• Program.X (cs)

    An excuse to learn Franch (again).

    By the way, since when has the English language been represented by the USA flag? (The hint is in the word: ENGLISH=ENGLAND for which you should use the St. Georges flag ...

    [image]

    ... or, the Union Flag ...

    [image]
  • Quango (unregistered)

    Speaking as an Englishman, I have no problem with the US flag representing the English language version. Most people around the world would not know the English flag anyway and it would serve to confuse.

    Especially since most of the articles will be in American English, which is not the same as UK English.

  • Program.X (cs) in reply to Quango
    Quango:
    Especially since most of the articles will be in American English, which is not the same as UK English.

    I grudgingly agree to that!

    I'm just being pedantic, or is it nit-picking?

    So the ALT tag on the flag should be changed to "US English", or "US Engrish", as appropriate.

  • MET (cs)

    You are just being pedantic, although by suggesting two flags ironically in a rather fuzzy fashion. It should definitely be the union flag for British English rather than the St George's cross.

  • dkf (unregistered) in reply to Quango
    Quango:
    Speaking as an Englishman, I have no problem with the US flag representing the English language version.
    Me too. I don't want my country too closely associated with some of the jaw-droppingly bad practices discussed here!
  • tin (cs)

    I agree... Ditch the US flag for English. I'm Australian, and I've become accustomed to searching for a Union Flag.

    US flag means nothing to me, apart from being a quick indicator that I'm about to get annoyed by incorrect spelling and strange measurements.

  • AdT (unregistered)

    I think it's entirely appropriate to use the US flag for US English. This way, international users will not be shocked and confused (that much) when they happen across "impact" being used as a synonym for "effect", and similar atrocities...

    All seriousness aside, shouldn't the article title read "Qu'est-ce que la baise en Français"?

  • streetpc (cs)

    Thanks for thinking about us Frenchies But if that was a plan to get rid of us, you FAILED. I'll keep an eye on you, no matter what.

    Addendum (2008-03-26 06:45):

    AdT:
    All seriousness aside, shouldn't the article title read "Qu'est-ce que la baise en Français"?
    Nice one, I suggest you try that line with a random Lady in Paris.

    More seriously, I don't think there is a French equivalent of WTF (my closest guess may be something like "Mais qu'est-ce que c'est que cette m**** ?" - What's that sh**), but most of the IT-related guy understands this perfectly. And the other do the WTFs :p

    Addendum (2008-03-26 06:47): guys*

    ...and I shall keep on making mistakes in your comments

  • Swami Atma (unregistered)

    Several comments here.

    I'm a French speaking reader of WTF. I do all my computing in English so I think I'll stick to this version but it's nice anyway to know that there is a new French section.

    Re: flags and languages The comments above demonstrate why it's considered bad form to use flags to illustrate languages. It will always sit well with a good portion of the audience. It brings up many historical, political, and cultural issues which the the majority of Americans is now aware of. You can read more about this by researching i18n and localization.

    Re: WTF in Français There is no literal French equivalent to this particular expression there are many local ones which fit the bill perfectly. I prefer not propose any here.

    I think it's my first time posting a comment. Keep up the good work Alex. This is a fun site.

  • Swami Atma (unregistered) in reply to Swami Atma

    i meant: it will always NOT sit well ...

  • doinitfortehlulz (unregistered)

    so do these alt versions of tdwtf get translated mandatory fun days? if not it might just be the reason to learn a new language...

  • jimlangrunner (cs)

    que?

  • JohnTheFattist (unregistered) in reply to Program.X

    no, English = a language, England = a country. It's bad practice to represent any language with a national flag, regardless of the language's origins.

    But if one were to insist upon representing it with a flag, the US flag would be a good choice since it's the largest country that speaks English as a first language.

    I'm English by the way. And I live in England. And I speak English.

  • Someone You Know (cs) in reply to JohnTheFattist
    JohnTheFattist:
    But if one were to insist upon representing it with a flag, the US flag would be a good choice since it's the largest country that speaks English as a first language.

    When you say "the largest country", I assume you mean in terms of population. Otherwise we would need to use the Canadian flag to represent French.

  • CRNewsom (cs) in reply to Swami Atma
    Swami Atma:
    ...It brings up many historical, political, and cultural issues which the the majority of Americans is now aware of...

    Don't you mean US Americans?

  • Couard anonyme (unregistered)

    A-t-on droit à l'Irlandaise dans la section française?

  • Lufo (unregistered)

    But how many flags with just RED-WHITE-BLUE will you add?

  • NSCoder (cs)

    Since when has the French language been represented by the French flag? There are many countries where French is spoken. I think we should use the Swiss flag, or 20.4% thereof.

    But seriously, why not use words, or ISO language codes? Sometimes a word is worth a thousand pictures.

  • JohnTheFattist (unregistered) in reply to Someone You Know

    yeah I do. But with the Congo not far behind France in terms of population, in a few years it may seem logical to use that flag to represent France!

  • JohnTheFattist (unregistered) in reply to JohnTheFattist

    .. sorry.. FRENCH. I'm doing it myself now! :-)

  • Tei (unregistered)

    Ok, guys.

    I have a fix for that problem.

    We can create "Languaje" flags. Who want to help me on that?

    A français drape, a bandera del castellano, english flag, etc..

  • NSCoder (cs) in reply to Tei
    Tei:
    We can create "Languaje" flags. Who want to help me on that?

    A français drape, a bandera del castellano, english flag, etc..

    Already on it.

  • Mandatoяy (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Jocelyn? (unregistered)

    I didn't know 'Jocelyn' made the leap to be a unisex name.

  • Tsela (cs) in reply to Jocelyn?
    Jocelyn?:
    I didn't know 'Jocelyn' made the leap to be a unisex name.

    "Jocelyn" in France is a male first name, sometimes used in Anglophilic fashion as female first name (and thus pronounced in a way similar to the English manner). The French female equivalent is "Jocelyne", which is pronounced slightly differently from French "Jocelyn" (but quite similarly to English "Jocelyn").

    Is that confusing enough? Then I should add that those are rather modern alternatives to the more conservatively spelled "Jocelin" and "Joceline", to say nothing of the original "Josselin", all alternate spellings for the same first names, but somehow seen as old-fashioned, as if replacing a I with a Y would somehow be cooler...

  • Skaven (cs)

    So my question is will the French be translating the Mandatory Fun Day? If so, how will they be able to maintain the high quality we have come to expect when translating those jokes?

  • operagost (cs) in reply to AdT
    AdT:
    I think it's entirely appropriate to use the US flag for US English. This way, international users will not be shocked and confused (that much) when they happen across "impact" being used as a synonym for "effect", and similar atrocities...
    UK English has quite a few atrocities of its own. A "flat" is not flat or it wouldn't be much use for living in, "aluminium" has too many syllables, and calling gasoline "petrol" is a bit nonspecific considering the myriad other petroleum products available.
  • Reader X (unregistered)

    I can't believe no one else has made the point that the French language itself is a WTF.

  • operagost (cs) in reply to CRNewsom
    CRNewsom:
    Swami Atma:
    ...It brings up many historical, political, and cultural issues which the the majority of Americans is now aware of...

    Don't you mean US Americans?

    Who else calls themselves Americans? Please cite specific examples.

  • sf (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • CynicalTyler (unregistered)

    WTF in French? Sacrebleu!

  • Grobbendonk (unregistered) in reply to operagost

    [quote user="operagost"][quote user="AdT"] UK English has quite a few atrocities of its own. A "flat" is not flat or it wouldn't be much use for living in, "aluminium" has too many syllables, and calling gasoline "petrol" is a bit nonspecific considering the myriad other petroleum products available.[/quote]

    <pedant> A flat is a living space that occupies a single level in a multiple unit residence. So it's perfectly good, and more descriptive than "apartment" (multi-level residences are usually called maisonettes)

    Aluminium has the correct number of syllables and matches the naming of the other elements. then some git went and discovered transuranics and came up with some really dumb names.

    I sort of agree with you on Petrol (a shorter version of petroleum spirit, or "rock oil spirit"), but the US English is even worse, as there's a heck of a lot more gases than there are rock oil products. The best term I know is mogas because it specifically means "gasoline for burning in automobiles"

    </pedant>

    And I am 100% with you on the impact/effect thing.

  • clevershark (cs)

    So, is it called "Le mais qu'est-ce qu'il a fait, ce petit connard journalier"?

  • mr_ed (unregistered) in reply to Tsela
    Tsela:
    Jocelyn?:
    I didn't know 'Jocelyn' made the leap to be a unisex name.

    "Jocelyn" in France is a male first name, sometimes used in Anglophilic fashion as female first name (and thus pronounced in a way similar to the English manner). The French female equivalent is "Jocelyne", which is pronounced slightly differently from French "Jocelyn" (but quite similarly to English "Jocelyn").

    Is that confusing enough? Then I should add that those are rather modern alternatives to the more conservatively spelled "Jocelin" and "Joceline", to say nothing of the original "Josselin", all alternate spellings for the same first names, but somehow seen as old-fashioned, as if replacing a I with a Y would somehow be cooler...

    In Ottawa (Canada) there is a boulevard called Jeanne D'Arc, and I find it really annoying that most anglophones call it Jean D'Arc.

  • Etudiant de Français (unregistered) in reply to Skaven
    Skaven:
    So my question is will the French be translating the Mandatory Fun Day? If so, how will they be able to maintain the high quality we have come to expect when translating those jokes?

    Ne traduissez pas le «Mandatory Fun Day», s'il vous plaît! Mais, s'il vous voulez, tradiuissez les réponses.

    Aussi, pardonnez moi si mon français n'est pas bien. Il y a 5+ ans depuis j'ai étudié la langue.

  • Lame ass (unregistered) in reply to Reader X
    Reader X:
    I can't believe no one else has made the point that the French language itself is a WTF.

    Yeah, fuck the french. Can't stand those stupid assholes!

  • Atario (unregistered) in reply to AdT

    Ok, I'm here to chew bubblegum and out-pedant and out-smartass all of you. And I'm aaaall out of bubblegum.

    AdT:
    "impact" being used as a synonym for "effect", and similar atrocities...
    Surely you mean "affect".
    streetpc:
    Thanks for thinking about us Frenchies
    I have a question for the Frenchies (and other ESL-landers). Do programming languages ever have localization of the code itself? Or do you pretty much have to learn at least enough English to know the keywords?
    CRNewsom:
    Swami Atma:
    Don't you mean US Americans?
    I can't tell if that's an attempt to stir up "America = a pair of continents, you US chauvinists" sentiment, or a reference to Miss South Carolina 2007.
    Grobbendonk:
    A flat is a living space that occupies a single level in a multiple unit residence. So it's perfectly good, and more descriptive than "apartment" (multi-level residences are usually called maisonettes)
    I wonder what it is that makes Britons care more about the number of levels in one's apartment than Americans do.
    Grobbendonk:
    Aluminium has the correct number of syllables and matches the naming of the other elements.
    Right, like lanthanium and molybdenium and platinium and tantalium.
    Grobbendonk:
    The best term I know is mogas because it specifically means "gasoline for burning in automobiles"
    Ugh. Can you imagine the interminable stream of "jokes" you'd be forced to endure, along the lines of "Hey, the tank's almost empty. Looks like we need mo gas! HAW HAW HAW!"?

  • Suomalainen (unregistered)

    Ei vieläkään suomeksi =(

  • streetpc (cs) in reply to Atario
    Atario:
    streetpc:
    Thanks for thinking about us Frenchies
    I have a question for the Frenchies (and other ESL-landers). Do programming languages ever have localization of the code itself? Or do you pretty much have to learn at least enough English to know the keywords?
    There is no localization for the code (at least for the keywords) ^^ You might see some algorithmic done in French, but AFAIK that's all
  • Anonymous Coward (cs)

    The Daily WTF en français? Trop cool!

  • Grobbendonk (unregistered) in reply to Atario

    I wonder what it is that makes Britons care more about the number of levels in one's apartment than Americans do.

    Mostly middle class snobbery. (I'm allowed to say that, I'm middle class and English, but I'm not a snob, just surrounded by it)

    Ugh. Can you imagine the interminable stream of "jokes" you'd be forced to endure, along the lines of "Hey, the tank's almost empty. Looks like we need mo gas! HAW HAW HAW!"?

    Yep. I work with oil, there's millions of them, and none of them are good...

  • Paolo G (unregistered) in reply to Grobbendonk
    Comment held for moderation.
  • The Language Police ;-) (unregistered) in reply to tin
    tin:
    US flag means nothing to me, apart from being a quick indicator that I'm about to get annoyed by incorrect spelling and strange measurements.
    You forgot correct spelling of the wrong word that happens to sound more or less similar. ;-)
  • Vertigo (unregistered) in reply to Quango
    Quango:
    Most people around the world would not know the English flag anyway and it would serve to confuse.
    Which fucking planet are you from?
  • Lumberjack (unregistered)

    To translate "WTF" in French, do what we do in Quebec and translate it phonetically:

    "What the f*ck" = "Ouatte de phoque"

    Translated back to English, it means "seal's cotton-ball". Try it on your English speaking coworkers and laugh at their sheer puzzlement!

  • Poltras (unregistered) in reply to Lumberjack

    woah... never heard of it lumber...

    Being from Quebec, working in Montreal, I'd say that we use WTF quite frequently in Canadian french, so it's not a problem for us.

    Otherwise, maybe using an expression french uses when seeing this kind of stuff, like "Putain de merde" (literally f**king sh*t) ou "Morbleu".

    The daily morbleu would have some cachet, indeed :)

  • ID (unregistered) in reply to Lumberjack
    Lumberjack:
    To translate "WTF" in French, do what we do in Quebec and translate it phonetically:

    "What the f*ck" = "Ouatte de phoque"

    Translated back to English, it means "seal's cotton-ball". Try it on your English speaking coworkers and laugh at their sheer puzzlement!

    I laughed pretty hard on this one !

  • Hilário Godinho (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • tharpa (cs) in reply to Program.X
    Program.X:
    An excuse to learn Franch (again).

    By the way, since when has the English language been represented by the USA flag? (The hint is in the word: ENGLISH=ENGLAND for which you should use the St. Georges flag ...

    [image]

    ... or, the Union Flag ...

    [image]

    I like using the St. Georges flag. Since the name of the language is English, not British, it's important to use the flag of England rather than any other flag, such as the British flag or the U.S.A. flag.

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