An Empty Offer

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  • DrDoom 2011-01-28 09:05
    Empty Comment
  • Dave 2011-01-28 09:06
    Go Away! Or I will force you to log in a second time!

    CAPTCHA: letatio another type of foreplay?
  • RBiter 2011-01-28 09:12
    What are 'lange' roses?
  • BostonDriver 2011-01-28 09:13
    RBiter:
    What are 'lange' roses?


    Long-stemmed roses.
  • Steve The Cynic 2011-01-28 09:14
    And of course, there's the question of why you would buy insurance from a company who spells "waiving" as "waving"...

    (And, no, it isn't a trivial matter. "Waiving" this, that, or the other thing (apparently, often, your right to claim) is an important part of the general operation of the insurance scam^H^H^H^Htrade, so if they can't spell the word, there's a problem.)
  • backForMore 2011-01-28 09:14
    Ooo I loathe Citi Financial, this is the only time I have came to TDWTF and left angered.
  • Chris 2011-01-28 09:23
    Sorry, I can't see anything wrong with the maths on the Twitter screenshot?
  • piskvorr 2011-01-28 09:25
    "smartie.on.computer at the G e-mail provider"? The way you redacted it, my brain actually filled in the shapes (I was wondering about the weird font). 's what I get from too much work with faulty printers, I guess.
  • Frankie Howerd 2011-01-28 09:26
    Nay, nay and thrice nay!

  • frits 2011-01-28 09:26
    Who hasn't created their own custom Exception type?
    I mean seriously, go away.
  • Anonymous 2011-01-28 09:36
    frits:
    Who hasn't created their own custom Exception type?
    I mean seriously, go away.

    throw new Exception("Funny exception messages are the lamest WTF of all time.
    It isn't smart, it isn't clever, it isn't even funny.",
    new Exception("Oh look, funny inner exception too! That
    makes me TWICE AS FUNNY!"));

  • TarquinWJ 2011-01-28 09:36
    Is there any point in partially redacting an email address but still leaving enough information to read it? Something about computer, smartie, on, gmail (the email address turns up on a web search). Is there a joke in there somewhere (too lazy to do a proper job of working it out), or was it just a really bad redaction job?

    (Edit; piskvorr ninja)
  • jfruh 2011-01-28 09:39
    The spelling "cheque" but the denomination in dollars indicates to me that that's from a Canadian bank, in which case you have to keep in mind that $0 Canadian is only worth $0 American.
  • foo 2011-01-28 09:47
    jfruh:
    The spelling "cheque" but the denomination in dollars indicates to me that that's from a Canadian bank, in which case you have to keep in mind that $0 Canadian is only worth $0 American.

    Actually, at the moment the CAD is worth slightly more than the USD, so $0 Canadian is worth a full 0$ US.
  • gramie 2011-01-28 09:48
    I get those letters from Citi Financial every month or so. Not only for me, but also for my mother-in-law, who hasn't lived here for two years and wasn't a resident in Canada anyway (she was on a visitor's visa).

    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!
  • My Name 2011-01-28 09:57
    Chris:
    Sorry, I can't see anything wrong with the maths on the Twitter screenshot?


    The math is not wrong. However, the developer should have checked for the rate limit to non-zero to show this dialog. In case of the limit being zero, he should have either assumed the header of the last request returned false information* or twitter blacklisted the IP/application/user. Based on this assumption the program should have taken an appropriate action.
    My guess is that the dialog is referring to the requests of this app on this machine with this user authenticating left rather than the general Twitter API rate limit, and it all comes down to bad wording. Still, the developer should have checked for the left requests being zero and displayed a message like "Too many requests to Twitter - we will be up to date in [time remaining until requests will be return the desired data again] [seconds or minutes, whatever is more appropriate]."

    * the current limit is included in the headers of the response to each request
  • Zapp Brannigan 2011-01-28 09:58
    foo:
    jfruh:
    The spelling "cheque" but the denomination in dollars indicates to me that that's from a Canadian bank, in which case you have to keep in mind that $0 Canadian is only worth $0 American.

    Actually, at the moment the CAD is worth slightly more than the USD, so $0 Canadian is worth a full 0$ US.
    Please check your math. If the value of the Canadian dollar is higher wouldn't $0 Canadian be worth some negative amount in American?
  • Delicious pie is delicious. 2011-01-28 09:59
    gramie:
    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!


    What do we know about that "someone?" He or she works in a call-center, probably living check to check, and has no decision making authority whatsoever, *and* was concerned enough about doing his or her job to listen to your voicemail all the way through.

    But you sure showed those worthless fatcats!
  • corey 2011-01-28 10:05
    Someone set up the Grim Reaper with the BOM!
  • My Name 2011-01-28 10:10
    My Name:
    Chris:
    Sorry, I can't see anything wrong with the maths on the Twitter screenshot?


    The math is not wrong. However, the developer should have checked for the rate limit to non-zero to show this dialog. In case of the limit being zero, he should have either assumed the header of the last request returned false information* or twitter blacklisted the IP/application/user. Based on this assumption the program should have taken an appropriate action.
    My guess is that the dialog is referring to the requests of this app on this machine with this user authenticating left rather than the general Twitter API rate limit, and it all comes down to bad wording. Still, the developer should have checked for the left requests being zero and displayed a message like "Too many requests to Twitter - we will be up to date in [time remaining until requests will be return the desired data again] [seconds or minutes, whatever is more appropriate]."

    * the current limit is included in the headers of the response to each request


    Forget the second paragraph, it comes down to bad reading comprehension on my side in this case. The first one still stands, though.
  • Nagesh Kukunoor 2011-01-28 10:25
    Empty Offer has was an old joke.



  • Gary 2011-01-28 10:31
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Please check your math. If the value of the Canadian dollar is higher wouldn't $0 Canadian be worth some negative amount in American?


    Damn if that's true then since I have zero Canadian dollars I have negative infinity American dollars. There goes my 401(k)!
  • Me 2011-01-28 10:56
    Steve The Cynic:
    And of course, there's the question of why you would buy insurance from a company who spells "waiving" as "waving"...

    (And, no, it isn't a trivial matter. "Waiving" this, that, or the other thing (apparently, often, your right to claim) is an important part of the general operation of the insurance scam^H^H^H^Htrade, so if they can't spell the word, there's a problem.)


    Obviously the server itself was aware of the difference. That's why it wouldn't let him not select "Other coverage". He wasn't waiving it.
  • Stark 2011-01-28 10:57
    Gary:
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Please check your math. If the value of the Canadian dollar is higher wouldn't $0 Canadian be worth some negative amount in American?


    Damn if that's true then since I have zero Canadian dollars I have negative infinity American dollars. There goes my 401(k)!


    This is why I always keep at least one Canadian dollar. Don't want to risk my future there ay.
  • encre 2011-01-28 10:57
    1. Is "100 lange rode rozen" the Dutch version of "100 Bottles of Beer on the Wall?

    2. Does "waving coverage" remind anyone else of Marilyn Monroe's steam grate scene?
  • imgx64 2011-01-28 10:57
    I can understand the <FEFF> is the Unicode BOM. But why is it in the middle of the sentence?
  • Power Troll 2011-01-28 10:59
    Internet explorer? On my TDWTF?
  • Me 2011-01-28 11:00
    Me:
    Steve The Cynic:
    And of course, there's the question of why you would buy insurance from a company who spells "waiving" as "waving"...

    (And, no, it isn't a trivial matter. "Waiving" this, that, or the other thing (apparently, often, your right to claim) is an important part of the general operation of the insurance scam^H^H^H^Htrade, so if they can't spell the word, there's a problem.)


    Obviously the server itself was aware of the difference. That's why it wouldn't let him not select "Other coverage". He wasn't waiving it.


    Sorry for quoting myself - but I'm surprised I didn't notice something earlier.

    Forgetting about the waiving vs waving mistake, the poster was selecting "No", which meant he wasn't waiving (or waving) other coverage, so naturally the server wouldn't let him continue.

    So TRWTF is the submitter.
  • Steve The Cynic 2011-01-28 11:07
    gramie:
    I get those letters from Citi Financial every month or so. Not only for me, but also for my mother-in-law, who hasn't lived here for two years and wasn't a resident in Canada anyway (she was on a visitor's visa).

    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!

    Reminds me of the time when I worked in the London office of a large American firm, one that provides financial information services. I had two calls from different people in the department whose name rhymes with "sails".

    In the first, the caller dialed my number, then put me on hold and forgot about the call, so I had to listen to 20 minutes of the company's radio station recorded on my voice mail. When I asked him about it later, he said that he had wondered why his phone wasn't working properly afterward...

    The second call was from one of the first caller's colleagues. She dialed my number, then proceeded to have a conversation with, oddly enough, the first caller, but without putting me on either hold or mute, and without noticing that the call had gone to my voice mail. The other side of the conversation was sufficiently muted as to be unintelligible, which made for a surreal listening experience when I got back to my desk.
  • JamesQMurphy 2011-01-28 11:16
    imgx64:
    I can understand the <FEFF> is the Unicode BOM. But why is it in the middle of the sentence?


    I think in this case, it's meant to hide an expletive. I read the comic as "It's my FEFFing job."

    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)
  • Alex 2011-01-28 11:24
    imgx64:
    I can understand the <FEFF> is the Unicode BOM. But why is it in the middle of the sentence?
    It's a zero-width whitespace character, actually.
  • boog 2011-01-28 11:29
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)

    The woman is the grim reaper's wife. Think about it.

    It's dark humor.
  • swschrad 2011-01-28 11:29
    you forgot to black out all the scattered characters at the bottom. that is the specific offer code tied to your credit pull. with that, somebody could go online and get their $0 card on your record.
  • swschrad 2011-01-28 11:31
    habst hier der Deutsche sich gewerden.
  • My Name 2011-01-28 11:39
    swschrad:
    habst hier der Deutsche sich gewerden.


    WTF?!?
  • Jasmine 2011-01-28 11:41
    I didn't do the calculations on the numbers for the flowers, but when I worked in a flower shop, it didn't follow a regular bulk formula. So, 2 roses are not twice as expensive as one. The prices are for *arrangements* of X flowers. There's a fixed cost for arrangement materials like foam and baby's breath, and adding another flower doesn't increase that cost. So - it's a WTF, but I understand why they have to do it that way. Possibly TRWTF with that one is that they make available the arrangements with weird numbers of flowers - you don't buy 99 roses and you certainly don't buy 98...
  • My Name 2011-01-28 11:49
    Jasmine:
    I didn't do the calculations on the numbers for the flowers, but when I worked in a flower shop, it didn't follow a regular bulk formula. So, 2 roses are not twice as expensive as one. The prices are for *arrangements* of X flowers. There's a fixed cost for arrangement materials like foam and baby's breath, and adding another flower doesn't increase that cost. So - it's a WTF, but I understand why they have to do it that way. Possibly TRWTF with that one is that they make available the arrangements with weird numbers of flowers - you don't buy 99 roses and you certainly don't buy 98...


    From what one can see in the picture, one might guess it's EUR 1,95 per "lange rode rozen" (not sure whether this is plural or singular). So, even though you're right, in this case there is a quite obvious pattern/formula for the prices.
  • Jake 2011-01-28 11:50
    Jasmine:
    you don't buy 99 roses and you certainly don't buy 98...
    Damn! I was planning to buy my wife 99 roses for our 99th anniversary! Assuming I'm not sick of her by then...
  • @Deprecated 2011-01-28 11:54
    Nagesh Kukunoor:
    Empty Offer has was an old joke.





    Please find enclosed a drawing of a spider...
  • Jay 2011-01-28 11:55
    jfruh:
    The spelling "cheque" but the denomination in dollars indicates to me that that's from a Canadian bank, in which case you have to keep in mind that $0 Canadian is only worth $0 American.


    I thought $0 Canadian was worth $32 American. At least, that's how it works with temperatures.
  • Bill 2011-01-28 12:00
    To be fair, Citi did say if you'd like more than $0, just ask and maybe we'll approve it. I used to work in a bank, and we would usually go as much as 200% of the original amount, if the person begged enough.
  • Carl 2011-01-28 12:03
    Chances are, you'll save on interest too
    Well my other bank only charges $0.00 per month on my $0.00 loan, so to beat that you'll have to be paying me. Yeah, gimme that check. In fact I'll take 100 of them!
  • Jay 2011-01-28 12:05
    I think when they ask if you want to "wave coverage", they mean, "Are you going to be one of those people who come to our office every time a claim is denied and wave your coverage certificate around?"
  • Jay 2011-01-28 12:08
    Even without the embedded code, I don't get the grim reaper cartoon. Was there a previous cartoon that we had to see that involved her mother?
  • ConE 2011-01-28 12:09
    lol, so if I begged enough I could get 200% of $0... wow, I wonder how much in US$ that would be?

    captcha: nimis... isn't that an admiral?
  • ConE 2011-01-28 12:12
    Ok, it may not be funny, but why aren't people getting this cartoon?

    The grim reaper is apologizing for doing something to her mother that was his job... Put the pieces together..


    lol, captcha: nulla ... haha, NULLA, you hear that NULLA!
  • WhiskeyJack 2011-01-28 12:15
    I don't get the password one.

    The password field is blank, so of course it's asking for a longer password.

    If the joke is that there WAS a longer password, well, we can't see that from the screenshot.

    Also: Nepean, ON? That's where I am right now!


    Addendum (2011-01-28 12:58):
    Oh, must NOT be longer... oops. I get it now.
  • plaidfluff 2011-01-28 12:18
    My Name:
    Chris:
    Sorry, I can't see anything wrong with the maths on the Twitter screenshot?


    The math is not wrong. However, the developer should have checked for the rate limit to non-zero to show this dialog. In case of the limit being zero, he should have either assumed the header of the last request returned false information* or twitter blacklisted the IP/application/user. Based on this assumption the program should have taken an appropriate action.
    My guess is that the dialog is referring to the requests of this app on this machine with this user authenticating left rather than the general Twitter API rate limit, and it all comes down to bad wording. Still, the developer should have checked for the left requests being zero and displayed a message like "Too many requests to Twitter - we will be up to date in [time remaining until requests will be return the desired data again] [seconds or minutes, whatever is more appropriate]."

    * the current limit is included in the headers of the response to each request

    I had submitted a screenshot like this about a year ago when the problem first started occurring - Twitter had completely changed their developer API at one point, and to phase the old API out they slowly reduced the rate limit to 0, permanently. Unfortunately, the makers of Twitterrific did a terrible job of letting people know about the fact that the app had been updated for the new API when the rate limiting change went into effect, and so a lot of people were (and apparently still are) running an old, no-longer-functional version of Twitterrific.

    Anyway, Twitterrific 3.2.4 fixed the problem, in August of 2010.
  • ConE 2011-01-28 12:18
    "Your password must not be longer than 8 characters." in the error was the WTF they were talking about. It was 0 chars, so how could it be longer... unless I missed something.

    ideo!
  • Darth FEFF 2011-01-28 12:19
    I have just FEFFed your FEFF. Pray I do not FEFF it any further.
  • Mason Wheeler 2011-01-28 12:21
    Anonymous:
    frits:
    Who hasn't created their own custom Exception type?
    I mean seriously, go away.

    throw new Exception("Funny exception messages are the lamest WTF of all time.
    It isn't smart, it isn't clever, it isn't even funny.",
    new Exception("Oh look, funny inner exception too! That
    makes me TWICE AS FUNNY!"));



    They're not smart. They're not clever. They're not even full-time employees. They just end up getting posted here because of how
    
    unlikable they are.
  • plaidfluff 2011-01-28 12:23
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)
    It's a comic in a newspaper. Of course it isn't funny.
  • Sven 2011-01-28 12:30
    Delicious pie is delicious.:
    gramie:
    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!


    What do we know about that "someone?" He or she works in a call-center, probably living check to check, and has no decision making authority whatsoever, *and* was concerned enough about doing his or her job to listen to your voicemail all the way through.

    But you sure showed those worthless fatcats!


    You have to save that kind of thing for a time when it really counts. For example, whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling. I don't want them to call me at all, but if they insist on inconveniencing me, they should join me by experiencing some inconvenience of their own.

    I realize that the boss only loses a trivial amount of money (to labor who could have been talking to someone else who was really interested), but if everybody acted as I do, it could make a difference.
  • da Doctah 2011-01-28 12:43
    plaidfluff:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)
    It's a comic in a newspaper. Of course it isn't funny.

    TRWTF is having the Grim Reaper right next to Family Circus.
  • Big Jerk 2011-01-28 12:43
    Delicious pie is delicious.:
    gramie:
    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!


    What do we know about that "someone?" He or she works in a call-center, probably living check to check, and has no decision making authority whatsoever, *and* was concerned enough about doing his or her job to listen to your voicemail all the way through.

    But you sure showed those worthless fatcats!

    Look at it this way: I'm doing that individual and the world a favor by making the job even more unappealing than it already undoubtedly is. Hopefully, I'll be able to influence him to make the right decision and quit.
  • frits 2011-01-28 12:57
    Big Jerk:
    Delicious pie is delicious.:
    gramie:
    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!


    What do we know about that "someone?" He or she works in a call-center, probably living check to check, and has no decision making authority whatsoever, *and* was concerned enough about doing his or her job to listen to your voicemail all the way through.

    But you sure showed those worthless fatcats!

    Look at it this way: I'm doing that individual and the world a favor by making the job even more unappealing than it already undoubtedly is. Hopefully, I'll be able to influence him to make the right decision and quit.


    Who said activism was dead?
  • caper 2011-01-28 13:04
    Last week I had to use a system that needed a password of 6 to 8 chars, must be of mixed case and must contain a digit or special char.

    Come-on this is 2011, what's the deal with 8 chars maximum.
  • My Name 2011-01-28 13:13
    caper:
    Last week I had to use a system that needed a password of 6 to 8 chars, must be of mixed case and must contain a digit or special char.

    Come-on this is 2011, what's the deal with 8 chars maximum.


    The password text field in the DB was once configured to take eight characters at maximum, maybe to keep the size of the DB small, or maybe they didn't want the passwords to be too long in case they had to look it up and give it to the user. Be thankful you can use special characters!
  • Rank Amateur 2011-01-28 13:15
    boog:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)

    The woman is the grim reaper's wife. Think about it.

    It's dark humor.


    Well, that wasn't apparent to me, but now that I know, I have to ask: if they're sharing the same bed, can the woman legitimately claim that every night she has a brush with death?

    And when they play chess, can she not resist the urge to move pieces when her husband isn't looking?
  • My Name 2011-01-28 13:20
    plaidfluff:
    I had submitted a screenshot like this about a year ago when the problem first started occurring - Twitter had completely changed their developer API at one point, and to phase the old API out they slowly reduced the rate limit to 0, permanently. Unfortunately, the makers of Twitterrific did a terrible job of letting people know about the fact that the app had been updated for the new API when the rate limiting change went into effect, and so a lot of people were (and apparently still are) running an old, no-longer-functional version of Twitterrific.

    Anyway, Twitterrific 3.2.4 fixed the problem, in August of 2010.

    Thanks for sharing! Didn't know that.
  • The Bird is the Word 2011-01-28 13:23
    99 roses are in a bouquet,
    99 roses to sell!
    take one out,
    drop the price a bit...
    98 roses are in the bouquet!

  • anonymous_coward 2011-01-28 13:36
    That CitiFi letter was scary till I realized it was from 2008. That could have just killed my afternoon with production emer tickets.
  • Ken B. 2011-01-28 13:43
    Steve The Cynic:
    In the first, the caller dialed my number, then put me on hold and forgot about the call, so I had to listen to 20 minutes of the company's radio station recorded on my voice mail. When I asked him about it later, he said that he had wondered why his phone wasn't working properly afterward...
    And robocallers getting voicemail are fun (FSVO) as well.

    "Please hold for an important message... [music] Please hold for an important message... [music] Please hold for[click] Can I talk to $(NAME) please?... Can I talk to $(NAME) please?... Hello?... Hello?... [click]"

    Yes, it's such an important message that they have a robocaller call us, and that robocaller doesn't know about voicemail, so when a human finally gets on the line at their end, they have no clue they were talking to a machine.
  • Ken B. 2011-01-28 13:48
    Carl:
    Chances are, you'll save on interest too
    Well my other bank only charges $0.00 per month on my $0.00 loan, so to beat that you'll have to be paying me. Yeah, gimme that check. In fact I'll take 100 of them!
    Long distance phone providers don't seem to understand that type of logic.

    "We can save you money on long distance by switching to us."
    "We don't make long distance calls on this line, so our bill is $0. Are you willing to pay us every month to switch to you?"

    We usually have to tell them that several times before they realize it's a losing battle.
  • Dan 2011-01-28 13:49
    Rank Amateur:
    boog:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)

    The woman is the grim reaper's wife. Think about it.

    It's dark humor.


    Well, that wasn't apparent to me, but now that I know, I have to ask: if they're sharing the same bed, can the woman legitimately claim that every night she has a brush with death?

    And when they play chess, can she not resist the urge to move pieces when her husband isn't looking?


    TRWTF is that this was funnier than the cartoon was, even after having the cartoon explained.
  • Ken B. 2011-01-28 13:53
    da Doctah:
    plaidfluff:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)
    It's a comic in a newspaper. Of course it isn't funny.
    TRWTF is having the Grim Reaper right next to Family Circus.
    But, by the time the Grim Reaper follows that dotted line to his "victim", they'll be long gone, and perfectly safe.

    Captcha: commoveo... Santana's latest hit.
  • North Shore Beach Bum 2011-01-28 13:59
    Bill:
    To be fair, Citi did say if you'd like more than $0, just ask and maybe we'll approve it. I used to work in a bank, and we would usually go as much as 200% of the original amount, if the person begged enough.


    200% of 0 is still 0.
  • Ted Powell 2011-01-28 14:03
    Perhaps they really are asking whether you want to grasp the coverage by one end and swing it about!
  • ConE 2011-01-28 14:18
    My Name:
    caper:
    Last week I had to use a system that needed a password of 6 to 8 chars, must be of mixed case and must contain a digit or special char.

    Come-on this is 2011, what's the deal with 8 chars maximum.


    The password text field in the DB was once configured to take eight characters at maximum, maybe to keep the size of the DB small, or maybe they didn't want the passwords to be too long in case they had to look it up and give it to the user. Be thankful you can use special characters!


    TFWTF is that they probably are recording your password. That's a huge no-no. You don't give people their passwords, you shouldn't be able to get it yourself. Should be hashed and salted with a side of green eggs and ham... uh, well, without the green eggs and ham. Either way, if they are storing the password in plain text, limiting you to 8 chars, and/or not letting you use special chars... well, you should be using different passwords on every site anyway, but not everyone does... saepius for the captcha
  • Stark 2011-01-28 14:30
    WhiskeyJack:
    I don't get the password one.

    The password field is blank, so of course it's asking for a longer password.

    If the joke is that there WAS a longer password, well, we can't see that from the screenshot.

    Also: Nepean, ON? That's where I am right now!


    Addendum (2011-01-28 12:58):
    Oh, must NOT be longer... oops. I get it now.

    ConE:
    "Your password must not be longer than 8 characters." in the error was the WTF they were talking about. It was 0 chars, so how could it be longer... unless I missed something.

    ideo!


    The point is that the submitter used a password longer than 8 characters. The application then complained that the password was too long. As an addendum to the specific error "password must not be more than 8 chars" the application also spat out that "the password should be more complex".

    TRWTF is that the submitter thinks these two errors are necessarily contradictory. For all we know the submitter's password could be a dictionary word, which would make it significantly less complex than 8 "random" characters. In fact, for all we know, the submitter discovered via trial and error that the system would not take passwords longer than 8 characters and also performed some rudimentary dictionary based password strength test and failed any weak passwords. Armed with that knowledge the submitter could have purposefully generated the error dialog because at least a quarter of these images are perfectly rationale outcomes to idiotic requests submitted by the intellectually and maturity challenged followers of this site.
  • ConE 2011-01-28 14:52
    Stark:


    The point is that the submitter used a password longer than 8 characters. The application then complained that the password was too long. As an addendum to the specific error "password must not be more than 8 chars" the application also spat out that "the password should be more complex".

    TRWTF is that the submitter thinks these two errors are necessarily contradictory. For all we know the submitter's password could be a dictionary word, which would make it significantly less complex than 8 "random" characters. In fact, for all we know, the submitter discovered via trial and error that the system would not take passwords longer than 8 characters and also performed some rudimentary dictionary based password strength test and failed any weak passwords. Armed with that knowledge the submitter could have purposefully generated the error dialog because at least a quarter of these images are perfectly rationale outcomes to idiotic requests submitted by the intellectually and maturity challenged followers of this site.


    lol, apparently I didn't read what I was copying either... Didn't even realize that it said "must not be longer than 8" and read it as "must be longer than 8"... See I did miss something. Why do they still require less than 8 rather than updating to a new DB? Doesn't make sense.
  • jasmine2501 2011-01-28 14:53
    Sven:

    You have to save that kind of thing for a time when it really counts. For example, whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling. I don't want them to call me at all, but if they insist on inconveniencing me, they should join me by experiencing some inconvenience of their own.



    I do that and then I put them on hold, so when they pick up, there's just music, and it's BAD music too :)
  • Red 2011-01-28 15:01
    Ha, that actually IS funny!
  • Power Troll 2011-01-28 15:43
    Dan:
    Rank Amateur:
    boog:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)

    The woman is the grim reaper's wife. Think about it.

    It's dark humor.


    Well, that wasn't apparent to me, but now that I know, I have to ask: if they're sharing the same bed, can the woman legitimately claim that every night she has a brush with death?

    And when they play chess, can she not resist the urge to move pieces when her husband isn't looking?


    TRWTF is that this was funnier than the cartoon was, even after having the cartoon explained.


    Actually, that's fairly normal. Jokes tend to be a little less funny when you have to explain them.
  • JamesQMurphy 2011-01-28 15:46
    Ken B.:
    da Doctah:
    plaidfluff:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)
    It's a comic in a newspaper. Of course it isn't funny.
    TRWTF is having the Grim Reaper right next to Family Circus.
    But, by the time the Grim Reaper follows that dotted line to his "victim", they'll be long gone, and perfectly safe.

    Captcha: commoveo... Santana's latest hit.


    And Billy will at least be Age 9.
  • airdrik 2011-01-28 15:48
    North Shore Beach Bum:
    Bill:
    To be fair, Citi did say if you'd like more than $0, just ask and maybe we'll approve it. I used to work in a bank, and we would usually go as much as 200% of the original amount, if the person begged enough.


    200% of 0 is still 0.


    But it's 200% bigger, which makes it better!

    Now can I get that in USD please?
  • airdrik 2011-01-28 15:51
    JamesQMurphy:

    And Billy will at least be Age 9.

    Finally, after all these years.

    (TRWTF is that I just got the same captcha twice)
  • boog 2011-01-28 16:23
    airdrik:
    JamesQMurphy:

    And Billy will at least be Age 9.

    Finally, after all these years.

    (TRWTF is that I just got the same captcha twice)


    airdrik:
    North Shore Beach Bum:
    Bill:
    To be fair, Citi did say if you'd like more than $0, just ask and maybe we'll approve it. I used to work in a bank, and we would usually go as much as 200% of the original amount, if the person begged enough.


    200% of 0 is still 0.


    But it's 200% bigger, which makes it better!

    Now can I get that in USD please?


    3 minutes apart. Same guy?
  • gramie 2011-01-28 16:31
    Delicious pie is delicious.:
    gramie:
    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!


    What do we know about that "someone?" He or she works in a call-center, probably living check to check, and has no decision making authority whatsoever, *and* was concerned enough about doing his or her job to listen to your voicemail all the way through.

    But you sure showed those worthless fatcats!


    Actually, the phone number was for the local office. Do you really think a call centre would have voicemail? Not much point in a call centre then!

    And, in case you have never seen the Citi Financial letters, they offer to lend you money at the bargain price of 30%/year plus fees. These guys are low-lifes preying on the poor just like cheque-cashing places.

    They also, in the terms, reserve the right to contact you with other products, services, and/or solicitations for two years after your last payment to them.
  • Ralph 2011-01-28 16:41
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.
  • SomeYoungGuy 2011-01-28 16:42
    Aren't funny exceptions funny by definition?
  • frits 2011-01-28 16:43
    Ralph:
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.

    Who hasn't done something like this?
  • My Name 2011-01-28 16:50
    frits:
    Ralph:
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.

    Who hasn't done something like this?

    Me. But I like the idea. I just never thought of it.
  • WhiskeyJack 2011-01-28 17:09
    Ralph:
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.


    Nah, the real challenge is to see how much crap you can stuff in the envelope. Postage is charged by weight, right? See if you can shove in a couple of old issues of Reader's Digest.
  • superjer 2011-01-28 17:48
    I like to fill them with garbage. I have to pay to get rid of garbage otherwise. And why do that?
  • Gern Blaanston 2011-01-28 18:17
    da Doctah:
    plaidfluff:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)
    It's a comic in a newspaper. Of course it isn't funny.

    TRWTF is having the Grim Reaper right next to Family Circus.


  • neminem 2011-01-28 18:38
    WhiskeyJack:
    Nah, the real challenge is to see how much crap you can stuff in the envelope. Postage is charged by weight, right? See if you can shove in a couple of old issues of Reader's Digest.

    Obligatory link to XKCD^HBash.org: www.bash.org/?127039

    Also, http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/566/can-i-mail-a-brick-back-to-a-junk-mail-firm-using-the-business-reply-envelope
  • Silverhill 2011-01-28 18:44
    Is the balance $0.02, or $0.0002? ...No, that would be Verizon!

    -------------------------

    Regarding the "waving" of the insurance:
    It's quite clear that the Yes/No/Yes/No/Yes/No/Yes/No/Yes/No/... choices represent the wa(i)v(er)ing of the undecided client.
  • boog 2011-01-28 19:48
    Power Troll:
    Dan:
    Rank Amateur:
    boog:
    JamesQMurphy:
    TRWTF is that the comic isn't all that funny. (Or did I miss it?)

    The woman is the grim reaper's wife. Think about it.

    It's dark humor.


    Well, that wasn't apparent to me, but now that I know, I have to ask: if they're sharing the same bed, can the woman legitimately claim that every night she has a brush with death?

    And when they play chess, can she not resist the urge to move pieces when her husband isn't looking?


    TRWTF is that this was funnier than the cartoon was, even after having the cartoon explained.


    Actually, that's fairly normal. Jokes tend to be a little less funny when you have to explain them.

    My bad; I shouldn't have given any hints. I ruined it.

    Some of the best comics require a little bit of thought to figure out. Only enough detail is given to get the point across, no more, no less.

    Example

    I won't explain this one. If you don't get it the first time, keep looking at it until you do.
  • frits (unregistered) 2011-01-28 20:00
    TRWTF is that that ever results in a marketer talking to a real human.
  • hoodaticus 2011-01-28 20:40
    Stark:
    Armed with that knowledge the submitter could have purposefully generated the error dialog because at least a quarter of these images are perfectly rationale outcomes to idiotic requests submitted by the intellectually and maturity challenged followers of this site.
    Excuse me; I just farted.
  • hoodaticus 2011-01-28 20:45
    TarquinWJ:
    Is there any point in partially redacting an email address but still leaving enough information to read it? Something about computer, smartie, on, gmail (the email address turns up on a web search). Is there a joke in there somewhere (too lazy to do a proper job of working it out), or was it just a really bad redaction job?

    (Edit; piskvorr ninja)
    It's the submitter's job to redact.
  • TK 2011-01-28 20:50
    frits:
    Ralph:
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.

    Who hasn't done something like this?

    It was a somewhat common practice many decades ago in the US for companies to ship you some merchandise you never asked for. With this unwanted merchandise, they included a letter which informed you that you must either send them a check for the goods, or return the item with a pre-paid shipping label.

    Of course this was a major nuisance. If you didn't pay or return the item, these companies would send you nasty letters threatening to turn you over to a collection agency. For something you never needed, wanted, or asked for.

    One of my high school teachers received a watch in the mail this way. He didn't want the crappy watch, so he decided to return it. But he also figured if they were going to inconvenience him, he'd return the favor.

    He did return the watch, but this is how he did it. First, he went down to the local hardware store and purchased two cinder blocks and some twine. He then placed the watch between the two cinder blocks, tied them together, stuck the return shipping label on the outside and shipped it back to the vendor.

    He never heard from that company again!
  • michael 2011-01-28 21:56
    Actually, it's €1,95 per rose... Perfectly linear (at least for the 90-100 bit I looked at)
  • Zongo 2011-01-28 22:44
    More like Flapping Coverage.
  • foo 2011-01-29 00:40
    North Shore Beach Bum:
    Bill:
    To be fair, Citi did say if you'd like more than $0, just ask and maybe we'll approve it. I used to work in a bank, and we would usually go as much as 200% of the original amount, if the person begged enough.


    200% of 0 is still 0.

    And the I-got-the-joke award goes to ...
  • foo 2011-01-29 00:41
    My Name:
    Jasmine:
    I didn't do the calculations on the numbers for the flowers, but when I worked in a flower shop, it didn't follow a regular bulk formula. So, 2 roses are not twice as expensive as one. The prices are for *arrangements* of X flowers. There's a fixed cost for arrangement materials like foam and baby's breath, and adding another flower doesn't increase that cost. So - it's a WTF, but I understand why they have to do it that way. Possibly TRWTF with that one is that they make available the arrangements with weird numbers of flowers - you don't buy 99 roses and you certainly don't buy 98...


    From what one can see in the picture, one might guess it's EUR 1,95 per "lange rode rozen" (not sure whether this is plural or singular). So, even though you're right, in this case there is a quite obvious pattern/formula for the prices.

    In fact, "99 lange rode rozen" is the Dutch version of "99 Luftballons".
  • Cheng 2011-01-29 04:12
    TRWTF in rose case is IE. But anyway, small checkbox would have fixed that
  • grumpy 2011-01-29 04:29
    caper:
    Last week I had to use a system that needed a password of 6 to 8 chars, must be of mixed case and must contain a digit or special char.

    Come-on this is 2011, what's the deal with 8 chars maximum.

    It's probably some conspiracy thing going on. The <insert TLA here> don't want to work too hard to crack the password and made a backdoor into the system to insert this rule. Or something. Tin-foil hat time.
  • exception 2011-01-29 05:25
    SomeYoungGuy:
    Aren't funny exceptions funny by definition?

    No, because they're exceptions.
  • ZPedro 2011-01-29 08:53
    I got the Twitterrific error as well, it amused me on the moment, but I'm 100% sure that was because it was a pre-oauth version that hadn't been used in some time, and in the meantime Twitter had switched to oauth entirely, so I quickly figured that Twitter had disabled the previous method by rate-limiting it to 0. Sure it's funny, but also remember it wasn't a condition the developer could possibly test for at the time that version was released (since, again, that version predated the oauth switch); the versions made after the switch, well, simply supported oauth.

    (full disclosure: I have known about the Iconfactory since 1996, I've bought Craig Hockenberry's iPhone dev book, I follow him on Twitter, using Twiterrific, and met him once)

    To a few of you: remember Alex loves to "censor" information that has already been anonymised…
  • BillyBong 2011-01-29 10:09
    Re. the lange rosen - obviously, they use some generic webshop app, so it doesn't support selecting how many roses are in the bouquet. For each product, you can select quantity (but that would be a number of bouquets, not roses in one bouquet), and you can select one of the SKUs.
    So in order to circumvent that limitation, they've put all bunch sizes as SKUs. The only WTF is that they could put numbers like, say, 1-10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, etc.
    But what if someone's getting a bouquet for her 63rd birthday?

    So the only way to correct the WTF is to change the software.
  • dr spock 2011-01-29 10:47
    ConE:
    My Name:
    caper:
    Last week I had to use a system that needed a password of 6 to 8 chars, must be of mixed case and must contain a digit or special char.

    Come-on this is 2011, what's the deal with 8 chars maximum.


    The password text field in the DB was once configured to take eight characters at maximum, maybe to keep the size of the DB small, or maybe they didn't want the passwords to be too long in case they had to look it up and give it to the user. Be thankful you can use special characters!


    TFWTF is that they probably are recording your password. That's a huge no-no. You don't give people their passwords, you shouldn't be able to get it yourself. Should be hashed and salted with a side of green eggs and ham... uh, well, without the green eggs and ham. Either way, if they are storing the password in plain text, limiting you to 8 chars, and/or not letting you use special chars... well, you should be using different passwords on every site anyway, but not everyone does... saepius for the captcha


    TRWTF is that the University of Auckland upgraded its student records/enrolment site to Oracle Peoplesoft mid-2010. (Proof)

    I guess its an improvement from the previous system which looked like was designed in 1995 (and probably was), which made heavy use of Iframes. However, you still need to do a huge amount of clicks and pageloads to get anything done in this peoplesoft thing.
    For example, clicking one of the green arrows on the left hand side on this screen reloads the entire page just to expand out the contents beneath it. I guess just providing all the subitems and showing/hiding them with JS, or loading them with AJAX just isn't 'enterprisey' enough.
    As a bonus, page loads seem to take ~3 seconds each...

    This is just one of many wtf's in the University of Auckland's IT systems.
  • Matt Westwood 2011-01-29 18:24
    TK:
    frits:
    Ralph:
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.

    Who hasn't done something like this?

    It was a somewhat common practice many decades ago in the US for companies to ship you some merchandise you never asked for. With this unwanted merchandise, they included a letter which informed you that you must either send them a check for the goods, or return the item with a pre-paid shipping label.

    Of course this was a major nuisance. If you didn't pay or return the item, these companies would send you nasty letters threatening to turn you over to a collection agency. For something you never needed, wanted, or asked for.

    One of my high school teachers received a watch in the mail this way. He didn't want the crappy watch, so he decided to return it. But he also figured if they were going to inconvenience him, he'd return the favor.

    He did return the watch, but this is how he did it. First, he went down to the local hardware store and purchased two cinder blocks and some twine. He then placed the watch between the two cinder blocks, tied them together, stuck the return shipping label on the outside and shipped it back to the vendor.

    He never heard from that company again!


    I believe that in this country (UK) if you receive such unsolicited merchandise you are perfectly entitled to keep it and not pay for it. Therefore we don't get such things happening.

    You sometimes get free samples, which can be nice. Junk mail is just one of those things that people tend to get overly het up about. (Means no nothing to me to routinely recycle or shred the junk. I don't get much anyway, being careful to select the "no junk mail" options when ordering stuff.)

    But we don't get stuff which we *have* to respond to *or else*, that is just plain *illegal* here.
  • TK 2011-01-29 19:11
    Matt Westwood:
    TK:
    frits:
    Ralph:
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.

    Who hasn't done something like this?

    It was a somewhat common practice many decades ago in the US for companies to ship you some merchandise you never asked for. With this unwanted merchandise, they included a letter which informed you that you must either send them a check for the goods, or return the item with a pre-paid shipping label.

    Of course this was a major nuisance. If you didn't pay or return the item, these companies would send you nasty letters threatening to turn you over to a collection agency. For something you never needed, wanted, or asked for.

    One of my high school teachers received a watch in the mail this way. He didn't want the crappy watch, so he decided to return it. But he also figured if they were going to inconvenience him, he'd return the favor.

    He did return the watch, but this is how he did it. First, he went down to the local hardware store and purchased two cinder blocks and some twine. He then placed the watch between the two cinder blocks, tied them together, stuck the return shipping label on the outside and shipped it back to the vendor.

    He never heard from that company again!


    I believe that in this country (UK) if you receive such unsolicited merchandise you are perfectly entitled to keep it and not pay for it. Therefore we don't get such things happening.

    You sometimes get free samples, which can be nice. Junk mail is just one of those things that people tend to get overly het up about. (Means no nothing to me to routinely recycle or shred the junk. I don't get much anyway, being careful to select the "no junk mail" options when ordering stuff.)

    But we don't get stuff which we *have* to respond to *or else*, that is just plain *illegal* here.

    Fortunately, US courts agreed with you that such business practices are absurd. Now days we also are entitled to keep and merchandise shipped to us that we didn't ask for.

    Definitely less of a headache this way, but I still love my teacher's solution.
  • Sudo 2011-01-29 19:55
    What a sign of the times... people are just plain impatient these days. Ask someone to wait inf minutes, and they act like you're asking them to wait until the end of time...
  • foo 2011-01-30 07:42
    Sudo:
    What a sign of the times... people are just plain impatient these days. Ask someone to wait inf minutes, and they act like you're asking them to wait until the end of time...

    Why don't you go to Canada, since inf US minutes = minus zero CAN minutes ... or something like that.
  • Ajtacka 2011-01-30 07:49
    dr spock:
    TRWTF is that the University of Auckland upgraded its student records/enrolment site to Oracle Peoplesoft mid-2010.
    *snip*
    This is just one of many wtf's in the University of Auckland's IT systems.

    I'm *really* not surprised about the Auckland uni one. My mother works there, and has been entertaining me about first the (delayed, of course) development of the system and then the issues she's had with it once it was introduced. And that's coming from someone who's far from a power user - she can do what she needs to but only very reluctantly ventures outside that.
  • Dear Dealer 2011-01-30 13:20
    Just adding my $0.00 to the comments.
  • shimon 2011-01-30 16:03
    piskvorr:
    "smartie.on.computer at the G e-mail provider"? The way you redacted it, my brain actually filled in the shapes (I was wondering about the weird font). 's what I get from too much work with faulty printers, I guess.


    Your job with printers has little to do with this, my brain was completely able to fill in the blanks too.

    I'm dreaming of a day when there is an OCR tool capable of doing the same thing, at at least the same speed. A nice-to-have feature would be medical doctors' writing recognition.
  • Scarlet Manuka 2011-01-30 21:01
    shimon:
    A nice-to-have feature would be medical doctors' writing recognition.

    What, your doctor still writes stuff out? Mine just types everything into the computer. Slowly and painfully, but at least when he prints it out it's legible.
  • junior 2011-01-31 06:08
    An unfortunately common way to use a cheque for 0 dollars is to add a 1 and several zeros.

    This is particularly ammusing if zero-dollar ammounts don't show up on your audit reports.

    Or perhaps I should have let you all discover that on your employers dime.
  • GalacticCowboy 2011-01-31 07:45
    My first thought on the Amazon one was trying to figure out why, if he was searching for a backpack, there were two mice included in the results?
  • A german *gasp* 2011-01-31 08:44
    swschrad:
    habst hier der Deutsche sich gewerden.


    Wann ist das Nunstuck Git und Slotermeyer? Ja! Beierhund ist mein gespurt!
  • eRat 2011-01-31 09:22
    GalacticCowboy:
    My first thought on the Amazon one was trying to figure out why, if he was searching for a backpack, there were two mice included in the results?

    Ever heard of rat pack?
    The same applies to mice or any other rodents.
  • bjolling 2011-01-31 09:45
    A german *gasp*:
    swschrad:
    habst hier der Deutsche sich gewerden.
    Wann ist das Nunstuck Git und Slotermeyer? Ja! Beierhund ist mein gespurt!
    ahahahaha *urgl*
  • Anonymous 2011-01-31 09:54
    Delicious pie is delicious.:
    gramie:
    I called the number and left a voicemail asking several questions very slowly, reading large sections from the letter in a slow, mentally-handicapped voice. The voicemail stopped recording after 5 minutes, but I felt good knowing that someone would have to listen all the way through!


    What do we know about that "someone?" He or she works in a call-center, probably living check to check, and has no decision making authority whatsoever, *and* was concerned enough about doing his or her job to listen to your voicemail all the way through.

    But you sure showed those worthless fatcats!


    They wouldn't get paid per call they listen to, so it shouldn't matter to them whether they listen to 5 short calls or 1 long one, they get paid whatever. In fact it probably brightens up their dull day and gives them a laugh.

    On the other hand, it will waste some company time.
  • Delicious pie is delicious. 2011-01-31 13:07
    Matt Westwood:
    TK:
    frits:
    Ralph:
    Sven:
    whenever I get a robo-call that asks me to press 1 to talk to a person, I *always* press 1 -- the purpose is not to annoy the poor schmuck who has to talk to me, but to deprive the boss of some of the benefit of robo-calling.
    That's why I always send in those prepaid reply envelopes -- empty. You waste my time, I waste your money.

    Who hasn't done something like this?

    It was a somewhat common practice many decades ago in the US for companies to ship you some merchandise you never asked for. With this unwanted merchandise, they included a letter which informed you that you must either send them a check for the goods, or return the item with a pre-paid shipping label.

    Of course this was a major nuisance. If you didn't pay or return the item, these companies would send you nasty letters threatening to turn you over to a collection agency. For something you never needed, wanted, or asked for.

    One of my high school teachers received a watch in the mail this way. He didn't want the crappy watch, so he decided to return it. But he also figured if they were going to inconvenience him, he'd return the favor.

    He did return the watch, but this is how he did it. First, he went down to the local hardware store and purchased two cinder blocks and some twine. He then placed the watch between the two cinder blocks, tied them together, stuck the return shipping label on the outside and shipped it back to the vendor.

    He never heard from that company again!


    I believe that in this country (UK) if you receive such unsolicited merchandise you are perfectly entitled to keep it and not pay for it. Therefore we don't get such things happening.

    You sometimes get free samples, which can be nice. Junk mail is just one of those things that people tend to get overly het up about. (Means no nothing to me to routinely recycle or shred the junk. I don't get much anyway, being careful to select the "no junk mail" options when ordering stuff.)

    But we don't get stuff which we *have* to respond to *or else*, that is just plain *illegal* here.


    No court in the US has ever allowed someone to send you something, unsolicited, and demand it back. That's absurd. But people believe businesses can do the oddest things. For instance, if you don't have money to pay a bill at a restaurant, there's a common belief that the restaurant can detain you and force you to wash dishes.
  • Worf 2011-01-31 14:36
    My Name:
    plaidfluff:
    I had submitted a screenshot like this about a year ago when the problem first started occurring - Twitter had completely changed their developer API at one point, and to phase the old API out they slowly reduced the rate limit to 0, permanently. Unfortunately, the makers of Twitterrific did a terrible job of letting people know about the fact that the app had been updated for the new API when the rate limiting change went into effect, and so a lot of people were (and apparently still are) running an old, no-longer-functional version of Twitterrific.

    Anyway, Twitterrific 3.2.4 fixed the problem, in August of 2010.

    Thanks for sharing! Didn't know that.


    Let me guess - they posted the update information via... Twitter!
  • Worf 2011-01-31 14:41
    Nagesh Kukunoor:
    Empty Offer has was an old joke.





    For that you find some spare time, then line up at the counter and ask that you pay the bill there. Don't have anything ready, just say you're there to pay the bill and when you get to the counter look in the bag for your bill.

    Then when it comes time to hand over the cash, take out your wallet and count the coins out. Just make sure the whole transaction takes a few minutes, more than 2 pennies worth of their counter time.

    An alternative is to phone them up and pay via credit card... just make it cost them more money than it's actually worth.

    (It's why smart businesses have a a threshold cutoff - the cost to pursue small debts isn't worth their costs...)
  • beret 2011-01-31 15:20
    Last night I BOM'd your mother.
  • biff 2011-02-01 15:59
    So the wtf is why would one attempt to use a bronze pressure relief valve as a camera case?
  • biff 2011-02-01 16:01
    beret:
    Last night I BOM'd your mother.


    OMG! You DID! hope you didn't catch anything!
  • Luiz Felipe 2011-02-01 20:01
    Perhaps you are some type of voyer then you will put some microcamera in it and install the relief in a woman bathrom. noone will notice it.
  • nobulate 2011-02-03 05:29
    Anonymous:
    frits:
    Who hasn't created their own custom Exception type?
    I mean seriously, go away.

    throw new Exception("Funny exception messages are the lamest WTF of all time.
    It isn't smart, it isn't clever, it isn't even funny.",
    new Exception("Oh look, funny inner exception too! That
    makes me TWICE AS FUNNY!"));




    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
    Exception up = new Exception("I beg to differ");
    throw up;
    }
  • only me 2011-02-04 17:21
    Scarlet Manuka:
    shimon:
    A nice-to-have feature would be medical doctors' writing recognition.

    What, your doctor still writes stuff out? Mine just types everything into the computer. Slowly and painfully, but at least when he prints it out it's legible.

    Mine does too, while I am in the office. He is a touch-typist. I don't know why but there is something disturbing about him talking to me and simultaneously typing.