Elevator Failure

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  • AH 2012-12-14 06:10
    "YouTube think it knows..."?

    If "YouTube" is singular, "think" should be "thinks".

    If "YouTube" is plural (which it's not), "it knows" should be "they know".

    Ugh.
  • John Jackson 2012-12-14 06:24
    The FoxPro one isn't that uncommon... When you're running a foxpro program, it doesn't like being interrupted (it could corrupt tables if it exits prematurely)
  • chris 2012-12-14 06:49
    John Jackson:
    The FoxPro one isn't that uncommon... When you're running a foxpro program, it doesn't like being interrupted (it could corrupt tables if it exits prematurely)

    Great. I just tried to look up how old the concept of db transaction logs is - I couldn't find a direct answer, but did see the top of a paper on the "history" of it, written in 1993.
  • ParkinT 2012-12-14 07:01
    John Jackson:
    The FoxPro one isn't that uncommon... When you're running a foxpro program, it doesn't like being interrupted (it could corrupt tables if it exits prematurely)


    It would be worse to experience Premature Incontinence!!
  • the beholder 2012-12-14 07:04
    Were there 102% laminated sheets when that promo started?
  • OldCoder 2012-12-14 07:11
    the beholder:
    Were there 102% laminated sheets when that promo started?

    Given the accuracy of the other arithmetic in that shot, anything is possible.
  • faoileag 2012-12-14 07:15
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???

    Elevators don't move, they sulk in basements.
  • Gorbachov 2012-12-14 07:19
    OldCoder:
    the beholder:
    Were there 102% laminated sheets when that promo started?

    Given the accuracy of the other arithmetic in that shot, anything is possible.


    thats what she said!
  • TheCPUWizard 2012-12-14 07:19
    chris:
    John Jackson:
    The FoxPro one isn't that uncommon... When you're running a foxpro program, it doesn't like being interrupted (it could corrupt tables if it exits prematurely)

    Great. I just tried to look up how old the concept of db transaction logs is - I couldn't find a direct answer, but did see the top of a paper on the "history" of it, written in 1993.


    So, FoxPro as a product goes back to 1989, and the underlying design goes back even earlier [1981 for DBase II, and 1971 for RETRIEVE)
  • portablejim 2012-12-14 07:22
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.
  • faoileag 2012-12-14 07:25
    Levi B.:
    I want to know why there's still 41% of the laminating sheets left unclaimed with that awesome -21% savings.

    Because shoppers smart enough to notice the "-" in front of the 21% are waiting for the "Lightning Deal" period to end so that they could order the laminating sheets at their original price of $3.32.
  • faoileag 2012-12-14 07:30
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.
  • Ho Miscreant! 2012-12-14 07:35
    The value of "What is the sound of one hand clapping is wrong. Please meditate on this further"
  • Hindrim 2012-12-14 07:44
    faoileag:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???

    Elevators don't move, they sulk in basements.


    Just speak nicely to them and they may even go sideways.
  • faoileag 2012-12-14 07:50
    Hindrim:
    faoileag:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???
    Elevators don't move, they sulk in basements.
    Just speak nicely to them and they may even go sideways.

    I thought they were over that phase?
  • Norman 2012-12-14 07:56
    Since the bounds of that range aren't specified to be open or closed, only a linguistic interpretation of "between" is possible. So in a mathematical sense, there isn't a (real) number _between_ 1048576 and 1048576.

    I guess this is a clever trick by MS to test the general population for math geniuses that invented a superior kind of mathematics, so they can hire them first.
  • Lockwood 2012-12-14 07:59
    How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and five are seven.
    Sometime, Alexander. Sometimes they are nine. Sometimes they are six. Sometimes they are all of them at once.

    Addendum (2012-12-14 08:18):
    Tried to delete this and repost. Someone got in after me.
  • just stop it 2012-12-14 08:03
    AH:
    "YouTube think it knows..."?

    If "YouTube" is singular, "think" should be "thinks".

    If "YouTube" is plural (which it's not), "it knows" should be "they know".

    Ugh.

    Cool story, bro.
  • Lockwood 2012-12-14 08:05
    "Do you remember," he went on, "writing in your diary, "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus five make seven"?"
    "Yes," said Alexander.
    The Registration Form held up his right hand, all fingers extended, then his left hand, its back towards Alexander, with the thumb, ring and little fingers hidden and two fingers extended.
    "How many fingers am I holding up, Alexander?"
    "Seven"
    "And if the party says it is not seven but nine, then how many?"
    "Seven"
    "How many fingers, Alexander?"
    "Seven! Seven! What else can I say? Seven!"
    "How many fingers, Alexander?"
    "Nine! Nine! Nine!"
    "No, Alexander, that is no use. You are lying. You still think there are seven. How many fingers, please?"
    "How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and five are seven."
    "Sometimes, Alexander. Sometimes they are nine. Sometimes they are six. Sometimes they are all of them at once."
  • Gaza Rullz 2012-12-14 08:08
    How does the elevator move ????








  • MindChild 2012-12-14 08:30
    My father is an elevator mechanic for over 20 years, so I can shed some light on the elevator moving. That panel has a missing operating system, not the elevator. An elevator is almost completely mechanical, driven by controllers that have designs dating back 80+ years. Some newer elevators (Otis most notably) use microcontrollers, but these tend to be undesirable because they require cooling in the machine room.
  • Bob 2012-12-14 08:49
    What? Maths fail!

    1 divided by 3 == one third == 0.3recurring

    Therefore, 3 times one third == 3 times 0.3recurring == 0.9recurring == 1
  • Mike Nightstky 2012-12-14 08:52

    Winnipeg minor basketball Association
    We have made come changes to your schedule on December 8th we apologize for the incontinence.


    First i thought it was the association of kindergarden kids. And the "come" changes were because of the incontinence of some of the members of the minor league.


  • Xarthaneon the Unclear 2012-12-14 09:00
    faoileag:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???

    Elevators don't move, they sulk in basements.


    What I do on the weekend is none of your business.
  • Zapp Brannigan 2012-12-14 09:03
    Grammar police are the the buzz killers of the the internet.
  • John M 2012-12-14 09:20
    The real WTF is the fact that there were 102% laminating sheets as part of that deal. Guess some were in overstock.

    CAPTCHA: Damnnum: Damn that number. Har har, oh the irony!
  • Martin E 2012-12-14 09:22
    The Hyper-V submission isn't actually a bug.

    When you configure a VM in Hyper-V 2012 to use dynamic RAM it defaults to a max memory of 1048576 Mb (or 1 Tb).

    If the VM is running, as this one is, you can't lower the max memory, only raise it and if the VM was configured with the default memory config you can't enter anything but the max amount of memory - which the tooltip will inform you about.

    CAPTCHA: genitus (a smart d*ck?)
  • Ben Jammin 2012-12-14 09:39
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.

    I believe that:
    1) 2.9 and 5.9 are just small values of 3 and 6 respectively and
    2) if you're gonna be a math nazi, you should get it right.

    p.s. I still like the original joke
  • Hank 2012-12-14 09:53
    chris:
    John Jackson:
    The FoxPro one isn't that uncommon... When you're running a foxpro program, it doesn't like being interrupted (it could corrupt tables if it exits prematurely)

    Great. I just tried to look up how old the concept of db transaction logs is - I couldn't find a direct answer, but did see the top of a paper on the "history" of it, written in 1993.
    We were doing properly atomic database transactions with reliable locking, commits, rollbacks, before and after images, "deadly embrace" handling, all that stuff, back in 1980 on a Honeywell mainframe with COBOL.

    Then came the "microcomputer" (aka PC) people: "You guys make everything too hard! This will be so easy!"

    We looked into the technology and saw they'd blown off virtually all the principles of computer science and practical knowledge acquired from experience. We warned it wouldn't be reliable. There will be problems.

    Nobody cared. All they wanted was easy.

    And we still struggle from that laziness today. Although arguably Windows 8 is a lot more complicated to master than that mainframe ever was. So there's your "easy".
  • Bas B. 2012-12-14 10:13
    "I want to know why there's still 41% of the laminating sheets left unclaimed with that awesome -21% savings."

    61% was already claimed. According my math only 39% is left unclaimed.
  • Rafael 2012-12-14 10:16
    In Soviet Daily WTF 61% claimed laminated sheets + 41% unclaimed totals the 102% of produced laminated sheets.
  • Lee 2012-12-14 10:17
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.


    1 / 3 = .3333...(3 repeated)
    .3333... * 3 = .9999... (9 repeated)
    1 / 3 = 1/3
    1/3 * 3 = 1

    1 = .9999...

    2.9999... = 2 + 3/3
    5.9999... = 5 + 3/3

    2.9999... + 5.9999... = 9

    capture/oppeto
  • Jim Rees 2012-12-14 10:42
    I don't think I'd get on the elevator if the display said "check cable".
  • Bribous 2012-12-14 11:10

    "Do you remember," he went on, "writing in your diary, "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus five make seven"?"
    "Yes," said Alexander.
    The Registration Form held up his right hand, all fingers extended, then his left hand, its back towards Alexander, with the thumb, ring and little fingers hidden and two fingers extended.
    "How many fingers am I holding up, Alexander?"
    "Seven"
    "And if the party says it is not seven but nine, then how many?"
    "Seven"
    "How many fingers, Alexander?"
    "Seven! Seven! What else can I say? Seven!"
    "How many fingers, Alexander?"
    "Nine! Nine! Nine!"
    "No, Winston, that is no use. You are lying. You still think there are seven. How many fingers, please?"
    "How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and five are seven."
    "Sometimes, Alexander. Sometimes they are nine. Sometimes they are six. Sometimes they are all of them at once."

    Oh. My. God.
  • Garrison Fiord 2012-12-14 11:14
    Up and down.
  • Jeff 2012-12-14 11:16
    Yoda moves the elevator! (...or depending on the energy needed to move the elevator, more than one yoda: http://what-if.xkcd.com/3/)
  • DCRoss 2012-12-14 11:19
    There... are... SEVEN LIGHTS!
  • Captcha:validus (your comment is not) 2012-12-14 11:34
    Lee:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.


    1 / 3 = .3333...(3 repeated)
    .3333... * 3 = .9999... (9 repeated)
    [snip]

    Pedantic reply:
    He said "irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers". This can be interpreted as including natural numbers only, since you can't actually "throw" an infinity of nines at a number, in which case you can't have "9 repeated" and he is absolutely correct.
  • Todd 2012-12-14 11:37
    I must be kinda dumb, but I can't find the WTF in the Amazon pic. Is it that -21% is not a big enough discount? Or $4.02 not a big enough price for the discount to be relevant?
  • sRc 2012-12-14 11:53
    the percent is the discount. -21% means its more expensive then the regular price
  • Zecc 2012-12-14 11:55
    My Firefox is visual too.
  • Visual Chrome 2012-12-14 11:56
    "Oh, Visual Firefox, I wish I knew how to quit you! Literally," wrote Peter Hamlen.


    Should be Visual FoxPro, not Firefox? Unless I'm missing some in joke?
  • jay 2012-12-14 12:43
    the beholder:
    Were there 102% laminated sheets when that promo started?


    The value of, "What's the result of 41+61?" is too large. Maximum value of 100 required.

    If the party says that 41+61=100, how many is it now?
  • jay 2012-12-14 12:59
    "Do you remember," he went on, "writing in your diary, "Freedom is the freedom to say that $1.6 trillion minus $40 billion makes $1.56 trillion"?"

    "Yes," said Milton.

    The President's Budget held up his right hand, all fingers extended, then his left hand, its back towards Milton, pointing to the annual deficit of $1.6 trillion and the president's proposed tax increase on the rich of $40 billion.

    "How much is the deficit now, Milton?"

    "$1.56 trillion."

    "And if the Democratic Party says it is not $1.56 trillion, but balanced, then how much?"

    "$1.56 trillion."

    "How much, Milton?"

    "$1.56 trillion! What else can I say? $1.56 trillion!"

    "How much, Milton?"

    "Balanced! Balanced! Balanced!"

    "No, Milton, that is no use. You are lying. You still think there is a deficit. How much, please?"

    "How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? $1.6 trillion minus $40 billion is $1.56 trillion."

    "Sometimes, Milton. Sometimes it is balanced. Sometimes it is a defict. Sometimes it is a surplus."
  • Zylon 2012-12-14 13:23
    Visual Chrome:
    "Oh, Visual Firefox, I wish I knew how to quit you! Literally," wrote Peter Hamlen.
    Should be Visual FoxPro, not Firefox? Unless I'm missing some in joke?
    The joke is the level of proofreading that goes into the articles. Unfortunately, the joke is on us.
  • Ken B 2012-12-14 13:25
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.
    (I hope this formats correctly.)

      _     _
    
    2.9 + 5.9 == 9
    (That's supposed to be overlines above the ".9"s.

    Not "close, but never really equal", but "exactly equal".
  • airdrik 2012-12-14 13:29
    We used to have a quotes page on our company wiki which featured (among other memorables, until the page was banned by our legal department to avoid potential legal complications) an e-mail chain between one of our client service people and one of our clients over some issue or other whose details have long since been lost.
    The CSR e-mailed the client with the explanation of the problem+resolution, followed by the "sorry for the incontinence" line, and the client replied saying "The <short description of problem> was a minor inconvenience. The incontinence, however, must be a major problem. Sorry to hear about it"
  • HowItWorks 2012-12-14 13:43
    faoileag:
    Hindrim:
    faoileag:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???
    Elevators don't move, they sulk in basements.
    Just speak nicely to them and they may even go sideways.

    I thought they were over that phase?

    Every one should know the elevator cage does not move. You enter that while the surrounding time-space continium is re-positioned.
  • Cube 2012-12-14 13:48
    "I want to know why there's still 41% of the laminating sheets left unclaimed with that awesome -21% savings"

    Cos their math is as good as yours?
  • Your Name 2012-12-14 13:52
    HowItWorks:
    faoileag:
    Hindrim:
    faoileag:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???
    Elevators don't move, they sulk in basements.
    Just speak nicely to them and they may even go sideways.

    I thought they were over that phase?

    Every one should know the elevator cage does not move. You enter that while the surrounding time-space continium is re-positioned.


    Look, we've been through this already. The laws of physics are the same for either reference frame, so you can model it as either the building is stationary and the elevator moving relative to it, or the elevator stationary and the building moving relative to the elevator. They're both equally correct; neither is a privileged frame of reference.
  • Lil Jon 2012-12-14 14:26
    TRWTF is FoxPro
  • Brian 2012-12-14 14:30
    >> "Oh, Visual Firefox, I wish I knew how to quit you! Literally,"

    Visual Firefox?
  • Jack 27 2012-12-14 14:46
    AH:
    "YouTube think it knows..."?

    If "YouTube" is singular, "think" should be "thinks".

    If "YouTube" is plural (which it's not), "it knows" should be "they know".

    Ugh.


    It's a British thing to treat company names as if they were plural.

    "Microsoft have come out with a new operating system."
  • urza9814 2012-12-14 14:49
    Brian:
    >> "Oh, Visual Firefox, I wish I knew how to quit you! Literally,"

    Visual Firefox?


    Yes, not to be confused with non-visual Firefox, which uses a text-to-speech engine to read the raw HTML code to you. It's not very well known, as it can only be invoked though voice recognition software running on a headless server.
  • 71 2012-12-14 14:51
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.


    True for any finite number of 9's. But if they are non-terminating decimals (the 9's go on forever) then 2.9[...] + 5.9[...] is strictly equal to 9.
  • ubersoldat 2012-12-14 15:02
    Lil Jon:
    TRWTF is FoxPro


    +1

    And yet, it's still being used and some apps actively maintained.
  • Capitalist 2012-12-14 15:18
    Bas B.:
    "I want to know why there's still 41% of the laminating sheets left unclaimed with that awesome -21% savings."

    61% was already claimed. According my math only 39% is left unclaimed.
    That's the math version of Muphry's law.
  • Paul Neumann 2012-12-14 15:20
    71:
    True for any finite number of 9's. But if they are non-terminating decimals (the 9's go on forever) then 2.9[...] + 5.9[...] is strictly equal to 9.
    Except, strictly speaking 2.9-non-terminating is 3 and 5.9-non-terminating is 6. If we are trunking the numbers, or performing any other conforming non-integral manipulation on the numbers than the only other solution's are
    2 + 5 = { 6, 7, 8 }
  • Quietust 2012-12-14 15:36
    Personally, I'd like to think that the "2+5=9" is just a clever way to filter out spambots that try to evaluate mathematical equation CAPTCHAs - a human would enter 7, get the error "must be at least 9", then enter 9 and successfully sign up, but a bot would always enter 7, not knowing to parse the error message for the correct value.
  • Zapp Brannigan 2012-12-14 16:03
    Ken B:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.
    (I hope this formats correctly.)

      _     _
    
    2.9 + 5.9 == 9
    (That's supposed to be overlines above the ".9"s.

    Not "close, but never really equal", but "exactly equal".


    OMG! You are wrong. 2.99999... is an infinite series and it is equal to 3. Look it up.
  • foo 2012-12-14 16:15
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Ken B:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.
    (I hope this formats correctly.)

      _     _
    
    2.9 + 5.9 == 9
    (That's supposed to be overlines above the ".9"s.

    Not "close, but never really equal", but "exactly equal".


    OMG! You are wrong. 2.99999... is an infinite series and it is equal to 3. Look it up.
    So, he's wrong because he's right!?
  • foo 2012-12-14 16:17
    Quietust:
    Personally, I'd like to think that the "2+5=9" is just a clever way to filter out spambots that try to evaluate mathematical equation CAPTCHAs - a human would enter 7, get the error "must be at least 9", then enter 9 and successfully sign up, but a bot would always enter 7, not knowing to parse the error message for the correct value.
    Wow, this will certainly stop spammers for another day or two. Parsing error messages is so much harder than recognizing characters in an image.
  • Harrow 2012-12-14 17:44
    Hank:
    We were doing properly atomic database transactions with reliable locking, commits, rollbacks, before and after images, "deadly embrace" handling, all that stuff, back in 1980 on a Honeywell mainframe with COBOL.

    Then came the "microcomputer" (aka PC) people: "You guys make everything too hard! This will be so easy!"

    We looked into the technology and saw they'd blown off virtually all the principles of computer science and practical knowledge acquired from experience. We warned it wouldn't be reliable. There will be problems.

    Nobody cared. All they wanted was easy. And we still struggle from that laziness today.
    Apparently the thinking went something like "If a computer costs $9,000 instead of $900,000 then it obviously needs only 1/100 the amount of hard-won practical computer engineering knowledge to program it."

    It was especially infuriating to us minicomputer (small stripped-down mainframe) programmers, who had labored for decades to ensure that our tiny charges were just as mathematically sound as (if a bit slower than) their big brothers.

    -Harrow.
  • Turtlepie 2012-12-14 18:42
    Visual Firefox?
  • Silverhill 2012-12-14 18:57
    Lockwood:
    Sometimes they are nine. Sometimes they are six. Sometimes they are all of them at once.
    This was obviously a premonition of quantum computing.
  • pedant 2012-12-14 19:20
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Grammar police are the the buzz killers of the the internet.


    Your doing it wrong, if you comment about grammar on the internet, you have to make a grammatical error.
  • da Doctah 2012-12-14 20:37
    Ho Miscreant!:
    The value of "What is the sound of one hand clapping is wrong. Please meditate on this further"
    What is the sound of Slow Hand Clapton?
  • Friedrice the Great 2012-12-14 20:52
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.


    Unless you've overloaded the "=" operator to automatically add 2 ...
  • Anon 2012-12-14 21:21
    chris:
    John Jackson:
    The FoxPro one isn't that uncommon... When you're running a foxpro program, it doesn't like being interrupted (it could corrupt tables if it exits prematurely)

    Great. I just tried to look up how old the concept of db transaction logs is - I couldn't find a direct answer, but did see the top of a paper on the "history" of it, written in 1993.


    There's NOTHING that can't corrupt a FoxPro table. Especially with the retarded way they "lock" a file by writing data to an invalid part of your drive. Because that was never going to be fixed in the OS.

    CAPTCHA: eros
    Say no more.
  • Norman Diamond 2012-12-15 00:36
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???
    Unfortunately a non-funny answer is highly relevant. It's a big WTF and not a bit funny.

    In recent years two Schindler elevators have moved while the doors were open, killing people who were halfway in.

    Elevators move by not having safety devices. Just like programs, stripping out debugging checks when moving from development mode to release mode. You can be an arrogrant pr*ck so sure that no problems remain in your product even if your product isn't an operating system.
  • Otis 2012-12-15 03:42
    MindChild:
    My father is an elevator mechanic for over 20 years, so I can shed some light on the elevator moving. That panel has a missing operating system, not the elevator. An elevator is almost completely mechanical, driven by controllers that have designs dating back 80+ years. Some newer elevators (Otis most notably) use microcontrollers, but these tend to be undesirable because they require cooling in the machine room.


    I'm a computer programmer/sys admin, and I can shed even more light: it doesn't say that the panel has a missing operating system, just that the Intel Boot Agent didn't find one. I get the same message from the Boot Agent every time I reboot my computer -- there is a BIOS error on my computer that prevents me from disabling the Boot Agent, so I have to wait for the network boot agent to fail before booting from disk.
  • powpowpow 2012-12-15 07:17
    Brian:
    >> "Oh, Visual Firefox, I wish I knew how to quit you! Literally,"

    Visual Firefox?


    to be fair, Visual firefox has the same problem

    "firefox is already running"
  • Hired Mind 2012-12-15 16:06
    Norman Diamond:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???
    Unfortunately a non-funny answer is highly relevant. It's a big WTF and not a bit funny.

    In recent years two Schindler elevators have moved while the doors were open, killing people who were halfway in.

    Elevators move by not having safety devices. Just like programs, stripping out debugging checks when moving from development mode to release mode. You can be an arrogrant pr*ck so sure that no problems remain in your product even if your product isn't an operating system.


    Or maybe, just maybe, you're human. And maybe you make mistakes.

    Elevators have physical interlocks to prevent the car from moving unless the doors are closed, precisely because the developers are human. And sometimes those fail as well, perhaps due to improper maintenance (because building managers are human as well).
  • PiisAWheeL 2012-12-15 16:57
    Lockwood:
    "Do you remember," he went on, "writing in your diary, "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus five make seven"?"
    "Yes," said Alexander.
    The Registration Form held up his right hand, all fingers extended, then his left hand, its back towards Alexander, with the thumb, ring and little fingers hidden and two fingers extended.
    "How many fingers am I holding up, Alexander?"
    "Seven"
    "And if the party says it is not seven but nine, then how many?"
    "Seven"
    "How many fingers, Alexander?"
    "Seven! Seven! What else can I say? Seven!"
    "How many fingers, Alexander?"
    "Nine! Nine! Nine!"
    "No, Winston, that is no use. You are lying. You still think there are seven. How many fingers, please?"
    "How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and five are seven."
    "Sometimes, Alexander. Sometimes they are nine. Sometimes they are six. Sometimes they are all of them at once."
    Somebody get that man a trophy! George Orwell ftw.
  • F 2012-12-15 17:41
    foo:
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Ken B:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.
    (I hope this formats correctly.)

      _     _
    
    2.9 + 5.9 == 9
    (That's supposed to be overlines above the ".9"s.

    Not "close, but never really equal", but "exactly equal".


    OMG! You are wrong. 2.99999... is an infinite series and it is equal to 3. Look it up.
    So, he's wrong because he's right!?

    Of course. This *is* TDWTF, after all.
  • Norman Diamond 2012-12-15 20:53
    Hired Mind:
    Norman Diamond:
    Larry Garfield:
    but it leaves me wondering - If my elevator has no operating system, how is it moving???
    Unfortunately a non-funny answer is highly relevant. It's a big WTF and not a bit funny.

    In recent years two Schindler elevators have moved while the doors were open, killing people who were halfway in.

    Elevators move by not having safety devices. Just like programs, stripping out debugging checks when moving from development mode to release mode. You can be an arrogrant pr*ck so sure that no problems remain in your product even if your product isn't an operating system.
    Or maybe, just maybe, you're human. And maybe you make mistakes.
    Yes I am human, yes I make mistakes, and yes I believe that is why debugging checks SHOULD NOT BE REMOVED when moving from test mode to release mode.
    Hired Mind:
    Elevators have physical interlocks to prevent the car from moving unless the doors are closed,
    No they do not, which is exactly why those two elevators killed people.
    Hired Mind:
    precisely because the developers are human.
    No, elevators NEED physical interlocks because developers are human, but elevators don't have physical interlocks because developers are arrogant pr*cks.

    Improper maintenance was also a problem, but the intentional omission of safety devices is unconscionable.
  • FRed 2012-12-16 16:42
    2+5

    Seems an effective way to get rid of SPAM bots - give the answer required in the error message rather than being the actual answer to the captcha....

    Sort of reminds me of the Quizmania/The Mint.....Stupid questions with nonsensical answers....
  • Coyne 2012-12-16 18:59
    Ben Jammin:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.

    I believe that:
    1) 2.9 and 5.9 are just small values of 3 and 6 respectively and
    2) if you're gonna be a math nazi, you should get it right.

    p.s. I still like the original joke



    No! NO!! NOOOO!!!! Anything but the 1 does not equal .99999999... argument again! It's been settled! The mathematicians won! Please, no more of this torture!


    Seriously, does it really bother you that 3.00000... and 3 are the same number? No? Then why does it bother you that 2.99999... and 3 are the same number? That if you repeat .99999... to infinity, the difference between that number and 1 is zero, proving they are equal?
  • Dirk 2012-12-16 20:25
    I made come changes to this comment. Sorry about the incontinence.
  • moz 2012-12-16 21:11
    Mike Nightstky:

    Winnipeg minor basketball Association
    We have made come changes to your schedule on December 8th we apologize for the incontinence.


    First i thought it was the association of kindergarden kids. And the "come" changes were because of the incontinence of some of the members of the minor league.

    Either that, or because of the incontinence of one or more of the staff, and at the suggestion of the police.
  • Iain 2012-12-17 03:47
    foo:
    Quietust:
    Personally, I'd like to think that the "2+5=9" is just a clever way to filter out spambots that try to evaluate mathematical equation CAPTCHAs - a human would enter 7, get the error "must be at least 9", then enter 9 and successfully sign up, but a bot would always enter 7, not knowing to parse the error message for the correct value.
    Wow, this will certainly stop spammers for another day or two. Parsing error messages is so much harder than recognizing characters in an image.


    You might be on to something. A program to parse an error message in an expected format is trivial but if the error message is, say, a paragraph of unstructured data that contains the hint of the answer then that's going to be a lot harder for programs without Watson level natural language interpretation.
    It will also likely be harder for non-native speakers of the language the message is displayed in, so such a system would come at the price that localization would have to be done very well; "all your base belong to us" style translation wouldn't cut it.
  • tin 2012-12-17 04:13
    Martin E:
    The Hyper-V submission isn't actually a bug.
    When you configure a VM in Hyper-V 2012 to use dynamic RAM it defaults to a max memory of 1048576 Mb (or 1 Tb).
    If the VM is running, as this one is, you can't lower the max memory, only raise it and if the VM was configured with the default memory config you can't enter anything but the max amount of memory - which the tooltip will inform you about.


    Still a WTF... Like WTF could they not simply have the tooltip tell you that? Or WTF do they default RAM to a freaking terabyte in the first place?

    Oh wait - this is a Microsoft product. It's meant to have stupidly worded dialogs and retarded defaults. How else would they sell the new versions in 12 months?
  • LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet 2012-12-17 05:09
    powpowpow:
    Brian:
    >> "Oh, Visual Firefox, I wish I knew how to quit you! Literally,"

    Visual Firefox?

    to be fair, Visual firefox has the same problem

    "firefox is already running"

    Run:

    firefox --no-remote -profilemanager
  • NotHere 2012-12-17 11:21
    tin:
    Martin E:
    The Hyper-V submission isn't actually a bug.
    When you configure a VM in Hyper-V 2012 to use dynamic RAM it defaults to a max memory of 1048576 Mb (or 1 Tb).
    If the VM is running, as this one is, you can't lower the max memory, only raise it and if the VM was configured with the default memory config you can't enter anything but the max amount of memory - which the tooltip will inform you about.


    Still a WTF... Like WTF could they not simply have the tooltip tell you that? Or WTF do they default RAM to a freaking terabyte in the first place?

    Oh wait - this is a Microsoft product. It's meant to have stupidly worded dialogs and retarded defaults. How else would they sell the new versions in 12 months?


    Or, WTF couldn't they simply fill in the amount for you with a note about how you can't change it.
  • jay 2012-12-17 13:26
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.


    Umm, I'm pretty sure that references to "very large values of 2" is a joke. Maybe I'm missing the meta-humor, but you seem to be (a) taking this joke seriously, and (b) somehow leaping to the conclusion that it means 2.99999. Who says that a "large value of 2" is 2.99999? 4 or 5 would also be a large value of 2, no?
  • Mirza Baig 2012-12-17 13:59
    Heh that elevator is definitely in DePaul's CDM building. It's been like that for at least a year.
  • Anon. 2012-12-17 15:31
    Most of the readers here would be surprised at how much can be achieved without an OS. Even with elevators that use microcontrollers, they probably don't have OSes anyway.
  • sdfh 2012-12-17 16:48
    Coyne:
    Ben Jammin:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.

    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.

    I believe that:
    1) 2.9 and 5.9 are just small values of 3 and 6 respectively and
    2) if you're gonna be a math nazi, you should get it right.

    p.s. I still like the original joke



    No! NO!! NOOOO!!!! Anything but the 1 does not equal .99999999... argument again! It's been settled! The mathematicians won! Please, no more of this torture!


    Seriously, does it really bother you that 3.00000... and 3 are the same number? No? Then why does it bother you that 2.99999... and 3 are the same number? That if you repeat .99999... to infinity, the difference between that number and 1 is zero, proving they are equal?

    Oh yeah....
    x=0.9999[...]
    => 10x=9.9999[...]
    => 10x-x=9.9999[...]-0.9999[...]
    => 9x=9
    => x=1
    QED
  • Julie 2012-12-17 16:49
    Iain:
    foo:
    Quietust:
    Personally, I'd like to think that the "2+5=9" is just a clever way to filter out spambots that try to evaluate mathematical equation CAPTCHAs - a human would enter 7, get the error "must be at least 9", then enter 9 and successfully sign up, but a bot would always enter 7, not knowing to parse the error message for the correct value.
    Wow, this will certainly stop spammers for another day or two. Parsing error messages is so much harder than recognizing characters in an image.


    You might be on to something. A program to parse an error message in an expected format is trivial but if the error message is, say, a paragraph of unstructured data that contains the hint of the answer then that's going to be a lot harder for programs without Watson level natural language interpretation.
    It will also likely be harder for non-native speakers of the language the message is displayed in, so such a system would come at the price that localization would have to be done very well; "all your base belong to us" style translation wouldn't cut it.
    Uhm....not to mention how many sites have captcha down the bottom and wierd error messages up the top (and often not sufficiently highlighted to be noticed).

    How many times do you fill in a form and keep having it rejected before you finally spot a message that says "Phone number is wrong" (or something)
  • Neil 2012-12-19 05:02
    I don't have Visual FoxPro (OK, well, we might have had a copy lying around at some point but it was never opened) but I have used FoxPro for Windows, and the web suggests that the issue is similar in that version.

    In order for a custom FoxPro window to interact with the user in any way it is generally required to use some sort of READ command, however attempting to quit FoxPro while the READ is active causes the aforementioned error message.

    A workaround is to define a custom close handler (such as ON SHUTDOWN QUIT) although then the problem is that the window's Close button becomes disabled. (The Close item on the system menu still works because it's a custom system menu.)
  • Kuba 2012-12-21 12:37
    71:
    faoileag:
    portablejim:
    I guess 2+5=9 for very large values of 2 and 5.
    Nope. 2.99999 + 5.99999 will never be 9 irrespective of how many 9s you might throw at the two numbers. Close, but never really equal.
    True for any finite number of 9's. But if they are non-terminating decimals (the 9's go on forever) then 2.9[...] + 5.9[...] is strictly equal to 9.
    Exactly. Way too many people have not learned in elementary school that the decimal positional system is a particular way of representing numbers. See, on one hand there's that abstract concept of a number. On the other hand, there's a practical way of representing those abstract numbers using a positional sytem.

    It so happens that every number out there that has a finite length positional representation in some base, also happens to have an infinite length positional representation in the same base. That's at least two positional representations for one number. The illiterate fools out there have a hard time getting over it, somehow.

    2.9[...] + 5.9[...] is strictly equal to 9, because you're adding the integers 3 and 6. That shouldn't be news to anyone.
  • Kuba 2012-12-21 12:42
    sdfh:
    Oh yeah....
    x=0.9999[...]
    => 10x=9.9999[...]
    => 10x-x=9.9999[...]-0.9999[...]
    => 9x=9
    => x=1
    QED
    This is idiotic. Just because you saw it on internet, doesn't mean it's not bovine manure. Here's why. You see, the stuff you have up there deals with numbers. Numbers are abstract concepts. They do have some practical representations, one of them being the positional representation. So, when you deal with positional representation, you must always keep in mind what numbers you're talking about.

    The first line says:
    x=1.

    That's it. The rest of it is entirely pointless. You're not proving anything. In line 2, you're multiplying both sides by 10, then rearranging things to remove the mess you made, and since you didn't make any mistakes, you get it back that x=1. Big deal, basic algebra still works. Just because something works doesn't make it useful, or fit for the purpose.

    The proof that the positional representation of numbers has a certain property of non-uniqueness for some numbers is a bit more involved and doesn't exactly end up at 5th grade math knowledge.
  • Kuba 2012-12-21 12:45
    Otis:
    I'm a computer programmer/sys admin, and I can shed even more light: it doesn't say that the panel has a missing operating system, just that the Intel Boot Agent didn't find one. I get the same message from the Boot Agent every time I reboot my computer -- there is a BIOS error on my computer that prevents me from disabling the Boot Agent, so I have to wait for the network boot agent to fail before booting from disk.
    Let's state the obvious: TRWTF is the Intel Boot Agent. Does anyone actually use it on the systems where it's most often idiotically installed (like desktop motherboards)?
  • JJ 2012-12-21 15:51
    pedant:
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Grammar police are the the buzz killers of the the internet.


    Your doing it wrong, if you comment about grammar on the internet, you have to make a grammatical error.

    And you failed you look closely at the original post. I won't claim the OP did it on purpose, but it certainly fits the stereotypical grammar flame.
  • JJ 2012-12-21 15:52
    JJ:
    pedant:
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Grammar police are the the buzz killers of the the internet.


    Your doing it wrong, if you comment about grammar on the internet, you have to make a grammatical error.

    And you failed you look closely at the original post. I won't claim the OP did it on purpose, but it certainly fits the stereotypical grammar flame.

    Wow. I just now noticed what I updated. Batting .500 here.
  • CigarDoug 2012-12-31 19:57
    I am downright giddy to be the first to post an xkcd reference on this thread.

    http://xkcd.com/810/
  • CigarDoug 2012-12-31 20:01
    Iain:
    foo:
    Quietust:
    Personally, I'd like to think that the "2+5=9" is just a clever way to filter out spambots that try to evaluate mathematical equation CAPTCHAs - a human would enter 7, get the error "must be at least 9", then enter 9 and successfully sign up, but a bot would always enter 7, not knowing to parse the error message for the correct value.
    Wow, this will certainly stop spammers for another day or two. Parsing error messages is so much harder than recognizing characters in an image.


    You might be on to something. A program to parse an error message in an expected format is trivial but if the error message is, say, a paragraph of unstructured data that contains the hint of the answer then that's going to be a lot harder for programs without Watson level natural language interpretation.
    It will also likely be harder for non-native speakers of the language the message is displayed in, so such a system would come at the price that localization would have to be done very well; "all your base belong to us" style translation wouldn't cut it.



    I am downright giddy to be the first to post an xkcd reference on this thread.

    http://xkcd.com/810/

    AND, I really feel like a long-time poster now because I mistook reply for quote! Thanks, forum software!
  • [insert name here] 2013-04-25 21:47
    That was beautiful. *wipes tears from eyes*