser, they can figure out exactly how much you're willing to pay for a 12-pack of Diet Coke. Sure they can make it and sell it at a profit for $1.25 but why should they sell it to you at that price when they know that you are willing to pay $4.99?

    And how do they know that?

    [...]Why do you think the prices keep changing so often? It isn't because the costs are changing that much. They are testing you, and every other shopper, to see just how much you will swallow. It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.

    The OP is right. They're evil.
    How is that evil? I'm not really in love with grocers, whether big or small, but I don't understand why leveraging technology for purposes of running the business at good profit is somehow bad. They aren't exactly a charity, you know.

    As for the loyalty cards, I think they may be a bit overrated. People who are on good financial footing will most likely use the same credit card all the time anyway, or perhaps they'll use a small set of them. It's no biggie to use a hash of the credit card number for customer ID. Yes, they get recycled as accounts get closed, but that's easy to pick out. If there was a period of inactivity followed by that same hash "appearing" three states over, it's probably not because the customer has moved...
  • Röb 2012-06-25 09:03
    That MSU one makes me think someone doesn't know the difference between forward slash and back slash, and that just raises more questions...

    str.replace( /insertnamehere/si, '' )


    !=

    str.replace( \insertnamehere\si, '' )
  • $$ERR:get_name_fail 2012-06-25 09:03
    Visual Studio 2010 developers really think of everything.

    They are not just checking for errors caused by a CPU malfunction, they even were thoughtful enough to identify that the cause is a meltdown in the 3rd CPU core.

    Did you remember to catch CPUMeltdownException in your last program? No? See how much you can learn from Microsoft developers!
  • Sayer 2012-06-25 09:35
    $$ERR:get_name_fail:
    Visual Studio 2010 developers really think of everything.

    They are not just checking for errors caused by a CPU malfunction, they even were thoughtful enough to identify that the cause is a meltdown in the 3rd CPU core.

    Did you remember to catch CPUMeltdownException in your last program? No? See how much you can learn from Microsoft developers!


    I'm willing to bet that if someone ever posted a picture of a collapsed birdhouse, there'd be someone in here declaring it was because they used the wrong brand of fucking hammer.
  • trtrwtf 2012-06-25 10:19
    Jack:

    Why do you think the prices keep changing so often? It isn't because the costs are changing that much. They are testing you, and every other shopper, to see just how much you will swallow. It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.

    The OP is right. They're evil.



    I agree that they're evil, but is this really the reason why? Let me just play Devil's advocate for a moment:
    This seems to be a good way to make the market more efficient. The supermarket still can't price the market to customer #1985763278, but they can work out how best to price goods to maximize sales - that is, to put the price at a point where the most people will think "oh, that's fair."
    Yes, they make more money this way - but they do it by setting prices so as to satisfy more customers, and that doesn't seem very evil to me.

    If the customer doesn't want to buy that 12-pack of soda, guess what? Nobody can make them do it.
  • Paul 2012-06-25 10:36
    trtrwtf:
    If the customer doesn't want to buy that 12-pack of soda, guess what? Nobody can make them do it.
    Unless the "seller" is the government, and the "product" is is a perpetual revenue stream for big corporations, like, say, health insurance*. Then, yeah, they can force you to buy the product with the full weight of the most powerful country in the world behind them if you resist.

    Let's keep our focus on where the true evil lies.

    (* P.S. Health care != health insurance. You don't buy grocery insurance do you? Yet everyone needs food to live! Since it is such an important need, shouldn't we force you to buy grocery insurance?)
  • Anymouse 2012-06-25 10:45
    I'd pay it to not have to deal with supermarket tracking.

    Just exchange your supermarket cards with random people. Use ones found in the parking lot. Request new ones every month or two.
  • pitchingchris 2012-06-25 11:24
    Don't accidently push ok and credit your account 5 million.
  • Some Damn Yank 2012-06-25 11:30
    iK the Alcoholic:
    I'd pay it to not have to deal with supermarket tracking.
    I have a QFC Advantage card, and I gave them zero personal information. I didn't give fake info, either - you just have to ask for a card and they'll give you one without making you fill in the form.
  • JJ 2012-06-25 11:42
    For those of you whose heads hurt from the first item but who haven't quite figured out what it's supposed to say, I present the corrected version: "They must really want your marketing information; that steak sure costs a lot if you want to buy it anonymously."

    Also, the super powers conferred by the T-shirt are clearly the ability to bend the rules of mathematics. How else could $91,299.00 -> $6.49 be a 100% reduction?
  • J-L 2012-06-25 11:52
    don'tseeanythngwrongwththeletterfromMchganStateUnversty.

    What'swrongwtht?
  • PedanticCurmudgeon 2012-06-25 11:57
    Paul:
    Unless the "seller" is the government, and the "product" is is a perpetual revenue stream for big corporations, like, say, health insurance*. Then, yeah, they can force you to buy the product with the full weight of the most powerful country in the world behind them if you resist.

    Let's keep our focus on where the true evil lies.

    (* P.S. Health care != health insurance. You don't buy grocery insurance do you? Yet everyone needs food to live! Since it is such an important need, shouldn't we force you to buy grocery insurance?)
    True evil, you say? How about this for starters?

    1. OMG health care is SO expensive!
    2. I know, let's have someone else pay for it!
    3. ....
    4. Profit!

    I suppose it would be out of the question to find out why health care is expensive and fix that instead.
  • Meep 2012-06-25 11:59
    @Deprecated:
    The MSU one reminds me of a compression algorithm that was presented in my first C book, "C Primer Plus".

    It was a simple and efficient algorithm: discard every 2nd and 3rd character.

    It even came with an example:
    "So even Eddy came oven ready"
    Try it yourself... Stupid Akismet won't let me post the 'compressed' string.

    Reconstructing the original message is a real bitch, tho.


    Not really, scan the dictionary for words that fit, then use bigram and trigram frequencies to pick some reasonably English-ish combinations; it'll be good enough for most clients.
  • Paul 2012-06-25 12:07
    PedanticCurmudgeon:
    I suppose it would be out of the question to find out why health care is expensive and fix that instead.
    "X is expensive" == "I could make a lot of money by selling X".

    So why don't some of us quit our lousy programming jobs and go into healthcare?

    Oh yeah that's right you can't. Not without permission. Lots of permission. Licenses. Certificates. Inspections. Regulations. Standards. Guidelines.

    And where do all those come from? Hmmm... I remember now, it is the same people whining that "OMG health care is SO expensive therefore we need somebody else to pay for it!"

    Force is the problem. Freedom is the solution.
  • Matt Westwood 2012-06-25 13:08
    Paul:
    trtrwtf:
    If the customer doesn't want to buy that 12-pack of soda, guess what? Nobody can make them do it.
    Unless the "seller" is the government, and the "product" is is a perpetual revenue stream for big corporations, like, say, health insurance*. Then, yeah, they can force you to buy the product with the full weight of the most powerful country in the world behind them if you resist.

    Let's keep our focus on where the true evil lies.

    (* P.S. Health care != health insurance. You don't buy grocery insurance do you? Yet everyone needs food to live! Since it is such an important need, shouldn't we force you to buy grocery insurance?)


    Mind you, the trivial sort of shit that people go to the emergency room for makes me piss myself with jeering laughter. No fucking health insurance for me because I'm not a sickly bag of psychosomatic hypochondria. Now FOAD.
  • Another Idiot on teh Interblag 2012-06-25 15:13
    blank:
    Jack:
    Jellineck:
    I forget:
    Those "advantage" type cards are evil and aught to be illegal.

    I know. I can't imagine what kind of junk mail the guy that lives at 666 Mulberry Lane is getting from 15 years of using my card at the grocery store.
    Oooh! You're so clever lying to the store, its a wonder no one else ever thought of that before!

    Got news for you. You're still getting screwed. The reason those cards are so valuable to the marketers (aside from junk mail) is that by assigning a unique ID to each purchase and purchaser, they can figure out exactly how much you're willing to pay for a 12-pack of Diet Coke. Sure they can make it and sell it at a profit for $1.25 but why should they sell it to you at that price when they know that you are willing to pay $4.99?

    And how do they know that?

    Because when they have a sale most people load up but not you, no, you just keep buying your same 12 pack every week. And when the sale is over most people stop buying but you just keep grabbing that same 12 pack every week. The only week you didn't was when they let it go up to $5.29. That was a test. If you'd bought one that week you can be sure that price would come around again some day -- just for your benefit.

    And so on for every other product in the store.

    They use those cards to figure out how many people are in your house, and their approximate age and gender. They know whether you go for the cheap fatty ground beef or the premium steak. So they have a good idea of your income bracket too. Most likely they know more about your financial and consumption habits than you do. And they can do all of that without ever needing to know who you really are. They don't care who you really are. They only care that "customer 1985763278 can be regularly screwed out of $17.32 per week". That's why your data is valuable to them, and they're willing to pay you to hand it over.

    Why do you think the prices keep changing so often? It isn't because the costs are changing that much. They are testing you, and every other shopper, to see just how much you will swallow. It used to be they had to set one price for everyone, but now, they can slice the market up into razor thin segments and extract the maximum possible from each one.

    The OP is right. They're evil.


    agree.
    maybe use multiple (fake id) "loyalty" cards with each company?

    are they doing facial recognition from cctv too (yet)?
    i guess it's back to balaclavas for the 'noids and "it's 1984" brigade. or are they illegal now?

    *considers creating fake id email handling (spam rebound) service*


    And those bastards made me apply for their card too! The nice cashier at Target tied me down while they Jack-Bauer-style tortured me until I took their card. I couldn't say "no" ... I _had_ to opt in.

    For all those people who are willing to trade purchasing data for a small discount -- screw them. I don't like the deal, so NO ONE should have it.

    And dammit, I just realize I fed the trolls again.
  • anon 2012-06-25 20:28
    Matt Westwood:

    Mind you, the trivial sort of shit that people go to the emergency room for makes me piss myself with jeering laughter. No fucking health insurance for me because I'm not a sickly bag of psychosomatic hypochondria. Now FOAD.

    Now just make sure you stay away from anyone else who has cancer, and you're good to go! Healthy for life!

    That's how cancer works, right?

    ...
  • RichP 2012-06-25 23:24
    P. Almonius:
    Recursive Reclusive:
    I'm not seeing the superpower connection on the previously expensive tshirt.

    I saw someone today in a tshirt with a logo saying "Zip". I wonder if it's slimming, and "Rar" brand is even more effective.


    Zip guy? I know him! I met him years ago. Now every time I see him he asks me for money.
  • RvdB 2012-06-26 06:09
    "There is no 'I' in Michigan State University."

    Wait, what?
  • Captcha:vulputate 2012-06-26 09:23
    Jack:
    They can figure out exactly how much you're willing to pay for a 12-pack of Diet Coke. Sure they can make it and sell it at a profit for $1.25 but why should they sell it to you at that price when they know that you are willing to pay $4.99?

    [...]

    So they have a good idea of your income bracket too. Most likely they know more about your financial and consumption habits than you do. And they can do all of that without ever needing to know who you really are. They don't care who you really are. They only care that "customer 1985763278 can be regularly screwed out of $17.32 per week". That's why your data is valuable to them, and they're willing to pay you to hand it over.


    I don't get it.

    They cannot possibly sell you the Diet Coke for $4.99 and sell them to everyone else for a lower price. So why should they care how much you are willing to pay? They should care how much the average customer who comes to their store is willing to pay. And they don't need advantage cards for that.
  • Woo woo flame war! 2012-06-26 09:30
    Paul:
    trtrwtf:
    If the customer doesn't want to buy that 12-pack of soda, guess what? Nobody can make them do it.
    Unless the "seller" is the government, and the "product" is is a perpetual revenue stream for big corporations, like, say, health insurance*. Then, yeah, they can force you to buy the product with the full weight of the most powerful country in the world behind them if you resist.

    [etc etc]

    You do know that they already invented this thing called "taxes" a long time ago that function in an equivalent way right?
  • Kurt 2012-06-26 10:46
    Yes it's real.
  • Jack 2012-06-26 11:20
    Captcha:vulputate:
    I don't get it.

    They cannot possibly sell you the Diet Coke for $4.99 and sell them to everyone else for a lower price.
    But that's exactly what they do!

    Week 1

    Poor Paul: Damn, that $4.99 Coke is expensive! I'm not buying any.

    Rich Ralph: ... and I'll need another 12 pack of Coke ...

    Week 2

    Poor Paul: $1.99! Hot diggity! Load up!

    Rich Ralph: ... and I'll need another 12 pack of Coke ...

    Why do you think the prices keep changing every week or two? The store knows "If we jack the price up to $4.99, 75 customers will still buy it. Then when we lower the price again everybody else will buy."
  • PiisAWheeL 2012-06-26 13:46
    Jack:
    Captcha:vulputate:
    I don't get it.

    They cannot possibly sell you the Diet Coke for $4.99 and sell them to everyone else for a lower price.
    But that's exactly what they do!

    Week 1

    Poor Paul: Damn, that $4.99 Coke is expensive! I'm not buying any.

    Rich Ralph: ... and I'll need another 12 pack of Coke ...

    Week 2

    Poor Paul: $1.99! Hot diggity! Load up!

    Rich Ralph: ... and I'll need another 12 pack of Coke ...

    Why do you think the prices keep changing every week or two? The store knows "If we jack the price up to $4.99, 75 customers will still buy it. Then when we lower the price again everybody else will buy."

    You are forgetting about another phenomenom... Some people shop there every week. They go in and have a set list of things they need. Maybe 1 week, a different brand of cheese is on sale, so they try it. After all, its half off. Maybe they like it better, and they start buying that brand, even after the price goes back up.

    Also, not everything you buy is on sale all the time. If you have coupons or know that half of your list is on sale, you go in and get everything you need. The next week, a different set of items is on sale, so you still have motivation to go into the store, even if you don't save money on some items you will save on others. The store basically uses that marketing strategy instead of just charging say, 15% cheaper across the board, because those saving seem like a good idea and it gets you to GO INTO THE STORE.

    You ever seen a frys electronics ad? They have random shit in there that you just know they are losing money on, with a quantity limit. They know that once you are inside, you will spend money on things you did not come there to buy, and you will probably pay full retail for them if you want them bad enough. That is why different items go on sale on different weeks.

    They don't really give a fuck about paul and ralph. Just that they got both of them to go into the store with the sale price so that they spend their money with the store.
  • Daniel Smedegaard Buus 2012-06-26 14:38
    TRWTF here is in the calories submission.

    Not the obvious math fail, but the wholly mindnumbing suggestions on how to burn calories.

    Well, obviously not to me, though, as I'm one of the millions of people now crazing over the new fad: treading water. It's fun, and it takes up less space in the pool, so more people can fit in it at one time! Plus, if you pee in the water, the treading and the amount of people in your vicinity makes it virtually impossible to pinpoint you as the culprit.

    Oh wait, it says *vigorous* treading — well, then I'm out, can't stand treading with all those athletes tread training for the olympics. Too much pressure.

    Guess I'll just burn those calories on my unicycle instead — it says only five minutes.
  • nee seattle waa 2012-06-27 19:07
    The best beef loin is usually made from "inspected and passed meat and/or poultry".

    rerigerated -- [[consonant][vowel]]*
  • Jay 2012-07-01 23:23
    lol looks like you better take the advantage price of $3.00 it looks like the other price was for the whole cow lol too funny!

  • Anonymous 2012-07-09 07:51
    SAGE.

    (Oh this wasn't an imageboard?)