Pop-up Potpourri: June Bugs

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  • Morbii 2006-06-02 13:25
    Oooh, I love these!
  • GreenLight 2006-06-02 13:25
    I like the one about the KDE Print System.<br><br>Yeah, I'd sure like to know why!<br>
  • Benanov 2006-06-02 13:26

    <p><b>Quoth Alex:</b></p><p><b>Hugo Kornelis</b> decided to uninstall HP Share-To-Web, which was
    some mystery program that must have installed with the printer driver.
    It didn't seem to like that too much ... <br></p><br><p>It's 2006, people.&nbsp; If you can't write a Unicode-Aware application, your code will end up here.</p><p>Sincerely,</p><p>Mr. Antonov<br></p>
  • GalacticCowboy 2006-06-02 13:34
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P><IMG src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/bigsong.gif"></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>Wow...&nbsp; that's...&nbsp; monolith-ic.</P>
  • doublel 2006-06-02 13:35
    <img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG" alt=""><br><br>Must have been using the Date calculation from <a href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</a><br>
  • R.Flowers 2006-06-02 13:39
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <p><b>Peter Rutner</b> got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ...
    </p><blockquote>
    <p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/epson2.png"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <p>
    </p><p><font size="3"><b>All your configs are belong to us!</b></font><br></p>
  • emurphy 2006-06-02 14:02
    At least the file size is only off by two bits:<br><br>9570149222628417 dec = 22000000DCBC41 hex<br>DCBC41 hex = 14466113 dec<br><br>I wonder whether the date bug is due to century or time zone or both.<br><br>
  • ParkinT 2006-06-02 14:04
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    <IMG alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><BR><BR>Must have been using the Date calculation from <A href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</A><BR>
    </P>
    <P>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</P>
    <P>1:00PM <STRONG>IS</STRONG> earlier than 12:59PM</P>
    <P>There is nothing wrong there!</P>
  • ParkinT 2006-06-02 14:05
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <P><B>Peter Rutner</B> got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ... </P>
    <BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P><IMG src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/epson2.png"></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>Resistance be futile&nbsp; </P>
  • Me 2006-06-02 14:09
    <P>uh no, 12:58:39 PM is before 1:00 PM.</P>
    <P>11:00 AM - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM</P>
  • Oscar L 2006-06-02 14:10
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <P><B>Peter Rutner</B> got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ... </P>
    <BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P><IMG src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/epson2.png"></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>I am gatekeeper.&nbsp; Are you keymaster?</P>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-06-02 14:10
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!
    </p>ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.&nbsp; I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • Otto 2006-06-02 14:11
    ParkinT:

    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <br>Are you daft? 12 PM = Noon. 12 AM = Midnight.<br><br>1 PM is after 12 PM.<br><br>
  • BradC 2006-06-02 14:16
    <P>Hehe, that's classic. </P>
    <P>"You may want to find out why."</P>
    <P>I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:</P>
    <P>"Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."</P>
    <P>"Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."</P>
    <P>"MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."</P>
  • codemoose 2006-06-02 14:17
    ParkinT:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    <img alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><br><br>Must have been using the Date calculation from <a href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</a><br>
    </p>
    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <br><br>The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?<br>
  • V. 2006-06-02 14:17
    and it's not getting better: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=151250154&amp;size=o">see this</a><br>
  • Doug 2006-06-02 14:21
    Otto:
    ParkinT:

    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <br>Are you daft? 12 PM = Noon. 12 AM = Midnight.<br><br>1 PM is after 12 PM.<br><br>
    <br><br>You, sir, are the daft one.&nbsp; For it is obvious to all but the most untrained eye that the error message is clearly referring to 4/19/1306 1:00:00 PM and 4/19/1706 12:58:39 PM.<br><br><br>CAPTCHA: knowhutimean<br>
  • Dazed 2006-06-02 14:24
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    <img alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><br><br>Must have been using the Date calculation from <a href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</a><br>
    </p>
    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <br><br>The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?<br>


    The WTF is that some people still don't use the 24-hour clock.
  • OtherMichael 2006-06-02 14:26
    <h3><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#Ambiguity_at_noon_and_midnight">Ambiguity at noon and midnight</a></h3>
    <p>The actual meaning of the terms <i>ante meridiem</i> (before noon) and <i>post meridiem</i> (after noon) are obviously not applicable at exactly noon or midnight.<sup></sup></p>
    <p>However, it has become common practice in countries that use the
    system (such as the United States) to designate noon as 12:00&nbsp;p.m and
    midnight as 12:00&nbsp;a.m. The practical advantage of this convention
    becomes clear when one considers a digital clock . Noon and midnight
    are only infinitesimal points in time, and therefore it is not
    practical to use any other convention than that which also applies
    immediately afterwards, when the clock still displays 12:00. This
    convention is standardized for computer usage in American National
    Standard <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI" title="ANSI">ANSI</a> INCITS 310 (which extends the international standard <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601" title="ISO 8601">ISO 8601</a> time notation with a 12-h a.m./p.m. variant for the U.S.-market).</p>
    <p>Many U.S. style guides (including the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NIST" title="NIST">NIST</a>
    website) recommend instead that it is clearest if one refers to "noon"
    or "12:00&nbsp;noon" and "midnight" or "12:00&nbsp;midnight" (rather than to
    12:00&nbsp;p.m. and 12:00&nbsp;a.m., respectively). Some other style guides
    suggest "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">n</span>" for noon and "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">m</span>" for midnight, but this conflicts with the older tradition of using "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">m</span>" for noon (Latin <i>meridies</i>), and "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">mn</span>" for midnight (<i>media nox</i>).</p>
    <p>Even with all these conventions, references to midnight remain
    problematic, because they do not distinguish between the midnight at
    the start of the day referenced and the midnight at its end. Therefore,
    some U.S. style guides recommend to either provide other context clues,
    or to avoid references to midnight entirely, for example in favour of
    11:59 p.m. for the end of the day and 00:01 a.m. for the start of the
    day. The latter has become common practice in the United States in
    legal contracts and for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airplane" title="Airplane">airplane</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus" title="Bus">bus</a>, or <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Train" title="Train">train</a> schedules.</p>
    <p>The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock" title="24-hour clock">24-hour clock</a> notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.</p>
  • jayKayEss 2006-06-02 14:41
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>
  • FriedEggs 2006-06-02 14:42
    <P>
    OtherMichael:
    The <A title="24-hour clock" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock">24-hour clock</A> notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.
    </P>
    <P>Yup, nothing ambiguous about 00:00 and 24:00.</P>
  • anon 2006-06-02 14:42
    OtherMichael:

    <H3><A href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#Ambiguity_at_noon_and_midnight">Ambiguity at noon and midnight</A></H3>
    <P>...The <A title="24-hour clock" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock">24-hour clock</A> notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.</P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>The WTF there is that 00:00 is 24:00, yet it avoids ambiguities!</P>
  • Bus Raker 2006-06-02 14:50
    R.Flowers:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <P><B>Peter Rutner</B> got this rather curious message when trying to save over a configuration file ... </P>
    <BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P><IMG src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/epson2.png"></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P><FONT size=3><B>All your configs are belong to us!</B></FONT><BR></P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>That is sad ... i mean '.sad'</P>
    <P>Me fail English, unpossible!</P>
  • jl 2006-06-02 14:59
    uh oh... i have never actually seen something like 24:00 or 12:01pm ... the clock switches always directly to 00:00... same like there's no 12:34:60 ...

    I'm stating obvious here but I feel like I have to
  • alias 2006-06-02 15:03
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <p>
    </p><blockquote>
    <p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/piracy.png"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;
    </p>I've got the same CD and the ticks and crosses are the other way around. I smell photoshop.<br>
  • dcardani 2006-06-02 15:05
    OtherMichael:

    <p>Even with all these conventions, references to midnight remain
    problematic, because they do not distinguish between the midnight at
    the start of the day referenced and the midnight at its end. </p>


    In fact, isn't that how Blockbuster video makes most of their money? They tell you, "This movie is due back by Midnight Sunday." Then you find out that they meant 00:00 Sunday, and not 23:59 + 1 minute Sunday and you end up with a late fee.
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-02 15:05
    <P>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</P>
  • Jefffurry 2006-06-02 15:06
    Anonymous:
    OtherMichael:

    <h3><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#Ambiguity_at_noon_and_midnight">Ambiguity at noon and midnight</a></h3>
    <p>...The <a title="24-hour clock" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock">24-hour clock</a> notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.</p>
    <p>
    </p>

    <p>The WTF there is that 00:00 is 24:00, yet it avoids ambiguities!</p>
    <br><br>Which is perfectly unambiguous. 00:00 refers to today, and 24:00 refers to tomorrow.<br><br>Unless you're reading this tomorrow, in which case .... oh, nevermind. You get the idea.<br><br>
  • dcardani 2006-06-02 15:08
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>


    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.
  • Micharl 2006-06-02 15:08
    There is no WTF. 24:00 is precisely 24 hours after 0:00. They are both midnight, but are by no means both the same time in the context of a certain day. Saying one "is" (equal to) the other is more than just a little stretch of the truth.<br>
  • Shadow Wolf 2006-06-02 15:31
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <blockquote>
    <p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/bigsong.gif"></p></blockquote>
    <p>
    </p>Hell, I just want that hard disk. What I could do with 8.5 petabytes...<br><br><br>
  • cjd1 2006-06-02 15:43
    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning or midnight tuesday evening?&nbsp; If you're going to use that sort of annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch Wednesday at 36:30?"&nbsp; 00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.&nbsp; Anothing greater (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...<br>
  • HitScan 2006-06-02 15:47
    dcardani:
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>


    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.
    <br><br>So it's <i>supposed</i> to have 3 ok buttons? that's re-retarded.<br>
  • l33t 2006-06-02 15:54
    <P>looks like a cheeze way of doing&nbsp;next and prev buttons... </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>captcha &gt; null</P>
  • Jonathan Thompson 2006-06-02 15:56
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!&nbsp; That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.<br>
  • Csaboka 2006-06-02 16:00
    <DIV><IMG src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/bigsong.gif"></DIV>
    <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
    <DIV>That's the good thing about those 64-bit systems. Instead of the old boring two-billion bogus values, you get brand new, much bigger ones!</DIV></IMG>
  • Anonymous Coward 2006-06-02 16:17
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    <img alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><br><br>Must have been using the Date calculation from <a href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</a><br>
    </p>
    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <br><br>The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?<br>


    The WTF is that some people still don't use the 24-hour clock.
    <br><br>The WTF is that some people still don't use ISO dates...<br>
  • rbriem 2006-06-02 16:27
    nsimeonov:

    <P>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>Well, criminy, that's even more confusing! Wouldn't it be better if it went from 00:00 to 00:01, then from 00:01 to 00:02, then ...</P>
    <P>Oh, wait.</P>
    <P>Never mind ...</P>
  • Bus Raker 2006-06-02 16:28
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning or midnight tuesday evening?&nbsp; If you're going to use that sort of annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch Wednesday at 36:30?"&nbsp; 00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.&nbsp; Anothing greater (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...<BR>
    </P>
    <P>Wednesday at 36:30 = File Not Found</P>
  • marvin_rabbit 2006-06-02 16:35
    Gene Wirchenko:
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!
    </p>ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.&nbsp; I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.<br>Sincerely,<br>Gene Wirchenko<br>
    <br>In the interest of self-deprication, I have to admit that I was thinking the same thing as ParkinT.&nbsp; Look at it over and over and scratching my head.<br><br>I probably would have made the post myself if it hadn't been done before I got here today.<br><br>(Not excusing the mistake, just admiting that I'm a doofus too sometimes.)<br>
  • marvin_rabbit 2006-06-02 16:38
    rbriem:
    nsimeonov:

    <p>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</p>
    <p>
    </p>
    <p>Well, criminy, that's even more confusing! Wouldn't it be better if it went from 00:00 to 00:01, then from 00:01 to 00:02, then ...</p>
    <p>Oh, wait.</p>
    <p>Never mind ...</p>
    <br>&lt;Laugh&gt; That's fricken funny, man.&nbsp; Now THAT's my kind of humor.&nbsp; (Bonus for using the word "criminy".&nbsp; Perfect.)<br>
  • Dazed 2006-06-02 16:39
    alias:
    I've got the same CD and the ticks and crosses are the other way around. I smell photoshop.


    Not impossible, but this could very well be genuine. I have myself witnessed the horrified expression of a PR manager who has just been confronted with a similar (but even worse) gaffe in something that was just released, and who has just realised that it is going to be a <b>very</b> long and embarrassing day getting a new version ready.
  • marvin_rabbit 2006-06-02 16:42
    nsimeonov:
    <p>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</p>
    <br>And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.&nbsp; In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.<br><br>(Just wanting to throw out trivia.)<br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-06-02 16:52
    Anonymous:
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!&nbsp; That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.
    <br><br>CP/M allowed them.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-06-02 16:56
    marvin_rabbit:
    Gene Wirchenko:
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!
    </p>ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.&nbsp; I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.
    <br><br>In the interest of self-deprication, I have to admit that I was thinking the same thing as ParkinT.&nbsp; Look at it over and over and scratching my head.<br><br>I probably would have made the post myself if it hadn't been done before I got here today.<br><br>(Not excusing the mistake, just admiting that I'm a doofus too sometimes.)
    <br><br>Admitting it is most of the battle.&nbsp; Clueless people who insist they know even after being whacked with a clue-by-four . . . well, you can fill the rest in, right?<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • DZ-Jay 2006-06-02 16:58
    ParkinT:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    <img alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><br><br>Must have been using the Date calculation from <a href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</a><br>
    </p>
    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <br><br>No its not!&nbsp; 1:00 pm comes 2 minutes <b>after </b><img src="file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/JAMESP%7E1.PIN/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg" alt=""> 12:58 pm.&nbsp; Or in this particular case, 1 minute and 21 seconds.<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -dZ.<br>
  • Jonathan Thompson 2006-06-02 16:59
    <P>Just sad that MS-DOS and then NT didn't support them until rather recently, really: imagine how much actual disk space could have been saved when using databases all these years!&nbsp; Wait, perhaps Microsoft was merely doing the hard drive manufacturers a huge favor, never mind...</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>
    Gene Wirchenko:
    Anonymous:
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!&nbsp; That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.
    <BR><BR>CP/M allowed them.<BR><BR>Sincerely,<BR><BR>Gene Wirchenko<BR><BR>
    </P>
  • DZ-Jay 2006-06-02 17:04
    Anonymous:
    OtherMichael:

    <h3><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#Ambiguity_at_noon_and_midnight">Ambiguity at noon and midnight</a></h3>
    <p>...The <a title="24-hour clock" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock">24-hour clock</a> notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.</p>
    <p>
    </p>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <p>The WTF there is that 00:00 is 24:00, yet it avoids ambiguities!</p>
    <br><br>It avoid the ambiguities between the midnight at the beginning of the day and the midnight at the end of the day -- there is a difference, depending on your point of view.<br>
  • DZ-Jay 2006-06-02 17:17
    marvin_rabbit:
    nsimeonov:
    <p>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</p>
    <br>And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.&nbsp; In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.<br><br>(Just wanting to throw out trivia.)<br>
    <br><br>OK, I'll bite.&nbsp; First, a link to the Wikipedia:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock#Midnight_00:00_and_24:00<br><br>I only offer that to make it easier for anybody to find and read it, as I don't trust Wikipedia, so here's another resource with the same:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html<br><br>Now, how about a more "official" page, say, an IBM reference on locales:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/locales/date_time.jsp<br><br>Here's a brief excerpt from that page:<br><br><blockquote>In the ISO/IEC twenty-four-hour system, 24:00 is midnight at the end of
    a day, and 00:01 is one minute after midnight of the next day. The
    sequence is 23:59, 24:00, 00:01. <b>In ISO/IEC standard 8601, both 24:00
    and 00:00 are allowed </b>to indicate midnight, with 24:00 indicating the
    end of the day and 00:00 indicating the start of the next day.<br></blockquote>(emphasis mine.)<br><br>Did you even look it up, or did you just *thought* that it was invalid, and therefore assumed it must be so?<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -dZ.<br>
  • Sgt. Zim 2006-06-02 17:24
    Jonathan Thompson:
    Welcome to the magic of sparse files!&nbsp; That's why I could create a 16 meg file on an Apple 2c on a 140K floppy using Apple ProDOS, and why (I think they enabled it on XP) under NTFS you can create friggin' huge files on NTFS, and I'm not sure which other filesystems allow/support them.<br>
    <br>"Welcome to All Things Scottish ... We've got three sizes:&nbsp; Wee, Not-so-wee and FRIGGIN' HUGE!"<br><br>Wow, I'm quoting SNL.&nbsp; It's late and I'm tired; two more hours and my body can join my brain, somewhere away from my desk.<br>
  • JoeBloggs 2006-06-02 18:08
    dcardani:
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>


    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.


    I interpret that as "OK and next", "OK and close", and "OK and previous". The arrows should be pointing left and right, though.
  • EvanED 2006-06-02 18:26
    Anonymous:
    dcardani:
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>


    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.


    I interpret that as "OK and next", "OK and close", and "OK and previous". The arrows should be pointing left and right, though.
    <br><br>I disagree on your last point. Look at &lt;a href="http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen"&gt;the screenshots&lt;/a&gt; someone posted earlier. The main window that leads to this displays a list -- in vertical format -- of the pictures (at least in the option settings that are shown). The up and down arrows make that list agree with this dialog.<br>
  • marvin_rabbit 2006-06-02 18:40
    DZ-Jay:
    marvin_rabbit:
    nsimeonov:
    <p>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</p>
    <br>And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.&nbsp; In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.<br><br>(Just wanting to throw out trivia.)<br>
    <br><br>OK, I'll bite.&nbsp; First, a link to the Wikipedia:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock#Midnight_00:00_and_24:00<br><br>I only offer that to make it easier for anybody to find and read it, as I don't trust Wikipedia, so here's another resource with the same:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html<br><br>Now, how about a more "official" page, say, an IBM reference on locales:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/locales/date_time.jsp<br><br>Here's a brief excerpt from that page:<br><br><blockquote>In the ISO/IEC twenty-four-hour system, 24:00 is midnight at the end of
    a day, and 00:01 is one minute after midnight of the next day. The
    sequence is 23:59, 24:00, 00:01. <b>In ISO/IEC standard 8601, both 24:00
    and 00:00 are allowed </b>to indicate midnight, with 24:00 indicating the
    end of the day and 00:00 indicating the start of the next day.<br></blockquote>(emphasis mine.)<br><br>Did you even look it up, or did you just *thought* that it was invalid, and therefore assumed it must be so?<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -dZ.<br>
    <br>WWWWHHHHHAAAACCCKK!!!!&nbsp; Ouch... Damn!&nbsp; That's the second time I've been hit with a clue-by-four today!<br><br>Although, I will take some slight solace in that at least one of your links confims that the seconds do go to 60 for a leap second, instead of rolling to the next minute.<br><br>Still... Damn that hurts.<br>
  • StratoS 2006-06-02 19:12
    I disagree.<br>
    <br>
    The UI is fucked, there should be "save" button and a "close" button.<br>
    it's 2006 let's drop the ok'ing and cancel'ing.<br>
    And the window should be non-blocking so i could open multiple
    instances of the window on diffrent images. (offcourse not on the same
    image, because that would be stupid) (and also offcourse, for all i
    know it could already be so, but then there would be no use for the
    "ok, next img" button or "ok, previous img" button.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
  • Coughptcha 2006-06-02 19:12
    DZ-Jay:
    <br>... &nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html<br>
    <br><i>"In case an unambiguous representation of time is required, 00:00 is
    usually the preferred notation for midnight and not 24:00.</i>"<br><br>24:00 yesterday is the same instant in time as 00:00 today ... but the standards don't go past 24:00. So a millisecond past that instant in time would not be 24:00:00.001 but rather 00:00:00.001.<br><br>Although that wouldn't stop me from writing an application which internally tracked time of, say, 26:00 to indicate 2am on the <i>next</i> day (e.g. when processing transactions actually associated with the previous day).&nbsp; I just wouldn't represent it that way externally.<br><br>But if you want to debate me, I'm 5 foot 14 inches tall.<br>
  • StratoS 2006-06-02 19:14
    please excuse me this was my first post here, and i was under the impression that i was quoting someone.<br>
    <br>
    In the above post i was replying to the kflicker comment that thaught the buttons actually made some sort of sense.<br>
    <br>
  • confused 2006-06-02 19:31
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:

    <P>
    Anonymous:
    <IMG alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><BR><BR>Must have been using the Date calculation from <A href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</A><BR>
    </P>
    <P>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</P>
    <P>1:00PM <STRONG>IS</STRONG> earlier than 12:59PM</P>
    <P>There is nothing wrong there!</P>
    <P>
    <BR><BR>The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?<BR>
    </P>
    <P>Recursively, or iteratively?</P>
  • confused 2006-06-02 19:34
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:

    <P>
    Anonymous:
    <IMG alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><BR><BR>Must have been using the Date calculation from <A href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</A><BR>
    </P>
    <P>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</P>
    <P>1:00PM <STRONG>IS</STRONG> earlier than 12:59PM</P>
    <P>There is nothing wrong there!</P>
    <P>
    <BR><BR>The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?<BR>
    The WTF is that some people still don't use the 24-hour clock.
    </P>
    <P>This would assume that all people can count past 12. You may be assuming too much.</P>
  • Sgt. Zim 2006-06-02 19:36
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    ParkinT:

    <p>
    Anonymous:
    <img alt="" src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/WTF-Time.JPG"><br><br>Must have been using the Date calculation from <a href="/forums/thread/75512.aspx">The Trouble with Blind Dates</a><br>
    </p>
    <p>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</p>
    <p>1:00PM <strong>IS</strong> earlier than 12:59PM</p>
    <p>There is nothing wrong there!</p>
    <p>
    <br><br>The WTF WTFer got WTF'ed?<br>
    The WTF is that some people still don't use the 24-hour clock.
    </p>
    <p>This would assume that all people can count past 12. You may be assuming too much.</p>
    <br>"Damn my inadequate Base-10 fingers!!!1!eleven!!"<br><br>
  • confused 2006-06-02 19:50
    <P>
    Coughptcha:
    DZ-Jay:
    <BR>... &nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html<BR>
    <BR><I>"In case an unambiguous representation of time is required, 00:00 is usually the preferred notation for midnight and not 24:00.</I>"<BR><BR>24:00 yesterday is the same instant in time as 00:00 today ... but the standards don't go past 24:00. So a millisecond past that instant in time would not be 24:00:00.001 but rather 00:00:00.001.<BR><BR>Although that wouldn't stop me from writing an application which internally tracked time of, say, 26:00 to indicate 2am on the <I>next</I> day (e.g. when processing transactions actually associated with the previous day).&nbsp; I just wouldn't represent it that way externally.<BR><BR>But if you want to debate me, I'm 5 foot 14 inches tall.<BR>
    </P>
    <P>Interestingly, Java's GregorianCalendar works this way - you can specify anti-normalized dates and it handles them correctly:</P><PRE>SimpleDateFormat sdf;
    GregorianCalendar gc;
    sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss");</PRE><PRE>// Specify the nonsensical: June 43, 2006 25:63:72
    gc = new GregorianCalendar(2006,Calendar.JUNE,43, // yields Jul 13, 2006
    25,63,72); // + 25hr, 63 min, 72 sec
    // This prints: 07/14/2006 02:04:12
    System.out.println(sdf.format(gc.getTime()));
    </PRE>
  • jayKayEss 2006-06-02 20:54
    Agreed.&nbsp; The buttons should say "Next" and "Previous," since they let you move through a list of photos.<br>
  • jayKayEss 2006-06-02 20:55
    dcardani:
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>


    No it doesn't. What's the difference between "OK (Down Arrow)", "OK," and "OK (Up Arrow)?" That's still confusing as hell.
    <br><br>Agreed.&nbsp; The buttons should say "Next" and "Previous," since they let you move through a list of photos.<br>
  • WallyT 2006-06-02 21:56
    BradC:
    <p>Hehe, that's classic. </p>
    <p>"You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:</p>
    <p>"Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>"Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>"MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."</p>
    <br><br>I'd love to see error messages like this. They would assume that I'm _not_ and idiot and can probably find the answer if I look. They are certainly better than some error messages I've seen that tell me a lot and say absolutly nothing.<br>
  • WallyT 2006-06-02 21:57
    BradC:
    <p>Hehe, that's classic. </p>
    <p>"You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:</p>
    <p>"Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>"Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>"MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."</p>
    <br><br>I'd love to see error messages like this. They would assume that I'm _not_ an idiot and can probably find the answer if I look. They are certainly better than some error messages I've seen that tell me a lot and say absolutly nothing.<br>
  • niko 2006-06-02 23:05
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <blockquote><p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/ShareToWeb1.png"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <br><br>FYI, this is Russian with the encoding messed up, which happens on systems without Cyrillic support. It goes: <b>? ?????????? ???? ???????? ????????? HP Share-to-Web ????? ??????? ? ??????????. ??????????? </b>Translation: "As a result of this operation, HP Share-to-Web will be removed from this computer. Continue?". (Duh.)<br>
  • Cheong 2006-06-02 23:16
    I think the "Microsoft Office Picture Manager's compression algorithm" is not a WTF, as we all know that if the "data" is too complex, a compression algorithm could have "negative compression ratio".<br><br>Remembering at the days of PCX format, the "compressed size" can range to less than 1 percent of origional (best case) to over than 10 times(I don't remember where the limit is) of the origional size.<br>
  • AI 2006-06-02 23:16
    Coughptcha:
    DZ-Jay:
    <br>... &nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html<br>
    <br><i>"In case an unambiguous representation of time is required, 00:00 is
    usually the preferred notation for midnight and not 24:00.</i>"<br><br>24:00 yesterday is the same instant in time as 00:00 today ... but the standards don't go past 24:00. So a millisecond past that instant in time would not be 24:00:00.001 but rather 00:00:00.001.<br><br>Although that wouldn't stop me from writing an application which internally tracked time of, say, 26:00 to indicate 2am on the <i>next</i> day (e.g. when processing transactions actually associated with the previous day).&nbsp; I just wouldn't represent it that way externally.<br><br>But if you want to debate me, I'm 5 foot 14 inches tall.<br>
    <br><br>I do that too, which sometimes gets me into really-high-numbers, but that's a different story.<br><br>as for AM/PM wtf-iness, I used to 'work' with a group of people over the internet, now, most of these lived somewhere in north america, so whenever they had planned something, it was in some obscure timezone like PST, ET, EST or whatever they managed to think up, and the times were in 12 hour format (and 12 PM and AM happened often enough). Now try to think of the how this works with dates (considering I live in CET, GMT+1) and you'll know I found out the hard way how the AM/PM system is supposed to 'work'.<br>
  • Maurits 2006-06-02 23:53
    Anonymous:
    Interestingly, Java's GregorianCalendar works this way - you can specify anti-normalized dates and it handles them correctly:
    <br><br>I would argue the "correctly" there.<br>
  • rob_squared 2006-06-03 00:06
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <blockquote><p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/ShareToWeb1.png"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <br><br>FYI, this is Russian with the encoding messed up, which happens on systems without Cyrillic support. It goes: <b>? ?????????? ???? ???????? ????????? HP Share-to-Web ????? ??????? ? ??????????. ??????????? </b>Translation: "As a result of this operation, HP Share-to-Web will be removed from this computer. Continue?". (Duh.)<br>
    <br><br>Ja, das ist good.<br><br>I'm very sorry, I couldn't resist.<br>
  • EvanED 2006-06-03 00:38
    Anonymous:
    I disagree.<br>
    <br>
    The UI is fucked, there should be "save" button and a "close" button.<br>
    it's 2006 let's drop the ok'ing and cancel'ing.<br>
    And the window should be non-blocking so i could open multiple
    instances of the window on diffrent images. (offcourse not on the same
    image, because that would be stupid) (and also offcourse, for all i
    know it could already be so, but then there would be no use for the
    "ok, next img" button or "ok, previous img" button.<br>
    <br>
    <br><br>There certainly is reason for a next and prev button whether the dialog is modal or not. If you're going through all your images sequentially, either just to look at them or to edit them, you don't want to have to open the dialog for the first image, close it, then open it for the second image, etc. If the dialog isn't modal you could make it so that you could select all the images in the browser, then open the dialog for all of them, but that leaves you with a huge mess of windows. (Though IMO it's still better than being able to open one window at once and not having prev/next buttons.)<br><br>And going linearly through pictures is something that's done pretty often. Hence the support for doing so in MS's Picture and Fax Viewer, Canon's Zoom Browser, Google's Picasa, and probably most other similar software.<br><br>That said... I should have said before that they could definitely improve over the "OK" "OK" "OK" dialog box. If I were making just a change of text I'd go with "Prev", "Close", "Next", but I'd keep the up and down arrows. (There's probably some even better way to do it if you make a bigger change, but I can't think of anything now, at least within not killing usability like I feel removing those buttons would.)<br>
  • Hawk777 2006-06-03 00:54
    Anonymous:
    I think the "Microsoft Office Picture Manager's compression algorithm" is not a WTF, as we all know that if the "data" is too complex, a compression algorithm could have "negative compression ratio".<br><br>Remembering at the days of PCX format, the "compressed size" can range to less than 1 percent of origional (best case) to over than 10 times(I don't remember where the limit is) of the origional size.<br>


    Oh for crying out loud, why not just add a flag byte indicating compressed or not compressed? You *can't* make *any* sample of data you can possibly store in a file on disk 10 times bigger by adding one byte (unless it's empty to start with... in which case you could leave the result empty too, so the flag doesn't even exist, which signifies empty). Try compressing: if it gets bigger, store the original uncompressed version.
  • Otac0n 2006-06-03 01:26
    Anonymous:
    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning
    or midnight tuesday evening?&nbsp; If you're going to use that sort of
    annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch
    Wednesday at 36:30?"&nbsp; 00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.&nbsp; Anothing greater
    (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...<br>
    <br><br>Just use hours, minutes, and seconds like they are used in degrees.&nbsp; Tuesday + 23°59'59.9'<br>
    <br>
    Tuesday at 24:00 is the same as Tuesday + 24°00'00" or the boundary between Tuesday and Wednesday.
  • Otac0n 2006-06-03 01:27
    Hawk777:
    Anonymous:
    I think the "Microsoft Office Picture Manager's compression algorithm" is not a WTF, as we all know that if the "data" is too complex, a compression algorithm could have "negative compression ratio".<br><br>Remembering at the days of PCX format, the "compressed size" can range to less than 1 percent of origional (best case) to over than 10 times(I don't remember where the limit is) of the origional size.<br>


    Oh for crying out loud, why not just add a flag byte indicating compressed or not compressed? You *can't* make *any* sample of data you can possibly store in a file on disk 10 times bigger by adding one byte (unless it's empty to start with... in which case you could leave the result empty too, so the flag doesn't even exist, which signifies empty). Try compressing: if it gets bigger, store the original uncompressed version.
    <br><br>Yay for deflate for coming up with this.<br>
  • Wells 2006-06-03 03:32
    I found this one today in Vista beta 2:<br><br><img src="http://wellsplace.co.uk/messageboardfiles/images/vista_indexcount.png"><br><br><br>
  • chowells 2006-06-03 04:17
    The KFlickr screenshot is hilariously funny.

    As a KDE developer I found the print system screenshot to be a bit sad, it is indeed terrible.

    grep'ing through the KDE source code reveals no hits for this string. The dialogue itself looks a bit GNOMEish... hmm... Googling for '"You may want to find out why" gnome' suggests that the error comes from eggcups, which is part of GNOME. I think the WTF is how someone managed to combine parts of KDE and GNOME together to generate such an error.
  • Gabe 2006-06-03 04:40
    <P>
    EvanED:
    <BR>That said... I should have said before that they could definitely improve over the "OK" "OK" "OK" dialog box. If I were making just a change of text I'd go with "Prev", "Close", "Next", but I'd keep the up and down arrows. (There's probably some even better way to do it if you make a bigger change, but I can't think of anything now, at least within not killing usability like I feel removing those buttons would.)<BR>
    </P>
    <P>My guess is that they're trying to make it obvious that "cancel" only cancels the changes for this photo, while "OK next" and "OK prev" save the changes before moving to the next image. Otherwise some people might think that "cancel" cancels all of the changes they've made for this dialog box.</P>
    <P>As for sparse files, NTFS has supported them since 1995, but you didn't have much control over the allocation. You just turn on compression for a file and every large block that gets smaller when compressed will get stored as a small block or possibly not at all if the block is all zeros. In 2000 they added explicit support for sparse files, meaning you can add and remove blocks at will and easily discover which blocks are missing.</P>
    <P>Keep in mind that the dialog box showing a 9PB file could have been from any filesystem, even FAT or CDFS. How? Well, the bits that got flipped might not have been flipped on disk. They could have been flipped in the remote server's memory, while being sent over the wire, or in the local client's memory.</P>
  • muppetry 2006-06-03 04:51
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <blockquote>
    <p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/angle.jpg"></p></blockquote>
    <br><br>I'm guessing this is an input locale bug, where the developers have hard-coded the input locale to something like French where . is a thousands separator and , is a decimal.&nbsp; So the software thought 0.500" was 500".&nbsp; <br>
  • Anon 2006-06-03 05:02
    Anonymous:
    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning or midnight tuesday evening?  If you're going to use that sort of annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch Wednesday at 36:30?"  00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.  Anothing greater (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...<br>


    Why? Wed 36:30 is Thu 12:30, easy as that. Likewise, the zeroth of the month is the last day of the previous month, and when doing the "what day-of-week is this or that date" dance, it's simply convenient to count "the 25th is a thursday, the 32nd is a thursday, and the 32nd is the 2nd (of the next month)" etc.
  • Roel 2006-06-03 05:04
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <blockquote><p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/ShareToWeb1.png"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <br><br>FYI, this is Russian with the encoding messed up, which happens on systems without Cyrillic support. It goes: <b>? ?????????? ???? ???????? ????????? HP Share-to-Web ????? ??????? ? ??????????. ??????????? </b>Translation: "As a result of this operation, HP Share-to-Web will be removed from this computer. Continue?". (Duh.)<br>
    <br>But how the hell did a Russian HP Share-to-Web end up on a Dutch Windows?<br>
  • Anonymous 2006-06-03 06:15
    I think you guys are forgetting <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_seconds">Leap seconds</a> ;)
  • Erlando 2006-06-03 07:00
    Anonymous:
    <br><br>Hell, I just want that hard disk. What I could do with 8.5 petabytes...<br><br>
    <br><br><a href="http://ars.userfriendly.org/cartoons/?id=20060603">You wouldn't like that</a>... ;-)<br>
  • panzi 2006-06-03 08:15
    Maybe KFlickr is made by Leo Gets from lethal weapon?<br><br><i>moderator's note: advertising image removed</i><br><br>Then it would be "ok, ok, ok" (all of them).<br>
  • dhromed 2006-06-03 10:54
    Sgt. Zim:
    <br>"Damn my inadequate Base-10 fingers!!!1!eleven!!"<br><br>
    <br><br>Tricked!<br><br>
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    FYI, this is Russian
    with the encoding messed up, which happens on systems without Cyrillic
    support. It goes: <b>? ?????????? ???? ???????? ????????? HP Share-to-Web ????? ??????? ? ??????????. ??????????? </b>Translation: "As a result of this operation, HP Share-to-Web will be removed from this computer. Continue?". (Duh.)<br>
    <br>Ja, das ist good.<br><br>I'm very sorry, I couldn't resist.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Dutch. Not Deutsch.<br>
    <br>
    You mean: "Ja, dat is goed."<br>
  • Loren Pechtel 2006-06-03 12:12
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <blockquote>
    <p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/angle.jpg"></p></blockquote>
    <br><br>I'm guessing this is an input locale bug, where the developers have hard-coded the input locale to something like French where . is a thousands separator and , is a decimal.&nbsp; So the software thought 0.500" was 500".&nbsp; <br>
    <br><br>No--note the dimension to reduce it to is stated in the same form.&nbsp; This is a floating point comparison bug.<br>
  • Alexis de Torquemada 2006-06-03 15:09
    Hawk777:
    Oh for crying out loud, why not just add a flag byte indicating compressed or not compressed? ... Try compressing: if it gets bigger, store the original uncompressed version.
    <br><br>Furthermore, most of the compression algorithms in use today are smarter than the ancient PCX algorithm: They will never produce compressed data that is substantially larger than the input.<br><br>In defense of PCX, of course, its RLE (run-length encoding) approach could never more than double the image data compared to 8-bit indexed raw data.&nbsp; The only way to produce a 10 times or higher increase would be to use input data for which PCX wasn't designed, e.g. 1-bit black and white, together with very short average run lengths <b>and</b> a color mapping that utilizes the PCX high range even when low range colors (index numbers &lt; 192) are still available.<br><br>So if a 1-bit picture containing a single pixel checkboard pattern is converted to PCX <b>and</b> the two colors are both mapped into the high range, we could obtain the maximum space increase of 1500% (not counting metadata).&nbsp; Which, of course, would be a totally theoretical exercise.<br><br>
  • makomk 2006-06-03 16:03
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <blockquote><p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/ShareToWeb1.png"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <br><br>FYI, this is Russian with the encoding messed up, which happens on systems without Cyrillic support. It goes: <b>? ?????????? ???? ???????? ????????? HP Share-to-Web ????? ??????? ? ??????????. ??????????? </b>Translation: "As a result of this operation, HP Share-to-Web will be removed from this computer. Continue?". (Duh.)<br>


    Apparently, the Russians even have a word for this: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojibake">???????´???</a>.<br><br>

    Edit: Oh, and HP have always been a bit locale-challenged. I remember the driver installer for my HP 840C kept coming up in a foreign language for no good reason at one point (I think I mentioned it before).
  • makomk 2006-06-03 16:19
    DZ-Jay:
    marvin_rabbit:
    nsimeonov:
    <p>24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59</p>
    <br>And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.&nbsp; In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.<br><br>(Just wanting to throw out trivia.)<br>
    <br><br>OK, I'll bite.&nbsp; First, a link to the Wikipedia:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock#Midnight_00:00_and_24:00<br><br>I only offer that to make it easier for anybody to find and read it, as I don't trust Wikipedia, so here's another resource with the same:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.html<br><br>Now, how about a more "official" page, say, an IBM reference on locales:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/locales/date_time.jsp<br><br>Here's a brief excerpt from that page:<br><br><blockquote>In the ISO/IEC twenty-four-hour system, 24:00 is midnight at the end of
    a day, and 00:01 is one minute after midnight of the next day. The
    sequence is 23:59, 24:00, 00:01. <b>In ISO/IEC standard 8601, both 24:00
    and 00:00 are allowed </b>to indicate midnight, with 24:00 indicating the
    end of the day and 00:00 indicating the start of the next day.<br></blockquote>(emphasis mine.)<br><br>Did you even look it up, or did you just *thought* that it was invalid, and therefore assumed it must be so?<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -dZ.<br>


    On the other hand, all devices - computers, alarm clocks, etc - that need to choose a 24-hour clock representation for midnight seem to ignore the standard and choose the (more sensible IMAO) 00:00; 24:00 seems to be relatively unusual.
  • An apprentice 2006-06-03 16:32
    makomk:
    On the other hand, all devices - computers, alarm clocks, etc - that need to choose a 24-hour clock representation for midnight seem to ignore the standard and choose the (more sensible IMAO) 00:00; 24:00 seems to be relatively unusual.
    <p>Both are correct behaviours, actually. The standard says that 2006-06-03 24:00 and 2006-06-04 00:00 denote the same point in time, so either of them can be used. I agree 00:00 is more familiar, though.</p>
  • Yacoubean 2006-06-03 18:01
    These would be more amusing if most of them weren't fake.&nbsp; Come on, we all know screenshots are fairly trivial to edit in your favorite graphics editor.<br>
  • ammoQ 2006-06-03 18:19
    Anonymous:
    These would be more amusing if most of them weren't fake.&nbsp; Come on, we all know screenshots are fairly trivial to edit in your favorite graphics editor.<br>
    <br>It's also relatively easy to write a few lines of bad code and make up a story about a stupid coworker or a failed outsourcing project. How can we know anything on this site is real? Well, most of us work in IT and we have seen such WTFs before and I'm afraid we will see them again and again. The same can be said about the screenshots: I believe every single one of them because I've seen Windows saying "can't delete file, not enough disk space" with my own eyes.<br>
  • Aeriscors 2006-06-03 19:31
    <i>And I always thought that adding a bunch of zeros to the right of a
    decimal point made a number bigger (you know, cause it weighs more) --
    but according to this pop-up from <b>Nathan Nottingham</b>, I guess I was wrong ...</i><br><br><br>This one is not so stupid. As 0.500 could be any truncated value between 0.500 and 0.501. I guess the value was 0.500-something and the software truncated it (why'o why ?) to print.<br>Well, okay this is lame but it could be a nearly rational explanation...<i><br></i>
  • EvanED 2006-06-03 19:49
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    <p>I thought you audiophiles were crazy with your 768kbit/s MP3s ... but 400 Tbit/s? Now that's just ridiculous ...
    </p><blockquote>
    <p><img src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/bigsong.gif"></p></blockquote>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <br><br>I'll say this for MS. They certainly seem to have gotten past their '640K is enough for anyone' mentality...<br>
  • niko 2006-06-04 11:33
    <P>
    makomk:
    Apparently, the Russians even have a word for this: <A href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojibake">???????´???</A>.
    </P>
    <P>Funny, "krakozyabry" is an expressive term along the lines of "abracadabra" and "mumbojumbo"; I live abroad and I didn't know it had made its way into "official" internet slang.</P>
  • snailwalker 2006-06-04 18:57
    Well I once installed Panda Antivirus and Firewall on my computer, and suddenly was my internet broken. First I thought it was a problem with the lan connection, until I got this dialog box :)<br><br><img src="http://invative.dk/lan_connection.jpg" alt="lan connection dialogbox"><br><br>It's from the Danish edition of Windows but look at the number of packages (Pakker) which has been sent (Sendt) :O<br>
  • Julio 2006-06-04 19:46
    But creates a new one: 00:00 = 24:00? ans: No.<br><br>Regards<br><br><br>
  • Anonymous 2006-06-04 23:58
    Anonymous:
    The KFlickr screenshot is hilariously funny.

    As a KDE developer I found the print system screenshot to be a bit sad, it is indeed terrible.

    grep'ing through the KDE source code reveals no hits for this string. The dialogue itself looks a bit GNOMEish... hmm... Googling for '"You may want to find out why" gnome' suggests that the error comes from eggcups, which is part of GNOME. I think the WTF is how someone managed to combine parts of KDE and GNOME together to generate such an error.
    <br><br>GNOME. Printing. Why aren't I surprised?<br><br>CAPTCHA: captcha<br>
  • -.- 2006-06-05 04:57
    surprise!

    there are people using the internet that speak languages other than english...
    really!
  • agh! 2006-06-05 05:12
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P><IMG src="http://www.thedailywtf.com/images/200606/epson2.png"></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>Would sir be liking some poppadums and&nbsp;Cobra beer while&nbsp;he is waiting?</P>
  • TheDoom 2006-06-05 05:57
    OtherMichael:
    <h3><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#Ambiguity_at_noon_and_midnight">Ambiguity at noon and midnight</a></h3>
    <p>The actual meaning of the terms <i>ante meridiem</i> (before noon) and <i>post meridiem</i> (after noon) are obviously not applicable at exactly noon or midnight.<sup></sup></p>
    <p>However, it has become common practice in countries that use the
    system (such as the United States) to designate noon as 12:00&nbsp;p.m and
    midnight as 12:00&nbsp;a.m. The practical advantage of this convention
    becomes clear when one considers a digital clock . Noon and midnight
    are only infinitesimal points in time, and therefore it is not
    practical to use any other convention than that which also applies
    immediately afterwards, when the clock still displays 12:00. This
    convention is standardized for computer usage in American National
    Standard <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI" title="ANSI">ANSI</a> INCITS 310 (which extends the international standard <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601" title="ISO 8601">ISO 8601</a> time notation with a 12-h a.m./p.m. variant for the U.S.-market).</p>
    <p>Many U.S. style guides (including the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NIST" title="NIST">NIST</a>
    website) recommend instead that it is clearest if one refers to "noon"
    or "12:00&nbsp;noon" and "midnight" or "12:00&nbsp;midnight" (rather than to
    12:00&nbsp;p.m. and 12:00&nbsp;a.m., respectively). Some other style guides
    suggest "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">n</span>" for noon and "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">m</span>" for midnight, but this conflicts with the older tradition of using "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">m</span>" for noon (Latin <i>meridies</i>), and "12:00&nbsp;<span style="font-variant: small-caps;">mn</span>" for midnight (<i>media nox</i>).</p>
    <p>Even with all these conventions, references to midnight remain
    problematic, because they do not distinguish between the midnight at
    the start of the day referenced and the midnight at its end. Therefore,
    some U.S. style guides recommend to either provide other context clues,
    or to avoid references to midnight entirely, for example in favour of
    11:59 p.m. for the end of the day and 00:01 a.m. for the start of the
    day. The latter has become common practice in the United States in
    legal contracts and for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airplane" title="Airplane">airplane</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus" title="Bus">bus</a>, or <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Train" title="Train">train</a> schedules.</p>
    <p>The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock" title="24-hour clock">24-hour clock</a> notation avoids all of these ambiguities by using 00:00, 12:00, and 24:00.</p>
    <br><br>Thanks for that mate, but I've worked at a place that uses this complete 'off the shelf' problem resolution management software. If you got an error message like that, you would have to wait about 2 minutes, press OK again and get the result you were after. Trust me, the application does honestly believe the afternoon has already happened - GET ON WITH YOUR WORK.<br><br>Please, someone from a company that has outsourced its infrastructure to this international company of business work machines, post the screenshot of the tab containing field 1, field 2, field 3 etc....from the same application.<br>
  • mlk 2006-06-05 07:48
    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
    Anonymous:
    The Kflickr dialog makes a lot more sense when icons are enabled on pushbuttons:<br><br>http://kflickr.sourceforge.net/wikka.php?wakka=Screen<br>
    No they do not.<br>
  • Shoomba 2006-06-05 07:50
    Anonymous:
    I think the "Microsoft Office Picture Manager's compression algorithm" is not a WTF, as we all know that if the "data" is too complex, a compression algorithm could have "negative compression ratio".<br><br>Remembering at the days of PCX format, the "compressed size" can range to less than 1 percent of origional (best case) to over than 10 times(I don't remember where the limit is) of the origional size.<br>
    <br><br>Not quite, unless the original was already compressed with a different method, such as LZW used in GIF format.<br><br>PCX compression uses a one-byte run length encoding scheme. Thus the in the best case the compression factor is 0.0157 (two bytes to encode a 127 byte run) and in the worst 1.008 (128 bytes to encode a 127 byte run).<br><br>Even the most moronic 'compression' could only double the uncompressed size in the worst case.<br><br>
  • Rangersam 2006-06-05 07:56
    <P>I'm so happy that another program may exist. I know for a fact I have IExplore, MSPaint, and Notepad on this machine..</P>
    <P>Too bad Photodraw cant save what it has right now</P>
  • Mike Anderson 2006-06-05 08:00
    <blockquote>
    The KFlickr screenshot is hilariously funny.<br></blockquote><br>I guess that's why it's still in beta, hmm?<br><blockquote>
    </blockquote>
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-05 08:42
    Anonymous:

    <BLOCKQUOTE>The KFlickr screenshot is hilariously funny.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR>I guess that's why it's still in beta, hmm?

    <P>It's not an excuse to create "moronic" user interface. Come on, some&nbsp;first grade students may come up with something better.</P>
  • ParkinT 2006-06-05 08:42
    marvin_rabbit:
    Gene Wirchenko:
    ParkinT:
    Hoooold on there Bobalouie!
    <P>1:00PM <STRONG>IS</STRONG> earlier than 12:59PM</P>
    <P>There is nothing wrong there!
    </P>
    <P>ParkinT, this is my friend 12:59 PM.&nbsp; I think you might know his other name: 1 minute to 1 PM.<BR>Sincerely,<BR>Gene Wirchenko<BR>
    <BR>In the interest of self-deprication, I have to admit that I was thinking the same thing as ParkinT.&nbsp; Look at it over and over and scratching my head.<BR><BR>I probably would have made the post myself if it hadn't been done before I got here today.<BR><BR>(Not excusing the mistake, just admiting that I'm a doofus too sometimes.)<BR>
    </P>
    <P>A special THANK YOU to Marvin_Rabbit.</P>
    <P>Late Friday afternoon, after a loooong week, I had my brain twisted and was thinking in terms of 11:59 vs 1:00.</P>
    <P>Suitably embarrassed, I am not afraid to admit I made a mistake.</P>
  • TheDoom 2006-06-05 09:02
    Good lad.<br><br>Mistakes prove you are human.<br>
  • Iago 2006-06-05 11:06
    Anonymous:
    So is Tuesday, 24:00 midnight tuesday morning or midnight tuesday evening?&nbsp; If you're going to use that sort of annotation, might as well also say things like "Want to go to lunch Wednesday at 36:30?"&nbsp; 00:00:00 to 23:59:59 is clear.&nbsp; Anothing greater (or less) than that starts the confusion timescale...<br>
    <br>I advise you never, ever, to read a Japanese TV listing, where they really DO have things like "Tuesday 25:30" (meaning "Wednesday 1:30 am").<br><br>Which is quite logical, because if you want to watch that programme instead of taping it, you will watch it in the period between getting up on Tuesday morning and the end of Tuesday, which is when you go to bed, go to sleep, and get up to begin your Wednesday.&nbsp; Never mind that the clock has rolled over in between.&nbsp; Humans are not clocks.<br>
  • mux 2006-06-05 11:24
    Because it is *no* KDE bug and has no relation to the KDE printing system?<br>
    <br>
    http://cvs.gnome.org/viewcvs/eggcups/ec-tray-icon.c?view=markup<br>
    <br>
    <pre><b><font color="#a020f0">if</font></b> (strstr (job-&gt;state_reason, <font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"resources-are-not-ready"</b></font>))<br> secondary = _(<font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"At least one of the resources needed "</b></font><br> <font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"by the document, such as media, fonts, "</b></font><br> <font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"resource objects, etc., is not ready."</b></font>);<br> <b><font color="#a020f0">else</font></b> <b><font color="#a020f0">if</font></b> (strstr (job-&gt;state_reason, <font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"printer-stopped-partly"</b></font>))<br> secondary = _(<font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"The printer is partly stopped."</b></font>);<br> <b><font color="#a020f0">else</font></b> <b><font color="#a020f0">if</font></b> (strstr (job-&gt;state_reason, <font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"printer-stopped"</b></font>))<br> secondary = _(<font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"The printer is stopped."</b></font>);<br> <b><font color="#a020f0">else</font></b> <b><font color="#a020f0">if</font></b> (strstr (job-&gt;state_reason, <font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"job-hold-until-specified"</b></font>))<br> secondary = _(<font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"Someone else has paused it."</b></font>);<br> <b><font color="#a020f0">else</font></b><br> secondary = _(<font color="#bc8f8f"><b>"You may want to find out why."</b></font>);</pre>
    <br>
    <br>
    See: <br>
    <br>
  • Mac hater 2006-06-05 11:27
    Anonymous:
    The UI is fucked, there should be "save" button and a "close" button.<br>
    it's 2006 let's drop the ok'ing and cancel'ing.
    <br>So... does that "save" button close the window?&nbsp; And does that "close" button save changes?&nbsp; How the fuck am I supposed to guess?<br><br>"OK" and "Cancel" are clear and unambiguous.&nbsp; A first-time user forced to guess what they did would probably be more likely to get it right for "save" and "close", but guess what?&nbsp; PRACTICALLY NOBODY IS A FIRST-TIME USER.<br><br>Give me plain "OK" and "Cancel", please.&nbsp; I know what they do.&nbsp; I do not want to have to waste valuable time trying to guess what the fuck your "friendly" button text means.<br>
  • panzi 2006-06-05 12:00
    I can count from 0 to 1023 with my 10 Fingers. I can't see theproblem. ;)<br>"There are only 10 kind of peoples: thouse who understand binary and thouse who don't."<br>
  • JoeBloggs 2006-06-05 13:03
    Anonymous:
    I think the "Microsoft Office Picture Manager's compression algorithm" is not a WTF, as we all know that if the "data" is too complex, a compression algorithm could have "negative compression ratio".<br><br>Remembering at the days of PCX format, the "compressed size" can range to less than 1 percent of origional (best case) to over than 10 times(I don't remember where the limit is) of the origional size.<br>

    Ten times? I worked with the PCX format for a bit, writing an importer, and as I recall the format, the worst case is a 2:1 expansion (plus header, of course).
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-06-05 13:12
    ammoQ:
    Anonymous:
    These would be more amusing if most of them weren't fake.&nbsp; Come on, we all know screenshots are fairly trivial to edit in your favorite graphics editor.
    <br><br>It's also relatively easy to write a few lines of bad code and make up a story about a stupid coworker or a failed outsourcing project. How can we know anything on this site is real? Well, most of us work in IT and we have seen such WTFs before and I'm afraid we will see them again and again. The same can be said about the screenshots: I believe every single one of them because I've seen Windows saying "can't delete file, not enough disk space" with my own eyes.
    <br><br>One that really struck me was "Out of paper on drive C:".<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-06-05 13:17
    Anonymous:
    Good lad.<br><br>Mistakes prove you are human.
    <br><br>What does this say about CAPTCHA?&nbsp; (Insert evil grin here.)<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • Richard Nixon 2006-06-05 14:42
    Gene Wirchenko:
    Anonymous:
    Good lad.<br><br>Mistakes prove you are human.
    <br><br>What does this say about CAPTCHA?&nbsp; (Insert evil grin here.)<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
    <br><br>That's such a clever remark Gene.<br><br>sincerely,<br>Richard Nixon<br>
  • Anonymous 2006-06-05 15:26
    <div id="_ctl0__ctl1_bcr_PostForm___Reply">
    <strong>dcardani wrote the following post at 06-02-2006 3:05 PM:</strong>
    <div class="ForumReplyToPostArea"><br><blockquote>In fact, isn't that how Blockbuster video makes most of their
    money? They tell you, "This movie is due back by Midnight Sunday." Then
    you find out that they meant 00:00 Sunday, and not 23:59 + 1 minute
    Sunday and you end up with a late fee. </blockquote></div>
    </div><br>Blockbuster hasn't had midnight due dates for about 6 years. It's been noon for a long time.<br>
  • John 2006-06-05 16:57
    <P>I was helping a guy setup his computer, with a new HP printer.</P>
    <P>slapped in the 'driver' cd.</P>
    <P>minimal install, 400 megabytes, suggested around 800 megabytes.</P>
    <P>I am never buying a HP product.</P>
  • Mike 2006-06-05 18:27
    <P>Trust me - it's forged ;)</P>
    <P>Mike</P>
    <P>Technical Director, Imagitech LTD (Authors of the Driving Test Success product range).</P>
  • Holger Friedrich 2006-06-06 05:59
    <DIV id=_ctl0__ctl1_bcr_PostForm___Reply><STRONG>AI wrote the following post at 06-02-2006 11:16 PM:</STRONG>
    <DIV class=ForumReplyToPostArea>
    <BLOCKQUOTE>as for AM/PM wtf-iness, I used to 'work' with a group of people over the internet, now, most of these lived somewhere in north america, so whenever they had planned something, it was in some obscure timezone like PST, ET, EST or whatever they managed to think up, and the times were in 12 hour format (and 12 PM and AM happened often enough). Now try to think of the how this works with dates (considering I live in CET, GMT+1) and you'll know I found out the hard way how the AM/PM system is supposed to 'work'.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></DIV>
    <P>You&nbsp;obviously missed the last weekend in March somehow.&nbsp; You are now living in CET DST, GMT+2.&nbsp; Are those timezones too obscure for you?</P>
  • Mike 2006-06-06 10:25
    <p>confused wrote:<br>Interestingly, Java's GregorianCalendar works this way - you can specify anti-normalized dates and it handles them correctly:</p>

    <pre>SimpleDateFormat sdf;<br>GregorianCalendar gc;<br>sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss");</pre><pre>// Specify the nonsensical: June 43, 2006 25:63:72<br>gc = new GregorianCalendar(2006,Calendar.JUNE,43, // yields Jul 13, 2006<br> 25,63,72); // + 25hr, 63 min, 72 sec<br>// This prints: 07/14/2006 02:04:12<br>System.out.println(sdf.format(gc.getTime()));<br><br></pre>======<br><br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">This sounds like they just save the date as unixsecs internally, saw this already.</span><br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">Not a WTF at all - just no errorchecking. Actually this is usefull, </span>

    <br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">you can add dates without worrying about "date-overflows".</span><br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><br style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">PS: How do I make those nice "user wrote:..."?</span>
  • Holger Schurig 2006-06-06 10:55
    Yes, a nice message, but it's actually not from KDE, but from a GNOME app. Here's the source code, you may want to search for the string "You may want to find out why" there:

    http://cvs.gnome.org/viewcvs/eggcups/ec-tray-icon.c?view=markup
  • GalacticCowboy 2006-06-06 13:01
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    <SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: Times New Roman">PS: How do I make those nice "user wrote:..."?</SPAN>
    </P>
    <P>Click "Quote" above the post you want to quote.</P>
  • Anonymous 2006-06-06 13:26
    ParkinT: Recheck your math, pal. 12:58:39 PM is one minute, 21 seconds&nbsp;BEFORE 1:00:00 PM.
  • Anonymous 2006-06-06 17:00
    BradC:
    <p>Hehe, that's classic. </p>
    <p>"You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:</p>
    <p>"Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>"Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."</p>
    <p>"MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."</p>
    <br>
    <br>
    No, the phrase isn't redundant, and in this case it's called for.&nbsp; It entirely changes the user's attitude.<br>
    <br>
    Printing is troublesome and a source of user anxiety, and a hot issue
    when evaluating OSs for the desktop or enterprise. Adding this phrase
    is a way of saying "This error doesn't mean the KDE printing subsystem
    is flaky, go check the printer / paper / cable, don't rush back to
    Windows just yet."<br>
    <br>
    (Captcha: clueless.&nbsp; Don't worry, I don't intend to post here regularly.)<br>
  • Steve 2006-06-07 06:56
    Indeed. 24:00 today is 00:00 tomorrow. Geddit?<br>
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-07 08:22
    Anonymous:
    BradC:

    <P>Hehe, that's classic. </P>
    <P>"You may want to find out why."</P>
    <P>I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:</P>
    <P>"Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."</P>
    <P>"Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."</P>
    <P>"MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."</P>
    <P>
    <BR><BR>No, the phrase isn't redundant, and in this case it's called for.&nbsp; It entirely changes the user's attitude.<BR><BR>Printing is troublesome and a source of user anxiety, and a hot issue when evaluating OSs for the desktop or enterprise. Adding this phrase is a way of saying "This error doesn't mean the KDE printing subsystem is flaky, go check the printer / paper / cable, don't rush back to Windows just yet."<BR>
    </P>
    <P>I'm always amazed by linux-fanatics like you blindly defending the OS and trying to convince everyone else that it's not linux that's wrong.</P>
    <P>"You may find out why" is just a substitute for "Unknown/unidentified problem"... I surely want to find out why, so some information would be helpful, and I would really want to find out why so I see no point why the OS should be telling me that if there's an error and it can't do it's job... if it can't then it should admit it, but it's not linux-ish, isn't it?</P>
    <P>I'm not saying windows is better, just getting irritated by fanatics trying to convince people that black is white or if you die killing other people of other religion you will go to heaven.</P>
  • ammoQ 2006-06-07 13:18
    nsimeonov:
    <p>I'm always amazed by linux-fanatics like you blindly defending the OS and trying to convince everyone else that it's not linux that's wrong.</p>
    <p>"You may find out why" is just a substitute for "Unknown/unidentified problem"... I surely want to find out why, so some information would be helpful, and I would really want to find out why so I see no point why the OS should be telling me that if there's an error and it can't do it's job... if it can't then it should admit it, but it's not linux-ish, isn't it?</p>
    <p>I'm not saying windows is better, just getting irritated by fanatics trying to convince people that black is white or if you die killing other people of other religion you will go to heaven.</p>
    <br><br>Maybe I'm nit-picking here, but KDE is not Linux and Gnome is not Linux and Linux doesn't print. Typically, it's up to CUPS to do the printing, but it could also be the BSD print system. Anyway, since KDE and Gnome also run on BSD, Solaris etc., there is no hard evidence that this really happened on a Linux-based system.<br>
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-07 17:13
    <P>
    ammoQ:
    <BR>Maybe I'm nit-picking here, but KDE is not Linux and Gnome is not Linux and Linux doesn't print. Typically, it's up to CUPS to do the printing, but it could also be the BSD print system. Anyway, since KDE and Gnome also run on BSD, Solaris etc., there is no hard evidence that this really happened on a Linux-based system.<BR>
    </P>
    <P>I like that... so what you say is that it's GUI may be crappy more or less, but no matter that linux is the greatest invention since the wheel and hot water, eh? :) It just sounds this way, sorry if I offended you somehow, I'm going to stop here because it's turning slowly into the next flame war - windows or linux and I for sure mr.Gates doesn't pay me anything to defend his company (I had an offer to start working for MS about 10 years ago&nbsp;but turned it down for some reasons)</P>
  • Michael Nixon 2006-06-07 18:07
    No I can assure you this is from a legitimate CD and not photoshopped - I'm guessing they noticed the problem and fixed it on a later production run?
  • Michael Nixon 2006-06-07 18:08
    Sorry that was supposed to be in response to the "Driving test" image...
  • Symbiatch 2006-06-09 04:04
    Yes, it's 2006 and Abode Reader still cannot open files that have names with characters other than the default codepage. I have documents with Slovenian and Chinese names, all of these only give the File not found error. Great.<br>
  • Symbiatch 2006-06-09 04:09
    Anonymous:
    <br>I advise you never, ever, to read a Japanese TV listing, where they really DO have things like "Tuesday 25:30" (meaning "Wednesday 1:30 am").<br>
    <br><br>Or TCM Nordic schedules where times go like this:<br><br>1st of May, 23:30<br>1st of May, 01:00<br>1st of May, 02:30<br>1st of May, 04:00<br>1st of May, 05:30<br>2nd of May, 07:00<br><br>Clearly 06:00 is the new midnight in TV listings. It's ok to show listings for "today" that start with 06:00 and end with 06:00 tomorrow but to show the dates this way is just crap.<br>
  • ammoQ 2006-06-09 08:25
    nsimeonov:
    <p>
    ammoQ:
    <br>Maybe I'm nit-picking here, but KDE is not Linux and Gnome is not Linux and Linux doesn't print. Typically, it's up to CUPS to do the printing, but it could also be the BSD print system. Anyway, since KDE and Gnome also run on BSD, Solaris etc., there is no hard evidence that this really happened on a Linux-based system.<br>
    </p>
    <p>I like that... so what you say is that it's GUI may be crappy more or less, but no matter that linux is the greatest invention since the wheel and hot water, eh? :) </p>
    <br><br>Where did I say linux is the greatest invention since the wheel and hot water? It's a nice and free unix-like operating system, a good choice for people like me who have been raised on Unix. The point is: A typical "Linux system" is made of the Linux kernel, the GNU system, the GUI (KDE, Gnome etc.) and a lot of other tools and programs, e.g. the CUPS printing systems. It's up to the distributors (Ubuntu, Redhat, SUSE etc.) to make these parts work together.<br><br>If you don't like the available distros or if they don't work well on your hardware, well... better use some other operating system. I've heard some people prefer the "Microsoft Windows" operating system or the "Mac OS" operating system, you might want to check out one of those.<br>
  • Torley Linden 2006-06-12 18:04
    These are so dang funny--I heard about this from a colleague, Tess. Lots of hilarity to be had--even I, primarily as an enduser, can understand the humor in these. What's even more spooky is perhaps the fact they are true, and not parodies (altho they have places for those too).<br><br>BTW, what a rich comment form! <br>
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-12 18:21
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    <BR>BTW, what a rich comment form! <BR>
    </P>
    <P>Welcome to the new millenium :)</P>
    <P>No seriously, someone has to fix this comment - I cannot cut-n-paste here... It's a shame. Can't we replace it with something that can like FreeTextBox or something nicer generating less crappy output but at least capable ot doing this... I'm not asking for too much, just cut-n-paste...</P>
  • Gigi 2006-06-14 17:14
    http://kecy.roumen.cz/roumingShow.php?file=zoner.jpg look here realy omg<br>
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-14 18:04
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    http://kecy.roumen.cz/roumingShow.php?file=zoner.jpg look here realy omg<BR>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>Would you please translate because the WTF isn't really obvious to people who don't speak this language? Probably it's great, but ....</P>
  • ammoQ 2006-06-14 20:06
    nsimeonov:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    http://kecy.roumen.cz/roumingShow.php?file=zoner.jpg look here realy omg<br>
    </p>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <p>Would you please translate because the WTF isn't really obvious to people who don't speak this language? Probably it's great, but ....</p>
    <br>My guess:<br>The text says that some function is only available in the PROFESSIONAL version; while the title bar says this is the PROFESSIONAL version.<br>
  • nsimeonov 2006-06-15 08:05
    ammoQ:
    nsimeonov:

    <P>
    Anonymous:
    http://kecy.roumen.cz/roumingShow.php?file=zoner.jpg look here realy omg<BR>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>Would you please translate because the WTF isn't really obvious to people who don't speak this language? Probably it's great, but ....</P>
    <P>
    <BR>My guess:<BR>The text says that some function is only available in the PROFESSIONAL version; while the title bar says this is the PROFESSIONAL version.<BR>
    </P>
    <P>It could be actually the professional version, but&nbsp;installed using an evaluation key - in this case it makes sense...</P>
  • jayh 2006-06-15 11:33
    <P>Here is a link to the MSKB concerning one of Microsoft's best error messages</P>
    <P>[I know they are becoming more security concious, but I question this]</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P><A href="http://support.microsoft.com/kb/276304/en-us">http://support.microsoft.com/kb/276304/en-us</A></P>
  • Harry 2006-07-01 23:21
    R u Stupid or something???? 12:59 is a minute b4 1:00 pm!!
  • evottaja 2006-07-03 18:30
    Anonymous:

    <P>Here is a link to the MSKB concerning one of Microsoft's best error messages</P>
    <P>[I know they are becoming more security concious, but I question this]</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P><A href="http://support.microsoft.com/kb/276304/en-us">http://support.microsoft.com/kb/276304/en-us</A></P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>A few more:</P>
    <P><A href="http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=830680">http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=830680</A></P>
    <P><A href="http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=72540">http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=72540</A></P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
  • Roy 2006-07-11 11:06
    Otto:
    ParkinT:

    <P>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</P>
    <P>1:00PM <STRONG>IS</STRONG> earlier than 12:59PM</P>
    <P>There is nothing wrong there!</P>
    <P>
    <BR>Are you daft? 12 PM = Noon. 12 AM = Midnight.<BR><BR>1 PM is after 12 PM.<BR><BR>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>12 PM doesn't even exist...it is 12AM (noon), and when the clock has gone round (12:01), de PM starts, but when it's 12PM then in fact it's 00:00...but i don't know if it's 00:00AM or 00:00PM... :P</P>
  • nsimeonov 2006-07-11 11:25
    Anonymous:
    Otto:
    ParkinT:

    <P>Hoooold on there Bobalouie!</P>
    <P>1:00PM <STRONG>IS</STRONG> earlier than 12:59PM</P>
    <P>There is nothing wrong there!</P>
    <P>
    <BR>Are you daft? 12 PM = Noon. 12 AM = Midnight.<BR><BR>1 PM is after 12 PM.<BR><BR>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>12 PM doesn't even exist...it is 12AM (noon), and when the clock has gone round (12:01), de PM starts, but when it's 12PM then in fact it's 00:00...but i don't know if it's 00:00AM or 00:00PM... :P</P>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>You're wrong. 12AM and 12PM exist. 00AM and 00PM do not. When asked nobody will say it's ZERO and FIVE minutes. Everyone will response it's TWELVE and FIVE minutes. Zero hour is used in the 24-hour type. Then you cound from zero to 23:59, in the other way around you count from 01:00 to 12:59.</P>
    <P>Cheers,<BR>Nick</P>
  • Matthew 2006-07-19 15:05
    <P>Yes. They tried this on me once, they're like, "You can't rent another movie until you pay the late fee."</P>
    <P>Long story short, I told them they could have my blockbuster card, because I wasn't paying a late fee for their ambiguity. They waived the late fee, now I rent from another, equally as&nbsp;people-friendly corporation.</P>
  • Ishai 2006-07-21 03:47
    This is&nbsp;a regular grammar mistake with russian programmers. I wonder if SOG is russian.
  • lolgoogle 2007-02-26 04:04
    nsimeonov:
    Anonymous:
    BradC:

    Hehe, that's classic.
    "You may want to find out why."
    I'm going to start using that in all my error messages:
    "Could not save file mystuff.txt. You may want to find out why."
    "Email address is not in the correct format. You may want to find out why."
    "MyProgram.exe encountered an error and could not continue. You may want to find out why, but you can't."
    No, the phrase isn't redundant, and in this case it's called for.&nbsp; It entirely changes the user's attitude.Printing is troublesome and a source of user anxiety, and a hot issue when evaluating OSs for the desktop or enterprise. Adding this phrase is a way of saying "This error doesn't mean the KDE printing subsystem is flaky, go check the printer / paper / cable, don't rush back to Windows just yet."

    I'm always amazed by linux-fanatics like you blindly defending the OS and trying to convince everyone else that it's not linux that's wrong.
    "You may find out why" is just a substitute for "Unknown/unidentified problem"... I surely want to find out why, so some information would be helpful, and I would really want to find out why so I see no point why the OS should be telling me that if there's an error and it can't do it's job... if it can't then it should admit it, but it's not linux-ish, isn't it?
    I'm not saying windows is better, just getting irritated by fanatics trying to convince people that black is white or if you die killing other people of other religion you will go to heaven.
  • Jeppe 2009-01-06 17:29
    DZ-Jay:
    marvin_rabbit:
    nsimeonov:
    24:00 is actually invalid so there are no ambiguities at all. 24h clock goes from 00:00 to 23:59
    And just to head off anyone that tries to make the argument (if anyone were to try to do so) , 24:00 still isn't valid even when a Leap Second is declared.&nbsp; In that case the clock goes from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60 to 00:00:00.(Just wanting to throw out trivia.)
    OK, I'll bite.&nbsp; First, a link to the Wikipedia:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock#Midnight_00:00_and_24:00I only offer that to make it easier for anybody to find and read it, as I don't trust Wikipedia, so here's another resource with the same:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-time.htmlNow, how about a more "official" page, say, an IBM reference on locales:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/locales/date_time.jspHere's a brief excerpt from that page:In the ISO/IEC twenty-four-hour system, 24:00 is midnight at the end of
    a day, and 00:01 is one minute after midnight of the next day. The
    sequence is 23:59, 24:00, 00:01. In ISO/IEC standard 8601, both 24:00
    and 00:00 are allowed to indicate midnight, with 24:00 indicating the
    end of the day and 00:00 indicating the start of the next day.(emphasis mine.)Did you even look it up, or did you just *thought* that it was invalid, and therefore assumed it must be so?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -dZ.

    Well you never see a clock on 24:00 because that is 00:00..
    24:00 is invalid its 00:00 to 23:59..

    Someone before got the point.. Otherwise it would be 23:58 -> 23:59 -> 24:00 -> 00:00 -> 00:01
    That isnt true :)