Dirty Laundry

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  • An Old Hacker 2011-03-15 10:20
    f.....r......i.....s
    TIMEOUT ERROR
  • the CTO 2011-03-15 10:21
    frist! ololol
  • Anonymous 2011-03-15 10:21
    Inb4 anyone else.
  • Anonymous 2011-03-15 10:21
    Oh god dammit...
  • Smitty 2011-03-15 10:26
    Akismet, I hate you with the heat of a thousand suns.
  • Hollow 2011-03-15 10:37
    As technically incompetant as most management types are, it's unbelievable how often they make the right decisions.
  • Severity One 2011-03-15 10:38
    the CTO:
    frist! ololol

    Looks like your network was slow.
  • some guy 2011-03-15 10:42
    Well, they were looking for a junior network admin. Sounds like they found one.
  • brazzy 2011-03-15 10:44
    Correct me if I'm wrong... but isn't that a perfectly normal and correct setup for "corporate interet"?

    Of course, it requires either a separate proxy at each location, or very good connections between the locations. So am I missing something or is the only WTF that Tyson didn't realize the performance implications of his policy implementation?
  • airdrik 2011-03-15 10:46
    It's never the fault of the design/software/implementation, the hardware just can't keep up with all of the things we are making it do. Faster hardware is the only way to make things faster.
  • akatherder 2011-03-15 10:47
    brazzy:
    Correct me if I'm wrong... but isn't that a perfectly normal and correct setup for "corporate interet"?

    Of course, it requires either a separate proxy at each location, or very good connections between the locations. So am I missing something or is the only WTF that Tyson didn't realize the performance implications of his policy implementation?


    From a technical standpoint, that's the only goddamn WTF I am seeing. If he wasn't such a worthless asshole, he would have seen a connection between slow traffic and funneling the entire company's traffic through one server and a single fucking T1.
  • Sudo 2011-03-15 10:55
    So today's WTF is "sometimes management know what they're talking about"? Meh.

    Tomorrow's WTF is going to be a snippet of well-written code.
  • nonA 2011-03-15 10:57
    I don't see a big WTF here. The guy was telling the truth: "Get a better connection upstream".

    //posted via single-entry-point corporate proxy some 4 timezomes away from where I'm sitting
  • renewest 2011-03-15 10:59
    Fortunately out central proxy allows thedailyWtf.com
  • kastein 2011-03-15 11:08
    "swirled the drain"?

    Remy, put down the thesaurus and back away with your hands where I can see them. It's "circled".

    Was actually a pretty good article other than that!
  • your name 2011-03-15 11:08
    The only WTF I see is that they iced him for 1.5 hours and he was *still* there for the interview at 1pm.
  • Capt. Obvious 2011-03-15 11:14
    your name:
    The only WTF I see is that they iced him for 1.5 hours and he was *still* there for the interview at 1pm.

    Hey, if you come 1.5 hours early for an interview, what do you expect? I mean, if I have nothing else going on, I probably don't mind moving it up. If I have a meeting or something... well, I'll get to you when I told you I would when we made plans. And if you move it up around lunch time, so I am hungry when I interview you, that may not be the best thing for you.
  • Jabrwock 2011-03-15 11:21
    nonA:
    I don't see a big WTF here. The guy was telling the truth: "Get a better connection upstream".
    But he was using that as a blanket suggestion to "shut up" his CTO. The WTF is that the guy didn't understand that that would actually solve the problem. The proxy at head office was the bottleneck not "some websites on the net" and "porno".
  • Nexzus 2011-03-15 11:26
    Hm. I was expecting the punchline to be that the former CTO and the Interviewer were friends, or at least acquaintances, and that CTO was actually a decent, smart guy.

    But the jackass, self-assured, ignorant interviewee works just as good.
  • Anon 2011-03-15 11:27
    From the bottom of the article:

    Share Dirty Laundry


    I've got some dirty underpants here, where do I send them?
  • Anon 2011-03-15 11:28
    Pro tip:

    Shitting on your former boss in an interview is not endearing to anybody. If you can't say anything nice, then don't say anything at all.
  • nonA 2011-03-15 11:32
    [quote user="Jabrwock]But he was using that as a blanket suggestion to "shut up" his CTO. The WTF is that the guy didn't understand that that would actually solve the problem. The proxy at head office was the bottleneck not "some websites on the net" and "porno". [/quote]

    They wanted a junior network admin. I've seen junior network admins with even less understanding of their field — hired and working. It's his attitude that's the WTF here, not his knowledge — and I wouldn't hire him myself, personality-wise — but that's a minor WTF.
  • Ernold 2011-03-15 11:39
    Anonymous:
    Inb4 anyone else.


    inb4 'OP can't inb4'
  • slackz 2011-03-15 11:39
    Proxy Servers are like Domain Controllers -- A minimum of one per location, replicated from a central setup.
  • sibtrag 2011-03-15 11:47
    Capt. Obvious:

    Hey, if you come 1.5 hours early for an interview, what do you expect? I mean, if I have nothing else going on, I probably don't mind moving it up. If I have a meeting or something... well, I'll get to you when I told you I would when we made plans. And if you move it up around lunch time, so I am hungry when I interview you, that may not be the best thing for you.


    I can easily see myself in that sort of situation. Back when I was interviewing (many years ago), I would try to allow extra time for anything that could come up, especially if the interview was a distance away in an unfamiliar area. In fact, I was more than an hour early for the interview for my current job.

    Then I would sit in my car for a moment & decide what to do. In my case it was an early morning interview, so I got coffee & a snack to calm my nerves. But, for a 1pm interview, I might have seen if the interviewer was available early. In the off chance that something had come up for the afternoon (an emergency meeting, a sick child, etc) s/he might be very grateful. Otherwise, I'd decline the conference room & go out for lunch.

    In the exact situation given, however, I'd probably have sought out a department store & tried to find something off-the-rack which actually fit me.
  • School Bully 2011-03-15 11:53
    kastein:
    "swirled the drain"?

    Remy, put down the thesaurus and back away with your hands where I can see them. It's "circled".

    Was actually a pretty good article other than that!

    "Swirled" is obscure? Have you never heard of a swirly? I'll bet the average reader of this site has been at the recieving end of a few...
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-03-15 12:03
    School Bully:
    kastein:
    "swirled the drain"?

    Remy, put down the thesaurus and back away with your hands where I can see them. It's "circled".

    Was actually a pretty good article other than that!

    "Swirled" is obscure? Have you never heard of a swirly? I'll bet the average reader of this site has been at the recieving end of a few...


    NOOOO! All the memories flooding back! (pun intended)
  • Mason Wheeler 2011-03-15 12:13
    some guy:
    Well, they were looking for a junior network admin. Sounds like they found one.


    +1. Someone please feature this.
  • Alan 2011-03-15 12:13
    airdrik:
    It's never the fault of the design/software/implementation, the hardware just can't keep up with all of the things we are making it do. Faster hardware is the only way to make things faster.


    As a hardware designer, I like that attitude a lot. Please keep coming up with more complex ways to do things.
  • Mythran 2011-03-15 12:30
    Have your proxy contact my proxy.
  • Anon 2011-03-15 12:37
    The economy might have been swirling around the drain, (like it might have been circling it), but I doubt very much that the economy was swirling the drain itself.
  • airdrik 2011-03-15 12:41
    Alan:
    airdrik:
    It's never the fault of the design/software/implementation, the hardware just can't keep up with all of the things we are making it do. Faster hardware is the only way to make things faster.


    As a hardware designer, I like that attitude a lot. Please keep coming up with more complex ways to do things.


    Oh, don't you worry, we can find plenty of ways to make more hardware do less. You keep making the hardware faster and we'll keep making the software [s]slower[/s] "more complex". >:)
  • Jack 2011-03-15 12:44
    If you are unable to detect which employees are actually doing work and which ones are slacking off watching teh p00rnies, you might have a bigger problem than your network architecture...

    In other words, web filtering is a technical solution to a human problem, and hindering all the productive people in your company is TRWTF.
  • dohpaz42 2011-03-15 12:51
    Sudo:
    So today's WTF is "sometimes management know what they're talking about"? Meh.
    +1

    Sudo:
    Tomorrow's WTF is going to be a snippet of well-written code.
    ++1
  • anonymin 2011-03-15 12:52
    I work somewhere like one of those branch offices. Today the upstream squid proxy that authenticates and filters web access for our entire far-flung corporate VPN went on the fritz for several hours, issuing frequent protests about inability to create TCP connections probably due to overload. How can I tell, from inside my workplace, whether upstream is using some decent form of load balancing or is as clueless as Tyson?
  • Zaratustra 2011-03-15 13:04
    ISSUE: The traffic is fucking slow

    STATUS: Fucking resolved

    NOTES: The entire fucking company's fucking traffic was being sent through a single fucking T1, worthless asshole said issue could not be described to fucking management

    ACTIONS TAKEN: Worthless asshole fired, replaced with new asshole
  • Bushea 2011-03-15 13:18
    Not too shocked at the proxy concept. When I was working for a big multinational, this was their corporate policy - and they used to audit regularly.
  • Don 2011-03-15 13:20
    The CTO complained about the -network- not the internet.... how is this related to the proxy?
  • Capt. Obvious 2011-03-15 13:22
    sibtrag:

    I can easily see myself in that sort of situation. Back when I was interviewing (many years ago), I would try to allow extra time for anything that could come up, especially if the interview was a distance away in an unfamiliar area. In fact, I was more than an hour early for the interview for my current job.

    Then I would sit in my car for a moment & decide what to do. In my case it was an early morning interview, so I got coffee & a snack to calm my nerves. But, for a 1pm interview, I might have seen if the interviewer was available early. In the off chance that something had come up for the afternoon (an emergency meeting, a sick child, etc) s/he might be very grateful. Otherwise, I'd decline the conference room & go out for lunch.

    In the exact situation given, however, I'd probably have sought out a department store & tried to find something off-the-rack which actually fit me.

    Arriving early for an interview can be a good thing. I mean, building in a buffer, making sure you're on time, all good things. I was just reacting to the "OMG, you made him wait until the actual interview time" comment.

    But yeah, if someone arrives for an interview an hour early cause they were worried they would get lost, the worst result I can imagine would be giving them a seat in the lobby with a coffee or tea until the scheduled time.

    But I do try to schedule interviews so they don't interfere with lunch. Lunch time is when I go outside, clear my head or puzzle through a difficult problem (depending on whether the day is difficult or routine). Switching gears to interview someone before then just happens not to work well for me.
  • Fred 2011-03-15 13:24
    dohpaz42:
    Sudo:
    Tomorrow's WTF is going to be a snippet of well-written code.
    ++1


    so... 2?
  • Fab 2011-03-15 13:25
    Click on "salty language" in the story.
    It's wonderful !
  • Franz Kafka 2011-03-15 13:31
    akatherder:
    brazzy:
    Correct me if I'm wrong... but isn't that a perfectly normal and correct setup for "corporate interet"?

    Of course, it requires either a separate proxy at each location, or very good connections between the locations. So am I missing something or is the only WTF that Tyson didn't realize the performance implications of his policy implementation?


    From a technical standpoint, that's the only goddamn WTF I am seeing. If he wasn't such a worthless asshole, he would have seen a connection between slow traffic and funneling the entire company's traffic through one server and a single fucking T1.


    Really, that pales in comparison to the whole ego-fueled rant during the interview. Seriously, what the hell?

    Also, the proxy setup was effing stupid. And not hosting the website in a colo.
  • JV 2011-03-15 13:36
    I have a fun proxy story. So, this company I worked at for many years decided it was time to start tracking, filtering and reporting on all employee's Internet usage. Sure, I get it, that a company wants to make sure people are working and using the network for job-related functions, no problem.

    However, they decided to use the reporting to go after people. Everyone had an allocated amount of "personal time" to browse the Internet. The company started using these numbers against people during reviews and weekly status meetings.

    Enter my department: the developers. As a developer, you'll understand the Internet is "The Developer Handbook". Google is your best friend, and blogs are like the gold mines of the coder's treasure trove. Needless to say, our first few "reviews" by the CIO were not good. He was red in the face, on the verge of screaming and was ready to make heads roll (yes, it was a typical CIO that could barely utilize Outlook, let alone understand the needs of his developers).

    So, after a month of dealing with this crap, I decided to take action. We had a co-location hosting facility down town, where we had our QA, staging and production servers for web-based applications. The web filters/reporting system was not monitoring these systems, so I installed a lightweight proxy server on the QA machine.

    Fast forward a year later, all of our developers had zero (0) minutes of Internet time, and the CIO always referred to "his awesome team" when it came to the Internet usage report.

    After the company was sold to a competitor and I left, I told the network engineer about it. He was pissed at first, but soon got over it and had a good laugh. Mr. CIO still doesn't know to this day.

    Oh, and my current company blocks TheDailyWTF.com, but that doesn't stop me. Muhahaha.
  • Codism 2011-03-15 13:39
    Just disconnect VPN and surf.
  • boog 2011-03-15 13:47
    "It was like trying to explain calculus to a dog."
    That's an interesting thing to say, considering which would look like the bigger idiot.
  • Bondo 2011-03-15 13:57
    Wow. I worked at a place that was just like that. Corporate was located in Los Angeles and we were in Spokane, WA. All network traffic was proxied through their server in LA, so we had to wait every Tuesday and Wednesday night for hours and hours while gigabytes of files were transfered from downtown Spokane to our print shop, which was only about 20 miles away. It was faster to drive downtown with a external hard drive and transfer the data via sneakernet.
  • hoodaticus 2011-03-15 14:06
    To those who don't see the WTF, let's start from square one:

    1. Interview Attire
    2. Decorum
    3. Not trash talking your old boss in the interview

    And those are just the WTFs. Everything else is "meh".
  • Yazeran 2011-03-15 14:11
    dohpaz42:
    Sudo:
    So today's WTF is "sometimes management know what they're talking about"? Meh.
    +1

    Sudo:
    Tomorrow's WTF is going to be a snippet of well-written code.
    ++1


    Parse errror Can't modify constant item in preincrement (++)

    Couldn't resist :-)
  • A Gould 2011-03-15 14:15
    I've never quite understood what the purpose of filtering at work is in this day and age.

    My workplace is the perfect example. Anything "fun" is blocked via proxy, but anyone with a smartphone (or in my case, iPad w/MiFi) has an free connection - and that includes the company provided phones! - so everyone's still screwing around, they just are taking more time doing it.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-03-15 14:28
    A Gould:
    I've never quite understood what the purpose of filtering at work is in this day and age.

    My workplace is the perfect example. Anything "fun" is blocked via proxy, but anyone with a smartphone (or in my case, iPad w/MiFi) has an free connection - and that includes the company provided phones! - so everyone's still screwing around, they just are taking more time doing it.


    Spoken like a true recent grad...
  • Network Engineeer 2011-03-15 14:50
    Really, I don't see the technical WTF here...

    This is a normal set-up procedure for enterprises, especially when the chain is connected to the DC/Head Office using an MPLS cloud or VPN technologies over the internet.

    Putting proxy servers at each site is expensive, can be an administrative nightmare, and the savings by centralizing this at the DC is usually put into better hardware and/or HA for the proxy servers, and a faster and/or multihomed internet access.

    The real WTF is the assumptions about the interwed and their network. Also, the unprofessional attitude by the said person. Using such language is only appropriate in certain interviews, and you should always make sure you dress properly.
  • frits 2011-03-15 14:56
    Tyson's interview suit looked like it was last washed during the Nixon administration, with motor oil for detergent.

    Seriously? Who doesn't wash their clothes in something like this?
  • ABC 2011-03-15 15:04
    First comment!
  • Ã 2011-03-15 15:13
    Yet another story about the boss watching porn and giving grief to his employee for making it harder to watch porn. Real original, Remy Martin.
  • ¢ÃƒÆ’†â€Ã 2011-03-15 15:15
    You're also getting lazy with the hidden comments, Remy Martin. And enough with the damn unicorns and rainbows, Remy Martin.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-03-15 15:21
    ABC:
    First comment!


    You're joking, right? Or retarded, either-or...
  • excelius 2011-03-15 15:25
    I was thinking the same thing. That's exactly how my company operates.

    Leased lines to all of our retail locations, and their only internet access comes through corporates proxies. Of course our corporate datacenter also has some pretty fat pipes.
  • Boris 2011-03-15 15:29
    C-Octothorpe:
    ABC:
    First comment!


    You're joking, right? Or retarded, either-or...

    Or it illustrates what a slow network would do?
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-03-15 15:33
    Boris:
    C-Octothorpe:
    ABC:
    First comment!


    You're joking, right? Or retarded, either-or...

    Or it illustrates what a slow network would do?


    Perhaps... Just saw the comment and jumped the gun. Giving poster benefit of doubt.
  • ignacio 2011-03-15 15:33
    Is it me or the page was flooded with unicorns?
  • MrEricSir 2011-03-15 15:35
    A sysadmin... wearing a suit?

    Sorry, I gotta call BS on this.
  • kastein 2011-03-15 15:36
    School Bully:
    kastein:
    "swirled the drain"?

    Remy, put down the thesaurus and back away with your hands where I can see them. It's "circled".

    Was actually a pretty good article other than that!

    "Swirled" is obscure? Have you never heard of a swirly? I'll bet the average reader of this site has been at the recieving end of a few...
    I never said anything about obscure. Remy really likes to clumsify (yes, I just made that up) English though, and needless thesaurizing (also made that up) of random words is a great way to do it.

    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.
  • synp 2011-03-15 15:39
    Don:
    The CTO complained about the -network- not the internet.... how is this related to the proxy?


    Traffic to the proxy is clogging the VPN gateway, so everything, including email, VoIP, intranet and file shares (which also go through the VPN) get slow.
  • School Bully 2011-03-15 15:48
    kastein:
    School Bully:
    kastein:
    "swirled the drain"?

    Remy, put down the thesaurus and back away with your hands where I can see them. It's "circled".

    Was actually a pretty good article other than that!

    "Swirled" is obscure? Have you never heard of a swirly? I'll bet the average reader of this site has been at the recieving end of a few...
    I never said anything about obscure. Remy really likes to clumsify (yes, I just made that up) English though, and needless thesaurizing (also made that up) of random words is a great way to do it.

    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    Well excuse me for thinking you would use a thesesaurus for finding recondite synonymns.

    Now who wants a noogie?
  • Nexzus 2011-03-15 16:09
    Oh yeah.

    At my last place, Web Browsing, VPN, EDTs and FTP, and OWA all came and went through a residential class DSL modem and service.

    They didn't cheap out on the rest of the networking gear though. Kinda weird seeing that modem attached to a pair of Cisco PIX 515s, and then some Catalysts running the rest of the network.
  • JayC 2011-03-15 16:11
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-03-15 16:36
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.
  • Lorens 2011-03-15 16:43
    slackz:
    Proxy Servers are like Domain Controllers -- A minimum of one per location, replicated from a central setup.


    Or else like the setup I provided at my last job: everybody including main office gets an appropriately sized line into the telco, and the one filtering proxy (+spare) is hosted at the telco, eventually alongside dedicated web or mail or file or whatever servers, mostly in much better hosting conditions than main office could provide.
  • Anonymou5 2011-03-15 16:49
    This is precisely what my high school's board did. The problem is that they had around a hundred schools, each with several hundred students. Put all of them on a VPN and send every bit of traffic through a proxy, and you might as well be on dial-up. The worst part was when someone complained, and was told the problem was too much clutter on the computer (it was a fresh install).

    As far as I know, nothing's changed since then. I wonder why they even bother providing internet if they manage to botch it so badly.
  • ABC 2011-03-15 16:50
    C-Octothorpe:
    ABC:
    First comment!


    You're joking, right? Or retarded, either-or...


    Joking, but can I prove that I'm not retarded? Nope.
  • Anon 2011-03-15 16:54
    C-Octothorpe:
    ABC:
    First comment!


    You're joking, right? Or retarded, either-or...


    Whoosh!
  • Junior 2011-03-15 16:57
    Remy's Sick and someone is posing for him. The number of Easter Eggs is far below his quota....
  • Anon 2011-03-15 16:57
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.
  • Bus Driver Rant 2011-03-15 17:17
    Jack:
    If you are unable to detect which employees are actually doing work and which ones are slacking off watching teh p00rnies, you might have a bigger problem than your network architecture...

    In other words, web filtering is a technical solution to a human problem, and hindering all the productive people in your company is TRWTF.


    Yes!! Don't use technology to fix problem with people - fix the people!
    <rant>
    I once worked driving buses, and twice in fairly quick succession there were major incidents (one at our company, one at another) where drivers were run over by buses because they hadn't put the hand brake on (the brake would automatically lock when the door was open, but the door could be closed from outside on some buses - AFAIK in at least one of these cases, the door couldn't be shut from the outside if the handbrake was off, but the driver {having failed to close the door from the outside} reached in through the driver's window) - I recall similar incidents (although without injury) happening long before I drove buses. Long story short, rather than teaching drivers to apply handbrake, or disciplining those caught forgetting, the company investigated a whole host of ways to alarm if the handbrake hasn't been applied (eg sensor in the seat that alarms when the driver stands up if the handbrake isn't applied). The solution they decided on (taking into account cost associated with wearing parts, reliability etc), was to put a sensor that triggered if a line was breached beside the driver and the bus was travelling less than some speed (4 km/h, I think). For me, what this meant that when I slowed to a stop at traffic lights during the morning peak (packed bus), something (eg a bag) would happen to cross the sensor and set the alarm off (and in fact, often even releasing the brake at lights, the alarm would trigger again - and it could only be switched off by pulling the handbrake). As a result, most drivers have learnt that there is a point the handbrake can be pulled to where the alarm will switch off, but the brake won't activate - but Heavy Vehicle brakes being what they are (they are fully on or fully off) if a driver accidentally pulls to far, the bus screeches to a halt.
    In my opinion, all they achieved in this exercise, was to (1) train drivers to play with the handbrake while driving; (2) teach drivers to rely on the alarm to remind them to do something that any driver should do anyway; (3) annoy the hell out of drivers who were constantly frustrated that a peak service kept triggering the alarm, or a malfunctioning system kept the alarm going (it was an incredibly annoying high pitch alarm)
    The reliance on (2) means that should the alarm fail to activate (or should the company get a new bus that doesn't have the alarm fitted yet), we are suddenly more likely to have a major incident. So while the solution might have appeared to fix the problem, the reality is that money had been spent to mask the problem. The real problem, is that (for whatever reason) some drivers were forgetting to apply the handbrake - the solution should have been to better educate drivers, and to have a process to discipline drivers who were found to have failed to do so. (there were also instances of buses in depots rolling, because the park brake hadn't been applied - as the air in the bus gradually leaked out, the 'interlock' on the door could release, so if the brake wasn't applied, the bus would roll.
    </rant>

    Captcha: cogo - except I'm talking about PAX not Cogo...
  • Jeremy 2011-03-15 17:22
    Capt. Obvious:
    sibtrag:

    I can easily see myself in that sort of situation. Back when I was interviewing (many years ago), I would try to allow extra time for anything that could come up, especially if the interview was a distance away in an unfamiliar area. In fact, I was more than an hour early for the interview for my current job.

    Then I would sit in my car for a moment & decide what to do. In my case it was an early morning interview, so I got coffee & a snack to calm my nerves. But, for a 1pm interview, I might have seen if the interviewer was available early. In the off chance that something had come up for the afternoon (an emergency meeting, a sick child, etc) s/he might be very grateful. Otherwise, I'd decline the conference room & go out for lunch.

    In the exact situation given, however, I'd probably have sought out a department store & tried to find something off-the-rack which actually fit me.

    Arriving early for an interview can be a good thing. I mean, building in a buffer, making sure you're on time, all good things. I was just reacting to the "OMG, you made him wait until the actual interview time" comment.

    But yeah, if someone arrives for an interview an hour early cause they were worried they would get lost, the worst result I can imagine would be giving them a seat in the lobby with a coffee or tea until the scheduled time.

    But I do try to schedule interviews so they don't interfere with lunch. Lunch time is when I go outside, clear my head or puzzle through a difficult problem (depending on whether the day is difficult or routine). Switching gears to interview someone before then just happens not to work well for me.


    How is that the worst result? The worst result would be to be aggressive to them, and tell them they're idiots for being so early. Offering them the chance to sit and wait it out (and give them a drink) seems to me one of the better approaches. Letting them know thta they are very early and it will be a long wait (so that they have the option of leaving and coming back) would probably be a good idea too.

    It's good to be (reasonably) early for interviews, but the interviewee should accept that the earlier they are, the longer they will probably have to wait. If I am ever ealry to an interview (which is most times) I'll busy myself reading in the car, or go for a wander in the area (maybe try to work out exactly where I need to go - it's not always as simple as straight through the main entrance) or do something until about 10-15 minutes before.
  • Mr Hanky 2011-03-15 17:30
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    Can't say I stop to watch....
  • nobody 2011-03-15 17:34
    Anon:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.


    Arguing about retarded details is one of the least endearing qualities of the technically inclined. Just FYI.
  • Fred 2011-03-15 17:48
    nobody:
    Arguing about retarded details is one of the least endearing qualities of the technically inclined. Just FYI.
    They're not retarded details, they're retarded people. Just FYI.
  • anon 2011-03-15 18:10
    I'm confused, was it Tyson or the new CTO.
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2011-03-15 18:54
    nobody:
    Anon:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.


    Arguing about retarded details is one of the least endearing qualities of the technically inclined. Just FYI.

    Point taken. However, I have to add, the word C-Octothorpe was looking for is "spiral".
  • blarg 2011-03-15 19:10
    Don:
    The CTO complained about the -network- not the internet.... how is this related to the proxy?


    presumably they weren't bypassing the proxy for local addresses. Was it that hard?
  • iToad 2011-03-15 19:23
    Nexzus:
    Oh yeah.

    At my last place, Web Browsing, VPN, EDTs and FTP, and OWA all came and went through a residential class DSL modem and service.

    They didn't cheap out on the rest of the networking gear though. Kinda weird seeing that modem attached to a pair of Cisco PIX 515s, and then some Catalysts running the rest of the network.


    What is this "bottleneck" that you speak of? - Management
  • HellKarnassus 2011-03-15 19:28
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    nobody:
    Anon:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.


    Arguing about retarded details is one of the least endearing qualities of the technically inclined. Just FYI.

    Point taken. However, I have to add, the word C-Octothorpe was looking for is "spiral".

    I say it depends on the size of the object, sometimes it spirals, sometimes it swirls, and sometimes it is just stuck there and helixes its way down the drain.
  • Anone 2011-03-15 22:01
    JayC:
    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks.


    "Soft drink".
  • hoodaticus 2011-03-15 22:13
    Network Engineeer:
    Really, I don't see the technical WTF here...

    This is a normal set-up procedure for enterprises, especially when the chain is connected to the DC/Head Office using an MPLS cloud or VPN technologies over the internet.

    Putting proxy servers at each site is expensive, can be an administrative nightmare, and the savings by centralizing this at the DC is usually put into better hardware and/or HA for the proxy servers, and a faster and/or multihomed internet access.

    The real WTF is the assumptions about the interwed and their network. Also, the unprofessional attitude by the said person. Using such language is only appropriate in certain interviews, and you should always make sure you dress properly.
    If you can afford an MPLS line, you can afford a DC.
  • hoodaticus 2011-03-15 22:20
    Jack:
    If you are unable to detect which employees are actually doing work and which ones are slacking off watching teh p00rnies, you might have a bigger problem than your network architecture...

    In other words, web filtering is a technical solution to a human problem, and hindering all the productive people in your company is TRWTF.
    Rrrriiiiiiiiight; it couldn't possibly be the viruses you download, the spam blacklists you get our domain added to, and the subsequent inability to communicate with our customers that concerns us. It's you wasting a measley $10,000 a year masturbating on the clock that bothers us - even though that can't effect our lives in IT in any way.

    Please.
  • Arvind 2011-03-15 22:31
    "Your one o'clock is here"

    But your manners are not here. Why can't you refer to a person by his name? Receptionist, my ass.
  • iFrog 2011-03-15 23:14
    HellKarnassus:
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    nobody:
    Anon:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.


    Arguing about retarded details is one of the least endearing qualities of the technically inclined. Just FYI.

    Point taken. However, I have to add, the word C-Octothorpe was looking for is "spiral".

    I say it depends on the size of the object, sometimes it spirals, sometimes it swirls, and sometimes it is just stuck there and helixes its way down the drain.

    What is this "bottleneck" that you speak of? - Management
  • biff 2011-03-16 00:00
    excelius:
    I was thinking the same thing. That's exactly how my company operates.

    Leased lines to all of our retail locations, and their only internet access comes through corporates proxies. Of course our corporate datacenter also has some pretty fat pipes.


    Yeah...but WE also had a completely unfiltered backup connection that was mostly unused(!).... except for emergencies...
  • biff 2011-03-16 00:02
    Arvind:
    "Your one o'clock is here"

    But your manners are not here. Why can't you refer to a person by his name? Receptionist, my ass.


    "Hello, Ass, would you perhaps like a cup of coffee?"
  • biff 2011-03-16 00:06
    iToad:
    Nexzus:
    Oh yeah.

    At my last place, Web Browsing, VPN, EDTs and FTP, and OWA all came and went through a residential class DSL modem and service.

    They didn't cheap out on the rest of the networking gear though. Kinda weird seeing that modem attached to a pair of Cisco PIX 515s, and then some Catalysts running the rest of the network.


    What is this "bottleneck" that you speak of? - Management


    Ours used to... then they brought in a T1 for most things... but we just kept the asdl for emergencies....
    for awhile....
  • biff 2011-03-16 00:13
    hoodaticus:
    Jack:
    If you are unable to detect which employees are actually doing work and which ones are slacking off watching teh p00rnies, you might have a bigger problem than your network architecture...

    In other words, web filtering is a technical solution to a human problem, and hindering all the productive people in your company is TRWTF.
    Rrrriiiiiiiiight; it couldn't possibly be the viruses you download, the spam blacklists you get our domain added to, and the subsequent inability to communicate with our customers that concerns us. It's you wasting a measley $10,000 a year masturbating on the clock that bothers us - even though that can't effect our lives in IT in any way.

    Please.


    Hey, if the big guys can, so can the little guys... and besides, don't we have a RIGHT to view porn on our company computer?
  • bemis 2011-03-16 00:40
    This is exactly how the setup at my major US technology corporation it setup. We are on one coast, HQ is on another... ALL traffic (including internet) must be routed through the other coast.

    The most fun part is the our exchange server, admittedly an intranet service, is also located on the other coast... so when I'm sending a 2MB presentation to 4-5 of my local colleagues it ends up being 2MB of traffic to the coast, then 8-10MB traffic back when they all retrieve it.
  • Pr0gramm3r 2011-03-16 00:53
    The bottleneck is an area of infinitesimal size that acts as the center point for the swirling of bs. Some people confuse it with the more uncommon term circling which comes from the misconception that a object is of a constant radius away from a center point which has no definite position. Personally I have always preferred oscillating.
  • fsd 2011-03-16 01:31
    Pr0gramm3r:
    The bottleneck is an area of infinitesimal size that acts as the center point for the swirling of bs. Some people confuse it with the more uncommon term circling which comes from the misconception that a object is of a constant radius away from a center point which has no definite position. Personally I have always preferred oscillating.


    Well, you go oscillate quietly in the corner then
  • Nick 2011-03-16 01:35
    What junior sysadmin wears a suit to work??! Leave the suits and ties to the managers.

    JV:
    I have a fun proxy story. So, this company I worked at for many years decided it was time to start tracking, filtering and reporting on all employee's Internet usage. Sure, I get it, that a company wants to make sure people are working and using the network for job-related functions, no problem.

    However, they decided to use the reporting to go after people. Everyone had an allocated amount of "personal time" to browse the Internet. The company started using these numbers against people during reviews and weekly status meetings.

    Enter my department: the developers. As a developer, you'll understand the Internet is "The Developer Handbook". Google is your best friend, and blogs are like the gold mines of the coder's treasure trove. Needless to say, our first few "reviews" by the CIO were not good. He was red in the face, on the verge of screaming and was ready to make heads roll (yes, it was a typical CIO that could barely utilize Outlook, let alone understand the needs of his developers).
    I had the exact same problem, the department manager couldn't understand why the two programmers who were reverse engineering an existing software product (so we could create a new module with features that even the original application developers said weren't possible), were the people who downloaded the most.
  • J.D. 2011-03-16 02:10
    Bushea:
    Not too shocked at the proxy concept. When I was working for a big multinational, this was their corporate policy - and they used to audit regularly.

    Yes, our company has the same policy, although the proxy server doesn't even reside in the same country. For whatever unknown reasons, most of the sites the proxy blocks are necessary, especially for or hardware developers, but the pr0n seems to flow freely. Oh, and as a bonus, they've also blocked ssh-traffic at a packet level. It's not like we're designing anything with Linux here or something.
  • Not of this Earth 2011-03-16 03:47
    It's a good manager's craftsmanship I believe.
  • bushkey 2011-03-16 04:38
    kastein:
    School Bully:
    kastein:
    "swirled the drain"?

    Remy, put down the thesaurus and back away with your hands where I can see them. It's "circled".

    Was actually a pretty good article other than that!

    "Swirled" is obscure? Have you never heard of a swirly? I'll bet the average reader of this site has been at the recieving end of a few...
    I never said anything about obscure. Remy really likes to clumsify (yes, I just made that up) English though, and needless thesaurizing (also made that up) of random words is a great way to do it.

    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.

    There's a reason: it is wrong.
    You can swirl something in your mouth, you don't circle something in your mouth.
  • pr0ngramm3r 2011-03-16 04:50
    Pr0gramm3r:
    The bottleneck is an area of infinitesimal size that acts as the center point for the swirling of bs. Some people confuse it with the more uncommon term circling which comes from the misconception that a object is of a constant radius away from a center point which has no definite position. Personally I have always preferred oscillating.

    ...which is why the expression is "circling down the drain". As in moving down the drain in circles.
    Swirling refers to liquid.
  • Peter 2011-03-16 05:01
    Arvind:
    "Your one o'clock is here"

    But your manners are not here. Why can't you refer to a person by his name? Receptionist, my ass.

    Option A:
    "Your one o'clock is here"
    "Okay, ask him to wait"

    Option B:
    "Tyson is here"
    "Who's Tyson?"
    "Your one o'clock interviewee"
    "Okay, ask him to wait"
  • Peter 2011-03-16 05:06
    Junior:
    Remy's Sick and someone is posing for him. The number of Easter Eggs is far below his quota....

    "posing for him"? Why, is Remy getting into portraiture?
  • anon 2011-03-16 06:16
    Turning up 1.5 hours early for an interview is a WTF. Him still being there after waiting until the scheduled interview time is not a WTF, clearly he needed the job.
  • Bert Glanstron 2011-03-16 08:27
    Dear Roberto,

    I could cite you for age discrimination. I saw who you intended to hire: a student right out of college. You could have had the best, now you'll have to settle for the rest.

    Go away and grow up

    Sincerely,
    Bert Glanstron
  • Bill's Kid 2011-03-16 10:09
    Peter:
    Arvind:
    "Your one o'clock is here"

    But your manners are not here. Why can't you refer to a person by his name? Receptionist, my ass.

    Option A:
    "Your one o'clock is here"
    "Okay, ask him to wait"

    Option B:
    "Tyson is here"
    "Who's Tyson?"
    "Your one o'clock interviewee"
    "Okay, ask him to wait"

    Option C:
    "Tyson is here for his one o'clock interview."
    "WTF? Tell him what time it is and remind him the interview is at one."
  • Childish 2011-03-16 12:39
    frits:
    Tyson's interview suit looked like it was last washed during the Nixon administration, with motor oil for detergent.

    Seriously? Who doesn't wash their clothes in something like this?

    It's basic chemistry "like dissolves like."
  • fritters 2011-03-16 12:56
    A T1 line? Do we still consider those fast? They're only 1.536 Mb.

    My cable modem connection at home is 5 times faster than that.
  • Pointed Hairy Boss 2011-03-16 13:18
    I'm still waiting for the end of that article to load ...
  • Owen Two 2011-03-16 15:53
    hoodaticus:
    masturbating on the clock

    Doesn't the clock get all sticky?

    Captcha: nimis - something you use to mastur...oh, never mind
  • anon 2011-03-16 15:54
    Capt. Obvious:
    your name:
    The only WTF I see is that they iced him for 1.5 hours and he was *still* there for the interview at 1pm.

    Hey, if you come 1.5 hours early for an interview, what do you expect? I mean, if I have nothing else going on, I probably don't mind moving it up. If I have a meeting or something... well, I'll get to you when I told you I would when we made plans. And if you move it up around lunch time, so I am hungry when I interview you, that may not be the best thing for you.


    Unless you brought lunch!
  • DeaDPooL 2011-03-16 16:57
    Forget opposable thumbs, apes downloading pornos is clear proof they have evolved to our level!
  • Earp 2011-03-16 18:12
    If an interviewee showed up for his interview early, and asked if I was available earlier, I would pretty much not hire him. Nothing pisses me off more than someone showing up before I'm ready. Of course, as you say, someone sometime might be very grateful - but I wouldn't do this personally if you wanted the job.
  • SQLDave 2011-03-16 18:55
    some guy:
    Well, they were looking for a junior network admin. Sounds like they found one.

    Yeah.. Junior Samples.
  • SQLDave 2011-03-16 19:07
    Anon:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.


    No, he didn't claim that the common phrase is "concentrically circling the drain". Hmmm... perhaps it's "spiraling the drain"?
  • Mike 2011-03-17 13:22
    kastein:
    "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    What the hell is "clunky"? Try using English. Maybe you mean "awkward"?

    </sarcastic> <!-- Grammar/usage/spelling Nazis come across like people who just discovered that the internet and think people on it give a damn about grammar/usage/spelling. -->
  • Rob 2011-03-17 14:38
    Anon:
    Pro tip:

    Shitting on your former boss in an interview is not endearing to anybody. If you can't say anything nice, then don't say anything at all.


    I've heard that tip, many times. But I have to disagree. I'm not saying you should go on a rant about how horrible your old boss/coworkers/job was. Still, the fact remains; if you have a job and are interviewing for a new one - they will almost certainly ask you why you are looking to move.

    The honest answer to that question is, almost always, because you want a better job. And better is a relative term. Compared to the job you want, your old job is lacking. Otherwise, you wouldn't be changing jobs.

    People try to put a positive spin on it, but it just sounds fake and hollow.

    "Yeah, it was a great place....but now I want to find a new opportunity" <-- What the hell does that mean? Your old company had zero opportunity? You couldn't take advantage of it? Maybe you suck, and they realized it and won't promote you?

    I might be wrong, but I still feel like honesty is the way to go.

  • poutines 2011-03-17 14:44
    Rob:
    Anon:
    Pro tip:

    Shitting on your former boss in an interview is not endearing to anybody. If you can't say anything nice, then don't say anything at all.


    I've heard that tip, many times. But I have to disagree. I'm not saying you should go on a rant about how horrible your old boss/coworkers/job was. Still, the fact remains; if you have a job and are interviewing for a new one - they will almost certainly ask you why you are looking to move.

    The honest answer to that question is, almost always, because you want a better job. And better is a relative term. Compared to the job you want, your old job is lacking. Otherwise, you wouldn't be changing jobs.

    People try to put a positive spin on it, but it just sounds fake and hollow.

    "Yeah, it was a great place....but now I want to find a new opportunity" <-- What the hell does that mean? Your old company had zero opportunity? You couldn't take advantage of it? Maybe you suck, and they realized it and won't promote you?

    I might be wrong, but I still feel like honesty is the way to go.



    Nah Dude, you should totally lie and say something about the commute and how the company you're interviewing for seems like a super-stimulating place to work.
  • Ro 2011-03-18 01:08
    This is what happens when one "IT Guy" ends up doing a lot of things he is not qualified to do because there isn't enough staff to do it, and he ends up using it on a resume later. Clearly he didn't understand enough about networking to try that sort of solution, but because he had done so much other networking stuff in the past that didn't fail miserably, he thought he knew exactly what he was doing.
  • Omnifarious 2011-03-19 19:53
    nonA:
    I don't see a big WTF here. The guy was telling the truth: "Get a better connection upstream".


    There are several WTFs here. First, if one really needs to trash a former employer in an interview, one should be a lot more diplomatic about it. And really, you should consider not doing that at all.

    Secondly, the problem wouldn't be solved by a better connection. One of the problems doing things that way introduces is latency. In these days of Ajax, that can really effect how responsive a website is to the point of it being nearly unusable.

    You aren't going to get rid of latency by getting a faster pipe. Latency is governed by the speed of light. It's why all the big companies want data centers scattered all over creation.

    And the combination of those two traits means you have an employee on your hands who won't admit any fault of any kind, and who will be a complete jerk about it and blame you for problems.
  • Jay 2011-03-19 23:28
    JayC:
    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.


    If you use the word "coke" as a generic word for soft drink, you will be receiving a visit from the Coca Cola Company's trademark lawyers.
  • The real frits (too lazy to sign in) 2011-03-20 00:15
    Jay:
    JayC:
    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.


    If you use the word "coke" as a generic word for soft drink, you will be receiving a visit from the Coca Cola Company's trademark lawyers.


    You've never been to the Southeastern US, have you?
  • Anonymous Coder 2011-03-21 17:44
    J.D.:
    Bushea:
    Not too shocked at the proxy concept. When I was working for a big multinational, this was their corporate policy - and they used to audit regularly.

    Yes, our company has the same policy, although the proxy server doesn't even reside in the same country. For whatever unknown reasons, most of the sites the proxy blocks are necessary, especially for or hardware developers, but the pr0n seems to flow freely. Oh, and as a bonus, they've also blocked ssh-traffic at a packet level. It's not like we're designing anything with Linux here or something.


    Are you working where I am working? Seriously. Off site proxy and blocking sites like:
    www.google.com (not www.google.fr though - hint)
    www.source-forge.org (for downloads - category "productivity" - oh yeah! I kid you not)
    Various sites to do with "networking" (i.e. ethernet, TCP/IP - that kind of networking is apparently bad for you - hmmmm)
    Benchmarking sites like EEMBC - no we don't do CPU cores which require to be benchmarked, do we?
    What you said in your post sounds so familiar, we may actually sit in the same office.
  • nonpartisan 2011-03-22 12:16
    DeaDPooL:
    Forget opposable thumbs, apes downloading pornos is clear proof they have devolved to our level!


    FTFY.
  • Wyrdo 2011-03-27 00:52
    The glass-half-full here was that the interviewers successfully avoided hiring someone who would have been a big liability instead of an asset.

    --
    Furry cows moo and decompress.
  • Network Engineer 2011-03-28 19:35
    Sorry, but here you are dead wrong. What you're talking about is propgation delay. Another significant delay is transmission delay, and upgrading from a T1 to a T3 can reduce this.

    However, the real culprit on a loaded T1 line, is Queuing delay. This occurs when the pipe is fully loaded, and can only be resolved by either 1) upgrading the bandwidth avilable, or 2) introducing QoS so that important taffic is not queued for long (as well as shaping or policing unimportant traffic).

    In this example, the interviewee is quite clear that the problem is a fully loaded T1... and has asked for the budget for a faster connection.
  • ChaosD 2011-04-15 12:18
    SQLDave:
    Anon:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JayC:
    kastein:
    "circled the drain" or "circling the drain" is a common turn of phrase. "swirled the drain" is clunky and just sounds wrong.


    This sounds too much like questioning which of pop/soda/coke should be the common name for carbonated drinks. They're all fine in different areas of the US.

    Swirled sounds just fine to me. Besides, a combination of liquids going down the drain doesn't "circle". "Swirl" is more accurate, as the liquids are mixing in swirls just before they're in the drain.


    True, however an object being flushed down a ceramic throne "circles", not swirles, the drainage point.


    I'd say "swirl" is the better word here. Swirl suggests circling in an ever tightening circle rather than just staying the same distance from the center point.


    No, he didn't claim that the common phrase is "concentrically circling the drain". Hmmm... perhaps it's "spiraling the drain"?


    Now you've gone and done it, you've thrown the whole paradigm into chaos.
  • Leon 2011-04-20 03:54
    My company actually still does this. All our network traffic goes through a central location before coming back to us. Same reason too.
  • spamspamspamspam 2011-04-23 08:16
    Fab:
    Click on "salty language" in the story.
    It's wonderful !


    and keep on clicking! :D
  • Sayer 2012-06-13 08:59
    Bill's Kid:
    Peter:
    Arvind:
    "Your one o'clock is here"

    But your manners are not here. Why can't you refer to a person by his name? Receptionist, my ass.

    Option A:
    "Your one o'clock is here"
    "Okay, ask him to wait"

    Option B:
    "Tyson is here"
    "Who's Tyson?"
    "Your one o'clock interviewee"
    "Okay, ask him to wait"

    Option C:
    "Tyson is here for his one o'clock interview."
    "WTF? Tell him what time it is and remind him the interview is at one."


    Option D:
    Stop bitching about the minutiae of imagined slights. If a receptionist not using the name of an interviewee, in an exchange the interviewee will never hear, gets your panties in a bunch, you might not be suitable for human interaction.