Fan or Die!

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  • gosse 2009-09-15 09:04
    cooling fail.
  • Anonymous 2009-09-15 09:05
    What they obviously need to do to fix this problem is build a robot.
  • SR 2009-09-15 09:08
    Anonymous:
    What they obviously need to do to fix this problem is build a robot.


    I vote for a monkey butler.
  • SR 2009-09-15 09:08
    Anonymous:
    What they obviously need to do to fix this problem is build a robot.


    I vote for a monkey butler.
  • Charles400 2009-09-15 09:09

    Dave was a big fan of the build process.
  • uiv 2009-09-15 09:09
    they already had mainframes in 1994?
  • Steve the Cynic 2009-09-15 09:09
    "Nobody ever thought to..."

    Apparently, even David didn't think of it. Sigh.
  • SR 2009-09-15 09:09
    SR:
    I vote for a monkey butler.


    Oh cool. After weeks of needing to send 3 times to comment, now I send once and get 2.
  • SR 2009-09-15 09:10
    Charles400:

    Dave was a big fan of the build process.


    [applauds]
  • Steve the Cynic 2009-09-15 09:10
    uiv:
    they already had mainframes in 1994?


    s/already/still/
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 09:12
    Is this the origin of the term "fanboy"?
    And over all that time, nobody ever thought to vent A/C directly to the machine room, or a build machine that wasn't so temperamental, or at the very least, buy an electric fan.
    I don't think I would have the guts to submit a story with such an admission in it. I mean, for about twelve bucks you can get a little fan at Walmart... if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.
  • !? 2009-09-15 09:13
    And over all that time, nobody ever thought to vent A/C directly to the machine room, or a build machine that wasn't so temperamental, or at the very least, buy an electric fan.


    Not even David!?

    ...no more comments.
  • jcoehoorn 2009-09-15 09:16
    I guess that's one to keep in shape while working a desk job.
  • Warren 2009-09-15 09:17
    Sadly this is only the extreme outcome of the same mentality that plagues us all:

    "If it's too much effort to do properly, tell everyone how to do it the stupid way."
  • akatherder 2009-09-15 09:19
    You should see what they have to do when they send an email.
  • Anon 2009-09-15 09:22
    Code Dependent:
    Is this the origin of the term "fanboy"?
    And over all that time, nobody ever thought to vent A/C directly to the machine room, or a build machine that wasn't so temperamental, or at the very least, buy an electric fan.
    I don't think I would have the guts to submit a story with such an admission in it. I mean, for about twelve bucks you can get a little fan at Walmart... if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.


    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
  • Anon 2009-09-15 09:23
    akatherder:
    You should see what they have to do when they send an email.


    Tie it to a pigeon?
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 09:25
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?
  • Incourced 2009-09-15 09:25
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?


    And on all the room moves, they never thought to spec another socket/multi adapter?

  • amischiefr 2009-09-15 09:27
    Alright, so the OP is the WTF in this story for not buying a $10 fan right?
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 09:28
    Incourced:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    And on all the room moves, they never thought to spec another socket/multi adapter?
    I imagine those are sold pretty close to the fans in Walmart.
  • RBoy 2009-09-15 09:28
    Fantastic...
  • Max 2009-09-15 09:28
    Come on, people. You should be smarter than this.

    Fans do not actually cool down air. They just move it. The story said that they fanned air from the hallway into the warm room. The open door is the key, not the fan.

    So the real solution would be to just chock the door open...
  • DES 2009-09-15 09:30
    An electric fan would actually have raised the average temperature in the machine room.

    Blowing the dust out of the case and CPU fans (and vacuuming it up so it didn't go right back in) and putting the frickin' case cover back on would have gone a long way.
  • MRAB 2009-09-15 09:33
    DES:
    An electric fan would actually have raised the average temperature in the machine room.

    Blowing the dust out of the case and CPU fans (and vacuuming it up so it didn't go right back in) and putting the frickin' case cover back on would have gone a long way.


    "Dust and dirt swirled in the room", so the machine's fans were probably already clogged.
  • justsomedude 2009-09-15 09:35
    Clearly they should be using a script to slosh the cd tray back an forth, and just tape the cardboard to that...
  • Anonymous Organ Donor 2009-09-15 09:35
    Hunnert bucks fer a new ac wood do it.
    Too hunnert (this hurts to type) wood git a bigger juan.
    Cupel hunnert more fer a big ol' unit that'll take care of it reeaaaaal gud.
  • eViLegion 2009-09-15 09:49
    Very nice.

    I would have suggested a complicated system of levers and pulleys.
  • notme 2009-09-15 09:54
    DES:
    An electric fan would actually have raised the average temperature in the machine room.


    Not as much as a human fanning with a piece of cardboard...
  • Gieron 2009-09-15 09:57
    I think more of us could use some exercise during the work day. Perhaps this is not as stupid as it sounds.
  • teh jav 2009-09-15 10:00
    The "whole room filled with dust" bit makes me think no one ever actually this before the OP. Then when his co-workers released just how dumb he was they continued the pretence just to see how long it lasted.

    Quite some time from the sounds of it.

    Attempting to get past the DailyWTF error page:

    This is not spam. The Real WTF is the forum software. I would have posted first if I did not have to fan the DailyWTF IIS server. <simpsons/> Last post (correct at time of posting). I love Paula.
  • Richard 2009-09-15 10:02
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    Invent USB ports so I can use a USB fan. :-)
  • Mike 2009-09-15 10:03
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    >KILL COMPUTER
    >You can't do that here...
  • Anon 2009-09-15 10:08
    Mike:
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    >KILL COMPUTER
    >You can't do that here...


    >KILL COMPUTER WITH SWORD
    >You don't have the sword...
    >GET SWORD
    >You don't see the sword here...
  • Adrian 2009-09-15 10:12
    Dave was the big fan in the build process.

    There, fixed it for ya!
  • the real wtf fool 2009-09-15 10:16
    Anon:
    Mike:
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    >KILL COMPUTER
    >You can't do that here...


    >KILL COMPUTER WITH SWORD
    >You don't have the sword...
    >GET SWORD
    >You don't see the sword here...


    >COMPILE
    >You have been reading too much xkcd
  • WhiskeyJack 2009-09-15 10:18
    The real WTF is that even David didn't think to buy a fan or at least bring in a vacuum to clean up all that dust. If not a big box fan by the door, how about another fan installed inside the tower case?

    I don't think people should be afraid to spend a minimal amount of their own money on things to make the workplace better (for yourself, at minimum, but if other people benefit, all the better). Here at my desk those brilliant IT guys gave me a PC with a DVI-capable graphics card, a DVI-capable LCD monitor, and a VGA cable with DVI-to-VGA adaptor. They wouldn't buy me a DVI cable because it wasn't strictly necessary, so I bought my own.

  • BentFranklin 2009-09-15 10:22
    I like how the build gets compiled twice. In case the first time it isn't compiled enough.
  • eliac 2009-09-15 10:26
    teh jav:
    The "whole room filled with dust" bit makes me think no one ever actually this before the OP.

    You accidentally the whole sentence...
  • Grump 2009-09-15 10:29
    Removing the case only makes the problem worse...it helps to channel air flow over the components to aid cooling. Dumbasses.
  • Grue 2009-09-15 10:31
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?

    You have been eaten by a grue!
  • Federico 2009-09-15 10:36
    "one of the batch jobs failed and we had to manually update about 1,500 transactions. Exciting stuff!": isn't it already a WTF? What can be exciting about manually updating 1.500 transactions? Didn't they invent computers exactly to avoide repetitive actions?
  • derula 2009-09-15 10:38
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    > TURN AROUND

    You see the machine room door before you. In the background, you can see Tom sitting in front of his monitor, about to copy his compiled software to a network directory.

    You should get ready to cool the build machine if you want to stay employed.

    > RUN

    You run out of the building. In the background, you hear your former co-workers shout "fire!". From far, you hear sirens from fire engines approaching, and just for a second, you remember what you learned about the Doppler effect back in school.

    > KEEP RUNNING

    You keep running until you reach home. When you read the newspaper the next day, you learn that the Initrode Global headquarters burned to the ground.

    YOU LOST.
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 10:44
    derula:
    YOU LOST.
    I dunno, sounds like a win to me.
  • JoJo 2009-09-15 11:02
    Max:
    Come on, people. You should be smarter than this.

    Fans do not actually cool down air. They just move it. The story said that they fanned air from the hallway into the warm room. The open door is the key, not the fan.

    So the real solution would be to just chock the door open...


    and put the fan in the doorway...
  • SR 2009-09-15 11:05
    SR:
    Anonymous:
    What they obviously need to do to fix this problem is build a robot.


    I vote for a monkey butler.
  • CaptainSmartass 2009-09-15 11:06
    BentFranklin:
    I like how the build gets compiled twice. In case the first time it isn't compiled enough.


    "He said compile twice."

    "He likes compiling."
  • Derek 2009-09-15 11:06
    Old Cobol Bill knows how to solve this problem...


  • AlpineR 2009-09-15 11:07
    TRWTF is that Tom and coworkers managed to keep straight faces for YEARS while David and other young hires continued to believe in the "fan the computer to make it work" prank.
  • xtremezone 2009-09-15 11:09
    justsomedude:
    Clearly they should be using a script to slosh the cd tray back an forth, and just tape the cardboard to that...
    We have a winner!
  • DWalker59 2009-09-15 11:09
    "David, I'm so glad you were able to make your way here! Us old timers have been hoping ..."

    That's "We old timers", man, not "Us old timers". The old, sweaty guy doesn't even know basic, simple grammar, so how can he possibly know anything vastly harder like computer programming?

    :-)

    It's weird that (good) computer programming is an exacting art/skill, requiring great attention to detail and an appreciation of minutiae, and yet so many programmers can't even spell. (I'm talking about the native English/American speakers; proficiency in a second or third language is understandably hard.)

    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)
  • Sir Wilhelm 2009-09-15 11:15
    If it doesnt involve a mouse-in-a-wheel fueled contraption alla Incredible Machine, then I dont do it.
  • boardofpowder 2009-09-15 11:18
    ha ha ha, I nearly pissed myself laughing! "hustle man, hustle hustle hustle!"

    That's awesome!
  • Bosshog 2009-09-15 11:18
    Max:

    Fans do not actually cool down air. They just move it.

    WINDMILLS DO NOT WORK THAT WAY!
    GOODNIGHT!
  • DWalker59 2009-09-15 11:24
    The fans aren't "cooling down the air"; the fans are moving the air faster to better cool the warmer-than-ambient-air-temperature components in the computer. Sheesh.
  • Maurits 2009-09-15 11:24
    DWalker59:
    how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration?


    Wiping is continuous, but *dabbing* is discrete.
  • psm321 2009-09-15 11:32
    DWalker59:

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)


    One drop at a time.
  • Ouch! 2009-09-15 11:36
    DWalker59:
    "David, I'm so glad you were able to make your way here! Us old timers have been hoping ..."

    That's "We old timers", man, not "Us old timers". The old, sweaty guy doesn't even know basic, simple grammar, so how can he possibly know anything vastly harder like computer programming?

    I don't think computer programming is indeed vastly harder.
    The grammars of programming languages are much simpler than grammars of natural languages.
    Plus, the compiler nowadays not only notices your grammatical errors but also tells you in what way you erred (of course, it doesn't spot the exact error in every case; still it's much easier to correct your errors now than in the days where the only error message the compiler gave was "Syntax error on line xx. Possibly missing ';' on line above.").

    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Isn't that supposed to be spelled 'complimentary' on the internets?

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)

    'Discretely' as opposed to 'continuously'?
  • monkeyPushButton 2009-09-15 11:47
    Ouch!:
    DWalker59:
    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Isn't that supposed to be spelled 'complimentary' on the internets?

    Muphry's Law FTW
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 11:54
    monkeyPushButton:
    Ouch!:
    DWalker59:
    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Isn't that supposed to be spelled 'complimentary' on the internets?
    Muphry's Law FTW
    Give that man a two's compliment!
  • DWalker59 2009-09-15 11:58
    Code Dependent:
    monkeyPushButton:
    Ouch!:
    DWalker59:
    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Isn't that supposed to be spelled 'complimentary' on the internets?
    Muphry's Law FTW
    Give that man a two's compliment!


    Or two compliments!
  • Malenfant 2009-09-15 12:00
    Ouch!:
    DWalker59:
    "David, I'm so glad you were able to make your way here! Us old timers have been hoping ..."

    That's "We old timers", man, not "Us old timers". The old, sweaty guy doesn't even know basic, simple grammar, so how can he possibly know anything vastly harder like computer programming?

    I don't think computer programming is indeed vastly harder.
    The grammars of programming languages are much simpler than grammars of natural languages.
    Plus, the compiler nowadays not only notices your grammatical errors but also tells you in what way you erred (of course, it doesn't spot the exact error in every case; still it's much easier to correct your errors now than in the days where the only error message the compiler gave was "Syntax error on line xx. Possibly missing ';' on line above.").

    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Isn't that supposed to be spelled 'complimentary' on the internets?

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)

    'Discretely' as opposed to 'continuously'?


    Although I don't usually like to pull people on their grammar, for some reason I feel the need to comment here. Complementary was exactly right, unless you wanted to praise them for their lack of skills. I don't mind people making mistakes with language, but I feel incorrect 'corrections' need a response.
  • Plz Send Me The Code 2009-09-15 12:03
    complementary and complimentary are two different words...or don't I get the joke?
  • snoofle 2009-09-15 12:05
    akatherder:
    You should see what they have to do when they send an email.
    So that's how you get fan mail!
  • Murdog 2009-09-15 12:07
    Anon:
    akatherder:
    You should see what they have to do when they send an email.


    Tie it to a pigeon?


    Nope, go stoke the woodfire out back for them there smoke signals!
  • Dank. 2009-09-15 12:23
    I am so annoyed that someone already suggested the CD tray hack.

    Now I am gonna go out back and throw a few logs on the TCP/IP smoke-stack and see if that makes my connection faster.
  • Bellinghman 2009-09-15 12:26
    Malenfant:
    Ouch!:

    Isn't that supposed to be spelled 'complimentary' on the internets?
    Although I don't usually like to pull people on their grammar, for some reason I feel the need to comment here. Complementary was exactly right, unless you wanted to praise them for their lack of skills. I don't mind people making mistakes with language, but I feel incorrect 'corrections' need a response.
    Malenfant <--.....--> Joke

    (Yes, I know, he didn't use a smiley.)
  • jimbobmcgee 2009-09-15 12:28
    Bosshog:

    WINDMILLS DO NOT WORK THAT WAY!
    GOODNIGHT!

    Win!!
  • Bellinghman 2009-09-15 12:28
    Plz Send Me The Code:
    complementary and complimentary are two different words...or don't I get the joke?
    Yes, they are two different words. The joke is that 'on the internets' [sic], they are seemingly confused more often than not.
  • jschank 2009-09-15 12:51
    Don't be silly. There's no way a pigeon can carry a mail server.

    You need a least two, and they have to have it on a line.
  • Loopy 2009-09-15 12:53
    Gieron:
    I think more of us could use some exercise during the work day. Perhaps this is not as stupid as it sounds.

    My thoughts exactly. Probably the only exercise they get all day. I also miss the days when compiles took 10 minutes or more and you had time for a coffee break.
  • Ouch! 2009-09-15 13:03
    Bellinghman:
    Plz Send Me The Code:
    complementary and complimentary are two different words...or don't I get the joke?
    Yes, they are two different words. The joke is that 'on the internets' [sic], they are seemingly confused more often than not.

    Quite sad that such an obvious joke needs to be explained, isn't it?
  • edthered 2009-09-15 13:08
    Grammanazi...

    I find it interesting that folks get their knickers all in a bunch over the "correct" use of a living language. I'm sure at some point in the past, someone would have told you that "We old timers..." was improper use.

    If you want to go all "that's not proper..." then restrict it to latin or one of the other dead languages where hard and fast rules actually make sense. Language, first and foremost, is about communication.

    Did you correctly understand what was said?

    Yes?

    Then it's PROPER!

    Geez...

    BTW... "As the months passed, David came to learn that, oddly enough, the younger and healthier non-smoking developers tended to have more success at getting their builds sent to the mainframe and tested"... almost blew coffee out my nose on that...
  • Chelloveck 2009-09-15 13:11
    Loopy:
    I also miss the days when compiles took 10 minutes or more and you had time for a coffee break.


    You need to work on a bigger project. A complete build here takes an hour, on some moderately beefy machines. More than two hours if you feed it to the dog of a VMware instance that is the "official" build machine.

    Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go read Slashdot-- Um, I mean, I have to go recompile my code.
  • snoofle 2009-09-15 13:18
    Loopy:
    Gieron:
    I think more of us could use some exercise during the work day. Perhaps this is not as stupid as it sounds.

    My thoughts exactly. Probably the only exercise they get all day. I also miss the days when compiles took 10 minutes or more and you had time for a coffee break.
    If you do stuff like this in enough project files, you can make compiles take as long as you like.
  • DWalker59 2009-09-15 13:29
    edthered:
    Grammanazi...

    Did you correctly understand what was said?

    Yes?

    Then it's PROPER!



    No, it ain't. That's not how things work.
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 13:45
    DWalker59:
    edthered:
    Grammanazi...

    Did you correctly understand what was said?

    Yes?

    Then it's PROPER!
    No, it ain't. That's not how things work.
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.
  • ExParrot 2009-09-15 14:00
    I have a story in a similar vein.

    Years ago, I was an operator on a Univac series 3 (AKA RCA Series 3, in the SPECTRA line). One evening, the AC for the whole building failed. Our machines were crashing every few minutes.

    In desperation, I opened the side panels to aid in cooling. There, I found the overtemp sensor - a common wall thermostat! I pushed it up to the max, and to keep the behemoth going, I would submit a job and fan the thermostat with my coat. Of the three machines in the room, mine was the only one that didn't crash. It didn't seem to suffer from overheat damage, either, so it was a win-win.
  • EngleBart 2009-09-15 14:03
    The boss of Ryan would fix it in a second...

    http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Fisher_Price_Technology_Integration.aspx
  • Sylver 2009-09-15 14:17
    Steve the Cynic:
    "Nobody ever thought to..."

    Apparently, even David didn't think of it. Sigh.


    Precisely my thought.
  • Keloran 2009-09-15 14:35
    So TRWTF is that they were all idiots
  • Anon 2009-09-15 14:36
    eViLegion:
    Very nice.

    I would have suggested a complicated system of levers and pulleys.


    How about a series of tubes?
  • Franz Kafka 2009-09-15 14:45
    Chelloveck:
    Loopy:
    I also miss the days when compiles took 10 minutes or more and you had time for a coffee break.


    You need to work on a bigger project. A complete build here takes an hour, on some moderately beefy machines. More than two hours if you feed it to the dog of a VMware instance that is the "official" build machine.

    Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go read Slashdot-- Um, I mean, I have to go recompile my code.


    Over here, builds take 40 minutes, or 1 if you disable ivy:reports (it builds a monster 2G xml file). I've been places that need over an hour to build - it usually means the project is to big.
  • bene 2009-09-15 15:06
    DWalker59:
    "David, I'm so glad you were able to make your way here! Us old timers have been hoping ..."

    That's "We old timers", man, not "Us old timers". The old, sweaty guy doesn't even know basic, simple grammar, so how can he possibly know anything vastly harder like computer programming?

    :-)

    It's weird that (good) computer programming is an exacting art/skill, requiring great attention to detail and an appreciation of minutiae, and yet so many programmers can't even spell. (I'm talking about the native English/American speakers; proficiency in a second or third language is understandably hard.)

    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)


    I think that that is actually connected to that you spend 8 hours a day being bitched at about tiny semantics by either compilers or basic tests (you do them, right?!) so when it comes to natural language, which normally parses just fine with even huge mistakes, many programmers just dont bother. ;)

    I've noticed the same thing in lots of programmers in my country as well, so its not just you english speakers.
  • Bim Job 2009-09-15 15:27
    Code Dependent:
    DWalker59:
    edthered:
    Grammanazi...

    Did you correctly understand what was said?

    Yes?

    Then it's PROPER!
    No, it ain't. That's not how things work.
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.
    Which is not only painful to read, but orthogonal to a discussion of what constitutes "proper" spelling or grammar.

    "Proper" in this context means exactly what a compiler would want it to mean: a construct which follows the rules as currently understood. Where a natural language is concerned, a small amount of wiggle-room is allowed. I would argue that the confusion between the nominative and the accusative in "Us programmers..." falls in to this category. (It's certainly acceptable in spoken English, which is an entirely different beast to written English.)

    Misspelling "complementary" as "complimentary," or vice versa, does not. It's all very well to say that "the meaning is obvious in context," but how do you know that without carefully analysing the context in each case? Why not just get it right in the first place?

    At the very least, you're going to cause a brain hiccough while the reader subconsciously says "did he really mean that?"

    The argument that the reader will follow the general meaning holds no water, either. If that were the criterion for proper usage, then our aim would be to write using all the solecisms that the reader would have used. This requires mind-reading in the one-to-one case and is entirely unworkable in the one-to-many.

    Besides which, given the illiteracy of the average programmer, you'd need a pretty sophisticated language mangler. Oh wait, I've got one right here:

    "I can haz Babelfizh?"
  • Bim Job 2009-09-15 15:34
    Or, to put it another way, misspelling complementary as complimentary is not complimentary to complementary; although misspelling complimentary as complementary is complementary to complimentary usage.

    Oh, and anybody who thinks that spelling and grammar rules are any more set in (Rosetta?) stone with regard to Latin or Greek clearly has never read any Latin or Greek.
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 15:38
    Bim Job:
    Code Dependent:
    DWalker59:
    edthered:
    Grammanazi...

    Did you correctly understand what was said?

    Yes?

    Then it's PROPER!
    No, it ain't. That's not how things work.
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.
    Which is not only painful to read, but orthogonal to a discussion of what constitutes "proper" spelling or grammar. *snip*
    Did you correctly understand what was said?
  • Bim Job 2009-09-15 15:58
    Code Dependent:
    Did you correctly understand what was said?
    Yup: I correctly understood it the first time I read it, many years ago. I've correctly understood it every single time it gets trotted out as a "gotcha" argument. I correctly understood it when you brought it up again this time, and I correctly understood the relationship between the argument that you can eroredr the ltteers in a wrod, ety sittl raed it wouthit a porbelm, and the argument that you can misspell a word as an entirely different word without fear of consequential confusion.

    There is no relationship. The two arguments are orthogonal. Did you correctly understand what "athrogolan" means?
  • shadowman 2009-09-15 15:59
    DWalker59:
    "David, I'm so glad you were able to make your way here! Us old timers have been hoping ..."

    That's "We old timers", man, not "Us old timers". The old, sweaty guy doesn't even know basic, simple grammar, so how can he possibly know anything vastly harder like computer programming?

    :-)

    It's weird that (good) computer programming is an exacting art/skill, requiring great attention to detail and an appreciation of minutiae, and yet so many programmers can't even spell. (I'm talking about the native English/American speakers; proficiency in a second or third language is understandably hard.)

    You would think the skills would be complementary, but obviously they are not.

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)


    Spoken language is informal and generally has less stringent rules of acceptable grammar. Are you really implying that you only talk in complete sentences and adhere to the same rules for written grammar when speaking?

    Seriously -- you're picking at a single informality in a *spoken* sentence, and then coming to the conclusion that the speaker doesn't know basic, simple grammar. That smacks of someone who is pretty desperately searching for something to make himself feel and sound superior to others.

    I'd suggest you keep looking, we're not impressed yet.
  • Zapp Brannigan 2009-09-15 16:02
    Are we 100% certain that Tom and the other old-timers weren't jerking David's chain? Cause that would be cool to pull off a long term punk like that.
  • Hatterson 2009-09-15 16:07
    Code Dependent:
    Is this the origin of the term "fanboy"?
    And over all that time, nobody ever thought to vent A/C directly to the machine room, or a build machine that wasn't so temperamental, or at the very least, buy an electric fan.
    I don't think I would have the guts to submit a story with such an admission in it. I mean, for about twelve bucks you can get a little fan at Walmart... if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.

    Yea it would take about 1 trip for me to get tired of running down the hall. I'd break my own budget and buy the cheapo Walmart fan and then calmly sit back and upload my changes.
  • quibus 2009-09-15 16:16
    Loopy:
    Gieron:
    I think more of us could use some exercise during the work day. Perhaps this is not as stupid as it sounds.

    My thoughts exactly. Probably the only exercise they get all day. I also miss the days when compiles took 10 minutes or more and you had time for a coffee break.


    Where I work, the test framework takes 4 hours to compile.
    Its a horrible screwup "script" that is heavily influenced by Pascal syntax, which is parsed into horrible, *horrible* c++ which is compiled. We have massive amounts of testcases that have to be compiled.
    The fun part? We have a homegrown test framework that is *really* scripts. If you need to change something you do so, and then just run it again. No half a days worth of compiling. >.< But we are not allowed to use it anymore. Company policy.

    I am SO going to have to write something about my workplace. The product I work on is oozing of wtfery.
  • moz 2009-09-15 16:37
    Murdog:
    Anon:
    akatherder:
    You should see what they have to do when they send an email.


    Tie it to a pigeon?


    Nope, go stoke the woodfire out back for them there smoke signals!
    Out back? Why not use the charcoal one in the machine room? Why do you think it's so warm and dusty in there?
  • v.dog 2009-09-15 17:00
    "or at the very least, buy an electric fan."
    Electric fans don't work long term, All they do is cause the heatsinks to get clogged with dust (TRWTF, I've tried this).

    A five dollar case fan and a hole saw is all you need.
  • Moss 2009-09-15 17:44
    the real wtf fool:
    Anon:
    Mike:
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    >KILL COMPUTER
    >You can't do that here...


    >KILL COMPUTER WITH SWORD
    >You don't have the sword...
    >GET SWORD
    >You don't see the sword here...


    >COMPILE
    >You have been reading too much xkcd


    >CONTINUE TO FAN COMPUTER
    >You fan the computer. Nothing happens.

    >KICK COMPUTER
    >You kick the computer. Your foot hurts.

    >WAIT
    >You are slain by a grue.
  • pong 2009-09-15 17:53
    boardofpowder:
    ha ha ha, I nearly pissed myself laughing! "hustle man, hustle hustle hustle!"

    That's awesome!


    Hustlin' Hustlin' Hustlin'
    Every day I'm hustlin'.
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-15 18:04
    Bim Job:
    There is no relationship. The two arguments are orthogonal.
    As you wish.
    Bim Job:
    Did you correctly understand what "athrogolan" means?
    Of course. However, you are using the archaic spelling. In modern Thurmese, it's "athrogolian".
  • By eck 2009-09-15 18:29
    jschank:
    Don't be silly. There's no way a pigeon can carry a mail server.

    You need a least two, and they have to have it on a line.


    These days they just need to carry a USB key.
  • Mr.'; Drop Database -- 2009-09-15 19:10
    Code Dependent:
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.
    Tihs tierd old cyoasptpa nedes to die. It osuveers sorht wodrs and all of the leretts are itnanlolietny rangeerard in a way taht's ralbeade to hanmus. Try rdloanmy snfihfulg the leretts of the wdors and wctah as the huamn bais dprsieaaps. You can pablorby stlil dihepecr it but it's osiblovuy mroe dcfulfiit. Ieialtlndncy, the utesiinrvy rarceseh is tlltoay foantciil. It nveer henepapd.
  • Andrew 2009-09-15 19:15
    And miss the spectacle of the old timers running out of breath?

    This arrangement is beneficial to the young and healthy.
  • Caffeine 2009-09-15 19:56
    jschank:
    Don't be silly. There's no way a pigeon can carry a mail server.


    It could grip it by the husk...
  • Xythar 2009-09-15 20:07
    Mr.'; Drop Database --:
    Code Dependent:
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.
    Tihs tierd old cyoasptpa nedes to die. It osuveers sorht wodrs and all of the leretts are itnanlolietny rangeerard in a way taht's ralbeade to hanmus. Try rdloanmy snfihfulg the leretts of the wdors and wctah as the huamn bais dprsieaaps. You can pablorby stlil dihepecr it but it's osiblovuy mroe dcfulfiit. Ieialtlndncy, the utesiinrvy rarceseh is tlltoay foantciil. It nveer henepapd.


    That's a little harder but still more readable than you'd expect from randomly rearranged words. I got stuff like "copypasta" almost immediately.
  • arran 2009-09-15 20:12
    Looks like to me the reason they didn't do replace it, is they enjoyed it. Look how they made it a game at the start with a 'heads start.' How else would that system move building with them?
  • Peter 2009-09-15 20:18
    "You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?"

    Buy a power strip while you're out getting that fan.
  • Franz Kafka 2009-09-15 20:55
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Are we 100% certain that Tom and the other old-timers weren't jerking David's chain? Cause that would be cool to pull off a long term punk like that.


    I expect so - wouldn't make sense to torpedo your SW build for a prank.
  • Edward Royce 2009-09-15 21:13
    Ok I'm sorry but I'm stealing this. There is no way in heck that I'm ever not going to make the 'New Hire' go through this run.to.server.and.fan.it.with.cardboard.

    I may be a bastard but I'm an -amused- bastard and that is all that really matters.
  • Anonymous Lurker 2009-09-15 22:15
    Edward Royce:
    Ok I'm sorry but I'm stealing this. There is no way in heck that I'm ever not going to make the 'New Hire' go through this run.to.server.and.fan.it.with.cardboard.

    I may be a bastard but I'm an -amused- bastard and that is all that really matters.


    Hell yeah. My company is looking for a new junior programmer at the moment and I can't wait to use this.
  • Franz Kafka 2009-09-15 22:25
    Edward Royce:
    Ok I'm sorry but I'm stealing this. There is no way in heck that I'm ever not going to make the 'New Hire' go through this run.to.server.and.fan.it.with.cardboard.

    I may be a bastard but I'm an -amused- bastard and that is all that really matters.


    If he shows up the second day...

    I mean, if he shows up the second day with a fan, give him a raise.
  • Scarlet Manuka 2009-09-15 22:53
    Franz Kafka:
    If he shows up the second day...

    I mean, if he shows up the second day with a fan, give him a raise.


    No, look at him as if you're horrified and tell him that company policy forbids any personal equipment to be plugged into the power sockets, just to make his brain melt. Oh, and whip up a fake PO for a power strip and a fan and tell him it's just waiting on approval and you should be able to get it in a month or two.
  • P.M.Lawrence 2009-09-16 00:08
    'Plus, the compiler nowadays not only notices your grammatical errors but also tells you in what way you erred (of course, it doesn't spot the exact error in every case; still it's much easier to correct your errors now than in the days where the only error message the compiler gave was "Syntax error on line xx. Possibly missing ';' on line above.").'

    Not necessarily. I know of a Forth variant where there is no such thing as a grammatical error and all possible finite source compiles to something (unrecognised text defines and declares a new keyword). Infinite source is valid in that too, you just never get anything out before you hit a limit.
  • Ouch! 2009-09-16 01:09
    P.M.Lawrence:
    'Plus, the compiler nowadays not only notices your grammatical errors but also tells you in what way you erred (of course, it doesn't spot the exact error in every case; still it's much easier to correct your errors now than in the days where the only error message the compiler gave was "Syntax error on line xx. Possibly missing ';' on line above.").'

    Not necessarily. I know of a Forth variant where there is no such thing as a grammatical error and all possible finite source compiles to something (unrecognised text defines and declares a new keyword). Infinite source is valid in that too, you just never get anything out before you hit a limit.

    So the grammar is "Do what thou wilt"? Scary.
    But easy.
    Of course, whether your programme does what you intended is a different question.
  • teh jav 2009-09-16 04:51
    Code Dependent:
    derula:
    YOU LOST.
    I dunno, sounds like a win to me.

    Have you not played The Path. Lost is the new win.
  • Grant 2009-09-16 05:10
    As the months passed, David came to learn that, oddly enough, the younger and healthier non-smoking developers tended to have more success at getting their builds sent to the mainframe and tested.

    Looks like another case of survival of the fittest to me.
  • SR 2009-09-16 07:01
    Keloran:
    So TRWTF is that they were all idiots


    Awww! That's _always_ TRWTF!
  • Swa 2009-09-16 08:08
    not sure about this but:

    isn't the whole point of the supposed fanning to let fresh air enter the warm server room? all you people whining about installing a mechanical fan etc, that most likely wouldn't be enough. you need a doorstop too. ;)

    anyhow, i'm SO going to use this when we get our next hire...

    either for large SVN commits or letting something build on the Build server. i don't know which yet.
    hmz... or maybe for our 'slow' QA server. fan it to make it go faster!
  • uxor 2009-09-16 08:15
    Mr.'; Drop Database --:
    Code Dependent:
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.
    Tihs tierd old cyoasptpa nedes to die. It osuveers sorht wodrs and all of the leretts are itnanlolietny rangeerard in a way taht's ralbeade to hanmus. Try rdloanmy snfihfulg the leretts of the wdors and wctah as the huamn bais dprsieaaps. You can pablorby stlil dihepecr it but it's osiblovuy mroe dcfulfiit. Ieialtlndncy, the utesiinrvy rarceseh is tlltoay foantciil. It nveer henepapd.


    Congratulations!
    You both can have wonderful careers writing spam.

    Fuckers.
  • Ron Piler 2009-09-16 08:20
    obody ever thought to vent A/C directly to the machine room, or a build machine that wasn't so temperamental, or at the very least, buy an electric fan.


    Including our hero, David G. So the real WTF is that numbnuts put up with this crap for so long
  • Ron Piler 2009-09-16 08:23
    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.


    Congratulations, you are the ten billionth person to regurgitate this tired old cliche. Here's an idea: write a script which will parse and re-arrange every single thing you ever read, in line with this philosophy, and spend a month or two reading just that. Then tell us how little it matters what order the letters are in
  • Cosi Fan Tutti 2009-09-16 08:26
    DES:
    An electric fan would actually have raised the average temperature in the machine room.

    Blowing the dust out of the case and CPU fans (and vacuuming it up so it didn't go right back in) and putting the frickin' case cover back on would have gone a long way.


    Depends which way the fan was facing. Having it behind the machine (from the door's perspective) blowing hot air out, would help
  • Spudley 2009-09-16 08:32
    Steve the Cynic:
    they still had mainframes in 1994?


    Yes.

    Yes they did.

    I know because I was there using one. An ICL mainframe running VME. Fortunately for me, I had a PC because my main job was to write code for DOS that interfaced with the mainframe. I was the only programmer in the company who's job didn't involve writing COBOL all day (just the odd bit here and there, but that was plenty!). Most of the other people in the building just had dumb terminals -- ie a monocrome (green-screen) CRT that linked up directly to the mainframe.

    We also had 8 inch floppy disks which the data entry clerks used for backing up their mainframe data.

    Yes, it was hideously archaic even in the mid 1990s but I do know that some of those old ICLs are still in service -- when I went to the bank recently, the lady I spoke to may have had a nice shiny PC on her desk, but the main window she was using to pull up my details was a terminal emulator showing an ICL-VME screen. I don't know whether the hardware in the background has seen improvements over the years, but I can easily imagine the bank's data capture clerks dutifully filing everything away onto 140K 8 inch floppies.
  • Martin Fowler 2009-09-16 08:33
    BentFranklin:
    I like how the build gets compiled twice. In case the first time it isn't compiled enough.


    So...either you don't compile your code locally to see if it works before committing it, or your organisation is in the habit of releasing binaries compiled by a developer. Either way, you fail process management forever
  • Martin Fowler 2009-09-16 08:33
    BentFranklin:
    I like how the build gets compiled twice. In case the first time it isn't compiled enough.


    So...either you don't compile your code locally to see if it works before committing it, or your organisation is in the habit of releasing binaries compiled by a developer. Either way, you fail process management forever
  • Arancaytar 2009-09-16 08:39
    if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.


    What... new hardware in the machine room, without being signed off by management, the Server Team and a highly-paid consultant? That would SO violate The Process! You can't do that!
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-16 08:58
    uxor:
    Congratulations!
    You both can have wonderful careers writing spam.

    Fuckers.
    Ron Piler:
    Congratulations, you are the ten billionth person to regurgitate this tired old cliche, blah blah blah, etc. etc.
    "Context". It'll be a new concept for you two. Study up on it; it'll help you in social situations, greatly improving your acceptance factor.
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-16 09:10
    Arancaytar:
    if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.
    What... new hardware in the machine room, without being signed off by management, the Server Team and a highly-paid consultant? That would SO violate The Process! You can't do that!
    I guess I'd request approval from the guy who signed off on the cardboard. :)
  • Connect the dots! La la la la la la! 2009-09-16 09:44
    Maybe they just enjoyed running in the halls all the time.

    If not, then that's a pretty big WTF...
  • eliac 2009-09-16 10:21
    Spudley:
    Steve the Cynic:
    they still had mainframes in 1994?


    Yes.

    Yes they did.

    I know because I was there using one. An ICL mainframe running VME. Fortunately for me, I had a PC because my main job was to write code for DOS that interfaced with the mainframe. I was the only programmer in the company who's job didn't involve writing COBOL all day (just the odd bit here and there, but that was plenty!). Most of the other people in the building just had dumb terminals -- ie a monocrome (green-screen) CRT that linked up directly to the mainframe.

    We also had 8 inch floppy disks which the data entry clerks used for backing up their mainframe data.

    Yes, it was hideously archaic even in the mid 1990s but I do know that some of those old ICLs are still in service -- when I went to the bank recently, the lady I spoke to may have had a nice shiny PC on her desk, but the main window she was using to pull up my details was a terminal emulator showing an ICL-VME screen. I don't know whether the hardware in the background has seen improvements over the years, but I can easily imagine the bank's data capture clerks dutifully filing everything away onto 140K 8 inch floppies.


    Oh, this just calls for a Fight Club quote...

    - Which car company do you work for?
    - A major one.
  • IT Girl 2009-09-16 10:31
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?


    Buy a $6 power bar to go with the fan.
  • Bim Job 2009-09-16 10:50
    Code Dependent:
    uxor:
    Congratulations!
    You both can have wonderful careers writing spam.

    Fuckers.
    Ron Piler:
    Congratulations, you are the ten billionth person to regurgitate this tired old cliche, blah blah blah, etc. etc.
    "Context". It'll be a new concept for you two. Study up on it; it'll help you in social situations, greatly improving your acceptance factor.
    Well, you know. What they said.

    It's (not particularly) interesting that neither one could be bothered to read earlier posts on the subject.

    It's (mildly) interesting that they both disagree with you, nonetheless.

    It's (even more) interesting that you're clue-batting them with the accusation that they haven't read the "context."

    IIRC, "context" was my whole problem with your absurd post in the first place. Of course, it's always easier to throw random insults at people you'll never meet than to address the defects of your own argument. Call it the "ex hominem" attack. Blah blah blah. Snip.
  • Code Dependent 2009-09-16 10:55
    Bim Job:
    IIRC, "context" was my whole problem with your absurd post in the first place. Of course, it's always easier to throw random insults at people you'll never meet than to address the defects of your own argument. Call it the "ex hominem" attack. Blah blah blah. Snip.
    Keep trying, BJ. Scattershot's bound to hit something, sooner or later.
  • Ron Piler 2009-09-16 11:24
    Code Dependent:
    uxor:
    Congratulations!
    You both can have wonderful careers writing spam.

    Fuckers.
    Ron Piler:
    Congratulations, you are the ten billionth person to regurgitate this tired old cliche, blah blah blah, etc. etc.
    "Context". It'll be a new concept for you two. Study up on it; it'll help you in social situations, greatly improving your acceptance factor.


    cf: http://www.encyclopediadramatica.com/Butthurt

    It's ok for me to call you a wanker, because of the context
  • Ceiswyn 2009-09-16 13:01
    Code Dependent:
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.


    First: that's not true. It only works if you're very picky about which words you choose and how to scramble them.

    Second: while it's possible to make out the sense of many things that are ungrammatical or incorrectly spelled, they make people's brains glitch and slow them down. Making something easy to comprehend - ie using the rules - is polite. Making something hard to comprehend - ie throwing a bunch of words at the screen and expecting the reader to make sense of them - is rude.
  • Liquid Egg Product 2009-09-16 13:47
    Code Dependent:
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.


    I'm sure people with reading disorders that require them to read words letter-by-letter were appreciative of the research.

    Ceiswyn:

    First: that's not true. It only works if you're very picky about which words you choose and how to scramble them.


    Exactly. The given example "Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy" has some conveniently placed letters (like the "cc" in the mixed up "according").

    "Anocdircg to rraceseh at an Egisnlh uiitrvesny" is more of a pain.
  • Franz Kafka 2009-09-16 14:41
    Scarlet Manuka:
    Franz Kafka:
    If he shows up the second day...

    I mean, if he shows up the second day with a fan, give him a raise.


    No, look at him as if you're horrified and tell him that company policy forbids any personal equipment to be plugged into the power sockets, just to make his brain melt. Oh, and whip up a fake PO for a power strip and a fan and tell him it's just waiting on approval and you should be able to get it in a month or two.


    By which time he'll be in a company that isn't so batshit insane.
  • uxor 2009-09-16 17:35
    Code Dependent:
    uxor:
    Congratulations!
    You both can have wonderful careers writing spam.

    Fuckers.
    Ron Piler:
    Congratulations, you are the ten billionth person to regurgitate this tired old cliche, blah blah blah, etc. etc.
    "Context". It'll be a new concept for you two. Study up on it; it'll help you in social situations, greatly improving your acceptance factor.

    "Spelling". I'd tell you to google it, but the way you type you're not going to find it.
  • Bim Job 2009-09-16 19:43
    Liquid Egg Product:
    Code Dependent:
    From the "first and last letter" people:

    Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.


    I'm sure people with reading disorders that require them to read words letter-by-letter were appreciative of the research.

    Ceiswyn:

    First: that's not true. It only works if you're very picky about which words you choose and how to scramble them.


    Exactly. The given example "Aoccdrnig to rseearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy" has some conveniently placed letters (like the "cc" in the mixed up "according").

    "Anocdircg to rraceseh at an Egisnlh uiitrvesny" is more of a pain.
    Oh, now, you two are just trying to be reasonable with CodeDependent. You know that won't work -- he's a Texan. He's even left-wing, so far as these things go in Texas.

    He can't cope with grammar (which is odd, because his is perfect); he can't cope with a logical argument (I'm still waiting for a refutation of "orthogonal"); and he just loves to dive sideways into an irrelevant (but fun) quote.

    You kind of have to take him as he is. In Texas, he's a Good Ole Boy. In the world of etymology, he's more of a juvenile delinquent.
  • Alberto 2009-09-17 06:05
    And so he would had been fired for changing a FANtastic and FANctional release process.
  • Alberto 2009-09-17 06:07
    Code Dependent:
    Is this the origin of the term "fanboy"?
    And over all that time, nobody ever thought to vent A/C directly to the machine room, or a build machine that wasn't so temperamental, or at the very least, buy an electric fan.
    I don't think I would have the guts to submit a story with such an admission in it. I mean, for about twelve bucks you can get a little fan at Walmart... if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.


    And so he would had been fired for changing a FANtastic and FANctional release process.
  • PinkFloyd43 2009-09-17 07:34
    I worked at a billion $$ company who basically did the same thing, we always had multiple fans in our computer room and one day the word went out if anyone had a fan at home to go and get it as it was really hot outside and the systems needed to keep going. We did have a fantastic team but the almightly dollar kept them from upgrading the a/c, don't get me going on the emergency generator day, ok, lost power and no generator, seems like they didn't pay the bill for the diesel and it had simply ran out due to monthly testing for a year or so..........again the almight dollar. BTW, it took an entire day to get the cash to get the thing serviced and started up again.
  • Anonymouse 2009-09-17 08:14
    psm321:
    DWalker59:

    Oh, and how do you "discretely" wipe off perspiration? (I know, that's Alex's fault...)


    One drop at a time.


    I think the intention was 'discreet' or 'discreetly'.
  • Buzzard 2009-09-17 21:05
    I am sure this fanning job could be outsourced to an Indian firm with great success
  • method1 2009-09-18 04:42
    DWalker59:

    It's weird that (good) computer programming is an exacting art/skill, requiring great attention to detail and an appreciation of minutiae, and yet so many programmers can't even spell. (I'm talking about the native English/American speakers; proficiency in a second or third language is understandably hard.)


    I find that the 2nd or 3rd language speakers(especially Europeans) spell better than many natives. The number of idiots that type 'seperate' instead of 'separate' or 'loose' when they mean 'lose' is beyond belief. Mistakes like 'loose' are the best, as they require *more* characters that the correct version. Mind you, the worst mistakes are spellings like 'color' for 'colour' or 'nabor' for 'neighbour'. People who make these errors tend to have speech impediments as well,unfortunately.
  • @thorfi 2009-09-18 05:05
    Arancaytar:
    if I couldn't convince management to kick down for one, I'd be willing to do it myself.


    What... new hardware in the machine room, without being signed off by management, the Server Team and a highly-paid consultant? That would SO violate The Process! You can't do that!

    Sadly, I am the David in Question. And even more Sadly, Arancaytar is about right.
  • @thorfi 2009-09-18 05:09
    DES:
    An electric fan would actually have raised the average temperature in the machine room.

    Blowing the dust out of the case and CPU fans (and vacuuming it up so it didn't go right back in) and putting the frickin' case cover back on would have gone a long way.
    Heh. Nope. Was tried, didn't work. Ancient 286, and I really mean ancient. Half dead fans, unique comms card (as in, there is only one and you can't buy a replacement). Put the case on in the nice cool main office and it would die, let alone in the Hot Place.
  • savar 2009-09-18 22:30
    Mr.'; Drop Database --:
    Tihs tierd old cyoasptpa nedes to die. It osuveers sorht wodrs and all of the leretts are itnanlolietny rangeerard in a way taht's ralbeade to hanmus. Try rdloanmy snfihfulg the leretts of the wdors and wctah as the huamn bais dprsieaaps. You can pablorby stlil dihepecr it but it's osiblovuy mroe dcfulfiit. Ieialtlndncy, the utesiinrvy rarceseh is tlltoay foantciil. It nveer henepapd.


    Haha... I was just wondering the same thing to myself as i read that classic chain mail example for the 10th time. I was about to write a perl script to see if it would apply to any normal writing samples. Thanks for saving me the time :)

    I'm still stuck on 'cyoasptpa' and 'foantciil'

    Addendum (2009-09-18 22:42):
    edit: 'copypasta' and 'fictional'.. cripes!
  • Frans Baron 2009-09-20 11:51
    Max:
    Come on, people. You should be smarter than this.

    Fans do not actually cool down air. They just move it. The story said that they fanned air from the hallway into the warm room. The open door is the key, not the fan.

    So the real solution would be to just chock the door open...
    So in your opinion, a CPU fan does not make the CPU less warm?

    Why not try it out yourself by unplugging the power cable to your CPU fan? ;)
  • Elvis 2009-09-21 07:21
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    Perhaps there wasn't a spare outlet?
    You are standing in a room, holding a fan. There is an old computer with the covers off here. There are no spare wall outlets.

    What do you do now?



    type XYZZY and see what happens
  • el_oscuro 2009-09-21 20:59
    Dank.:
    I am so annoyed that someone already suggested the CD tray hack.

    Now I am gonna go out back and throw a few logs on the TCP/IP smoke-stack and see if that makes my connection faster.

    I always thought that if you ran the cat-5 cable downhill, that would make your connection faster.