• ObiWayneKenobi (cs)

    Ah yes.. I loved this one when I first read it. Hilarious how folks like this consider themselves "programmers".

    w00t, first!

  • Nathan Taylor (unregistered)

    That he considers string concatination to be a nontrivial demonstration of his .NET talents is just about the most hilarious and/or terrible thing I've ever come across.

    ps: CAPTCHA: "ewww" indeed :V

  • DrkMatter (unregistered)

    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number. The whole of my experience with the language had come from books and tutorials, and I had never encountered the need to actually pronounce it. And still, I had managed to code a couple of GUIs with it!

    Granted, I never tried to pass that off as actual work experience (Though I did add C# in my list of "Additional abilities" within my resume), but I can see how calling it "C-Pound" could happen.

  • yep (unregistered)

    The real WTF is the name "C sharp". Who at M$ thought that would be a good name?

    Actually, let's just say "another WTF", since the real WTF is definitely the "string concatenation is a good demonstration!" thing.

  • Rennie (unregistered) in reply to DrkMatter
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

  • Bezalel (unregistered)

    The correct name should be C-number, C-pound is written as C£.

  • Badger (unregistered)

    Woah. Table names prefixed with 'tbl' and column names with 'fld'. Just in case you write something stupid "DELETE FROM fldCanidate WHERE tblNoQuack = ?"

    Looks like a VB monkey trying to blag it.

  • AssimilatedByBorg (cs) in reply to Rennie
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

    Damnation, you beat me to it :-)

    That's my favourite too... lets you spot the musician geeks in an instant. (B-double-sharp is just too many syllables...)

  • Fred4 (unregistered) in reply to Nathan Taylor
    Nathan Taylor:
    That he considers string concatination to be a nontrivial demonstration of his .NET talents is just about the most hilarious and/or terrible thing I've ever come across.

    ps: CAPTCHA: "ewww" indeed :V

    The greatest thing about it is that he forgot a space, so it will result in : "Jis a good canidate!"

  • rbowes (cs)

    I used to read it as "C-Pound", although I wasn't really confident that it was right. But there are so many ways to pronounce the "#" sign that that's completely reasonable.

    Of course, you'd think that once somebody was corrected, they'd learn.

  • Bas (unregistered)

    C sharp is actually C♯. The # is just evidence that Microsoft tends to be lazy.

  • Theo (unregistered)

    I wonder if he earned many C-Dollars in his new job.

  • Tchakkazulu (unregistered)

    Slogan = "Paula" & " is " & "brilliant!"

  • jon787 (cs) in reply to AssimilatedByBorg
    AssimilatedByBorg:
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

    Damnation, you beat me to it :-)

    That's my favourite too... lets you spot the musician geeks in an instant. (B-double-sharp is just too many syllables...)

    Yeah I get corrected by musicians a lot when I call it D flat. C hash and C octothorp are other good ones.

  • The MAZZTer (cs)

    I wonder if anyone calls it "C-Tic-Tac-Toe".

  • Disnarda (unregistered) in reply to The MAZZTer
    The MAZZTer:
    I wonder if anyone calls it "C-Tic-Tac-Toe".

    We used to call it "C gatito", (C kitten), being "Gato" (cat) the name of the Tic-Tac-Toe game in spanish, so...

  • steve (unregistered)

    what's neat about the # is that it's actually two ++ on top of each other.

    ++ ++

  • Kris (unregistered)

    I love the meta-comment of "Dim slogan as string".

  • kimbo305 (cs) in reply to steve

    oh is that what the # comes from? Gee, thanks. I think no one else on this whole forum had thought of that. At all.

    Sorry to be harshin on ya; just that that derivation was obvious.

  • kinglink (unregistered)

    The real WTF was when C# first came out there was requests for junior level programmers with 5 years experience with the language. Note at the time the language was only outside Microsoft's design team's grasp for 3 years.

  • No1 (unregistered) in reply to kinglink
    kinglink:
    The real WTF was when C# first came out there was requests for junior level programmers with 5 years experience with the language. Note at the time the language was only outside Microsoft's design team's grasp for 3 years.

    Erm... I believe that is SOP for big companies. 5-10 years experience in the subject, 15 years of schooling and a max age of 21.

  • Andrew (unregistered)

    I'm currently in the process of interviewing for a system admin and another position for a C# developer. I had a very similar experience.

    One of the people applying for the C# position kept talking about C-hash. When I first heard it I thought that it was a mistake. Nope, all through the interview I kept hearing how this person had 3 years experience in C-hash. I even used C-sharp regularly but he didn't seem to notice.

    The real wtf (in the classic sense) was the technical exam that he was asked to fill in. One question required writing a function that added up the first 100 integers then outputting the sum. His answer was: "Google this question and write the answer here."

    There's a resume that got the big X.

  • Mitch T (unregistered)

    Want to see if someone grew up in america or britain?

    Ask them what a # is.

    In the UK it is hash. In the US it is pound.

    And from microsofts faq on c#: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/aa336822.aspx

    Q. What is the symbol in the name "C#"?

    A. It's not the "hash" (or pound) symbol as most people believe. It's actually supposed to be the musical sharp symbol. However, because the sharp symbol is not present on the standard keyboard, it's easier to type the hash ("#") symbol. The name of the language is, of course, pronounced "see sharp".

    So what does this show? That microsoft is lazier than we thought. They can't even type in a unicode character for a product name.

  • Merus (unregistered)

    I'm wondering if some of you didn't get enough hugs as children. Microsoft have many things to be disparaged for, but an alternative to a Unicode character that looks pretty much the same and is used pretty much interchangeably is not one of them. I note that the ISO version of C# uses a sharp, while most of the third-party books don't seem to; and yet somehow Microsoft is the lazy one.

    Moreover, it's pretty obvious that if you take any opportunity to whinge about Microsoft you'll whinge regardless of whether or not there's a problem. "Oh, Microsoft has two 'o's in their name, how original. They should put an X in their names sometime, like Linux does!"

  • Daniel Beardsmore (cs) in reply to Mitch T

    Mitch ... You do realise that if Microsoft demanded that everyone dig out Character Map and locate the sharp sign every time they wanted to refer to C#, there'd be mutiny? Not forgetting the plethora of systems that are not set up to support Unicode.

    I know a forum where Unicode fails spectacularly. Type in an out-of-range character for Latin-1, and some if not all browsers will return a Unicode entity. This is then escaped entirely. So when people write in a foreign language (as is permitted there), Greek mostly, you get paragraphs of nothing but HTML entities. It's never going to get fixed.

    My genuine disagreement with Microsoft however is their lacklustre approach to character input. Apple made a valiant effort with the opt key, but even that fails hopelessly for many cases. I cannot type a multiplication sign, since that is not a part of MacRoman. I don't think OS X ever added more opt sequences for characters outside of MacRoman (for English speakers anyway) even after formally switching to UTF-8 with OS X.

    Everyone should move over to the *NIX compose system which offers a far, far wider range of possible characters. Then, we need to violently stamp out non-Unicode systems in a vicious, horrific bloodbath, for their impertinence of still existing in the 21st century. There is NO EXCUSE for any vaguely modern computer still being trapped in local code pages.

    Oh, and smack Microsoft and AOL upside the head for their retarded use of UTF-16. (Microsoft and AOL had to choose a bad Unicode transformation, naturally!)

    Addendum (2007-05-28 22:08): Bonus points to the first person to find the sharp sign in Character Map

  • hexatron (unregistered)

    Isn't D-flat (Db) the database component of C#? The stuff you write in Eskuel?

  • rjnewton (cs) in reply to kimbo305
    kimbo305:
    oh is that what the # comes from? Gee, thanks. I think no one else on this whole forum had thought of that. At all.

    Sorry to be harshin on ya; just that that derivation was obvious.

    Maybe I'm just a bit slow then, because it had never occured to me before.

    On the other hand, it took no time at all to recognize that you, kimbo, seem to have some self-worth issues to work out. Perhaps you could focus on dealing with your own ya-yas, rather than putting down the contributions of others?

  • Veinor (cs) in reply to Daniel Beardsmore
    Daniel Beardsmore:
    Addendum (2007-05-28 22:08): Bonus points to the first person to find the sharp sign in Character Map

    U+266F (or HTML entity &#9839)

  • Doubts (unregistered) in reply to yep
    yep:
    The real WTF is the name "C sharp". Who at M$ thought that would be a good name?

    The same guy who thought of "squirting" photos at people, I'm guessing.

  • Dark (unregistered) in reply to rbowes
    rbowes:
    I used to read it as "C-Pound", although I wasn't really confident that it was right. But there are so many ways to pronounce the "#" sign that that's completely reasonable.

    Of course, you'd think that once somebody was corrected, they'd learn.

    That depends on whether they see it as a correction at all. The # sign has multiple valid names, after all, and just because you're using a different one doesn't mean you're correcting him. Cultural diversity! For example, if someone reads a pointer declaration to me as "tshar asterisk pee", I'm not going to take it as a correction to my "khar star pee".

    I stick with C-octothorpe, myself.

  • shinobu (cs) in reply to Rennie
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    So do I as long as it is major. But I really prefer C sharp minor over D flat minor.

  • Taz (cs) in reply to kinglink
    kinglink:
    The real WTF was when C# first came out there was requests for junior level programmers with 5 years experience with the language. Note at the time the language was only outside Microsoft's design team's grasp for 3 years.

    So they were trying to hire Microsoft employees having more extended experience with the language than the general public. What's wrong with that?

  • Not First (unregistered) in reply to AssimilatedByBorg
    AssimilatedByBorg:
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

    Damnation, you beat me to it :-)

    That's my favourite too... lets you spot the musician geeks in an instant. (B-double-sharp is just too many syllables...)

    Or the real language geeks http://www.digitalmars.com/d/

  • Luc (unregistered) in reply to Rennie
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

    Of course, there is also the language D (http://www.digitalmars.com/d/index.html)...

  • Not First (unregistered) in reply to kimbo305
    kimbo305:
    oh is that what the # comes from? Gee, thanks. I think no one else on this whole forum had thought of that. At all.

    Sorry to be harshin on ya; just that that derivation was obvious.

    the ++ over ++ thing? I've been using it since RTM 1.0, and I never thought about it. I think that's quite cute actually!

  • Not First (unregistered) in reply to Luc
    Luc:
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

    Of course, there is also the language D (http://www.digitalmars.com/d/index.html)...

    Haha! First!

    /me hides...

  • Not First (unregistered)

    Actually, sometimes I think people must act stupid in interviews like this just for a stunt.

  • Guran (unregistered) in reply to AssimilatedByBorg
    AssimilatedByBorg:
    Rennie:
    DrkMatter:
    I actually used to refer to C-Sharp as C-Number.

    I always refer to it as "D-flat".

    Sometimes I get snickers, other times I get blank looks.

    Damnation, you beat me to it :-)

    That's my favourite too... lets you spot the musician geeks in an instant. (B-double-sharp is just too many syllables...)

    Though any musician geek worth his salt would know that (C# != Db)

  • ajw (unregistered) in reply to Andrew
    One question required writing a function that added up the first 100 integers then outputting the sum. His answer was: "Google this question and write the answer here."

    So, something like 'return 100*101/2', then?

    (What, you expected a for-loop? A schoolboy could do better than that...)

  • Ubersoldat (unregistered) in reply to Disnarda
    Disnarda:
    The MAZZTer:
    I wonder if anyone calls it "C-Tic-Tac-Toe".

    We used to call it "C gatito", (C kitten), being "Gato" (cat) the name of the Tic-Tac-Toe game in spanish, so...

    jejeje... voy a empezar a usarlo ahora: "Creo que sería un buen momento para migrar toda nuestra plataforma en pascal a C gatito :D"

    CAPTCHA: DUBYA? No speako inglich

  • booya (unregistered)

    I am indian, I want a job in c-pound because I want to be paid in pound this time. no rupee's thanking you

    comon Jhonny 5 lets go home.

  • c6jones720 (unregistered)

    Ive been to job interviews for programming jobs, where the interviewers have referred to it as C-HASH. makes you wonder if they even know what they want.

  • Random832 (cs)
    Dim Slogan as String Slogan = "J" & "is a good " & "canidate!"

    Anonymization seems to have replaced with "good" the word "brillant" from the original.

  • scruffy (unregistered)

    I'm a tad worried that the guy seems to have a poor grasp of english. In particular his so "interview" responses seem to be copy and pasted together, rather than merely idiosyncratic. Is this being hammed up along the way or did the guy REALLY speak like that? If so then he was blagging about far more than just his prowess of programming languages.

    I remember working with a couple of indian students on my Masters, one of them persistently said "resistor" instead of "register" when talking about CPU design. The other student quietly took the rest of us to one side, apologised for her compratriot and explained that the poor guy really didn't know what he was talking about... Dunno how but he passed, he must be out in the world somewhere by now.

    Captcha: [quote]doom[quote], how appropriate!

  • dave (unregistered) in reply to Mitch T

    Want to see if someone grew up in america or britain?

    Ask them what a # is.

    In the UK it is hash. In the US it is pound.

    And if they say "C octothorpe" they've spent too much time in the telco industry.

  • Gordonjcp (unregistered) in reply to Andrew
    Andrew:
    One of the people applying for the C# position kept talking about C-hash. When I first heard it I thought that it was a mistake. Nope, all through the interview I kept hearing how this person had 3 years experience in C-hash. I even used C-sharp regularly but he didn't seem to notice.

    It is a hash. It's not a sharp sign at all. It doesn't even look a little bit like a sharp sign.

  • Daniel Beardsmore (cs) in reply to Veinor
    Veinor:
    Daniel Beardsmore:
    Addendum (2007-05-28 22:08): Bonus points to the first person to find the sharp sign in Character Map

    U+266F (or HTML entity &#9839)

    You found that in Windows Character Map? Weird. I use Windows 2000 so it's possible that XP or Vista has added some more characters. I've checked and I don't have that symbol in 2000. (There are way too many missing characters in Character Map! I should compare with Character Palette on my iMac, which os superior.)

  • Jerry (unregistered)

    Aside from the C-Pound hilarity, did anyone notice how that DELETE statement is coded? I'm just going to guess that it uses sequential ID's.

  • Jesse (unregistered) in reply to Rennie

    cute

  • Jim (unregistered) in reply to Not First
    Not First:
    kimbo305:
    oh is that what the # comes from? Gee, thanks. I think no one else on this whole forum had thought of that. At all.

    Sorry to be harshin on ya; just that that derivation was obvious.

    the ++ over ++ thing? I've been using it since RTM 1.0, and I never thought about it. I think that's quite cute actually!

    I'll be honest, the ++ over ++ thing never occurred to me before either, but that's mainly because I'd always seen it as two interlocking plusses. (ie one "+" with another "+" shifted down and to the right).

Leave a comment on “Classic WTF: 5 years C-pound experience”

Log In or post as a guest

Replying to comment #:

« Return to Article