Elegant Syntax Error

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  • Shambo 2008-01-25 08:01
    where is the spec?
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:05
    Whilst you are posting these things before 7:00 AM (central time), how am I ever going to be fist?

    Answer: plan to stay home sick, and log on here instead of getting dressed. Whilst I do this, I may at least be fecund, if not fist.
  • Belcat 2008-01-25 08:08
    "clever"? Those words should be in quotes.
    Building things that aren't obvious to maintain and stupid extensions to the language... Just stupid.
  • streetpc 2008-01-25 08:10
    #define clever wtf
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:11
    Belcat:
    "clever"? Those words should be in quotes.
    Building things that aren't obvious to maintain and stupid extensions to the language... Just stupid.
    Don't be so hard on him. He was clearly an English major with a CS minor. He probably should have been writing technical documentation rather than code.
  • krupa 2008-01-25 08:13
    Who the hell ever says "whilst"?
  • joe 2008-01-25 08:13
    Looks like an easy trick to keep a contract... fill the code with stuff that won't work unless a well defined
    #define a=b b=a
    line appears.
  • Pink Duck 2008-01-25 08:15
    The contractor ought to check into the reasoning behind his decision to use 'whilst' over 'while'. Both are derived from ancient words, 'while' is the older and 'whilst' has mainly dropped out of usage in the US. 'whilst' is usually considered more formal and literary, which is certainly not the point of code. Plus it's an extra letter to type and introduces no benefit other than to a single individual - but of course the contractor needs to maintain his belovéd creations :)
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:17
    Pink Duck:
    The contractor ought to check into the reasoning behind his decision to use 'whilst' over 'while'. Both are derived from ancient words, 'while' is the older and 'whilst' has mainly dropped out of usage in the US. 'whilst' is usually considered more formal and literary, which is certainly not the point of code. Plus it's an extra letter to type and introduces no benefit other than to a single individual - but of course the contractor needs to maintain his belovéd creations :)
    Sounds similar to the raging will/shall controversy, which of course is enflamed by the King James zealots with their wilt/shalt controversy.
  • John Doe 2008-01-25 08:24
    Pink Duck:
    Plus it's an extra letter to type

    So, how about whil, whi, wh, or w then?

    Captcha: dolor, yes it's very painful to have to work with people like those "clever" contractors...
  • jim 2008-01-25 08:27
    I used the word "unbeknownst" in a bug report today. But it was tongue in cheek. (And before you rag me, YOU try saying "unbeknownst" with tongue in cheek.)
  • A Brit 2008-01-25 08:28
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:28
    jim:
    I used the word "unbeknownst" in a bug report today. But it was tongue in cheek. (And before you rag me, YOU try saying "unbeknownst" with tongue in cheek.)
    Okay, I was willing. It came out audibly as, "unbenoans(farting noise)".
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:31
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?
  • pitchingchris 2008-01-25 08:37
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    What do you expect from a company that is resided in America? If Microsoft was in Spain or England, it would have went differently. Those words have been used that way in America for a long time, prolly one of the few things Microsoft don't own the rights to :)
  • Ben 2008-01-25 08:41
    Careful, the way our economy is going we'll be writing c#++ in chinese.
  • AdT 2008-01-25 08:41
    FredSaw:
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    They overextended themselves. It can happen to anyone. What was the name of the next country Cheney wants to invade?
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:44
    pitchingchris:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    What do you expect from a company that is resided in America? If Microsoft was in Spain or England, it would have went differently. Those words have been used that way in America for a long time, prolly one of the few things Microsoft don't own the rights to :)
    So found your own rival company, get as big as Microsoft, and change the default language to Spanish. I'm good with it. At least that language doesn't have a million exceptions for every rule.
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 08:46
    AdT:
    FredSaw:
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    They overextended themselves. It can happen to anyone. What was the name of the next country Cheney wants to invade?
    Iran. Please god, let it happen. Maybe if we get our collective ass whipped into submission we (that is, the administration) will get a clue.

    Let the record show that I drive around Dallas with a bumper sticker that says, "Save our bill of rights! www.impeachbush.org"

    Addendum (2008-01-25 09:13):
    Lend your support. Let's kick that asshole out.
    Impeach Bush
  • Rob 2008-01-25 08:47
    FredSaw:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    World War II
  • gabba 2008-01-25 08:49
    They should have just refactored the code. while loops are useless anyway. Just use a 'for'.
  • AC 2008-01-25 08:54
    That's not a WTF, the guy was simply a jerk.
    It certainly was his intention to make a bad joke or something. (As oppossed to the "write Pascal in C" macros)

    Captcha: Those are a Latin test now? Bah, need some time to remember this one.
  • Shmurk 2008-01-25 09:06
    I forgot which program it was but there was a famous UNIX program (Bash?) that used this kind of trick all over the place, things like:

    #define IF(x) if(x) {
    #define ENDIF(x) }
    #define FOREVER for(;;) {
    #define ENDFOREVER }

    It's very ugly but not that uncommon, I've seen it in some places, sadly...
  • A Brit 2008-01-25 09:18
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    Yeah I installed Firefox because I couldn't change IE's spelling of favourites
  • Yorch 2008-01-25 09:20
    What's the problem? Clearly this guy is competent, studied and earned his "Works on my machine" certification.
    http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000818.html

    Gee... give him a break

    BTW. Thanks for my free sticker! I got it yesterday and have placed at my work's PC
  • A Yank 2008-01-25 09:25
    You obviously don't hate it enough if you haven't tried to fix it. In vi-speak:
    :ab colour color

    The possibilities are limitless.
  • DylanW 2008-01-25 09:26
    Your vocabulary is more embiggoned than that of your colleagues.

    I don't see what the problem is. They're perfectly cromulent words.
  • nt 2008-01-25 09:31
    That's "belovèd".
  • T $ 2008-01-25 09:36
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)

    Referring to colo(u)r both with and without a u are inefficient. Recommend replacing the word colo(u)r with the letter 'X' to save memory.
  • nt 2008-01-25 09:36
    Shmurk:
    I forgot which program it was but there was a famous UNIX program (Bash?) that used this kind of trick all over the place, things like:

    #define IF(x) if(x) {
    #define ENDIF(x) }
    #define FOREVER for(;;) {
    #define ENDFOREVER }

    It's very ugly but not that uncommon, I've seen it in some places, sadly...


    The original (1977) Bourne shell, actually. Here's the source.
  • Walleye 2008-01-25 09:46
    krupa:
    Who the hell ever says "whilst"?


    The Great Gonzo from the Muppet show often used it in the phrase "...whilst, and at the same time...".
  • KT 2008-01-25 09:46
    Shmurk:
    I forgot which program it was but there was a famous UNIX program (Bash?) that used this kind of trick all over the place, things like:

    #define IF(x) if(x) {
    #define ENDIF(x) }
    #define FOREVER for(;;) {
    #define ENDFOREVER }

    It's very ugly but not that uncommon, I've seen it in some places, sadly...


    #define ever (;;)

    ...

    for ever {
    printf("%s", "\a");
    }
  • MET 2008-01-25 09:48
    Rob:
    FredSaw:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    World War II

    Not really. At the end of WWII the British were still in charge of most of the globe. Essentially the people in the colonies persuaded us that it was better not to be in charge any longer, and we gave the empire away. India being the best example. Other countries such as Australia and Canada effectively just weakened the links so that they operated in their own right rather than as part of the empire, a process that I think started well before WWII.
    WWII was of course what brought the US to prominence. Before that it was just a sleeping giant.
  • Not a Brit (but a Canadian) 2008-01-25 09:58
    I understand what that's like, but that's often a library thing. I develop extensively with Ogre3D, which is maintained by non-US folks, so they use Colour. As a Canadian, I use 'our' too, but when programming I snap into a US spelling mindset. I often find myself mixing up the two regardless.

    Now, if a language introduced a keyword like "neighbour", that'd probably rile up a bunch of folks.
  • EvanED 2008-01-25 10:07
    Shmurk:
    I forgot which program it was but there was a famous UNIX program (Bash?) that used this kind of trick all over the place, things like:

    #define IF(x) if(x) {
    #define ENDIF(x) }
    #define FOREVER for(;;) {
    #define ENDFOREVER }

    It's very ugly but not that uncommon, I've seen it in some places, sadly...

    I've seen "#define FOREVER for(;;)" a few places; I've even seen it suggested in books. (I think Code Complete may even do so.)

    Including the opening brace though... that's a sin.

    I'm also reminded of my favorite entry I've seen to the IOCCC. It starts out with a whole ton of #defines for keywords that look like BASIC or Pascal, then a program written in them. Basically the the body of the program loos like it was written in Pascal, with some extra semicolons and other places the syntax isn't quite right. But the C program did something completely different than what the pseudo-Pascal program did. So you look at it and go "oh, that's just someone trying to be clever but not succeeding very well. Wait... oh wait..."
  • A Yank 2008-01-25 10:19
    Technically, english from US and UK should be considered two different languages. It might be annoying, but it's not as difficult as trying to figure out that "medarbejder" is danish for co-worker. Thought it was dutch at first, but the dutch translator spits the word right back at me.
  • DeLos 2008-01-25 10:24
    AdT:
    FredSaw:
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    They overextended themselves. It can happen to anyone. What was the name of the next country Cheney wants to invade?


    Shouldn't we finish the "wars" (what do we call them, missions? Something like that?) we started in Afghanastan (remember that one? We are still there, trying to find Osama) or Iraq?

    But hey, what's a few wars as long as the economy is strong and kicking ...
  • Sam 2008-01-25 10:25
    FredSaw:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    We liberated more countries than the US ever has. To be fair, we did conquer them first, but let history reflect that the UK was the great 20th-century liberator.
  • Outlaw Programmer 2008-01-25 10:25
    This story makes much more sense when you realize that Charles I.'s coworker wears a top hat, monocle and handlebar mustache!
  • uggalabugga 2008-01-25 10:26
    Must be a holy cow from India. ;)

    luctus
  • Brady Kelly 2008-01-25 10:26
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    I just don't. Intellisense pops 'Color' in for me, and when I name something, I name it Colour. My code is also full of xxxDialogue classes.
  • DeLos 2008-01-25 10:26
    A Yank:
    Technically, english from US and UK should be considered two different languages. It might be annoying, but it's not as difficult as trying to figure out that "medarbejder" is danish for co-worker. Thought it was dutch at first, but the dutch translator spits the word right back at me.


    For websites one of the first 'languages' they translate the site to is UK English (from US English). Yup, lots of z's to s's. and the our's.

    Must give them a margin of error because if a string goes untranslated, its still readable for the Brits
  • me too 2008-01-25 10:37
    WHYST?!
  • IComp 2008-01-25 10:38
    Since this article is submitted by King Charles I, I'd have thought he'd be quite used to 'elegant' pronunciation. Although at his age its a wonder he can handle a computer at all.
  • Jon Hanna 2008-01-25 10:38
    We can sort of forgive the S/Z thing, in this regard the Americans are simply more conservative; the Z spellings used to be more common than the S spellings (though both were acceptable) before a vogue for all things French brought made the French-like S spellings more popular. The Oxford English Dictionary still uses the Z spellings (see the commentary on http://www.iana.org/assignments/lang-tags/en-GB-oed for more).

    Webster's horrible decision to encourage his compatriots to leave out the U in words like colour is another matter though.

    Still, it's resulted in a strange idiolect for myself. "Colour" I think of as colour, reasonably enough, but "color" I think of as "an object or code used to describe a colour in a computer system", i.e green is a colour, but #00FF00 or System.Drawing.Color.FromArgb(0, 0, 0xFF, 0) or so on are colors.

    Which may make me seem a bit weird, but then all of us Old-World English-speakers use "program" when it comes to computers, though of course the origin of the spelling is that that is how American's spell programmes (the fact that programs haven't compared well with programmes since the 1950s probably helps).
  • Kiss me I'm Polish 2008-01-25 10:45
    DeLos:
    Four websites oneth ouf the first 'languages' they traunslateth the site tou is UK English (froum US English). Yup, louts of z's to s's. and the our's.
    Must giveth them a maurgin of errour bescause if a stringh goes untraunslated, it's still readaible for the Brits

    Here, fixed that for ya
  • Soviut 2008-01-25 10:54
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    I'm Canadian and spell it "colour" with the u as well. But I'd rather languages standardize to "american english" and know to always spell it "color" than to have to guess or check the docs for every single language I use.

    (I know captcha quoting is going out of style but this one says: dolor ...weird)
  • Mike Woodhouse 2008-01-25 10:54
    The contractor's name wasn't Mark, was it? Back in the way-back-when I had a guy who used macros to make his C code look like Pascal;

    #define begin {
    #define end }

    and so on...
  • A Yank 2008-01-25 11:00
    A Yank:
    You obviously don't hate it enough if you haven't tried to fix it. In vi-speak:
    :ab colour color

    The possibilities are limitless.


    Didn't realize someone already made a post with the name A Yank. =P
  • FredSaw 2008-01-25 11:01
    MET:
    WWII was of course what brought the US to prominence. Before that it was just a sleeping giant.
    We like to think we came to prominence with the Boston tea party and the concept, "No taxation without representation".
  • Jerry Kindall 2008-01-25 11:04
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    "Colour" rhymes with "velour," right?
  • Shakespeare 2008-01-25 11:13
    Wherefore?
  • Wizard Stan 2008-01-25 11:15
    By which thou dost mean "wherefore"?
  • Bogglestone 2008-01-25 11:17
    What a "clever" way to ensure to never get a contract from that company again.
  • mark 2008-01-25 11:24
    This reminds me of old SCO systems that I used to work with. We had to type 'whence' instead of 'where' ... very Shakespearian.
  • Verloc 2008-01-25 11:32
    Whilst is a perfectly cromulent keyword for a loop.
  • Ranxerox 2008-01-25 11:34
    A quarter century ago I was looking at some of the code in System V Unix. Someone had actually created a huge pile of C code using #defines that changed all of the keywords to those shell script keywords.

    I was impressed ... but not in a good way.
  • Back In My Day 2008-01-25 11:35
    You think this is bad? Imagine being a C++ programmer who has to deal with *this* crap in your codebase:

    #define private public
    #define protected public

    Only then will you know the true pain that bad C++ can bring to a software engineer.
  • Stitch 2008-01-25 11:40
    I'd like to see the other entries used to make the code more elegant, such as

    #define perchance if
    #define locomote goto /*it has been posited that locomote may be deleterious, mayhap we shan't use it henceforth*/
  • German B. 2008-01-25 11:42
    This is one of those things that, when you see them, you go "Whast the fuck?!"
  • Lewis Carroll 2008-01-25 11:51
    German B.:
    This is one of those things that, when you see them, you go "Whast the fuck?!"
    And hast thou slain the jabberfuck?
  • Richeh 2008-01-25 11:58
    So is that Charles I as in "Charles the First" then?
  • RN 2008-01-25 12:00
    I'm so sorry that we Americans are wrong in our English spelling. Could you at least be a bit respectful of us lesser beings and spell Americanisms with a capital 'A'?
  • Arlie 2008-01-25 12:02
    They're annoying? Boo hoo. Localization does not apply to programming languages or APIs. So it's basically arbitrary -- who ever builds the thing gets the privilege of choosing.

    So quite griping. Microsoft is an American creation, so you get the American spelling. Don't like it? Build your own thing.

    When I'm in the UK, I don't whine about having to see "colour" everywhere.
  • SomeCoder 2008-01-25 12:03
    Back In My Day:
    You think this is bad? Imagine being a C++ programmer who has to deal with *this* crap in your codebase:

    #define private public
    #define protected public

    Only then will you know the true pain that bad C++ can bring to a software engineer.



    And that, sir, is when you go and kill the programmer who wrote those lines.

    I love C++ but #define/macro abuse just... gah.
  • Publius 2008-01-25 12:08
    >> Plus it's an extra letter to type and introduces no benefit other than to a single individual - but of course the contractor needs to maintain his belovéd creations :)

    e-grave, not e-acute, for "no elision" marks in past participles
  • Steve 2008-01-25 12:11
    nt:
    Shmurk:
    I forgot which program it was but there was a famous UNIX program (Bash?) that used this kind of trick all over the place, things like:

    #define IF(x) if(x) {
    #define ENDIF(x) }
    #define FOREVER for(;;) {
    #define ENDFOREVER }

    It's very ugly but not that uncommon, I've seen it in some places, sadly...


    The original (1977) Bourne shell, actually. Here's the source.


    Ah...would that make it a list of Bourne identities?
  • Kill 'em all, let god sort 'em out 2008-01-25 12:16
    SomeCoder:
    And that, sir, is when you go and kill the programmer who wrote those lines.
    I'm don wit dat.
  • Richard Sargent 2008-01-25 12:25
    [quote user="FredSaw]We like to think we came to prominence with the Boston tea party and the concept, "No taxation without representation".[/quote]

    I wonder why your nation's capital has so many license plates and bumper stickers lamenting this same issue today?

    Methinks the whole set of publically stated reasons for the war of independence were nothing but smoke screens. From what little I read, it seems like there were more than a few leaders of the rebellion who were determined to have independence regardless of whether England addressed the grievances.
  • Loyalist 2008-01-25 12:27
    > We like to think we came to prominence with the Boston tea party > and the concept, "No taxation without representation".

    So what happened? Got complacent?
  • operagost 2008-01-25 12:35
    pitchingchris:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    What do you expect from a company that is resided in America? If Microsoft was in Spain or England, it would have went differently.

    Gone.

    :-P
  • operagost 2008-01-25 12:38
    FredSaw:
    AdT:
    FredSaw:
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    They overextended themselves. It can happen to anyone. What was the name of the next country Cheney wants to invade?
    Iran.

    [remainder of belligerent rant snipped]
    It doesn't make sense that you want to impeach the President while you specifically vilify the VP as well. You don't put both on trial at once. Can you say, President Cheney?
  • operagost 2008-01-25 12:46
    We like to think we came to prominence with the Boston tea party and the concept, "No taxation without representation".


    I wonder why your nation's capital has so many license plates and bumper stickers lamenting this same issue today?

    Because the District of Columbia is a federal district, not a state; so as part of the principle of separation of powers, it has no representation in the legislature. That's the reason; whether you agree with it or not is up for debate.

    Methinks the whole set of publically stated reasons for the war of independence were nothing but smoke screens. From what little I read, it seems like there were more than a few leaders of the rebellion who were determined to have independence regardless of whether England addressed the grievances.

    Scandalous!
  • Boing 2008-01-25 12:54
    In an ill-advised crossover between my appreciation for theater and my major in computer science, I created an alias in my bash profile so I could type "exeunt" instead of exit. I never included it in production code, though. Nor did I think it was actually an improvement... I just liked the style of it.
  • Anonononymous 2008-01-25 13:09
    A Yank:
    Technically, english from US and UK should be considered two different languages. It might be annoying, but it's not as difficult as trying to figure out that "medarbejder" is danish for co-worker. Thought it was dutch at first, but the dutch translator spits the word right back at me.


    British English and American English are still clearly the same language. We spell color and armour differently, but both spellings are understood on both sides of the ocean. There are other differences in vocabulary, slang and accent, but nothing major enough to call them distinct languages.
  • Charles 2008-01-25 13:10
    Early in my career I worked with somebody who had just learned C, but who preferred Fortran. He wrote a bunch of macros to make C code look as much like Fortran as possible.
  • GregM 2008-01-25 13:27
    Don't forget the classics unless() and until()

    #define unless(x) if(!(x))
    #define until(x) while(!(x))
  • A Yank 2008-01-25 13:35
    Anonononymous:
    A Yank:
    Technically, english from US and UK should be considered two different languages. It might be annoying, but it's not as difficult as trying to figure out that "medarbejder" is danish for co-worker. Thought it was dutch at first, but the dutch translator spits the word right back at me.


    British English and American English are still clearly the same language. We spell color and armour differently, but both spellings are understood on both sides of the ocean. There are other differences in vocabulary, slang and accent, but nothing major enough to call them distinct languages.


    During the American Revolution, Noah Webster published a dictionary distinguishing US from Britain. In this respect, these are two languages of two different nations. Similar to how other Asian nations borrowed from the Chinese. In fact, Webster wanted to completely reform English, but his changes were narrowed down.
  • 28% Genius 2008-01-25 13:39
    jim:
    I used the word "unbeknownst" in a bug report today. But it was tongue in cheek. (And before you rag me, YOU try saying "unbeknownst" with tongue in cheek.)


    Ow! Bit my tongue!
  • DropDeadThread 2008-01-25 13:41
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came

  • Lawrence 2008-01-25 14:06
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    Speaking as a Kiwi (NZ'er)...

    While I found the American (capital A, BTW - don't be rude) spelling a little jarring at first, I have to concede that on the whole it's much more logical and more faithful to the actual (modern/current) pronunciation. I would argue that if you say 'z', spell it 'z', and it you insist on spelling it with 's', at least have the consistency to pronounce it as an 's'.

    And let's face it, if an American company is going to provide you with a zillion lines of free framework, I think they get to spell it using their native way, not yours.

    And anyway, there are more American's than Brits, Kiwis and Aussies (Auzzies???) put together.

    Just my two bits... don't steam at the ears <grin>.
  • Kelly 2008-01-25 14:09
    Well, Whyst not? Darest thou not hither and thither whilst pondering the question....
  • Yankee Doodle 2008-01-25 14:11
    Thats because we invented software development. If you Brits had been busy developing a superior way to program computers, you could have filled with "colour", "defence", "whilst", "blood pudding", and other such Britishims. Instead, you have wasted the last 40 years of computer science opportunity destroying your healthcare system and filling up the country with violent, disaffected Muslims. BTW, you are more than welcome to move to America.
  • Yankee Doodle 2008-01-25 14:15
    FredSaw:
    AdT:
    FredSaw:
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    They overextended themselves. It can happen to anyone. What was the name of the next country Cheney wants to invade?
    Iran. Please god, let it happen. Maybe if we get our collective ass whipped into submission we (that is, the administration) will get a clue.

    Let the record show that I drive around Dallas with a bumper sticker that says, "Save our bill of rights! www.impeachbush.org"

    Addendum (2008-01-25 09:13):
    Lend your support. Let's kick that asshole out.
    Impeach Bush


    Let the record show that you are a homosexual who wants to take large sums of money away from hard working IT employees and give it to lazy jerks.

    Let the record show that you will never again attempt to politicize this forum --- dickhead
  • Andrew 2008-01-25 14:16
    wtfst.
  • Walleye 2008-01-25 14:24
    Soviut:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    I'm Canadian and spell it "colour" with the u as well. But I'd rather languages standardize to "american english" and know to always spell it "color" than to have to guess or check the docs for every single language I use.

    (I know captcha quoting is going out of style but this one says: dolor ...weird)



    Use COBOL, it accepts either spelling.


    (I can't believe I just recommended COBOL!)
  • Fabian 2008-01-25 14:35
    Yankee Doodle:
    Thats because we invented software development. If you Brits had been busy developing a superior way to program computers, you could have filled with "colour", "defence", "whilst", "blood pudding", and other such Britishims. Instead, you have wasted the last 40 years of computer science opportunity destroying your healthcare system and filling up the country with violent, disaffected Muslims. BTW, you are more than welcome to move to America.


    If was Colossus that broke Enigma. Not ENIAC, which was little more than a science project during WWII.
    And, supposing you are American, critici(s|z)ing any healthcare system is very unwise.

    Or should that be "suppozing"?
  • My Name 2008-01-25 14:38
    In this topic, moronic English denizens argue with moronic American denizens, whil/e|st/ the half-intelligent citizens of both sides giggle at the intercontinental pissing contest.
  • mrprogguy 2008-01-25 14:55
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    But mostly you're just ticked that no one in GB has been able to get a computer language into the mainstream.
  • The General 2008-01-25 15:06
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)

    Revenge: change all the 'S's to 'SZ's. When someone asks, "WTF is this?", tell them it's Hungarian notation.
  • Andrew 2008-01-25 15:14
    FredSaw:
    Pink Duck:
    The contractor ought to check into the reasoning behind his decision to use 'whilst' over 'while'. Both are derived from ancient words, 'while' is the older and 'whilst' has mainly dropped out of usage in the US. 'whilst' is usually considered more formal and literary, which is certainly not the point of code. Plus it's an extra letter to type and introduces no benefit other than to a single individual - but of course the contractor needs to maintain his belovéd creations :)
    Sounds similar to the raging will/shall controversy, which of course is enflamed by the King James zealots with their wilt/shalt controversy.


    The difference between will & shall is important legally. "I shall pay $100." is an immediate obligation. "I will pay $100 (at some undefined future time)." means I can put it off until I die.
  • Not an English Major 2008-01-25 15:33
    I just want to know who's responsible for this mess -

    tough
    though
    through
    trough
  • Kevin Kofler 2008-01-25 15:38
    "#define a=b b=a" is not accepted by current standards-compliant preprocessors, as a=b is not a valid token.

    Qt 4 actually defines forever (and foreach): http://doc.trolltech.com/4.3/containers.html#the-foreach-keyword

    As for the use of American spelling in APIs: most KDE developers are Europeans, yet one of the API cleanups in KDE 4 was that they changed all the instances of "colour" or "dialogue" in class or method names to "color" and "dialog", respectively (and most were already using the American spelling).
  • Matthew 2008-01-25 16:00
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    Actually, the OED says that the correct spelling is with a z

    The OED:
    Hence globalism, internationalism; globalization, the act of globalizing; globalize v. trans., to render global; so globalized ppl. adj.
  • Russ 2008-01-25 16:07
    FredSaw:
    AdT:
    FredSaw:
    Well, you guys were once the empire upon which the sun never set. What happened? Got complacent?


    They overextended themselves. It can happen to anyone. What was the name of the next country Cheney wants to invade?
    Iran. Please god, let it happen. Maybe if we get our collective ass whipped into submission we (that is, the administration) will get a clue.

    Let the record show that I drive around Dallas with a bumper sticker that says, "Save our bill of rights! www.impeachbush.org"

    Addendum (2008-01-25 09:13):
    Lend your support. Let's kick that asshole out.
    Impeach Bush


    Like that's going to happen. Why don't we just take a deep breath and wait another 11 months for him to step down. That is unless he decided to tell the public that if we don't extend the presidential term limits then the terrorists win. The general populace being the dumb scared sheep that they are just might believe him and go for it.
  • Outlaw Programmer 2008-01-25 16:20
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    Can we all take a few minutes from the US/UK bashing and focus upon this masterpiece of a post? I see a new contest on the horizon...!
  • iToad 2008-01-25 16:26
    Outlaw Programmer:
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    Can we all take a few minutes from the US/UK bashing and focus upon this masterpiece of a post? I see a new contest on the horizon...!


    I see a new language on the horizon...
  • GrandmasterB 2008-01-25 16:28
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    Greatest Post Ever.

  • clively 2008-01-25 16:37
    Fine, the Real WTF is that his coworkers obviously need a lesson on their language of choice. After all it should never have taken months, or even minutes for that matter, to know that the word had been redefined.


  • clively 2008-01-25 16:38
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    Simply Beautiful.
  • untalented_newbie 2008-01-25 16:55
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    Y'know...this might interest you.

    And yes, this is definitely in the running as greatest post of all time.
  • DrGuz 2008-01-25 17:22
    Outlaw Programmer:
    This story makes much more sense when you realize that Charles I.'s coworker wears a top hat, monocle and handlebar mustache!


    I say, vengeance is served! See this fellow get his comeuppance in today's Dinosaur Comic.
  • George 2008-01-25 17:26
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    Let's be objective for a moment. As much as the world is right to despise America and Americans, for they are very stupid and do smell bad, American spellings make a lot more sense than English spellings. Americans formalized spelling first, the English added their pointless bastardizations later.

    Just one thing, it's ZED you morons, not ZEE.
  • Fabian 2008-01-25 18:12
    clively:
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    Simply Beautiful.


    Quite, except of course for the magic number, inconsistent use of 'thou' and 'you' and the likely infinite loop. ;-)

    PS: seriously, DropDeadThread's post is one for the books...
  • schnitzi 2008-01-25 18:24
    I recently moved to Australia, and was soon struck by all the uses of "whilst" instead of "while", particularly on government forms, safety signs, etc. So I looked into it a bit.

    There's actually a semi-sensible reason why it's done. It turns out, that in some obscure backwater of the Commonwealth (northern England, IIRC), the term "while" is used to mean "until".

    So you can imagine the possible confusion. For instance, on the trams here, there are signs that read "Do not talk to the driver whilst the tram is moving". Imagine that with an "until".
  • FlenchFlies 2008-01-25 18:52
    True story: worked for a French company and, them being French, they didn't want to program in the barbaric language that English is:

    #define si if
    #define sinon else
    #define alors while
    #define retour return

    *shudder*
  • German B. 2008-01-25 19:25
    Not an English Major:
    I just want to know who's responsible for this mess -

    tough
    though
    through
    trough


    Add 'thorough' to complete the English learner nightmare list. Or are there more? :(
  • Richard Sargent 2008-01-25 19:35
    [quote user="German B]Add 'thorough' to complete the English learner nightmare list. Or are there more? :([/quote]

    Let's not forget wound versus wound and wind versus wind!
  • Mitch 2008-01-25 19:56
    With you on that. And after spelling it the American way so many times, I start to use color in conversation...
  • origin_dev 2008-01-25 19:56
    For XMLHttpRequest responses,
    function... {
    return fromWhenceItCame
    }
  • MC 2008-01-25 20:06
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)



    Come up with a programming language in the UK that the world wants to use, and you can use whatever spelling you want.
  • Jim Steichen 2008-01-25 20:33
    Just wanted to check out that you gnarly dudes are using the latest and greatest software technology fer yer rad code to make it easy for the dudes who have to read it. The hip new way to write readable C code involves the use of a few simple defines.

    #define like {
    #define man ;}
    #define an ;
    #define SayBro /*
    #define CheckItOut */


    SayBro like, this is some rad program, so CheckItOut

    like
    a = b
    an
    c = d
    man

    SayBro , like who needs help from them compiler choads anyway?
    THIS is the way to write CLEAR code. I mean really! CheckItOut

    like SayBro this is ShellSort straight out of the white book, but in
    a readable form.

    CheckItOut man

    #define YoDude for(
    #define OK )
    #define is =
    #define AND &&
    #define as
    #define Do
    #define long
    #define some
    #define make
    #define garbage
    #define FAROUT

    shell(v, n) SayBro sort v[0]...v[n-1] into increasing order CheckItOut
    int v[], n;

    like int gap, i, j, temp;

    YoDude gap is n/2 an as long as gap > 0 Do some garbage an make gap /=2 OK
    YoDude i is gap an as long as i < n Do some garbage an make i++ OK
    YoDude j is i - gap an as long as j >= 0 AND v[j] > v[j+gap] Do some
    garbage an make j -= gap OK
    like
    temp is v[j] an
    v[j] is v[j+gap] an
    v[j+gap] is temp
    man
    FAROUT man

    Found at:
    http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~omri/Humor/verbose-c.html
  • Dgvid 2008-01-25 22:29
    A Brit:
    I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.

    To be fair, the differences in spelling are due to an honest attempt to modernize and improve the spelling of English words. The u in colour is quite unnecessary. Don't even get me started on draught vs. draft. Spell it that way...you might as well be speaking German!

  • SomeGuy 2008-01-26 00:10
    German B.:
    Not an English Major:
    I just want to know who's responsible for this mess -

    tough
    though
    through
    trough


    Add 'thorough' to complete the English learner nightmare list. Or are there more? :(


    width, height and lots of others ended in th or ht. it still confuses me sometimes

    O/T: the real wtf is the forum software, the text area to post is 2 colums by 20 rows ahhhh
  • Shinobu 2008-01-26 01:08
    Lewis Carroll:
    And hast thou slain the jabberfuck?
    Hentai alert.
  • Zemm 2008-01-26 01:08
    Arlie:
    When I'm in the UK, I don't whine about having to see "colour" everywhere.


    I remember in the Trumpet Winsock (what you used to get on the Internet with Windows 3.1) help there was a mention about the spellings in its program: Things like "dialler". Trumpet is an Australian company. So obviously people were whining at them about their spelling.

    But IIRC the Windows 95 version of the software they went to the dark side and spelt things in the American way. (But by then Microsoft took all their market share by including TCP/IP in Windows)
  • Freddy 2008-01-26 01:52
    To be honest, as an American, these briticisms in weights and measures are very annoying. I hate having to measure in pounds, for example, the british way. And feet and inches. Egad! Our construction sites are overloaded with *fractions*.

    Sorry, just funnin'. :)

    Thank the Lord, however, that we don't weigh things in stones.
  • Marcus 2008-01-26 07:28
    No good Technial Authors know the meaning of Elegant Fallacy.

    We know that you have to call a spade a spade and never refer to it as an entreching tool.

    Therefore to cope with those who do not have English as their first language we would never use Whilst as While isperfectly acceptable.

    Marcus
  • Anonononymous 2008-01-26 10:46
    George:

    Just one thing, it's ZED you morons, not ZEE.


    Why would it be ZED? Zee fits in the scheme with Bee, See, Dee, Gee... Why should the last letter of the alphabet get its own pronunciation scheme? If you wanted to call it Zay, that would be fine, or Ez. Zed just doesn't work.
  • Brooks 2008-01-26 14:18
    Back when I was first learning to program, I found the British spellings quite useful when I wanted to name a variable "color" and the language already had color as a keyword. I just named it "colour" and the compiler was quite happy.
  • EvanED 2008-01-26 17:23
    George:
    Just one thing, it's ZED you morons, not ZEE.

    As an American, I was very annoyed with the latest Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy movie pronouncing "ZZ9 Plural-Z Alpha" with "zee"s instead of "zed"s.

    Even if people here DO use "zee", the Hitchhiker's characters are British! They wouldn't use "zee", they'd use "zed"! (Reference the radio or BBC series if you don't believe me.)

    They also crippled the discussion between Dent and Prosser about the notice in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet in the back of a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying "beware of the leopard" (one of the best snippets of the book/radio/BBC) and removed the line "this is obviously some new use of the word 'safe' that I wasn't previously aware of."
  • - 2008-01-26 18:09
    Microsoft decided that the scripting language in Excel/Word (VBA?) should be translated to Norwegian (this was the version before Office 95 I think). This was probably the most stupid decision they have ever made, and everyone just hated it. MS quietly changed it back to English the next release.
  • ShawnD 2008-01-26 19:08
    German B.:

    Add 'thorough' to complete the English learner nightmare list. Or are there more? :(


    It was many years before I realized draught has an F sound in it. WhereTF does the F come from?

    And I am Canadian.
  • real_aardvark 2008-01-26 19:32
    ShawnD:
    German B.:

    Add 'thorough' to complete the English learner nightmare list. Or are there more? :(


    It was many years before I realized draught has an F sound in it. WhereTF does the F come from?

    And I am Canadian.

    Anglo-Saxon or Middle English. Not sure which.

    And you are excused.
  • real_aardvark 2008-01-26 19:35
    George:
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    Let's be objective for a moment. As much as the world is right to despise America and Americans, for they are very stupid and do smell bad, American spellings make a lot more sense than English spellings. Americans formalized spelling first, the English added their pointless bastardizations later.

    Just one thing, it's ZED you morons, not ZEE.

    Smell bad?

    You're talking about the cuntry that invented vaginal deoderants, for Fuck's sake.

    Addendum (2008-01-26 19:41):
    Oops, sorry. Omitted the 'u'.
  • The Dane 2008-01-26 20:36
    A Yank:
    ... "medarbejder" is danish for co-worker.

    Actually, "medarbejder" is Danish for employee.
  • SlyEcho 2008-01-28 03:46
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)



    using Colour = System.Drawing.Color;
    using Globalisation = System.Globalization;


    Not quite as flexible as the C preprocessor, but it works.
  • Nick 2008-01-28 04:01
    If they want more elegance in a language, use INTERCAL.
    You have to say PLEASE a lot, or else the compile will fail because 'Programmer is insufficiently polite'.

    Also, no dirty GOTO's in INTERCAL. They use COME FROM instead. Much more elegant.
  • Taz 2008-01-28 06:06
    Anonononymous:
    There are other differences in vocabulary, slang and accent, but nothing major enough to call them distinct languages.


    What do you do with same words having different meanings? e.g. gas (US) vs. petrol (UK). Whereas gas in the UK stands for natural gas.

    And there are Americans who won't know what a tyre is. You know, this circular, inflatable device Americans spell tire. :)
  • JimM 2008-01-28 06:35
    German B.:
    Not an English Major:
    I just want to know who's responsible for this mess -

    tough
    though
    through
    trough


    Add 'thorough' to complete the English learner nightmare list. Or are there more? :(


    Plough

    and I think there might be one more - the number seven rings a bell for the -ough construct
  • JimM 2008-01-28 06:39
    GregM:
    Don't forget the classics unless() and until()

    #define unless(x) if(!(x))
    #define until(x) while(!(x))


    Actually, I find the
    until(x) { }
    and
    do { ... } until (x)
    constructs useful for certain tests that involve multiple comparisons. I once had to correct my tutor's code because he'd got his || and && mixed up in a while statement.

    On the other hand, it has to be VBScript for the win with the charming
    while condition
    
    statements...
    [bold]wend[/bold]

    construction...

    CAPTCHA: validus. Yes, yes, I'm validating already...
  • Rhialto 2008-01-28 08:18
    EvanED:

    I'm also reminded of my favorite entry I've seen to the IOCCC. It starts out with a whole ton of #defines for keywords that look like BASIC or Pascal, then a program written in them. Basically the the body of the program loos like it was written in Pascal, with some extra semicolons and other places the syntax isn't quite right.


    http://www0.us.ioccc.org/2000/primenum.c
  • JD 2008-01-28 10:06
    #define clever dumbAss
  • xtremezone 2008-01-28 10:21
    Not a Brit (but a Canadian):
    I understand what that's like, but that's often a library thing. I develop extensively with Ogre3D, which is maintained by non-US folks, so they use Colour. As a Canadian, I use 'our' too, but when programming I snap into a US spelling mindset. I often find myself mixing up the two regardless.

    Now, if a language introduced a keyword like "neighbour", that'd probably rile up a bunch of folks.

    I'm Canadian, but I prefer the American spelling of things...

    Addendum (2008-01-28 10:46):
    FlenchFlies:
    True story: worked for a French company and, them being French, they didn't want to program in the barbaric language that English is:

    #define si if
    #define sinon else
    #define alors while
    #define retour return

    *shudder*

    *shudder*
  • ChessKnught 2008-01-28 11:20
    ROFL...

    I worked with this guy who used to do something similar. The company we worked for had the coding policy of always using "the" in front of it's variable names, such as "theForm", "theData", "theHeaderStruct", etc... well, he didn't want to do that so instead, he decided that the German version would be better... he coded everything as "daForm", "daData", "daHeaderStruct"... drove everybody nuts.
  • Fnord 2008-01-28 12:01
    This contractor made a feeble attempt at 'job security'. As a contractor, I understand the need for an extension from time to time, but it is best to employ multiple overlapping methods of 'job security' to make yourself invaluable to the company. Now, had the changes to the header file been promoted to all other developers' machines but not to production, this would have been much more effective because then all of the other developers would have been scratching their heads while the contractor would have known the 30 second fix.
  • Rev. Spaminator 2008-01-28 12:22
    This sounds similar to the Pirate Speak perl module. But everyone knows that is only meant for fun.
  • Jay 2008-01-28 13:56
    ShawnD:
    It was many years before I realized draught has an F sound in it.


    Riddle: What causes a cold, cures a cold, can be used to pay the doctor for the cure, and is used to replace the Army doctor?

    Answer: A draught.

    A riddle from the play, "Our American Cousin".
    (The play Abraham Lincoln was attending when he was assassinated.) (I don't remember the exact words but that was the gist of it.)
  • Eric 2008-01-28 15:19
    I'm only a dumb English major, but even I figured out why it compiled on the contractor's system before the end of the story.

    Where are all the Tech Writers? I'm sure there are plenty of examples of inelegant syntax, grammar, and spelling errors in documentation written by engineers.
  • Anonymous 2008-01-28 15:51
    The contractor seems to have embiggened his role with a less than cromulent performance.
  • Tom 2008-01-28 17:19
    I used the word "Kibosh" in a bug report once and got scolded at triage
  • Self Aware 2008-01-29 14:09
    I've always wondered how non-English speakers interpret English programming constructs.

    Maybe we should just use the whitespace programming language?
  • dp 2008-01-29 18:14
    Perhaps you should contract a British company to develop your programming language of choice, eh?
  • Alan 2008-01-30 05:48
    I used to use an in-house language that had a
    catch ... caught ... endcatch
    construct.
    But it also accepted the spelling
    catch ... catched ... endcatch
    Allegedly this was to make life easier for the Germans.
  • Volatile 2008-01-30 06:30
    whye?
  • Volatile 2008-01-30 06:33
    Volatile:
    whye?

    ehm...
    s/.*//
    Anyway, cute code... :)
  • urtext 2008-01-30 08:58
    The word choice makes more sense when you realize that Charles I died in 1649.
  • getAccess 2008-01-30 10:41
    I can almost imagine how programming languages will go if Shakespeare pioneered it... LOL
  • magetoo 2008-01-30 10:54
    Self Aware:
    I've always wondered how non-English speakers interpret English programming constructs.

    As code.

    Addendum (2008-01-30 11:01):
    Self Aware:
    I've always wondered how non-English speakers interpret English programming constructs.

    As code.


    Edit:

    (No, seriously. It really is a sort of code that you need to learn in order to communicate what you want.

    Possibly, a good thing about this is that you don't have to think about separating the everyday and the programming-specific definitions of, say, "OR". I suppose.)
  • Annie 2008-01-31 11:06
    Speaking of american-centric programming constructs, I once insisted that 'comments shall be in the English language' be included in a style guide, after reading a whole lot of code commented in French (and yes, this was code written in Redwood City, CA).
    HPL is Hindi centric.
    कार्य खाली मुख्य ( )
    लिखें "Hello World!"
    खत्म कार्य
    The language, intended to teach non English speaking Indians basic programming, uses reserved words in Hindi. I remind our complaining British friend that localizing keywords is a two way street. Angrezi Hatao!
  • CSK 2008-02-04 00:47
    Tbat's the WRONG cheek. Very wrong cheek...
  • Paolo G 2008-02-07 06:44
    DropDeadThread:
    whilst thee_value dominate not twenty_and_five
    
    procure thine data thusly
    shouldst thou faileth thine task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return from whence you came



    I do love it when people try to write in archaic English and mess it up royally.

    Let's try that again.

    whilst the_value dominate not five_and_twenty
    
    procure thy data thus
    shouldst thou fail thy task
    announce 'hear ye, hear ye!'
    return whence thou came


    Explanation...

    * It's "four and twenty blackbirds", not "twenty and four blackbirds".
    * "Thine" means "yours", as it "It is thine". "Thy" means "your", as it "hallowed be thy name". It was used instead of "thy" before a vowel, as in "thine eyes".
    * -eth was the third-person singular ending, which is -s in modern English. So "he faileth" (= he fails) but not "thou faileth" or anyone else faileth, for that matter.
    * -est was the second-person singular ending, so was only used with "thou" ("thou dost", "thou goest").
    * "Thusly" - "thus" is already an adverb, so why stick "-ly" on the end of it? This only came into being in the late 19th century according to dictionary.com, so it's an anachronism here.
    * "Whence" means "from where", so "from whence" is wrong. Yep, everyone says it, but it's wrong.
    * Oops, how did that last "you" creep in?
  • Dave 2008-02-14 06:54
    'embiggoned', 'efface' ??

    Pot , kettle?
  • A Yankee 2008-05-14 18:01
    Plain and simple. We invented it. Same reason why the telephone country code for the US is 1 and airline pilots (regardless of country) talk to control towers in English.
  • Lumpio- 2008-06-18 11:32
    And if they used the British English versions, the American English speakers would be annoyed. Can't please everyone at the same time.

    Btw, I'm fairly sure "globalization" is also an acceptable spelling in British English - even though it might not be in common use. For example the Oxford English Dictionary gives "globalization" as the primary word, and the spelling with "s" as a variant.
  • m1k4 2008-08-06 17:33
    me too:
    WHYST?!

    WYSTF
  • Arfer 2008-09-10 00:02
    A Brit:
    To be honest being British, these americanisms in programming languages are very annoying. I hate having to spell colour for example, the american way without the u.
    C# is full of them in the System namespace such as changing all the S's to Z's (like in Globalisation)


    And then - when you finally get used to spelling everything the US way, you find libraries that spell it the local way - and it confuses you more...(I've used something, I suspect it was wxWidgets that had Colour (or more accurately wxColour))...
  • Happy American 2009-05-28 14:15
    "Not ENIAC, which was little more than a science project during WWII."

    WOW, REALLY? I see you studied your history through rose colored glasses! :-)
  • Henry Troup 2009-09-25 10:43
    Back in the days of mainframe editors that took keyword commands, one guy I worked with had an editor profile similar to

    ALIAS UP DOWN
    ALIAS DOWN UP

    The WTF was that he was the newsletter editor and attempted to publish this as an example of "good" practice.

    I also remember running into

    #define TRUE 0
    #define FALSE 1

    once upon a time, where you had to code

    if (varname == TRUE)

    This created hundreds of hard-to-find bugs.

    CAPTCHA: sagaciter - one who write wise footnotes?
  • Anonecromancer 2013-10-30 09:50
    Richeh:
    So is that Charles I as in "Charles the First" then?


    In the future, we refer to him as 'Charles the Frist'
  • pjt33 2013-10-30 10:10
    me too:
    WHYST?!

    Try "Wherefore?!"
  • Al H. 2013-10-30 15:56
    One of my favorite things to do in C/C++ is to define "then" as nothing. The looks of colleagues is worth the brief ridicule. Then they ask "how?" and I get to ridicule them :).
  • Matt 2013-11-21 05:07
    Most of the time the Z is not actually an Americanism, that's a fallacy. For example "Globalization" is the correct spelling according to the Oxford English Dictionary. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_spelling