• Morbii (unregistered)

    Oooh, I love these!

  • GreenLight (cs)

    I like the one about the KDE Print System.

    Yeah, I'd sure like to know why!

  • Benanov (cs)

    Quoth Alex:

    Hugo Kornelis decided to uninstall HP Share-To-Web, which was some mystery program that must have installed with the printer driver. It didn't seem to like that too much ...


    It's 2006, people.  If you can't write a Unicode-Aware application, your code will end up here.

    Sincerely,

    Mr. Antonov

  • GalacticCowboy (cs)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Wow...  that's...  monolith-ic.

  • doublel (unregistered)



    Must have been using the Date calculation from The Trouble with Blind Dates

  • R.Flowers (cs)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Peter Rutner got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ...

     

    <font size="3"><b>All your configs are belong to us!</b></font>

  • emurphy (cs)

    At least the file size is only off by two bits:

    9570149222628417 dec = 22000000DCBC41 hex
    DCBC41 hex = 14466113 dec

    I wonder whether the date bug is due to century or time zone or both.

  • ParkinT (cs) in reply to doublel

    Anonymous:


    Must have been using the Date calculation from The Trouble with Blind Dates

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!

  • ParkinT (cs) in reply to R.Flowers
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Peter Rutner got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ...

     

     

    Resistance be futile 

  • Me (unregistered) in reply to ParkinT

    uh no, 12:58:39 PM is before 1:00 PM.

    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

  • Oscar L (cs) in reply to ParkinT
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Peter Rutner got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ...

     

    I am gatekeeper.  Are you keymaster?

  • Gene Wirchenko (cs) in reply to ParkinT
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!

    ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.  I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko

  • Otto (cs) in reply to ParkinT
    ParkinT:

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!


    Are you daft? 12 PM = Noon. 12 AM = Midnight.

    1 PM is after 12 PM.

  • BradC (cs)

    Hehe, that's classic.

    "You may want to find out why."

    I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:

    "Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."

    "Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."

    "MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."

  • codemoose (unregistered) in reply to ParkinT
    ParkinT:

    Anonymous:


    Must have been using the Date calculation from The Trouble with Blind Dates

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!



    The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?
  • V. (cs)

    and it's not getting better: see this

  • Doug (unregistered) in reply to Otto
    Otto:
    ParkinT:

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!


    Are you daft? 12 PM = Noon. 12 AM = Midnight.

    1 PM is after 12 PM.



    You, sir, are the daft one.  For it is obvious to all but the most untrained eye that the error message is clearly referring to 4/19/1306 1:00:00 PM and 4/19/1706 12:58:39 PM.


    CAPTCHA: knowhutimean
  • Dazed (unregistered) in reply to codemoose
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:

    Anonymous:


    Must have been using the Date calculation from The Trouble with Blind Dates

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!



    The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?

    The WTF is that some people still don't use the 24-hour clock.

  • OtherMichael (cs) in reply to Otto

    Ambiguity at noon and midnight

    The actual meaning of the terms ante meridiem (before noon) and post meridiem (after noon) are obviously not applicable at exactly noon or midnight.

    However, it has become common practice in countries that use the system (such as the United States) to designate noon as 12:00 p.m and midnight as 12:00 a.m. The practical advantage of this convention becomes clear when one considers a digital clock . Noon and midnight are only infinitesimal points in time, and therefore it is not practical to use any other convention than that which also applies immediately afterwards, when the clock still displays 12:00. This convention is standardized for computer usage in American National Standard ANSI INCITS 310 (which extends the international standard ISO 8601 time notation with a 12-h a.m./p.m. variant for the U.S.-market).

    Many U.S. style guides (including the NIST website) recommend instead that it is clearest if one refers to "noon" or "12:00 noon" and "midnight" or "12:00 midnight" (rather than to 12:00 p.m. and 12:00 a.m., respectively). Some other style guides suggest "12:00 <span style="font-variant: small-caps;">n</span>" for noon and "12:00 <span style="font-variant: small-caps;">m</span>" for midnight, but this conflicts with the older tradition of using "12:00 <span style="font-variant: small-caps;">m</span>" for noon (Latin meridies), and "12:00 <span style="font-variant: small-caps;">mn</span>" for midnight (media nox).

    Even with all these conventions, references to midnight remain problematic, because they do not distinguish between the midnight at the start of the day referenced and the midnight at its end. Therefore, some U.S. style guides recommend to either provide other context clues, or to avoid references to midnight entirely, for example in favour of 11:59 p.m. for the end of the day and 00:01 a.m. for the start of the day. The latter has become common practice in the United States in legal contracts and for airplane, bus, or train schedules.

    The 24-hour clock notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.

  • jayKayEss (unregistered)

    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:

    http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen

  • FriedEggs (cs) in reply to OtherMichael

    OtherMichael:
    The 24-hour clock notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.

    Yup, nothing ambiguous about 00:00 and 24:00.

  • anon (unregistered) in reply to OtherMichael
    OtherMichael:

    Ambiguity at noon and midnight

    ...The 24-hour clock notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.

     

    The WTF there is that 00:00 is 24:00, yet it avoids ambiguities!

  • Bus Raker (cs) in reply to R.Flowers
    R.Flowers:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Peter Rutner got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ...

     

    <font size="3"><b>All your configs are belong to us!</b></font>

    That is sad ... i mean '.sad'

    Me fail English, unpossible!

  • jl (unregistered) in reply to OtherMichael

    uh oh... i have never actually seen something like 24:00 or 12:01pm ... the clock switches always directly to 00:00... same like there's no 12:34:60 ...

    I'm stating obvious here but I feel like I have to

  • alias (cs)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

     

    I've got the same CD and the ticks and crosses are the other way around. I smell photoshop.

  • dcardani (cs) in reply to OtherMichael
    OtherMichael:

    Even with all these conventions, references to midnight remain problematic, because they do not distinguish between the midnight at the start of the day referenced and the midnight at its end.

    In fact, isn't that how Blockbuster video makes most of their money? They tell you, "This movie is due back by Midnight Sunday." Then you find out that they meant 00:00 Sunday, and not 23:59 + 1 minute Sunday and you end up with a late fee.

  • nsimeonov (cs) in reply to anon

    24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59

  • Jefffurry (cs) in reply to anon
    Anonymous:
    OtherMichael:

    Ambiguity at noon and midnight

    ...The 24-hour clock notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.

    The WTF there is that 00:00 is 24:00, yet it avoids ambiguities!



    Which is perfectly unambiguous. 00:00 refers to today, and 24:00 refers to tomorrow.

    Unless you're reading this tomorrow, in which case .... oh, nevermind. You get the idea.

  • dcardani (cs) in reply to jayKayEss
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:

    http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen

    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.

  • Micharl (unregistered) in reply to anon

    There is no WTF. 24:00 is precisely 24 hours after 0:00. They are both midnight, but are by no means both the same time in the context of a certain day. Saying one "is" (equal to) the other is more than just a little stretch of the truth.

  • Shadow Wolf (unregistered) in reply to GalacticCowboy
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Hell, I just want that hard disk. What I could do with 8.5 petabytes...


  • cjd1 (unregistered) in reply to Micharl

    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning or midnight tuesday evening?  If you're going to use that sort of annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch Wednesday at 36:30?"  00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.  Anothing greater (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...

  • HitScan (cs) in reply to dcardani
    dcardani:
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:

    http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen

    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.



    So it's supposed to have 3 ok buttons? that's re-retarded.

  • l33t (unregistered) in reply to HitScan

    looks like a cheeze way of doing next and prev buttons...

     

    captcha > null

  • Jonathan Thompson (unregistered) in reply to Shadow Wolf

    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!  That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.

  • Csaboka (unregistered)
     
    That's the good thing about those 64-bit systems. Instead of the old boring two-billion bogus values, you get brand new, much bigger ones!
  • Anonymous Coward (unregistered) in reply to Dazed
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:

    Anonymous:


    Must have been using the Date calculation from The Trouble with Blind Dates

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!



    The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?

    The WTF is that some people still don't use the 24-hour clock.



    The WTF is that some people still don't use ISO dates...

  • rbriem (cs) in reply to nsimeonov
    nsimeonov:

    24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59

    Well, criminy, that's even more confusing! Wouldn't it be better if it went from 00:00 to 00:01, then from 00:01 to 00:02, then ...

    Oh, wait.

    Never mind ...

  • Bus Raker (cs) in reply to cjd1

    Anonymous:
    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning or midnight tuesday evening?  If you're going to use that sort of annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch Wednesday at 36:30?"  00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.  Anothing greater (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...

    Wednesday at 36:30 = File Not Found

  • marvin_rabbit (cs) in reply to Gene Wirchenko
    Gene Wirchenko:
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!

    ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.  I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.
    Sincerely,
    Gene Wirchenko


    In the interest of self-deprication, I have to admit that I was thinking the same thing as ParkinT.  Look at it over and over and scratching my head.

    I probably would have made the post myself if it hadn't been done before I got here today.

    (Not excusing the mistake, just admiting that I'm a doofus too sometimes.)
  • marvin_rabbit (cs) in reply to rbriem
    rbriem:
    nsimeonov:

    24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59

    Well, criminy, that's even more confusing! Wouldn't it be better if it went from 00:00 to 00:01, then from 00:01 to 00:02, then ...

    Oh, wait.

    Never mind ...


    <Laugh> That's fricken funny, man.  Now THAT's my kind of humor.  (Bonus for using the word "criminy".  Perfect.)
  • Dazed (unregistered) in reply to alias
    alias:
    I've got the same CD and the ticks and crosses are the other way around. I smell photoshop.

    Not impossible, but this could very well be genuine. I have myself witnessed the horrified expression of a PR manager who has just been confronted with a similar (but even worse) gaffe in something that was just released, and who has just realised that it is going to be a very long and embarrassing day getting a new version ready.

  • marvin_rabbit (cs) in reply to nsimeonov
    nsimeonov:

    24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59


    And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.  In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.

    (Just wanting to throw out trivia.)
  • Gene Wirchenko (cs) in reply to Jonathan Thompson
    Anonymous:
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!  That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.


    CP/M allowed them.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko

  • Gene Wirchenko (cs) in reply to marvin_rabbit
    marvin_rabbit:
    Gene Wirchenko:
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!

    ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.  I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.



    In the interest of self-deprication, I have to admit that I was thinking the same thing as ParkinT.  Look at it over and over and scratching my head.

    I probably would have made the post myself if it hadn't been done before I got here today.

    (Not excusing the mistake, just admiting that I'm a doofus too sometimes.)


    Admitting it is most of the battle.  Clueless people who insist they know even after being whacked with a clue-by-four . . . well, you can fill the rest in, right?

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko

  • DZ-Jay (cs) in reply to ParkinT
    ParkinT:

    Anonymous:


    Must have been using the Date calculation from The Trouble with Blind Dates

    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!

    1:00PM IS earlier than 12:59PM

    There is nothing wrong there!



    No its not!  1:00 pm comes 2 minutes after 12:58 pm.  Or in this particular case, 1 minute and 21 seconds.

        -dZ.
  • Jonathan Thompson (unregistered) in reply to Gene Wirchenko

    Just sad that MS-DOS and then NT didn't support them until rather recently, really: imagine how much actual disk space could have been saved when using databases all these years!  Wait, perhaps Microsoft was merely doing the hard drive manufacturers a huge favor, never mind...

     

    Gene Wirchenko:
    Anonymous:
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!  That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.


    CP/M allowed them.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko

  • DZ-Jay (cs) in reply to anon
    Anonymous:
    OtherMichael:

    Ambiguity at noon and midnight

    ...The 24-hour clock notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.

     

    The WTF there is that 00:00 is 24:00, yet it avoids ambiguities!



    It avoid the ambiguities between the midnight at the beginning of the day and the midnight at the end of the day -- there is a difference, depending on your point of view.
  • DZ-Jay (cs) in reply to marvin_rabbit
    marvin_rabbit:
    nsimeonov:

    24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59


    And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.  In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.

    (Just wanting to throw out trivia.)


    OK, I'll bite.  First, a link to the Wikipedia:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock#Midnight_00:00_and_24:00

    I only offer that to make it easier for anybody to find and read it, as I don't trust Wikipedia, so here's another resource with the same:

        http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html

    Now, how about a more "official" page, say, an IBM reference on locales:

        http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/locales/date_time.jsp

    Here's a brief excerpt from that page:

    In the ISO/IEC twenty-four-hour system, 24:00 is midnight at the end of a day, and 00:01 is one minute after midnight of the next day. The sequence is 23:59, 24:00, 00:01. In ISO/IEC standard 8601, both 24:00 and 00:00 are allowed to indicate midnight, with 24:00 indicating the end of the day and 00:00 indicating the start of the next day.
    (emphasis mine.)

    Did you even look it up, or did you just *thought* that it was invalid, and therefore assumed it must be so?

         -dZ.
  • Sgt. Zim (cs) in reply to Jonathan Thompson
    Jonathan Thompson:
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!  That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.

    "Welcome to All Things Scottish ... We've got three sizes:  Wee, Not-so-wee and FRIGGIN' HUGE!"

    Wow, I'm quoting SNL.  It's late and I'm tired; two more hours and my body can join my brain, somewhere away from my desk.

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