• Saladin (cs)

    I don't remember seeing that J2EE image last time. I love it :D

  • anon (unregistered)

    aahh, I screwed my only chance in my life to be fist!

  • anon (unregistered) in reply to anon
    anon:
    aahh, I screwed my only chance in my life to be fist!

    btw I am dying to know how my first fist post got eliminated. A "moderator" user deleted it?

  • TomTheGeek (unregistered)

    So really this has nothing to do with the Great Old Consultants, rather the company signed a contract where they didn't get the source code then trying to save money by not hiring the consultants back. That plus them not saving the decompiled code. After decompiling the same module seven times you'd think they might start to keep the old version around.

  • anon (unregistered)

    why should they keep the source code? They can decompile it on demand. It isn't a bigger pain than a checkout. This way they also save some disk space, maintain a consistent code style, and you couldn't have a faster build than with that setup!

    captcha: digdug. like fickfuck, but in a different language :)

  • Former Jr. Programmer (unregistered)

    Decompiling code isn't so bad.

    At a company I worked for, IT had this one guy "Dave" come in and do some work that was released to production.

    And it causes all sorts of server errors. And Dave was also fired that week.

    And another guy who got fired soon after accidentally erased Dave's hard drive, where all the source code that was never checked in was kept.

    So after 2 months of running this crap in production, I volunteer to drop what I'm doing, decompile the code, and fix the problem.

    So I pull down all the classes and decompile with JAD.

    It's not so bad at all. The Try/Catch loops looked weird, but otherwise that was it. After a few refactors through Eclipse, I had mostly readable code. Turned out that Dave never properly caught any SQL exceptions and closed the resultset/connection.

    Easily fixed and I was hailed a hero as the SQL usage graph went from something that looked like a broken comb to a straight line.

    Company eventually died and I found another job. Coincidentally, it turns out Dave used to work here too. He didn't leave much code here; he was never cleared for coding at this company. I have no idea how he got into my prior workplace.

    Captcha: "craaazy" is right.

  • Alonzo Meatman (unregistered)

    You guys can stop it with the heavy-handed advertising now, 'kay?

  • nobody (unregistered)

    From the Necodenomicon:

    Code is not dead that can decompiled be And from strange code engineers must hide

    I don't usually post captchas but this was too good: sanitarium

  • my name (unregistered)

    I wonder if Paula Bean will reincarnate this Classics week. BTW, the Real WTF is lack of space in title of this page: "Comment OnClassics Week: The Call of Codethulhu". Not know if it's classic.

  • bpk (unregistered)

    people really like to tell me what the REAL wtf is

  • sf (unregistered) in reply to anon
    anon:
    why should they keep the source code? They can decompile it on demand. It isn't a bigger pain than a checkout. This way they also save some disk space, maintain a consistent code style, and you couldn't have a faster build than with that setup!

    captcha: digdug. like fickfuck, but in a different language :)

    One big reason why they should keep the decompiled code in source control is so that can start adding comments and rewriting the code by hand where necessary. Disks are cheap. I can see no good reason why they would follow this practice. Am I missing something?

  • IQpierce (cs)

    Great one. I particularly loved how they shot themselves in their already-mangled foot by refusing to keep the decompiled source code around, and always re-decompiling it each time they need to.

    I mean, if you decompiled it once, kept the source code, and tried to actually clean up each part of the source code that you ever actually touched (give it comprehensible variable names, etc.), then over the years the codebase could actually become largely readable and maintainable again.

    But no, they don't realize this and instead ensure that their nightmare just keeps getting worse and worse. WTF?

  • vt_mruhlin (cs)

    Ah, reminds me of my summer internship decompiling Maximo.
    Ah, I see IBM now owns Maximo, and the year after I left, the company outsourced that department to IBM. Knowing how bureaucracies work though, I bet they're still decompiling it...

  • Jimbo (unregistered) in reply to sf
    sf:
    anon:
    why should they keep the source code? They can decompile it on demand. It isn't a bigger pain than a checkout. This way they also save some disk space, maintain a consistent code style, and you couldn't have a faster build than with that setup!

    captcha: digdug. like fickfuck, but in a different language :)

    One big reason why they should keep the decompiled code in source control is so that can start adding comments and rewriting the code by hand where necessary. Disks are cheap. I can see no good reason why they would follow this practice. Am I missing something?

    Yes, the sarcasm.

  • phaedrus (cs)

    Ok. I need a J2E[vil]E T-Shirt. That's frickin' amazing.

    And the Codethulhu mug. Those still need to be created. That would require sending the entrails of 20 goats to CafePress, right?

  • chrismcb (cs) in reply to Former Jr. Programmer
    Former Jr. Programmer:
    Decompiling code isn't so bad.

    The Real WTF is the people who keep insisting that XYZ isn't so bad.

    Yeah, decompiling Java code isn't that bad (its better than decompiling C). But then again crawling over a bed of hot coals isn't so bad, if you know what you are doing. But that doesn't mean I want to keep a bed of hot coals between my bed and my bathroom that I have to traverse every morning.

  • Skipper (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Devil N (cs)

    Isn't the term 'Evil Java' like, a pleonasm?

  • TheRider (cs) in reply to anon
    anon:
    anon:
    aahh, I screwed my only chance in my life to be fist!

    btw I am dying to know how my first fist post got eliminated. A "moderator" user deleted it?

    Then die, please. Of course there are moderators who delete those completely pointless posts. *shakes*head*
  • anon (unregistered) in reply to TheRider
    TheRider:
    anon:
    anon:
    aahh, I screwed my only chance in my life to be fist!

    btw I am dying to know how my first fist post got eliminated. A "moderator" user deleted it?

    Then die, please. Of course there are moderators who delete those completely pointless posts. *shakes*head*
    I knew someone's going to write this. People are so easily annoyed. Anyway, that post wasn't pointless. It would've made me feel proud of myself. You know, a little accomplishment is an accomplishment, too. I am afraid I won't do that favour for you. Not now anyway. I don't have a reason, either, because now I *know* it was done by a moderator. Thx for telling me. Maybe Alex should post an empty "Fist competition!" article time to time, where "fist"-ers could compete without annoying anyone ;)
  • Viadd (unregistered) in reply to anon

    The post provided a purpose, it gave a moderator something to feel good about in deleting it. It's like a cockroach that makes such a great crunchy sound, without the mess.

  • Jackal von ÖRF (cs)

    Java Evil Edition is indeed a real product. It exists even on a wooden table:

    [image]
  • Youssef (unregistered) in reply to anon

    Technically, the very first thing that you did in life was being first... When you were very, very, very young, You did beat all the rest, cheer up! :)

  • anon (unregistered) in reply to Viadd
    Viadd:
    The post provided a purpose, it gave a moderator something to feel good about in deleting it. It's like a cockroach that makes such a great crunchy sound, without the mess.
    you are sick.
  • phaedrus (cs) in reply to Viadd
    Viadd:
    The post provided a purpose, it gave a moderator something to feel good about in deleting it. It's like a cockroach that makes such a great crunchy sound, without the mess.

    That's what xroach is for.

  • TheRider (unregistered) in reply to anon
    anon:
    I knew someone's going to write this. People are so easily annoyed. Anyway, that post wasn't pointless. It would've made me feel proud of myself. You know, a little accomplishment is an accomplishment, too. I am afraid I won't do that favour for you. Not now anyway. I don't have a reason, either, because now I *know* it was done by a moderator. Thx for telling me. Maybe Alex should post an empty "Fist competition!" article time to time, where "fist"-ers could compete without annoying anyone ;)
    Oh well. I guess the difference between you and me is what we consider an accomplishment. My understanding is that this site is a place where software professionals discuss good and bad hacking/engineering practices. So, I would consider it an accomplishment for someone if he or she writes down an argument for/against some practice which no other reader can mess with.

    Being the "fist" to post a reply to a thread starter, especially if the whole point of that first post is to say you're first and if that post doesn't contain any substantial response to the issue described in the starting post, then such a post is really pointless and, in my eyes, less than an accomplishment, but rather annoying to all other readers -- and deserves deletion.

  • Herbert West (unregistered)

    Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn."

  • 855 (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • BlackwaterMerk (cs) in reply to Jackal von ÖRF

    omg I would buy one of those mugs. I wonder if theres any stickers available with that logo, id so put it on my netbook.

  • tharpa (cs) in reply to Viadd
    Viadd:
    The post provided a purpose, it gave a moderator something to feel good about in deleting it. It's like a cockroach that makes such a great crunchy sound, without the mess.

    Or the bad kamma.

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