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  • sztupy 2014-05-28 06:36
    This is Jenny's frist comment
  • Steve The Cynic 2014-05-28 06:43
    Titleist makes golf stuff, so of course she'd have problems using it to make subtitles...

    EDIT: It's entirely possible I missed something somewhere, but so did Goggle and Wikipoodia.
  • Mike 2014-05-28 06:45
    That was pretty boring, and why is it on tales of the interview?
  • Toadworld 2014-05-28 06:47
    What, too realistic now? Oyy.
  • jnareb 2014-05-28 06:50
    That would be only possible with laptop configured to login without password (for a work laptop???).
  • Andy 2014-05-28 06:54
    Users would be auth'd on some kind of domain, but software is still only installed locally, or deployed to machines, not users in a normal setup.
  • Miriam 2014-05-28 06:58
    Oh look, an alright Story (even if miscategorized and slightly boring).

    Everything beats Sergio hunting down the President's daughter in medieval Spain, though.
  • schpeelah 2014-05-28 07:00
    Nonetheless, we're talking about a situation where anyone's work laptop can be used by anyone else who has a work laptop. That's pretty WTF.
  • Employ15 2014-05-28 07:03
    That's entirely normal. I can log onto any laptop in the company with my login - I just can't be sure that any of the programs I'm using will be installed.
  • v 2014-05-28 07:09
    Ok, so TRWTF is commenters that never heard of domain login. Did they use a stamp to post their comments?
  • -.- 2014-05-28 07:09
    Can someone humor me and tell me why this is listed in "Tales from the interview"?
  • faoileag 2014-05-28 07:14
    Steve The Cynic:
    Titleist makes golf stuff, so of course she'd have problems using it to make subtitles...

    EDIT: It's entirely possible I missed something somewhere, but so did Goggle and Wikipoodia.

    You might indeed - "Titleist" might also be a shortend form of "Titelleiste", german for title bar.

    Which, in the context, is entirely plausible.
  • faoileag 2014-05-28 07:26
    the article said:
    Sometimes, the answer is emphatically the former


    Always. The answer is always the former.

    Take your software to a large enough sample of people, whose technical abillity is roughly on the same level.

    Give them a couple of tasks to accomplish.

    Some will fail, even if the tasks are not impossible.

    But others will succeed.

    So it can't be your software that is defective, because then nobody would have succeeded.

    Conclusion: those users that did not succeed must be somehow "defective".

    Or how come, when you fail in tests at school, you are blamed and not your teacher?
  • faoileag 2014-05-28 07:30
    So, a PEBKAC wtf today.

    But am I the only one who thinks that someone not capable of picking the right workplace/laptop should perhaps not be entering subtitles that seem to go out live?
  • Rodnas 2014-05-28 07:34
    Mike:
    That was pretty boring, and why is it on tales of the interview?


    Because Mary will soon be looking for a new job.
  • laoreet 2014-05-28 07:47
    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a user screwed up...
  • Jim 2014-05-28 07:50
    But am I the only one who thinks that someone not capable of picking the right workplace/laptop should perhaps not be entering subtitles that seem to go out live?


    Hopefully, yes. But probably, no.

    People who are proficient in their own field can have a blind spot in some other field. In this case it sounds like the user picked up a laptop where she expected to find her own, had no trouble logging in, and when things looked different instead of thinking "oh, wrong laptop" she thought "oh, someone's changed everything". It's perfectly possible that this person can type 100wpm with no errors.

    In other news, a lot of people (not just in IT) find it hard to understand that something which is easy for them can be very difficult for others.
  • cyborg 2014-05-28 07:53
    Jim:
    But am I the only one who thinks that someone not capable of picking the right workplace/laptop should perhaps not be entering subtitles that seem to go out live?

    ...
    In other news, a lot of people (not just in IT) find it hard to understand that something which is easy for them can be very difficult for others.


    Agreed - this isn't so much a WTF it's just so easy to miss something when you're just not expecting that to happen. Why else is it that we train ourselves when troubleshooting anything to check the basics? Is it plugged in? Does power-cycling resolve it, etc... If it was obviously intuitive to the human mind we wouldn't have these checklists of the "obvious".
  • faoileag 2014-05-28 08:01
    Jim:
    In other news, a lot of people (not just in IT) find it hard to understand that something which is easy for them can be very difficult for others.

    I once heard that the ability to think like another person, i.e. to get into the skin of that person and think as that person does and not as oneself would, is hard wired, meaning either you can do it or you can't.

    Which probably means they must be excused.
  • Pock Suppet 2014-05-28 08:18
    Rodnas:
    Mike:
    That was pretty boring, and why is it on tales of the interview?


    Because Mary will soon be looking for a new job.

    What universe do you come from? If anyone's going to be fired, it's someone in IT for not making the "right" software appear no matter who's logged in.
  • sol 2014-05-28 08:31
    and another no wtf day... what is the world coming to
  • C-Derb 2014-05-28 08:35
    Mike:
    That was pretty boring, and why is it on tales of the interview?
    -.-:
    Can someone humor me and tell me why this is listed in "Tales from the interview"?
    Pray tell, which category do you think it should go in?

    Don't bring us problems. Bring us solutions!
  • vt_mruhlin 2014-05-28 08:41
    Great troubleshooting effort to even think to check for that possibility.

    Tales From the Interview are my favorite, so it was a little disappointing to see that this was mislabeled.
  • Valhar2000 2014-05-28 08:43
    Pock Suppet:
    If anyone's going to be fired, it's someone in IT for not making the "right" software appear no matter who's logged in.


    For not spending money, time and resources on setting up a system that will provide no additional benefit to any user capable of identifying their own desk in their own office?
  • murmur 2014-05-28 08:46
    How is this a tale from the interview?
  • anon 2014-05-28 09:04
    C-Derb:

    Don't bring us problems. Bring us solutions!


    God, no! Never ask users for solutions. Ever.
  • Mughi 2014-05-28 09:11
    Story was meh, but sometimes they are.. at least it wasn't embellished beyond recognition like some of them. And if the biggest issue is misfiling, then we should probably be thankful. Hey, it was free and good for a quick chuckle.
  • np 2014-05-28 09:24
    Ooo, Jenny's laptop. That is mine, just someone renamed it.
    They also changed the wallpaper to someone else's family.
    All the apps are different. Wait, it is windows when my laptop is a flavour of linux.

    Wow, who would make so many changes to my laptop. Hmm, it is a dell and not an IBM. They changed so much.
  • Mary-am 2014-05-28 09:41
    Why does this youtube have no videos?
    And why is my username so different?
    And this new site design is just hideously ugly!
    I like the new domain name, though.
    But where is Grumpy Cat?!
  • operagost 2014-05-28 09:43
    I'm pretty sure this demands a car analogy.

    Hey, someone changed a bunch of stuff in my car. The interior is leather instead of cloth, and it's a different color. Oh yeah, and now it's a Ford instead of a Honda. They changed so much.
  • geopsychic 2014-05-28 09:46
    faoileag:
    the article said:
    Sometimes, the answer is emphatically the former


    Or how come, when you fail in tests at school, you are blamed and not your teacher?


    Where have you been the last 30 years or so?
  • Blah 2014-05-28 09:50
    faoileag:
    So, a PEBKAC wtf today.

    But am I the only one who thinks that someone not capable of picking the right workplace/laptop should perhaps not be entering subtitles that seem to go out live?


    I'd go with an ID-10-T error. She was apparently capable of doing her job; just not finding the right work space to do it in.

    I must say though. This story would've been much funnier if it had been Jenny calling support to find out why her computer had been reconfigured and a bunch of new software installed.
  • anonymous 2014-05-28 09:51
    tl;dr: company buys identical laptops for all employees, hasn't heard of Labelmate. Confusion ensues.
  • Hannes 2014-05-28 09:58
    I love to read some "Tales from the Interview". But this isn't an "interview". Well, it is in some way, but not an "interview" you would expect to be featured on "Tales from the Interview".

    And yes, I tried hard to include the word "interview" (together with the quotation marks!) as many times as possible. But I bet someone can do better.
  • -.- 2014-05-28 09:58
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers". But I'd say this would be a perfect fit for "Feature Articles"

    captcha: conventio, why-a dontcha follow tha established conventio?
  • D-Coder 2014-05-28 09:59
    laoreet:
    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a user screwed up...
    Well, if you do any kind of support, and your employer sends you a paycheck... you do.
  • me 2014-05-28 10:03
    And they even parked it in a different lot!

    nobis: some pepl have nobis using computers.
  • DrPepper 2014-05-28 10:51
    If I needed a pen to jot down a note, I would grab one and not even think about whether it was actually my pen, or my co-workers pen which happened to look exactly like my pen. A pen is a commodity item.

    This story is not a WTF so much as it is a comment about how much computers have become commodity items -- just a tool to get a job done. She picked up a laptop, which looked exactly like hers -- because all laptops in the company look exactly the same -- and logged in, like she's done every single day for a year.

    How would she possibly know that she'd grabbed the wrong one? Only because the installed programs were different. There is no outward physical difference to indicate it, just like two pens are outwardly identical.
  • DrPepper 2014-05-28 10:54
    -.-:
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers".


    Wrong. You are not being paid to write code -- you're being paid to solve a problem; and the solution just happens to be code. You ARE a solution engineer. Unless, of course, you can't be bothered to think for yourself, and just do what others tell you to do. In that case, you're not a programmer, you're a monkey.

  • OldCoder 2014-05-28 10:56
    Valhar2000:
    Pock Suppet:
    If anyone's going to be fired, it's someone in IT for not making the "right" software appear no matter who's logged in.


    For not spending money, time and resources on setting up a system that will provide no additional benefit to any user capable of identifying their own desk in their own office?

    If you watch the BBC news you'll know that the journalists (and everybody else) are hot-desked in a battery farm right behind the newsreader. Nobody owns a desk. God help you if you put down a coat or a bag anywhere.

    Captcha: usitas. Usitas we provided it for you.
  • OldCoder 2014-05-28 10:59
    Pock Suppet:
    What universe do you come from? If anyone's going to be fired, it's someone in IT for not making the "right" software appear no matter who's logged in.

    Maybe Mary is someone who comes from a thin client environment, where anyone can log into any terminal and make the right software appear for them.
  • Josh 2014-05-28 11:00
    C-Derb:
    Mike:
    That was pretty boring, and why is it on tales of the interview?
    -.-:
    Can someone humor me and tell me why this is listed in "Tales from the interview"?
    Pray tell, which category do you think it should go in?

    Don't bring us problems. Bring us solutions!


    Featured Articles

    Tales from the Interview is quite rare, so when I see that purple banner, I expect some interview shenanigans.
  • Eric Gem 2014-05-28 11:01
    Steve The Cynic:
    Titleist makes golf stuff, so of course she'd have problems using it to make subtitles...

    EDIT: It's entirely possible I missed something somewhere, but so did Goggle and Wikipoodia.


    Google and Wikipedia. FTFY.

    CAPTCHA: frist
  • Could you dumb it down a shade, please? 2014-05-28 11:13
    Josh:
    Tales from the Interview is quite rare, so when I see that purple banner, I expect some interview shenanigans.


    Welcome to The Daily Incremental Reduction Of Expectations.
  • Paul Neumann 2014-05-28 11:15
    faoileag:
    [...]Give them a couple of tasks to accomplish.

    Some will fail, even if the tasks are not impossible.

    But others will succeed.[...]

    And what is your analysis of the users whom succeed on the impossible tasks?
  • Nagesh 2014-05-28 11:17
    I am feeling much piety for Mary, who has to deal with snobs like Tazza and her Alzheimer's at the same time.
  • Steve The Cynic 2014-05-28 11:19
    Jim:
    People who are proficient in their own field can have a blind spot in some other field. In this case it sounds like the user picked up a laptop where she expected to find her own, had no trouble logging in, and when things looked different instead of thinking "oh, wrong laptop" she thought "oh, someone's changed everything". It's perfectly possible that this person can type 100wpm with no errors.

    And who knows, they might be using roaming profiles, so the desktop will look the same because it will have the same wallpaper etc settings. Then the only difference between the machines will be the software load, in which case "someone removed my golf software" is a reasonable response.
  • emaN ruoY 2014-05-28 11:21
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?
  • no laughing matter 2014-05-28 11:26
    OldCoder:

    If you watch the BBC news you'll know that the journalists (and everybody else) are hot-desked in a battery farm right behind the newsreader. Nobody owns a desk. God help you if you put down a coat or a bag anywhere.

    "Hot-desking"! TRWTF!

    If your employer thinks your workplace is something that you should be able to swap every single day, in reality that means he thinks you are a person that he can swap every single day.

    Now let's check if your boss is fine with swapping his workbench every single day!
  • Could you dumb it down a shade, please? 2014-05-28 11:36
    no laughing matter:
    If your employer thinks your workplace is something that you should be able to swap every single day, in reality that means he thinks you are a person that he can swap every single day.

    Now let's check if your boss is fine with swapping his workbench every single day!


    "Due to the combination of your hot desking policy, and apparent inabilty to turn up before 11 even though you demand 8 o'clock starts from your employees, I have hot desked myself in this lovely spacious office; you can go and sit next to smelly susan."
  • Gene Wirchenko 2014-05-28 11:59
    DrPepper:
    -.-:
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers".


    Wrong. You are not being paid to write code -- you're being paid to solve a problem; and the solution just happens to be code. You ARE a solution engineer. Unless, of course, you can't be bothered to think for yourself, and just do what others tell you to do. In that case, you're not a programmer, you're a monkey.


    Not quite. Code is but part of the solution. I have had times where I have had to make a change in code and a bigger one in procedure. Other times, I have had to debug an operating procedure that I did not set up so that it would work with an edge case.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
  • TheCPUWizard 2014-05-28 12:26
    no laughing matter:
    If your employer thinks your workplace is something that you should be able to swap every single day, in reality that means he thinks you are a person that he can swap every single day.

    Now let's check if your boss is fine with swapping his workbench every single day!


    There are plenty of cases where Hot Desk makes sense. My office has a maximum of 3-5 people at any one time. There are over 50 employees. I am to pay rent and other costs for enough space for 50 desks, even though more than 5 would never be used????
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 12:35
    This:

    Mughi:
    Story was meh, but sometimes they are.. at least it wasn't embellished beyond recognition like some of them. And if the biggest issue is misfiling, then we should probably be thankful. Hey, it was free and good for a quick chuckle.
  • cellocgw 2014-05-28 12:36
    C-Derb:


    Don't bring us problems. Bring us solutions!


    Or failing that, precipitates. //rim shot
  • no laughing matter 2014-05-28 12:50
    TheCPUWizard:
    no laughing matter:
    If your employer thinks your workplace is something that you should be able to swap every single day, in reality that means he thinks you are a person that he can swap every single day.

    Now let's check if your boss is fine with swapping his workbench every single day!


    There are plenty of cases where Hot Desk makes sense. My office has a maximum of 3-5 people at any one time. There are over 50 employees. I am to pay rent and other costs for enough space for 50 desks, even though more than 5 would never be used????

    Well, i was talking about "your workplace".

    In your case you are either working from home or working at a clients site and the desks in the office are not regular workplace desks.
  • neminem 2014-05-28 13:10
    -.-:
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers".

    Funny - that is literally actually my official job title, "Solutions Engineer".
    operagost:
    I'm pretty sure this demands a car analogy.
    Hey, someone changed a bunch of stuff in my car. The interior is leather instead of cloth, and it's a different color. Oh yeah, and now it's a Ford instead of a Honda. They changed so much.

    Except the outward appearance *is* the same, so it's really more like: hey, I swear I parked my car here... it's a blue Honda, but crap, someone stole my GPS, and... put a stupid hangy thing in the dash? What the crap?

    Which... I have had a couple boneheaded moments very much like that, actually with my car. Turns out blue Hondas of recent make are fairly common, and look pretty similar from the outside. The difference is, a few seconds later, I realized I was being dumb, rather than, like this person would have, calling the cops that someone stole stuff from my car and replaced it with other stuff.

    Also agreeing with all the people complaining about where this article was posted - couldn't an admin just come in and change its category? It's not actually a bad article (unlike a couple recent ones...), just misposted.
  • Chosepf 2014-05-28 13:21
    You must not live in the US. Here teachers are punished when you fail tests in school, it's called, "No child left behind."
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 13:22
    neminem:
    -.-:
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers".

    Funny - that is literally actually my official job title, "Solutions Engineer".
    operagost:
    I'm pretty sure this demands a car analogy.
    Hey, someone changed a bunch of stuff in my car. The interior is leather instead of cloth, and it's a different color. Oh yeah, and now it's a Ford instead of a Honda. They changed so much.

    Except the outward appearance *is* the same, so it's really more like: hey, I swear I parked my car here... it's a blue Honda, but crap, someone stole my GPS, and... put a stupid hangy thing in the dash? What the crap?

    Which... I have had a couple boneheaded moments very much like that, actually with my car. Turns out blue Hondas of recent make are fairly common, and look pretty similar from the outside. The difference is, a few seconds later, I realized I was being dumb, rather than, like this person would have, calling the cops that someone stole stuff from my car and replaced it with other stuff.

    Also agreeing with all the people complaining about where this article was posted - couldn't an admin just come in and change its category? It's not actually a bad article (unlike a couple recent ones...), just misposted.


    Yup, I know that feeling. Someone in my building (which holds about 50 employees) just bought a car similar to mine. Luckily, his has two fewer doors, so it keeps the confusion to a minimum.
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 13:22
    Chosepf:
    You must not live in the US. Here teachers are punished when you fail tests in school, it's called, "No child left behind."


  • Anon 2014-05-28 13:33
    no laughing matter:
    OldCoder:

    If you watch the BBC news you'll know that the journalists (and everybody else) are hot-desked in a battery farm right behind the newsreader. Nobody owns a desk. God help you if you put down a coat or a bag anywhere.

    "Hot-desking"! TRWTF!

    If your employer thinks your workplace is something that you should be able to swap every single day, in reality that means he thinks you are a person that he can swap every single day.

    Now let's check if your boss is fine with swapping his workbench every single day!


    The practice is incredibly common.

    And that thought process is standard for management. You are utterly replaceable.
  • psuedonymous 2014-05-28 13:40
    jnareb:
    That would be only possible with laptop configured to login without password (for a work laptop???).
    Or roving accounts.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2014-05-28 13:44
    TRWTF to me is that apparently they are doing captions on a regular keyboard, and not a steno keyboard. I thought most live captioners used steno keyboards because it's faster, though you can make phonetic errors. Then Mary might have noticed that it wasn't her keyboard, too.
  • Zecc 2014-05-28 13:56
    twenty four-hour
    Sweet ass-hyphenation detected.
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 13:58
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    TRWTF to me is that apparently they are doing captions on a regular keyboard, and not a steno keyboard. I thought most live captioners used steno keyboards because it's faster, though you can make phonetic errors. Then Mary might have noticed that it wasn't her keyboard, too.


    Mary's trying to prep subs for the 5 AM slot


    False assumption.
  • Zylon 2014-05-28 14:04
    chubertdev:

    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative.
  • foo AKA fooo 2014-05-28 14:11
    Zylon:
    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative.
    Why not.
  • CAPTCHA: aliquam 2014-05-28 14:34
    Zylon:

    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative?


    FTFY
  • lolatu 2014-05-28 14:43
    That's what we in the business like to call a PEBCAK error, otherwise known as a ID-10-T error.
  • foo AKA fooo 2014-05-28 14:46
    emaN ruoY:
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?
    Actually, I once walked someone not in IT (an electrician if you care) through a moderately complex bash command line including $() and stuff, over the phone. It was kind of an emergency, but it was successful.
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 14:47
    Zylon:
    chubertdev:
    [image]

    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative.


    Boxes are inanimate objects, they can't draw.
  • Captain Oblivious 2014-05-28 14:53
    laoreet:
    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a user screwed up...


    Get a job in tech support. Get paid $10 an hour to handle maybe 4 calls. That's more than double your rate.
  • Anomaly 2014-05-28 15:13
    TRWTF if she doesn't take her laptop home, and has her own desk, why did she leave her laptop somewhere other than locked up in the cabinet? If she didn't have her own desk she should have taken the laptop home.

    Otherwise the other RWTF is not properly labelling individual laptops for brothers sake.
  • foo AKA fooo 2014-05-28 15:30
    chubertdev:
    Zylon:
    chubertdev:
    [image]

    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative.


    Boxes are inanimate objects, they can't draw.
    Oh yeah? And what about Box.draw()?

    If we learned anything in the past 20 years, it's that objects can do anything.
  • CodeMonkey 2014-05-28 15:35
    operagost:
    I'm pretty sure this demands a car analogy.

    Hey, someone changed a bunch of stuff in my car. The interior is leather instead of cloth, and it's a different color. Oh yeah, and now it's a Ford instead of a Honda. They changed so much.


    This actually happened to my parents once on a trip. They stopped somewhere to eat and when they came out they unlocked and got into what they thought was their car. Turned out it was a different car, same make, model and color, and even the the same key "combination". They figured it out once they noticed all the strange stuff in the back seat, but still, what are the odds? And it was before key fobs and electronic security systems were common in case anyone wondered why that worked.
  • Anonymouse Coder 2014-05-28 15:38
    I like this story, I really do.
    Nice little annecdote, well told - good surprise at the end. No tiresome embellishment. Will read again.

    Only "Tales from the Interview" puzzles me...
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 15:38
    foo AKA fooo:
    chubertdev:
    Zylon:
    chubertdev:
    [image]

    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative.


    Boxes are inanimate objects, they can't draw.
    Oh yeah? And what about Box.draw()?

    If we learned anything in the past 20 years, it's that objects can do anything.


    The Pen object is doing the drawing.
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 15:39
    CodeMonkey:
    operagost:
    I'm pretty sure this demands a car analogy.

    Hey, someone changed a bunch of stuff in my car. The interior is leather instead of cloth, and it's a different color. Oh yeah, and now it's a Ford instead of a Honda. They changed so much.


    This actually happened to my parents once on a trip. They stopped somewhere to eat and when they came out they unlocked and got into what they thought was their car. Turned out it was a different car, same make, model and color, and even the the same key "combination". They figured it out once they noticed all the strange stuff in the back seat, but still, what are the odds? And it was before key fobs and electronic security systems were common in case anyone wondered why that worked.


    If it's a 91 Integra, I think it was something like 1 in 7.
  • QJo 2014-05-28 15:57
    Valhar2000:
    Pock Suppet:
    If anyone's going to be fired, it's someone in IT for not making the "right" software appear no matter who's logged in.


    For not spending money, time and resources on setting up a system that will provide no additional benefit to any user capable of identifying their own desk in their own office?


    Some people hot-desk so much they can't remember where they were sitting before lunch break, let alone yesterday.

    I have to carry enough around in my head that one little extra thing to remember, like: where am I sitting today? is enough to reduce my efficiency below critical threshold. I detect in Mary someone who is so overworked and stressed that this is just one of the little things that could have her on the edge of a nervous breakdown.

    At the risk of sounding like the Bob-meme: please show a little respect. I had a nervous breakdown once, and I can assure you, it was no laughing matter.
  • A Non. E. Mouse 2014-05-28 16:30
    Anonymouse Coder:
    Only "Tales from the Interview" puzzles me...


    I think it's one of those stupid, ridiculous "logic" problems interviewers these days like to ask. Maybe Alex is looking for a new writer and this is his way of finding top-notch talent, though, like most of the interview puzzles, I fail to see any correlation between the puzzle and the job.
  • Hannes 2014-05-28 16:36
    laoreet:
    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a user screwed up...


    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a "computer tech" screwed up...
  • the beholder 2014-05-28 16:37
    Zylon:
    chubertdev:

    Explain why both boxes put a question mark at the end of an imperative.
    Because they're kinda literal translations from the french original, by Emmanuel Chaunu. Here's one (PT-BR) version where his signature hasn't been chopped off: http://blog.cev.org.br/laercio/files/educacao_1969_2009.jpg
    Next question please?
  • Bananas 2014-05-28 16:43
    Could you dumb it down a shade, please?:
    Josh:
    Tales from the Interview is quite rare, so when I see that purple banner, I expect some interview shenanigans.


    Welcome to The Daily Incremental Reduction Of Expectations.
    +1
  • Teo 2014-05-28 17:01
    For me, IT and Development lends itself to a certain type of personality. That kind of personality is at least a little OCD and very attention oriented.

    Most developers where I work would get this very perplexed look on their face in the morning if someone moved their keyboard or shifted one of their monitors by 6 or 8 inches.

    So, people who have that kind of attention to detail find it incomprehensible that a person couldn't tell "their" laptop from another of the same model.

    Personally, I think the wear pattern on the keycaps would be the first giveaway for me, but then again, I can't get comfortable in hotel beds because they aren't my bed.
  • herby 2014-05-28 17:28
    This episode reminds me of the commercial where someone is looking for his glasses. Then another office mate with very accurate throwing skills lobs a wadded up paper ball and hits the glasses on the subject's heat (they were propped up there) and they fall cleanly on their nose.

    File in category: DUH!

    p.s. Wallpaper on users laptops can help here!
  • Hermun 2014-05-28 18:19
    faoileag:

    Or how come, when you fail in tests at school, you are blamed and not your teacher?

    Many schools need pupils to achieve certain grades to continue to be funded, often laying off teachers. So they may not be blamed but they're getting punished.
  • PAW 2014-05-28 18:26
    emaN ruoY:
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?

    Going back a few decades I had to reprogram mainframes by reading sets of six digits over the phone to people not in IT. Reloading the bootstrap even involved flipping switches for the binary version.
  • dkf 2014-05-28 18:36
    herby:
    glasses on the subject's heat
    The glasses were on heat? In that case he'd better take them to the vet to get them “done”. Nobody likes a randy pair of spectacles.

    Waitaminute…
  • Javelin 2014-05-28 18:39
    emaN ruoY:
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?
    I actually once talked my ex-girlfriend through removing an old host-key entry from ~/.ssh/known_hosts on her MacBook. Over the phone. In Terminal. Using vi.
  • chubertdev 2014-05-28 18:40
    Javelin:
    emaN ruoY:
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?
    I actually once talked my ex-girlfriend through removing an old host-key entry from ~/.ssh/known_hosts on her MacBook. Over the phone. In Terminal. Using vi.


    uphill both ways?
  • pedant 2014-05-28 19:03
    D-Coder:
    laoreet:
    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a user screwed up...
    Well, if you do any kind of support, and your employer sends you a paycheck... you do.
    no, I get 12c each time a user screws up....
  • Not Matt Westwood 2014-05-28 19:07
    OldCoder:
    Valhar2000:
    Pock Suppet:
    If anyone's going to be fired, it's someone in IT for not making the "right" software appear no matter who's logged in.


    For not spending money, time and resources on setting up a system that will provide no additional benefit to any user capable of identifying their own desk in their own office?

    If you watch the BBC news you'll know that the journalists (and everybody else) are hot-desked in a battery farm right behind the newsreader. Nobody owns a desk. God help you if you put down a coat or a bag anywhere.

    Captcha: usitas. Usitas we provided it for you.
    Thy'r fucking thieves too
  • mickey 2014-05-28 19:07
    DrPepper:
    -.-:
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers".


    Wrong. You are not being paid to write code -- you're being paid to solve a problem; and the solution just happens to be code. You ARE a solution engineer. Unless, of course, you can't be bothered to think for yourself, and just do what others tell you to do. In that case, you're not a programmer, you're a monkey.

    in any IT shop it's important to have some "Solution engineers" and some "Code Monkeys". On large projects, things get ugly when there's too many thinkers, because they all approach the problem differently and fight to the death to protect their idea at the exclusion of all others (even the ones that are actually the same). While we all like to think we're smart enough to actually design the solution (and perhaps we are) it doesn't make sense for all of us to independently be designing solutions for the same problem, so in any project some of us have to accept that we're just there to be code monkeys (in a friendly workplace you'd hopefully take it turns to be the brains and the brawn)....
  • Hugh 2014-05-28 19:22
    Paul Neumann:
    faoileag:
    [...]Give them a couple of tasks to accomplish.

    Some will fail, even if the tasks are not impossible.

    But others will succeed.[...]

    And what is your analysis of the users whom succeed on the impossible tasks?
    When you don't know something's impossible it's a lot easier to do.

    There's a saying along the lines of "She didn't know it couldn't be done, so she went ahead and did it"
  • M_Adams 2014-05-28 19:55
    Seeing the moji-bake that most often passes as "subtitling"...

    I'm surprised deaf people don't go hunting the subtitlers down and bash their heads in with a teleprinter:
  • Griffyn 2014-05-28 20:01
    How did the IM get sent to the laptop? Mary is using Jenny's laptop, which would mean that she'd be logged in as Jenny. Tazza's IM wouldn't have been received on Jenny's laptop.
  • ae; roh 2014-05-28 20:34
    Griffyn:
    How did the IM get sent to the laptop? Mary is using Jenny's laptop, which would mean that she'd be logged in as Jenny. Tazza's IM wouldn't have been received on Jenny's laptop.
    how many people have already mmentioned about domain logon - this means IM would reolve to the person logged on, not the owner of the laptop
  • Reductio Ad Ridiculousum 2014-05-28 20:39
    Griffyn:
    How did the IM get sent to the laptop? Mary is using Jenny's laptop, which would mean that she'd be logged in as Jenny. Tazza's IM wouldn't have been received on Jenny's laptop.
    As mentioned at least twice: roving domain logins.
  • Reductio Ad Ridiculousum 2014-05-28 20:41
    chubertdev:
    Javelin:
    emaN ruoY:
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?
    I actually once talked my ex-girlfriend through removing an old host-key entry from ~/.ssh/known_hosts on her MacBook. Over the phone. In Terminal. Using vi.


    uphill both ways?
    in the snow.
  • Reductio Ad Ridiculousum 2014-05-28 20:45
    D-Coder:
    laoreet:
    Oh if I had a dollar for every time a user screwed up...
    Well, if you do any kind of support, and your employer sends you a paycheck... you do.
    +1

    I'll mitch and boan along with everyone else, but without users we'd be out of work. Think "job security".
  • Darth Paul 2014-05-28 21:09
    DrPepper:
    ...How would she possibly know that she'd grabbed the wrong one? Only because the installed programs were different. There is no outward physical difference to indicate it, just like two pens are outwardly identical.


    It would be trivial for the IT department to add a popup on login that says something to the effect that this is not your computer and some of the programs you use may not be available.
  • Darth Paul 2014-05-28 21:15
    neminem:
    ...
    Except the outward appearance *is* the same, so it's really more like: hey, I swear I parked my car here... it's a blue Honda, but crap, someone stole my GPS, and... put a stupid hangy thing in the dash? What the crap? ...


    And, I kid you not, there have been cases of people who drove away in the wrong car because it turned out that, not only was it an identical make and model in the same parking lot, their own key actually opened it and started the engine.

    That sort of makes the analogy fit the domain login scenario.
  • Reductio Ad Ridiculousum 2014-05-28 21:26
    Darth Paul:
    DrPepper:
    ...How would she possibly know that she'd grabbed the wrong one? Only because the installed programs were different. There is no outward physical difference to indicate it, just like two pens are outwardly identical.


    It would be trivial for the IT department to add a popup on login that says something to the effect that this is not your computer and some of the programs you use may not be available.

    8 hrs for the suits to talk about it in between golfing stories.
    2 hrs for an IT monkey to find out how to do it and do basic testing.
    2 hrs for a QA monkey to get around to do further testing.
    2 hrs to notify and implement.
    2 hrs talking to the folks that couldn't be bothered with the notification.
    2 hrs to discover the edge cases that cause "those special programs on those special PC's" to hang.
    8 hrs for the suits to bitch about it in between golfing stories.
    8 hrs to work around the edge cases.
    2 hrs to patch.
    ---
    total 36 hrs

    APFF (Automatic Programmer Fudge Factor): 2 x 36 = 72 hrs
    AMFF (Automatic Manager Fudge Factor): Raise to the next time frame.

    So, two and a half months or so to implement, because, you know, this really isn't a priority.

    (YMMV depending on the size of the shop and the bureaucracy)
  • korvaks 2014-05-29 00:03
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    Darth Paul:

    It would be trivial for the IT department to add a popup on login that says something to the effect that this is not your computer and some of the programs you use may not be available.

    8 hrs for the suits to talk about it in between golfing stories.
    2 hrs for an IT monkey to find out how to do it and do basic testing.
    2 hrs for a QA monkey to get around to do further testing.
    2 hrs to notify and implement.
    2 hrs talking to the folks that couldn't be bothered with the notification.
    2 hrs to discover the edge cases that cause "those special programs on those special PC's" to hang.
    8 hrs for the suits to bitch about it in between golfing stories.
    8 hrs to work around the edge cases.
    2 hrs to patch.
    ---
    total 36 hrs

    APFF (Automatic Programmer Fudge Factor): 2 x 36 = 72 hrs
    AMFF (Automatic Manager Fudge Factor): Raise to the next time frame.

    So, two and a half months or so to implement, because, you know, this really isn't a priority.

    (YMMV depending on the size of the shop and the bureaucracy)


    And it still wouldn't work, because the user will click "OK" without reading the message.
  • ph 2014-05-29 01:48
    np:
    Ooo, Jenny's laptop. That is mine, just someone renamed it.
    They also changed the wallpaper to someone else's family.
    All the apps are different. Wait, it is windows when my laptop is a flavour of linux.

    Wow, who would make so many changes to my laptop. Hmm, it is a dell and not an IBM. They changed so much.


    Can happen easily at 4 AM. What's an identity, anyway? If you copy the full HD bitwise to Jenny's laptop, is it now Mary's or Jenny's?
  • Ziplodocus 2014-05-29 04:42
    Darth Paul:
    DrPepper:
    ...How would she possibly know that she'd grabbed the wrong one? Only because the installed programs were different. There is no outward physical difference to indicate it, just like two pens are outwardly identical.


    It would be trivial for the IT department to add a popup on login that says something to the effect that this is not your computer and some of the programs you use may not be available.


    It would be trivial-er to put a sticky label on Mary's laptop with her name on it. She seems to be the only one who has this issue, otherwise Tazza would have lead with "Are you using someone else's laptop?"
  • np 2014-05-29 06:11
    chubertdev:
    Javelin:
    emaN ruoY:
    I gotta give Mary some credit. Have you ever tried to instruct someone, not in IT, over the phone to open the command prompt and type in a command without it being a 5 minute ordeal?
    I actually once talked my ex-girlfriend through removing an old host-key entry from ~/.ssh/known_hosts on her MacBook. Over the phone. In Terminal. Using vi.


    uphill both ways?


    People say it like it isn't possible.

    ......._________......
    ....../.........\.....
    ...../...........\....
    ____/.............\___
    ^-- school.....home --^
  • anonymous 2014-05-29 08:44
    Darth Paul:
    DrPepper:
    ...How would she possibly know that she'd grabbed the wrong one? Only because the installed programs were different. There is no outward physical difference to indicate it, just like two pens are outwardly identical.


    It would be trivial for the IT department to add a popup on login that says something to the effect that this is not your computer and some of the programs you use may not be available.


    To be immediately confused with the login popup that says something to the effect that this is not your computer and your use of it must follow your company's technology use policy.
  • GladysBertrude 2014-05-29 11:23
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    Griffyn:
    How did the IM get sent to the laptop? Mary is using Jenny's laptop, which would mean that she'd be logged in as Jenny. Tazza's IM wouldn't have been received on Jenny's laptop.
    As mentioned at least twice: roving domain logins.


    I prefer rambling domain logins.
  • Jay 2014-05-29 12:59
    neminem:
    -.-:
    We are programmers! Not "solution engineers".

    Funny - that is literally actually my official job title, "Solutions Engineer".
    operagost:
    I'm pretty sure this demands a car analogy.
    Hey, someone changed a bunch of stuff in my car. The interior is leather instead of cloth, and it's a different color. Oh yeah, and now it's a Ford instead of a Honda. They changed so much.

    Except the outward appearance *is* the same, so it's really more like: hey, I swear I parked my car here... it's a blue Honda, but crap, someone stole my GPS, and... put a stupid hangy thing in the dash? What the crap?

    Which... I have had a couple boneheaded moments very much like that, actually with my car. Turns out blue Hondas of recent make are fairly common, and look pretty similar from the outside. The difference is, a few seconds later, I realized I was being dumb, rather than, like this person would have, calling the cops that someone stole stuff from my car and replaced it with other stuff.

    Also agreeing with all the people complaining about where this article was posted - couldn't an admin just come in and change its category? It's not actually a bad article (unlike a couple recent ones...), just misposted.


    Except to make the analogy truly fair, it has to be a company-owned car, and the company supplied the GPS, and in the past the company HAS removed the GPS from the car to install a newer model, and it does regularly hang air fresheners from the rear-view mirror, or whatever. And the cars all use the same key.

    So you get in the car and notice the GPS is missing. You very well might not say, "Oh, I must be in the wrong car", but, "Blast, the company mechanic took my GPS out again".

    If they're company-issued laptops, they very well might all be exactly the same make and model so they look exactly the same. Normally your login will work from any computer attached to the network so there'd be no warning there. Maybe one person or the other is using a picture of her cat or whatever for wall paper, or maybe like many companies all laptops have the company logo for wallpaper. Or maybe both of them left the default that was pre-installed on the computer. So the only clue might well be different software installed. Lots of companies push software changes to laptops over the network. So if you sign in and the only thing that's different is that there's differernet software or different versions, it's not at all irrational to immediately think, "The company has pushed a software update" rather than "Oops, I picked up the wrong computer."
  • Jay 2014-05-29 13:15
    Anomaly:
    TRWTF if she doesn't take her laptop home, and has her own desk, why did she leave her laptop somewhere other than locked up in the cabinet? If she didn't have her own desk she should have taken the laptop home.

    Otherwise the other RWTF is not properly labelling individual laptops for brothers sake.


    Or she usually does keep her laptop at her desk, but yesterday she carried it over to Jenny's desk to show something to Jenny, or because she and Jenny were working together on something, or because her office was being cleaned, or any of dozens of other possible reasons, and then she forgot and left it there when she went home.

    No one is saying this happens every day. They're saying an unusual event happened one time and that confused someone.
  • Jay 2014-05-29 13:17
    schpeelah:
    Nonetheless, we're talking about a situation where anyone's work laptop can be used by anyone else who has a work laptop. That's pretty WTF.


    Really? I think everywhere I've worked, I've been able to log on using other people's computers. As long as their computer is connected to the network.

    Is it really common for companies to lock down all the computers so that each person can only log in on the computer that was assigned to them? I've never seen such a set-up.
  • Jay 2014-05-29 13:25
    faoileag:
    the article said:
    Sometimes, the answer is emphatically the former


    Always. The answer is always the former.

    Take your software to a large enough sample of people, whose technical abillity is roughly on the same level.

    Give them a couple of tasks to accomplish.

    Some will fail, even if the tasks are not impossible.

    But others will succeed.

    So it can't be your software that is defective, because then nobody would have succeeded.

    Conclusion: those users that did not succeed must be somehow "defective".

    Or how come, when you fail in tests at school, you are blamed and not your teacher?


    If you have 20 users, and 19 of them have no trouble getting your software to work and do the job, and 1 person can't figure it out, then I would say yes, perhaps this person is simply an idiot. But if only 1 of the users can get your software to work and 19 can't, then I suppose we could say that the software "works", in the sense that it is possible to get the job done. But apparently it is very difficult to understand and use.

    "It is possible to get the job done if you spend weeks carefully studying the manual and you successfully guess at many obscure key combinations that are not described anywhere on the screen or in the manual" is not a description of a well-written software product.

    When I was in high school, one of my teachers got into trouble because students in his classes did significantly worse on standardized tests than students who had other teachers. If one student does badly and the rest do well, sure, that's probably the student's fault. But if ALL the students do badly, and when those same students are in classes with other teachers they do well, yes, I'd blame the teacher.
  • Reductio Ad Ridiculousum 2014-05-29 18:20
    GladysBertrude:
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    Griffyn:
    How did the IM get sent to the laptop? Mary is using Jenny's laptop, which would mean that she'd be logged in as Jenny. Tazza's IM wouldn't have been received on Jenny's laptop.
    As mentioned at least twice: roving domain logins.


    I prefer rambling domain logins.
    I knew there was something wrong w/ my statement, but couldn't see it at the time. I guess my mind was roaming.
  • Reductio Ad Ridiculousum 2014-05-29 20:24
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    GladysBertrude:
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    Griffyn:
    How did the IM get sent to the laptop? Mary is using Jenny's laptop, which would mean that she'd be logged in as Jenny. Tazza's IM wouldn't have been received on Jenny's laptop.
    As mentioned at least twice: roving domain logins.


    I prefer rambling domain logins.
    I knew there was something wrong w/ my statement, but couldn't see it at the time. I guess my mind was roaming.
    Of course, in my defense, the thing *did* compile.
  • HardwareGeek 2014-05-29 20:38
    GladysBertrude:
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    roving domain logins.
    I prefer rambling domain logins.
    Or long, rambling TDWTF articles with no real WTF.
  • Meep 2014-05-29 23:02
    faoileag:
    So, a PEBKAC wtf today.

    But am I the only one who thinks that someone not capable of picking the right workplace/laptop should perhaps not be entering subtitles that seem to go out live?


    Given how tedious the job is, you'd kind of want a moron working it.
  • another bypasser 2014-05-29 23:12
    Real WTF:

    Did anyone else notice that Tazza had a sex change and name change toward the end of the story (last mention she suddenly was a he called Taz)?
  • QJo 2014-05-30 09:40
    Darth Paul:
    neminem:
    ...
    Except the outward appearance *is* the same, so it's really more like: hey, I swear I parked my car here... it's a blue Honda, but crap, someone stole my GPS, and... put a stupid hangy thing in the dash? What the crap? ...


    And, I kid you not, there have been cases of people who drove away in the wrong car because it turned out that, not only was it an identical make and model in the same parking lot, their own key actually opened it and started the engine.

    That sort of makes the analogy fit the domain login scenario.


    Call me a cautious old fusspot, but as I drive a popular make and model of car, I always check the numberplate of the car I am about to open to just make sure it definitely is mine. As for the laptop confusion, I always have it with me -- I carry it everywhere I go (on business, that is, I don't take it down the pub with me).
  • CigarDoug 2014-06-02 11:41
    Jay:

    Except to make the analogy truly fair, it has to be a company-owned car, and the company supplied the GPS, and in the past the company HAS removed the GPS from the car to install a newer model, and it does regularly hang air fresheners from the rear-view mirror, or whatever. And the cars all use the same key.

    So you get in the car and notice the GPS is missing. You very well might not say, "Oh, I must be in the wrong car", but, "Blast, the company mechanic took my GPS out again".

    If they're company-issued laptops, they very well might all be exactly the same make and model so they look exactly the same. Normally your login will work from any computer attached to the network so there'd be no warning there. Maybe one person or the other is using a picture of her cat or whatever for wall paper, or maybe like many companies all laptops have the company logo for wallpaper. Or maybe both of them left the default that was pre-installed on the computer. So the only clue might well be different software installed. Lots of companies push software changes to laptops over the network. So if you sign in and the only thing that's different is that there's differernet software or different versions, it's not at all irrational to immediately think, "The company has pushed a software update" rather than "Oops, I picked up the wrong computer."

    To apply Occam's Razor to this scenario:

    1. Everything you said is true, uniformity of wallpaper and other characteristics are strictly enforced, and Mary is of average or above-average intelligence.

    or

    2. Mary is an idiot.

    Which scenario is more likely?
  • nomdeplume 2014-06-05 06:05
    another bypasser:
    Real WTF:

    Did anyone else notice that Tazza had a sex change and name change toward the end of the story (last mention she suddenly was a he called Taz)?

    Looks to me like Tazza's gender was only mentioned once (at the end of the article). Changing name from Tazza to Taz is about as alarming as changing from Michael to Mike. Maybe poor writing style for this kind of site, but he was referred to as Taz twice.
  • Martin 2014-06-20 12:08
    korvaks:
    Reductio Ad Ridiculousum:
    So, two and a half months or so to implement, because, you know, this really isn't a priority.

    (YMMV depending on the size of the shop and the bureaucracy)


    And it still wouldn't work, because the user will click "OK" without reading the message.


    Totally, totally this. Just put a big sticker on the outside.
  • Vodermoan 2014-06-20 12:25
    Steve The Cynic:
    Titleist makes golf stuff, so of course she'd have problems using it to make subtitles...

    EDIT: It's entirely possible I missed something somewhere, but so did Goggle and Wikipoodia.


    I presume this has been obfuscated because the industry in question is so small, you could in some cases identify the company by knowing which software they used.

    It's interesting to note that there are some misconceptions about subtitles (not surprising, as it's not an obvious thing for 90% of the population).

    Some live subtitling is done by steno keyboard, but these days the vast majority is done using voice recognition (re-speaking the programme audio). This is why you get the bizarre errors like "Prince William and the badgers of Cambridge". If the mistakes are real words completely out of context, you're watching a respeaker's subtitles. It happens all the time with for/four/fore, to/two/too, chilly/chilli/Chile and everyone claims the subtitlers are dunces - trust me, the ones I've worked with are sticklers for spelling, punctuation and grammar in real life. If these mis-recognitions happen during live subtitling, they have very little time to react and correct whilst still remembering what is being said and trying to catch back up.

    Prepared subtitles are normally edited from an imported script, or are pre-recorded from a video piece using one of the above input methods. In this case, you can sanity check/spell check etc., and the likely errors are reduced to pretty much to the user playing out the wrong subtitles at the wrong time.
  • AnotherHelper 2014-09-09 15:57
    I once worked for a place that used SCCM to push application packages based on userid. On the odd occasions when someone shared their machine, of course, ... especially when someone in accounting let a data analyst log in briefly... x64 packages pushing to an x86 machine with 1/10 the HDD space. Cleanup!
  • Vince 2014-09-26 17:49
    True that.