Mistaken Identity

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  • Quango 2013-07-03 08:41
    The first item about the Visual Studio installer needs to be clarified before you release it - I don't see the WTF?

    Is it that Visual Studio is not installed? If so that's not a WTF - the installation is a Language pack, not VS itself.

    Or is it that VS is not installed and it's warning that VS needs to be closed.
  • trololo 2013-07-05 06:27
    It wasn't klingon, it was just a new italian dialect.
  • Pippo 2013-07-05 06:31
    The real wtf is that I clicked the ok on the last image ...
  • Jens 2013-07-05 06:59
    Pippo:
    The real wtf is that I clicked the ok on the last image ...


    ...on a Window computer.
  • OK 2013-07-05 06:59
    The real wtf is that I clicked ok 50 times on the third image ...
  • Sarah 2013-07-05 07:00
    Infinite speed may sounds like fun, but in reality you are still limited by the speed of the computer to be able to write the data to the memory or most likely the hard disk drive (hdd or ssd) and the network card being able to receive the data and process it. It would not surprise me if it went 'screw it, that is to much and to fast' instead :P
  • RaceProUK 2013-07-05 07:07
    trololo:
    It wasn't klingon, it was just a new italian dialect.

    :)

    It actually looks like the sort of test string MS use to check localisation.
  • kta 2013-07-05 07:30
    The Klingon is actually Pseudolocalization
    (Also short informative comments are apparently spam unless I add this additional sentence.)
  • Anon 2013-07-05 08:31
    TRWTF is translating any IDE. Srsly, you are programming using english, after all (brainfuck aside). And no, I'm not native english user
  • Tim 2013-07-05 08:33
    RaceProUK:

    It actually looks like the sort of test string MS use to check localisation.

    or in this case, to _not_ check the localisation
  • Steve The Cynic 2013-07-05 09:09
    Anon:
    TRWTF is translating any IDE. Srsly, you are programming using english, after all (brainfuck aside). And no, I'm not native english user

    Try programming^W building an Excel spreadsheet in a non-English version of Excel.

    Example: =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3, B3) has to be written as =SI(ESTVIDE(A4),A3,B3) in French Excel.

    Compounding the lunacy, if you load the sheet in an English version, it becomes =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3,B3) - automatic translation!

    It's the most moronically halfwittedly boneheaded idea I've ever come across. Let's say I want to search for ways to do something or other with Excel. With a normal programming system like C++, Java, or even PHP (FFS!), I can copy and paste a working example into my source and away I go, no matter what language I speak and no matter the localisation of my machine. With Excel, I need to search for examples written in French and described in English if I don't want to have to do some translation somewhere. (Added to which, some of the translations of function names are less than totally obvious. For some reason, the function EOMONTH (returns the serial number of the last day of a given month) becomes FIN.MOIS (yes, with a dot in the name, go figure)!)

    http://www.piuha.fi/excel-function-name-translation/index.php?page=english-french.html has a big ol' list of the equivalences, and allows you to see the epic length of some of the French names, dots and all.
  • Anon 2013-07-05 09:21
    Do you suggest excel ain't brainfuck?
  • Anon 2013-07-05 09:22
    btw Polish translators like dots too ;(
    http://www.piuha.fi/excel-function-name-translation/index.php?page=jezyk-polski-english.html

    captcha: minim - whoever ecided to translate excel functions have _minim_al brain
  • Rodnas 2013-07-05 09:48
    OMG. It is full of pop-up messages!
  • xaade 2013-07-05 10:17
    Quango:
    The first item about the Visual Studio installer needs to be clarified before you release it - I don't see the WTF?

    Is it that Visual Studio is not installed? If so that's not a WTF - the installation is a Language pack, not VS itself.

    Or is it that VS is not installed and it's warning that VS needs to be closed.


    Can't you see that the WTF would go either way.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2013-07-05 10:42
    My śıŝťěŗ was bitten by a štøråģē äĉçøũňŧ once.
  • Hannes 2013-07-05 10:54
    Anon:
    TRWTF is translating any IDE. Srsly, you are programming using english, after all (brainfuck aside). And no, I'm not native english user


    But you can name variables anything you want. I name variables in my native language (it's just simpler). And I do like the menues to be in my native language as well.

    I have no problems working with an english IDE, but I'm just used to working with IDEs (and other programs) in my native language.
  • Dan 2013-07-05 11:07
    At first glance I thought I saw the words "will blend" on the Visual Studio screen shot. Seems worth a try.
  • XXI 2013-07-05 11:50
    Hannes:

    I name variables in my native language (it's just simpler)


    Please don't ever ever ever do this
  • chubertdev 2013-07-05 11:56
    Steve The Cynic:
    Anon:
    TRWTF is translating any IDE. Srsly, you are programming using english, after all (brainfuck aside). And no, I'm not native english user

    Try programming^W building an Excel spreadsheet in a non-English version of Excel.

    Example: =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3, B3) has to be written as =SI(ESTVIDE(A4),A3,B3) in French Excel.

    Compounding the lunacy, if you load the sheet in an English version, it becomes =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3,B3) - automatic translation!

    It's the most moronically halfwittedly boneheaded idea I've ever come across. Let's say I want to search for ways to do something or other with Excel. With a normal programming system like C++, Java, or even PHP (FFS!), I can copy and paste a working example into my source and away I go, no matter what language I speak and no matter the localisation of my machine. With Excel, I need to search for examples written in French and described in English if I don't want to have to do some translation somewhere. (Added to which, some of the translations of function names are less than totally obvious. For some reason, the function EOMONTH (returns the serial number of the last day of a given month) becomes FIN.MOIS (yes, with a dot in the name, go figure)!)

    http://www.piuha.fi/excel-function-name-translation/index.php?page=english-french.html has a big ol' list of the equivalences, and allows you to see the epic length of some of the French names, dots and all.


    TRWTF is moving to France for a job.

    anyways, can you change the localization in Excel alone to work in your mother tongue?
  • xaade 2013-07-05 12:00
    XXI:
    Hannes:

    I name variables in my native language (it's just simpler)


    Please don't ever ever ever do this


    At least not:

    1. In open source.
    2. In a tutorial that has just exactly what someone needs. If you want to write an existing tutorial in another language that's fine. Most of those tend to be wrong.
    3. In code that has to be maintained by people that speak other languages.
    4. And most importantly, in code that was outsourced to you that you hand over as source that has to maintained by programmers that speak another language.

    The problem with outsourcing to other countries is that it's hard to keep a record on who did what. These outsourced programmers keep dissolving and reforming companies, so you can't track who you want to avoid.
  • xaade 2013-07-05 12:01
    Steve The Cynic:
    Anon:
    TRWTF is translating any IDE. Srsly, you are programming using english, after all (brainfuck aside). And no, I'm not native english user

    Try programming^W building an Excel spreadsheet in a non-English version of Excel.

    Example: =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3, B3) has to be written as =SI(ESTVIDE(A4),A3,B3) in French Excel.

    Compounding the lunacy, if you load the sheet in an English version, it becomes =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3,B3) - automatic translation!

    It's the most moronically halfwittedly boneheaded idea I've ever come across. Let's say I want to search for ways to do something or other with Excel. With a normal programming system like C++, Java, or even PHP (FFS!), I can copy and paste a working example into my source and away I go, no matter what language I speak and no matter the localisation of my machine. With Excel, I need to search for examples written in French and described in English if I don't want to have to do some translation somewhere. (Added to which, some of the translations of function names are less than totally obvious. For some reason, the function EOMONTH (returns the serial number of the last day of a given month) becomes FIN.MOIS (yes, with a dot in the name, go figure)!)

    http://www.piuha.fi/excel-function-name-translation/index.php?page=english-french.html has a big ol' list of the equivalences, and allows you to see the epic length of some of the French names, dots and all.


    Excel is the accountant's programming language. That's why.
  • cellocgw 2013-07-05 12:02
    No, that's not necessarily the fastest you can ever download. That was probably just Aleph-Null speed, so there's always Aleph-One speed to look forward to! (that's 2^(Aleph-Null) for you folks who forgot your "Side Topics In Calculus")
  • chubertdev 2013-07-05 12:04
    I'm still waiting for Google Tachyon™ to be rolled out here...
  • Coyne 2013-07-05 12:34
    That one with the weird language text looks like the language that Americans use when visiting France: Loud, with a French twist to try to force that into the French listener's brain.
    ___

    I didn't know Microsoft took over Illustrator. But that's clearly a Microsoft message, because they're partial to such "informative" reports as, "The action failed to complete." You know, messages of unknown origin, relating to unknown objects, relating to unknown actions, from unknown antecedents; issued via a popup that appears when you have done nothing or carefully logged to inform future reviewers of ... nothing.
    ___

    If a spam comment is one that is unsolicited, wouldn't that pretty much cover all comments? Guess they just decided to call a spade a spade.

    Come to think of it, I guess this comment is spam...
  • Gurth 2013-07-05 13:28
    Steve The Cynic:
    Try programming^W building an Excel spreadsheet in a non-English version of Excel.
    [snip]
    It's the most moronically halfwittedly boneheaded idea I've ever come across.

    Except that spreadsheets typically get programmed by non-coders, such as accountants and other types that the world has too many of. IMHO it makes sense to localise the function names etc. if your audience cannot be expected to speak English well enough to figure these things out.

    As for the Illustrator error: maybe the problem was that the computer was set at an angle?
  • xaade 2013-07-05 15:01
    Coyne:
    That one with the weird language text looks like the language that Americans use when visiting France: Loud, with a French twist to try to force that into the French listener's brain.
    ___

    I didn't know Microsoft took over Illustrator. But that's clearly a Microsoft message, because they're partial to such "informative" reports as, "The action failed to complete." You know, messages of unknown origin, relating to unknown objects, relating to unknown actions, from unknown antecedents; issued via a popup that appears when you have done nothing or carefully logged to inform future reviewers of ... nothing.
    ___

    If a spam comment is one that is unsolicited, wouldn't that pretty much cover all comments? Guess they just decided to call a spade a spade.

    Come to think of it, I guess this comment is spam...


    The types of comments that are solicited are those comments that have been requested of the person maintaining the blog.
    At this point they would be comments that maintained the topic either from the article itself, from the culture of the community, or from the current topic that stems from the latest or any previous comment.

    Thus unsolicited comments are those that disrupt from above.

    Anything that disrupts the topic from the article, the topics that emerge from talking about the article, or the culture of the community.

    Of course, any action taken against unsolicited comments are at the discretion of the owner of the topic. Therefore, not all unsolicited comments will face any "punishment".
  • jay 2013-07-05 15:18
    XXI:
    Hannes:

    I name variables in my native language (it's just simpler)


    Please don't ever ever ever do this


    Huh, why not? If you are an Italian working at an Italian office of an Italian-based company, it seems to me the logical language to use for comments, variable names, etc would be Italian. Are you suggesting that everyone in the world who wants to be a programmer should learn English? Why?

    I'm an American and I'll gleefully make comments about the natural superiority of all things American, but really now, convenient as it would be if everyone in the world spoke English, that's not the reality.
  • jay 2013-07-05 15:24
    xaade:
    XXI:
    Hannes:

    I name variables in my native language (it's just simpler)


    Please don't ever ever ever do this


    At least not:

    1. In open source.


    As an English-speaking person, I agree it would be nice if all open-source code was in English. But I don't see how I can rightly demand that. And if a potential open-source author speaks no English, so the choices are getting a product written in Ruritanian or getting no product at all, I think I'd prefer (a).


    2. In a tutorial that has just exactly what someone needs. If you want to write an existing tutorial in another language that's fine. Most of those tend to be wrong.


    If you mean, don't write a tutorial in English but give code samples in Ruritanian, sure, obviously. But if you're writing a tutorial in Ruritanian, it makes sense to me that the examples would be in Ruritanian.


    3. In code that has to be maintained by people that speak other languages.


    If you are writing code that is to be maintained by people who speak English, than it is highly desirable that it be written in English. If you are writing code that is to be maintained by people who speak Ruritanian, then I'd think the code should be in Ruritanian. If you are writing code that is to be maintained by many people who speak many different languages, then English is a good choice because many technical people speak English as a second language if not their first. To that extent, English is a good "default" language.


    4. And most importantly, in code that was outsourced to you that you hand over as source that has to maintained by programmers that speak another language.


    That's pretty much the same as #3.
  • jay 2013-07-05 15:29
    #1 reminds me of an issue I hit a few years back:

    I was trying to install some video game for my son. I got an error message saying, "DirectX not installed" with an option to install it now. So I checked the Ok box to go ahead and install it. I then got an error message, "DirectX already installed". I went through this loop several times: I couldn't install the game because it concluded that DirectX was not installed, but it wouldn't let me install DirectX because it concluded that it was already installed. Oh, and I couldn't uninstall DirectX from Windows because it didn't show up on the list of installed programs.

    I don't understand why the install wouldn't let me say, I don't care if it's already installed, just re-install it.

    I did finally get DirectX successfully installed. I forget how.
  • anonymous 2013-07-05 15:53
    Steve The Cynic:
    Try programming^W building an Excel spreadsheet in a non-English version of Excel.

    Example: =IF(ISEMPTY(A4),A3, B3) has to be written as =SI(ESTVIDE(A4);A3;B3) in French Excel.
    FTFY
  • anotherusername 2013-07-05 16:01
    "I got this great error message from Illustrator when trying to quit - perhaps a better error message is WON'T?," Andrew G. remarked.


    CANT is probably the name of the operation that couldn't be completed.
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cant:
    ²cant verb
    Definition of CANT
    transitive verb
    1 : to give a cant or oblique edge to : BEVEL
    2 : to set at an angle : TILT
  • chubertdev 2013-07-05 16:18
    CANT info:

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/482873
  • RichardD1 2013-07-05 16:48
    anotherusername:
    CANT is probably the name of the operation that couldn't be completed.


    Either that, or it's an insult from a cockney. Probably preceded by "Yoo".
  • RichP 2013-07-05 17:46
    kta:
    The Klingon is actually Pseudolocalization
    (Also short informative comments are apparently spam unless I add this additional sentence.)


    Lorem Ipsum Stovokor?
  • o11c 2013-07-05 18:41
    chubertdev:
    CANT info:

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/482873


    I was hoping TRWTF was still using telnet in this day and age.
  • Cole 2013-07-06 03:05
    The first one isn't a WTF. It's saying you need Visual Studio installed to install a language pack. TRWTF is the person trying to install the language pack.
  • Gurth 2013-07-06 04:22
    Cole:
    The first one isn't a WTF. It's saying you need Visual Studio installed to install a language pack.

    Look more carefully: trying to install a language pack for a program when that program isn't installed may be the user's mistake, but the two warnings in the window are what this one is probably really about.
  • Hannes 2013-07-06 09:54
    XXI:
    Hannes:

    I name variables in my native language (it's just simpler)


    Please don't ever ever ever do this


    Too late. ;)

    Don't worry, though. It's highly unlikely that you will ever have to work with any of my code. 99% of my work is "in house" only. And I don't see any reason why I should name my variables in english if only I (or my colleagues) have to work with it. ;)
  • Anonymous 2013-07-06 13:08
    Because companies tend to grow, employees tend to leave, and code tends to stay for decades.

    If you're the „computer guy“ for Mike's car wash you're probably safe, but almost any company in Europe that even hires dedicated developers will eventually want to tap into international markets (remember: tiny weeny nations over here). Or at least keep the option to sometime hire a foreign specialist to work on their code.

    There are now hundreds of French software companies active in Germany and vice versa. Having to translate codebases is a real problem that just stupidly burns money.
  • Cole 2013-07-06 17:41
    Gurth:
    Cole:
    The first one isn't a WTF. It's saying you need Visual Studio installed to install a language pack.

    Look more carefully: trying to install a language pack for a program when that program isn't installed may be the user's mistake, but the two warnings in the window are what this one is probably really about.

    Oh. The only explanation is a bug or that the installer identifies itself as Visual Studio and the person had two instances running.

    CAPCHA: tation - tations may be responsible for this.
  • Hannes 2013-07-06 18:18
    Anonymous:
    Because companies tend to grow, employees tend to leave, and code tends to stay for decades.

    If you're the „computer guy“ for Mike's car wash you're probably safe, but almost any company in Europe that even hires dedicated developers will eventually want to tap into international markets (remember: tiny weeny nations over here). Or at least keep the option to sometime hire a foreign specialist to work on their code.


    First of all, it is highly unlikely that my company will ever do business in other countries. Right now, my company has about 50 employees, 2 of them are dedicated developers, and the IT has 5 people in it (yes, that does include the developers).

    Second, any foreigner I work with has a good enough grasp of the german language to understand my code. Plus, the data we work with is in german. All the tables in our databases (yes, there's more than one database) have german headers and of course the data is in german as well. Would be really stupid if all of our employees would have to type in the data they need to do their work in english.

    Third, I don't need to speak english at all while I am at work, so why should I code only in english? I don't write my comments in english, because that would just feel silly. Besides, not everyone can speak english well enough to do that.
    Does that mean people who cannot speak english well enough can never work as a developer, because there's an every so small chance that some poor foreigner who doesn't speak that particular language might see their code? Sorry, but that's just ridiculous.
  • Matt Westwood 2013-07-06 18:51
    Hannes:
    Anonymous:
    Because companies tend to grow, employees tend to leave, and code tends to stay for decades.

    If you're the „computer guy“ for Mike's car wash you're probably safe, but almost any company in Europe that even hires dedicated developers will eventually want to tap into international markets (remember: tiny weeny nations over here). Or at least keep the option to sometime hire a foreign specialist to work on their code.


    First of all, it is highly unlikely that my company will ever do business in other countries. Right now, my company has about 50 employees, 2 of them are dedicated developers, and the IT has 5 people in it (yes, that does include the developers).

    Second, any foreigner I work with has a good enough grasp of the german language to understand my code. Plus, the data we work with is in german. All the tables in our databases (yes, there's more than one database) have german headers and of course the data is in german as well. Would be really stupid if all of our employees would have to type in the data they need to do their work in english.

    Third, I don't need to speak english at all while I am at work, so why should I code only in english? I don't write my comments in english, because that would just feel silly. Besides, not everyone can speak english well enough to do that.
    Does that mean people who cannot speak english well enough can never work as a developer, because there's an every so small chance that some poor foreigner who doesn't speak that particular language might see their code? Sorry, but that's just ridiculous.


    I think it's just cultural chauvinism. There are nations in the world (at least one nation, anyway) who believe that everyone else in the world should do everything in their own taste-lacking way.
  • I kill them 2013-07-07 02:53
    Why would you feel bad for an installer that tell you "Hey douchebag I am a language pack you need to install the main product first!"
  • lawson 2013-07-08 04:28
    Every person wants to make his/her house look nice and elegant. People use different Jimmy Choo Uggs kind of accessories and antique pieces to decorate their houses. Decorating a house is a matter of great concern to a woman. Woman will always exhaust herself in keeping her house neat, clean and decorated.
  • silverpie 2013-07-08 08:20
    Cole:
    The first one isn't a WTF. It's saying you need Visual Studio installed to install a language pack. TRWTF is the person trying to install the language pack.


    Neither message alone is a WTF. The combination of "X isn't installed" and "X is already running"--that's the WTF.
  • Some Person 2013-07-08 09:04
    They need VS 2012 installed to install the language pack, but they have an older pre-2012 VS open at the same time. Bam, done.
  • Dave 2013-07-08 12:14
    Reminds me of the time I was working on a multinational project in Antwerp (which is in the Flemish speaking part of Belgium), and had to help the Italian members of our team debug software written by the French team, who had by then gone home.

    Per company policy, the comments were in English (my native language) which the Italians spoke, but they could not understand these comments. The problem was the strange abbreviations, of which there were many. I then realised that the abbreviations were all based on FRENCH descriptions, embedded in the otherwise-English text!
  • jay 2013-07-08 15:06
    It seems a little odd to me to say that two French-speaking people who both have very limited English should try to communicate with each other in broken English rather than in French because maybe someday under circumstances that we cannot presently envision someone who does not speak French will want to join the conversation.

    Now OF COURSE if this is an international project and there are presently people on the team who speak many different languages, or it is reasonably likely that people will join the team before long who speak other languages, that then we should look for a common language. And in that case, English would be a good candidate as it is widely spoken around the world.

    Sure, any project might someday bring on team members who speak other languages. It makes sense to plan for contingencies. But it doesn't make sense to do things that we know will cause problems today because of things that might possibly happen someday. You have to deal with probabilities. Like, if you're building a house on the beach, it makes sense to consider the possibility of hurricanes and flooding and to go to extra expense to prepare for it. If you're building a house 500 miles from the coast, not so much. Is it possible that the place will be hit by a hurricane and flooded? Well, I suppose. We might be hit by the worst hurricane in history and it tears hundreds of miles inland. An asteroid could strike the Earth and split the continent in two. But the probabilities of such events are small enough that we don't spend a lot of time and money preparing for them.
  • Rich 2013-07-08 15:34
    The Redhat installer (4 or 5 maybe, it was in the late 90's) used to use "Redneck" (they were/are in North Carolina) as their Pseudolocalization language. I remember something like "put them thar shiny disk right into that cupholder"
  • logos 2013-07-08 16:56
    Frankly, I'm puzzled that some readers (programmers?) don't see the WTF in the first installer error.

    If one can't see the broken logic of that error message, how can you see any logic or lack thereof in anything else (code for example...)?

    As well, to the last error message. I so hate when programmes ask me something like: "Foo has been unexpectedly terminated, do you WANT to restart?" after some part of the programme crashed. Expecially when it means losing data I clearly do NOT want, I just have to...
  • logos 2013-07-08 17:07
    In my experience error messages by installers like the first one happen in cases, when the version already installed was written after program your trying to install.

    Allmost always a f.u. version check.

  • urza9814 2013-07-11 17:48
    I kill them:
    Why would you feel bad for an installer that tell you "Hey douchebag I am a language pack you need to install the main product first!"


    OH GOD LEARN TO READ EITHER THE ACTUAL ERROR TEXT OR THE COMMENTS!

    The first error says VS is not installed. The second error says VS is already running. Either it's not installed, in which case it can't be running; or it's already running, in which case it must already be installed.
  • fritz with sauce 2013-07-14 22:10
    It's C U N T not C A N T
  • abjdhoaz 2013-07-16 07:20

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