REGISTER_NOT_FOUND

« Return to Article
  • Steve the Cynic 2009-10-16 09:07
    I've never posted Italian messages.

    (first attempt, trying someone's hint about previewing first)
  • nothingspecial 2009-10-16 09:10
    COMMENT NOT FOUND
  • Fist 2009-10-16 09:15
    A purple monkey dishwasher is just something a technitian needs to do his job. Don't worry about it.
  • pjt33 2009-10-16 09:15
    Actually those are Unicode values expressed as decimal escape codes. In UTF-8, Łą is 0xc5 0x81 0xc4 0x85.
  • Indrora 2009-10-16 09:16
    The first error is one that's a problem with the Starbucks POS system. It attempts to look up the name of who was working your register. However, if it cant find you because you have a name like John Smith or Jose Garcia (or you've only worked there less than a year or so) it simply says "NOT FOUND".

    Now given the fact that most people dont work at Starbucks for more than about a year, or if they do they're either desperate or stupid, there's a lot of "NOT FOUND"s.

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.
  • DOA 2009-10-16 09:18
    "I installed Windows Vista-"
    Well, there's your problem.
  • whatever 2009-10-16 09:19
    FYI, "purple monkey dishwasher" is a Simpsons quote.
  • toth 2009-10-16 09:21
    A+ for Simpsons reference. F for having it on an error message in a production system.
  • Ha 2009-10-16 09:23
    "cancled and tryied"
  • Ann Onymous 2009-10-16 09:25
    "the result of this latter activity doesn't reassure me that I've gained anything."

    Microsoft have clearly decided to go for extra geek kudos with the obscure minus-one-based indexing scheme.
  • P. Edant 2009-10-16 09:29
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
  • DaveK 2009-10-16 09:30
    Obviously what the receipt is trying to tell you is that the price of the coffee is $4.04!

  • SR 2009-10-16 09:32
    Re: Purple Monkey Dishwasher. In the days of writing ColdFusion webapps with just a fancy text editor (i.e. not a proper IDE) I'd leave "banana" to bookmark somewhere in a file I wanted to get back to after checking/tweaking elsewhere. I chose "banana" as I could be pretty sure it wouldn't be present as a variable name or whatever. I never had one leak out to production, though.

    If that's what the original code-monkey was doing he should know there are things such as comments. If not, WTF?
  • Bob 2009-10-16 09:32
    Ceci n'est pas un cafe
  • Bruce W 2009-10-16 09:37
    whatever:
    FYI, "purple monkey dishwasher" is a Simpsons quote.


    It's from "The PTA Disbands"
  • DaveK 2009-10-16 09:38
    Dave Cartwright:
    "I installed Windows Vista. Then I installed the first Service Pack. Then I installed the Service Pack that comes after that" [ ... ]
    Ah, I can see his problem here. He meant to install the service pack that comes after that one, but he accidentally went and installed the service pack that comes before that one instead. A simple mistake, easily made!

  • QuixoticCoder 2009-10-16 09:39
    Purple Monkey Dishwasher! A sublime Simpsons reference right there in the code.
    I have to believe it was intentional that it ended up in production.
  • Peter 2009-10-16 09:43
    "ATTENTION: Only enter leave requests for the current calendar year."

    That must make it a bit difficult if you want to request leave for January 2nd (or January 1st, if you live in a country where the first is not a public holiday).
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 10:01
    SR:
    Re: Purple Monkey Dishwasher. In the days of writing ColdFusion webapps with just a fancy text editor (i.e. not a proper IDE) I'd leave "banana" to bookmark somewhere in a file I wanted to get back to after checking/tweaking elsewhere. I chose "banana" as I could be pretty sure it wouldn't be present as a variable name or whatever. I never had one leak out to production, though.

    If that's what the original code-monkey was doing he should know there are things such as comments. If not, WTF?
    Banana seems to be quite popular.

    Back in the days of supporting a client application on Win 3.1, a colleague used to search for "Unexpected Error" in various DLLs -- I think it was "Unexpected Error;" there were so many to choose from -- and replace it with "Unexploded Banana." Oh, how we laughed.

    Right up to the point where the banana exploded.

    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?
  • Incourced 2009-10-16 10:07
    Ha:
    "cancled and tryied"


    occoured cencle plesae
  • Milan Cermak 2009-10-16 10:11
    I know what CSN is. It is an acronym and it stands for Czech State Norm.
    And for that error message... AFAIK there is no Norm for database sequences. User should create one for sure.
  • Anna Krzysztof 2009-10-16 10:11
    I guess I didn't have to pixelate my last name after all.
  • anon 2009-10-16 10:11
    "Purple Monkey Dishwasher" makes sense. Users won't remember things like "ERRNO 472", but they'll remember "the computer said something about a purple monkey dishwasher", and whoever's giving support can know exactly what error message it is.
  • Code Monkey's Manager Rob 2009-10-16 10:14
    SR:
    Re: Purple Monkey Dishwasher. In the days of writing ColdFusion webapps with just a fancy text editor (i.e. not a proper IDE) I'd leave "banana" to bookmark somewhere in a file I wanted to get back to after checking/tweaking elsewhere. I chose "banana" as I could be pretty sure it wouldn't be present as a variable name or whatever. I never had one leak out to production, though.

    If that's what the original code-monkey was doing he should know there are things such as comments. If not, WTF?


    Code Monkey doesn't like bananas.

    Code Monkey like Fritos
    Code Monkey like Tab and Mountain Dew
    Code Monkey very simple man
    with big warm fuzzy secret heart
    Code Monkey like you
  • Sir Twist 2009-10-16 10:16
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?
    One that you've put in code to handle. E.g. when opening a file, you might expect ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND to be possible; if you get ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER, that's an unexpected error.
  • dtobias 2009-10-16 10:21
    Wired left the closing semicolon off their numeric character references.
  • lolwtf 2009-10-16 10:29
    IE used to (still does?) allow the semicolon to be left off, but this was always considered a bug, and didn't work elsewhere.
  • BigFriendlyDave 2009-10-16 10:32
    Was a a technitian a citizen of Tenochtitlan?
  • P. Edant 2009-10-16 10:34
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?


    Anybody who unit tests their code should know that
  • Pol 2009-10-16 10:34
    Keep comments nice plesae...


    ...and, plesae, definitely no pointing out obvious typos!
  • ThomsonsPier 2009-10-16 10:37
    The first company that figures out how to make deliveries into the distant past will make an absolute fortune. I'd use them, at least if they continued trading rather than just sending their past selves this week's winning lottery numbers.
  • Observer 2009-10-16 10:43
    Indrora:

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.


    Do you have any idea what Pig Latin is? Or is this a troll that I didn't get?
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 10:45
    Sir Twist:
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?
    One that you've put in code to handle. E.g. when opening a file, you might expect ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND to be possible; if you get ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER, that's an unexpected error.
    Why is ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER an unexpected error? It's certainly meaningless in context, but it's hardly unexpected. We're back to booleans again; either an API call works, or it fails. Subsidiary information like "File not found" or "Out of paper" is advisory only, is generally tied to an error string, and is (IMHO) entirely to be expected. Programmers write junk, just like anybody else.

    Stuffing "Unexpected Error" into a dialog box is just plain wrong. Even "Error 4021" amongst other glories of Microsoft APIs is preferable. Not only does "Unexpected Error" confuse and insult the user, but it also skates over the fact that the programmer should damn well do something about the error, expected or not.

    I mean, can you imagine the equivalent for "Expected Error?"

    "I just knew that wasn't going to work..."
  • shadowman 2009-10-16 10:50
    Crosby Stills & Nash, perhaps? But there's only a select few who can create that.
  • Willie Makeit 2009-10-16 10:55
    Bim Job:
    Not only does "Unexpected Error" confuse and insult the user, but it also skates over the fact that the programmer should


    More that his employer fails quality assurance forever. Coders make mistakes. Always assume they have done. Many's the argument I've had with various managers that I, as programmer, am [i]least
    qualified to declare that the thing actually works. A bug like this escaping into the wild is not the fault of the developers, it's shoddy process on part of the house
  • Willie Makeit 2009-10-16 10:56
    ...and I fail BBCode forever :-(
  • Mac This 2009-10-16 11:00
    Here's another nice one:
    The operation could not be completed. An unexpected error occurred (error code -10814).
    Apparently the first -10813 errors were entirely expected and par for the course. Damn Windows cryptic messages... except... oops... this one comes from that holier-than-thou always-nice-and-intuitive Mac OS X!

    http://zotline.com/shownote.zot/NoteNum/4222.html

    OK So I guess the WTF "Submit" button does a Preview now...

    ... 5th try...
  • Alex 2009-10-16 11:02
    <blockquote>
    "clearly, these break Notes 7.0 so badly that it causes the error message to error."
    </blockquote>
    Nothing can break Notes. It's always been broken.
  • der_Cthulhu 2009-10-16 11:04
    CSN is the standard name for "need help"-tickets in SAP R/3 systems.
  • Centricity 2009-10-16 11:12
    Well, actually, he forgot Poland.
  • IronMensan 2009-10-16 11:17
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?
  • SR 2009-10-16 11:18
    Mac This:
    Here's another nice one:
    The operation could not be completed. An unexpected error occurred (error code -10814).
    Apparently the first -10813 errors were entirely expected and par for the course. Damn Windows cryptic messages... except... oops... this one comes from that holier-than-thou always-nice-and-intuitive Mac OS X!

    http://zotline.com/shownote.zot/NoteNum/4222.html

    OK So I guess the WTF "Submit" button does a Preview now...

    ... 5th try...


    Such anger for a Friday!

    (Still relaxed on 3rd attempt)
  • SR 2009-10-16 11:19
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?


    It's the distant past for an 8-year-old.
  • Mac This 2009-10-16 11:28
    SR:
    Such anger for a Friday!

    I'm angry every day. It comes from living in a world crammed full with garbage masquerading as software. In other words, pretty much everything I didn't write myself. Now get off my lawn. And take your tricycle.
  • Anon 2009-10-16 11:37
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?


    Welcome! To the world of tomorrow!!!
  • jimicus 2009-10-16 11:42
    Or you want to take leave over the year-end, or your contract demands you give a certain amount of notice for annual leave...
  • Maurits 2009-10-16 11:43
    Here, Jason, let me AcronymFinder that for you...

    http://www.acronymfinder.com/CSN.html
    Confédération des Syndicats Nationaux (French)
    Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (Spanish: Nuclear Safety Council)
    Comcast SportsNet (TV channel)
    Centrala studiestödsnämnden (Swedish: state education grant and loan program)
    Crosby, Stills, and Nash (band)
    ... (more...)
  • NameNotFoundException 2009-10-16 11:51
    Bim Job:
    Sir Twist:
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?
    One that you've put in code to handle. E.g. when opening a file, you might expect ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND to be possible; if you get ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER, that's an unexpected error.
    Why is ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER an unexpected error? It's certainly meaningless in context, but it's hardly unexpected.


    You should not forget that programmers work with APIs. Suppose a function is defined to return (int)0 for success and (int)1 for ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND. Other return values are not defined but surely indicate an error. Then, if the function screws up for some reason, returning 2, the 2 would signify an unexpected error condition.

    Showing "Unexpected error" is quite acceptable in this situation. It is a situation which neither user nor programmer knows how to handle because it hasn't been encountered yet. It hasn't been speced either, so what should the programmer do about it? Do you expect them to have prophetic gifts?
  • Anonymous 2009-10-16 12:02
    anon:
    "Purple Monkey Dishwasher" makes sense. Users won't remember things like "ERRNO 472", but they'll remember "the computer said something about a purple monkey dishwasher", and whoever's giving support can know exactly what error message it is.


    I too had hoped it was some ingenious system for translating error codes to cute phrases that would be remembered and reported by non-technical users out of novelty factor. Kind of 'viral' error reporting (in the less undesirable sense of course), if you will.

    Was a little disappointed to learn that it was just a Simpson's quote. ;/
  • monkeyPushButton 2009-10-16 12:02
    SR:
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?


    It's the distant past for an 8-year-old.

    Mandatory XKCD reference http://xkcd.com/647/
  • Down Again, WTF? 2009-10-16 12:08
    Network Timeout

    The server at thedailywtf.com is taking too long to respond.

    The requested site did not respond to a connection request and the browser has stopped waiting for a reply.

    Could the server be experiencing high demand or a temporary outage? Try again later.
  • Me 2009-10-16 12:14
    I don't believe that message is from Notes. If it was from Notes the OK button would say "Send Again" and there would be no way to shorten the mail or cancel the send.
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 12:21
    NameNotFoundException:
    Bim Job:
    Sir Twist:
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?
    One that you've put in code to handle. E.g. when opening a file, you might expect ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND to be possible; if you get ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER, that's an unexpected error.
    Why is ERROR_OUT_OF_PAPER an unexpected error? It's certainly meaningless in context, but it's hardly unexpected.


    You should not forget that programmers work with APIs. Suppose a function is defined to return (int)0 for success and (int)1 for ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND. Other return values are not defined but surely indicate an error. Then, if the function screws up for some reason, returning 2, the 2 would signify an unexpected error condition.

    Showing "Unexpected error" is quite acceptable in this situation. It is a situation which neither user nor programmer knows how to handle because it hasn't been encountered yet. It hasn't been speced either, so what should the programmer do about it? Do you expect them to have prophetic gifts?
    No, I just expect them to be responsible members of society.

    After twenty-five years, I expect programmers to be responsible members of society.

    I accept a plea of guilty, but whilst temporarily out of my mind. Society, and Linus Torvalds, is to blame.
  • shadowman 2009-10-16 12:23
    Observer:
    Indrora:

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.


    Do you have any idea what Pig Latin is? Or is this a troll that I didn't get?


    My guess is he meant Lorem Ipsum text, which might be referred to as "Greeking," but certainly is not pig latin.
  • Anne 2009-10-16 12:33
    shadowman:
    Crosby Stills & Nash, perhaps? But there's only a select few who can create that.


    Thanks for beating me to that one. I think they already exist, is the problem.
  • justsomedude 2009-10-16 12:35
    Me:
    I don't believe that message is from Notes. If it was from Notes the OK button would say "Send Again" and there would be no way to shorten the mail or cancel the send.


    LOL - but that could easily be from Notes. Especially if the domino god just added their own LotusSript or @Formulas to the mail template for the size checking.
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 12:38
    shadowman:
    Observer:
    Indrora:

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.


    Do you have any idea what Pig Latin is? Or is this a troll that I didn't get?


    My guess is he meant Lorem Ipsum text, which might be referred to as "Greeking," but certainly is not pig latin.
    Failure to Grook.

    Captcha: "populus," or οἱ πολλοί.
  • D-Coder 2009-10-16 13:03
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? <...>


    Be patient. It will be. Maybe not soon, but some day...
  • Shredder 2009-10-16 13:04
    TRWTF is iced grande nonfat splenda coffee.
  • Jay 2009-10-16 13:21
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?


    "Distant past" is a relative term.

    We had a new employee who was in her twenties. I was trying to give her a quick history of what our department has been doing, and to put some tidbit in context, I commented, that we did such-and-such "when Reagan was president". She looked blank for a moment, then said, "Oh, yes, Reagan, we learned about him in history class." I then did some quick math in my head and realized that Reagan was elected before she was born.

    I once read a joke that said, You know you're getting old when the schools are now teaching as "ancient history" what you learned as "current events". I didn't expect it to actually happen to me.
  • Jay 2009-10-16 13:27
    Observer:
    Indrora:

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.


    Do you have any idea what Pig Latin is? Or is this a troll that I didn't get?


    Do you mean that you don't understand the relevance of Pig Latin, or that you never heard of it? Perhaps Pig Latin, too, is something from ancient history.

    If that's the case, the short explanation is: Pig Latin is one of many "code languages" invented a generation or so ago, intended to be used by children to share secret messages with their friends without fear of being overheard. You translate English to Pig Latin by moving the first letter to the end of the word, and then adding "ay" if that letter was a consonant or "way" if the letter was a vowel. So "This is the secret message" becomes "Histay siway hetay ecretsay essagemay". I'm sure it's described on Wikipedia or something. Of course it has almost as much to do with Latin as it has to do with pigs.

    I've been thinking of using it to encrypt passwords rather than that old-fashioned MD5 stuff.
  • Anon 2009-10-16 14:05
    Jay:
    Observer:
    Indrora:

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.


    Do you have any idea what Pig Latin is? Or is this a troll that I didn't get?


    Do you mean that you don't understand the relevance of Pig Latin, or that you never heard of it? Perhaps Pig Latin, too, is something from ancient history.

    If that's the case, the short explanation is: Pig Latin is one of many "code languages" invented a generation or so ago, intended to be used by children to share secret messages with their friends without fear of being overheard. You translate English to Pig Latin by moving the first letter to the end of the word, and then adding "ay" if that letter was a consonant or "way" if the letter was a vowel. So "This is the secret message" becomes "Histay siway hetay ecretsay essagemay". I'm sure it's described on Wikipedia or something. Of course it has almost as much to do with Latin as it has to do with pigs.

    I've been thinking of using it to encrypt passwords rather than that old-fashioned MD5 stuff.


    I think the point Observer was trying to make was how do you get from pig latin to Purple Monkey Dishwasher? If it has been urplepay onkeyay ishwasherday then it might have made sense.
  • evilspoons 2009-10-16 15:08
    I'm pretty sure you don't have to install Vista SP1 to upgrade Vista base to SP2, just install SP2.
  • blakeyrat 2009-10-16 15:09
    An "expected error" is like "not enough digits entered for SSN field".
  • Willie Makeit 2009-10-16 15:11
    Bim Job:
    After twenty-five years, I expect programmers to be responsible members of society.


    Good luck with that

    And, no, this is not friggin' spam
  • DaveK 2009-10-16 15:16
    Bim Job:
    Banana seems to be quite popular.

    Back in the days of supporting a client application on Win 3.1, a colleague used to search for "Unexpected Error" in various DLLs -- I think it was "Unexpected Error;" there were so many to choose from -- and replace it with "Unexploded Banana." Oh, how we laughed.

    Right up to the point where the banana exploded.

    "Of course! You don't think I'd threaten you with an unloaded banana, do you?"

    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?

    It goes something like this:
    Hey Bill, Windows just crashed on me again!
    Oh, yeh. That's expected.

  • noone 2009-10-16 15:24
    ThomsonsPier:
    The first company that figures out how to make deliveries into the distant past will make an absolute fortune. I'd use them, at least if they continued trading rather than just sending their past selves this week's winning lottery numbers.
    What makes you think this hasn't already happened?
  • Zack Jones 2009-10-16 15:35
    I love the 2nd one. There's even a typo in the pop-up "plesae" instead of "please" :)
  • John Hardin 2009-10-16 15:37
    ThomsonsPier:
    The first company that figures out how to make deliveries into the distant past will make an absolute fortune. I'd use them, at least if they continued trading rather than just sending their past selves this week's winning lottery numbers.
    Unfortunately that dialog is not asking for the delivery date, it's asking for the pickup (collection) date. So basically your only choice is "come pick up the package nine years ago".
  • Herohtar 2009-10-16 16:01
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym


    Wikipedia disagrees.
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 16:03
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    Banana seems to be quite popular.

    Back in the days of supporting a client application on Win 3.1, a colleague used to search for "Unexpected Error" in various DLLs -- I think it was "Unexpected Error;" there were so many to choose from -- and replace it with "Unexploded Banana." Oh, how we laughed.

    Right up to the point where the banana exploded.

    "Of course! You don't think I'd threaten you with an unloaded banana, do you?"
    Aw, c'mon. Literally dozens (a third of a dozen, anyway) of respondents can quote The Simpsons by heart, and you can't even manage a simple attribution to Neddie Seagoon?

    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?

    It goes something like this:
    Hey Bill, Windows just crashed on me again!
    Oh, yeh. That's expected.

    Things must be quiet this weekend. Whatever happened to "you can have an exploding banana in any operating system?" Or "Some people, when they see a purple monkey dishwasher, think 'I know! I'll use an exploding banana!.'

    "Now they have two purple monkey dishwashers..."

    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
  • distracted 2009-10-16 16:04
    Anon:
    Jay:
    Observer:
    Indrora:

    As for the Purple Monkey Dishwasher, it sounds like someone was writing their dialogs in Pig Latin so that they'd be sure to translate all of the localizable strings. Its a trick Microsoft uses, and there are occasionally strings in MS products that still have flakes of Pig Latin.


    Do you have any idea what Pig Latin is? Or is this a troll that I didn't get?


    Do you mean that you don't understand the relevance of Pig Latin, or that you never heard of it? Perhaps Pig Latin, too, is something from ancient history.

    If that's the case, the short explanation is: Pig Latin is one of many "code languages" invented a generation or so ago, intended to be used by children to share secret messages with their friends without fear of being overheard. You translate English to Pig Latin by moving the first letter to the end of the word, and then adding "ay" if that letter was a consonant or "way" if the letter was a vowel. So "This is the secret message" becomes "Histay siway hetay ecretsay essagemay". I'm sure it's described on Wikipedia or something. Of course it has almost as much to do with Latin as it has to do with pigs.

    I've been thinking of using it to encrypt passwords rather than that old-fashioned MD5 stuff.


    I think the point Observer was trying to make was how do you get from pig latin to Purple Monkey Dishwasher? If it has been urplepay onkeyay ishwasherday then it might have made sense.


    I think what Indrora was getting at was that it could be this company's practice to have programmers write strings that are obviously wrong (pig latin, purple monkey dishwasher, swearing... whatever), and then scrub them later all at once (possibly just before localisation).

    The obvious benefit being that it's easier to pick up that a string was missed, but it could lead to customers seing messages like CPAY OADLAY ETTERLAY
  • My Name? 2009-10-16 16:06
    Pol:
    Keep comments nice plesae...

    ...and, plesae, definitely no pointing out obvious typos!


    You dit it all worg! It must bee:

    ...and, plees, definitelie no poynting out obwiuos taipos!
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 16:14
    blakeyrat:
    An "expected error" is like "not enough digits entered for SSN field".
    Or maybe "There are not enough angels dancing on this pin." There I was, thinking that Carl Linnaeus was a taxonomically-obsessed loon, and I totally missed the big picture.

    Once more: The user doesn't care whether or not the error was unexpected. Why burden them with the Fear?

    Fix it, or show some useful information, or if necessary crash and burn. At least, in the last case, the user will go and find some software that is actually helpful. It will hurt at first, but the knowledge that you've paid your debt to society will give you warm fuzzies in the long term.
  • DaveK 2009-10-16 16:26
    Bim Job:
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    Banana seems to be quite popular.

    Back in the days of supporting a client application on Win 3.1, a colleague used to search for "Unexpected Error" in various DLLs -- I think it was "Unexpected Error;" there were so many to choose from -- and replace it with "Unexploded Banana." Oh, how we laughed.

    Right up to the point where the banana exploded.

    "Of course! You don't think I'd threaten you with an unloaded banana, do you?"
    Aw, c'mon. Literally dozens (a third of a dozen, anyway) of respondents can quote The Simpsons by heart, and you can't even manage a simple attribution to Neddie Seagoon?

    Not at all not at all notatall! I could have attributed that quote, but it was in plain clothes!
    Moriarty, aside:
    Very plain clothes indeed.

    Bim Job:
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?

    It goes something like this:
    Hey Bill, Windows just crashed on me again!
    Oh, yeh. That's expected.

    Things must be quiet this weekend. Whatever happened to "you can have an exploding banana in any operating system?" Or "Some people, when they see a purple monkey dishwasher, think 'I know! I'll use an exploding banana!.'

    "Now they have two purple monkey dishwashers..."

    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    And his name is Grytpype-Thinne!
  • DaveK 2009-10-16 16:29
    Bim Job:
    blakeyrat:
    An "expected error" is like "not enough digits entered for SSN field".
    Or maybe "There are not enough angels dancing on this pin."
    Bruce Schneier is always telling people not to use their SSN as a PIN. Now you know why.

  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 16:39
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    And his name is Grytpype-Thinne!
    Nice rewrite, but it's actually The Hampstead Building Society.

    Don't point that moot at me.
  • ContraCorners 2009-10-16 16:57
    evilspoons:
    I'm pretty sure you don't have to install Vista SP1 to upgrade Vista base to SP2, just install SP2.

    Or just go straight to Vista SP3 (which most of us just call "Windows XP")
  • lesle 2009-10-16 17:00
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?
    ---
    Actually, 2000-2009 is a decennary, not a decade. Look it up. 1991-2000, 2001-2010, 2011-2020, and so on, are decades.

  • Indrora 2009-10-16 17:10
    Exactly what I was trying to get at. For instance, there's strings in a few resource sets of "You broke it you moron! See what you did NOW? Thanks to you, the universe is going to END! This is worse than dividing by zero! Its like dividing by negative zero! Thanks, y'know for ending the human race as we know it, asshole." for errors like "couldnt_load_file_bad_hash" which later gets 'translated' to "Couldnt load file, bad hash. Check file hash and try again."

    CAPTCHA: Eros (Someone's going for blood, apparently.)
  • MyKey_ 2009-10-16 17:14
    Ha:
    "cancled and tryied"

    Typos. Not agian!
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 17:21
    lesle:
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?
    ---
    Actually, 2000-2009 is a decennary, not a decade. Look it up. 1991-2000, 2001-2010, 2011-2020, and so on, are decades.

    I'd recommend decimation, but nine out of ten cats say their owners object.

    A decennary is a decade in English, at least since 1594. There is no difference worth noting, except that a decennary refers specifically to a number of years, whereas a decade might (conceivably) refer to ten parts of anything.

    Feh, the quality of the Grammar Nazis you get these days.

    Captcha: et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
    Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

    (Go on: guess.) Worst. Poem. Ever. And, as usual, a total rip-off:

    Ἐρέω τε δηὖτε κοὐκ ἐρέω,
    καὶ μαίνομαι κοὐ μαίνομαι.

    Thank you, Anacreon -- he'll be here all night.

    I've got one from Lesbos, if you're interested, guv. In a plain wrapper. Something for the weekend...
    Moriarty, aside: Sapristi Ruckus!"
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 17:42
    Indrora:
    Exactly what I was trying to get at. For instance, there's strings in a few resource sets of "You broke it you moron! See what you did NOW? Thanks to you, the universe is going to END! This is worse than dividing by zero! Its like dividing by negative zero! Thanks, y'know for ending the human race as we know it, asshole." for errors like "couldnt_load_file_bad_hash" which later gets 'translated' to "Couldnt load file, bad hash. Check file hash and try again."

    CAPTCHA: Eros (Someone's going for blood, apparently.)
    No, that would be Thanatos. We obviously live in different dungeons.

    The point was: it wasn't Pig Latin. It wasn't Dog Latin. It might have been Gibberish, but it wasn't Polari.

    I've spent a year of my life watching trivial translations in "resource sets" from English to French fail miserably. I do not wish to endure that experience again.

    (1) Deal with errors. Just deal with them. Do not whine and hide under a haystack.
    (2) If you really, really, have to complain about the language, then do not wave your hands in the air and claim that it's Pig Latin. It's not. It's an abomination before the Lord.

    Mind you, I think we're in basic agreement here. But watch out. Loose lips sink fish and chips...
  • the beholder 2009-10-16 17:58
    Bim Job:


    Captcha: et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
    Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

    Vescere bracis meis
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 18:03
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:


    Captcha: et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
    Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

    Vescere bracis meis
    Yeah, it's congenital. Mine's a pint.
  • the beholder 2009-10-16 18:19
    Bim Job:
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:


    Captcha: et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
    Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

    Vescere bracis meis
    Yeah, it's congenital. Mine's a pint.
    Too bad you did not follow up on my post. Its meaning was "Eat my shorts". But it is too late now.
  • Bim Job 2009-10-16 18:32
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:


    Captcha: et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
    Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

    Vescere bracis meis
    Yeah, it's congenital. Mine's a pint.
    Too bad you did not follow up on my post. Its meaning was "Eat my shorts". But it is too late now.
    Yes, you win. I've temporarily mislaid my copy of "Bart Simpson's favorite Latin apothegms."

    Go on, do tell. Is is in Virgil, Book 6? Or perhaps it's Tiberius' favourite come-on line to his little fishes?

    Either way, I'm sure it wows them down at the Podunk baths.
  • mookers 2009-10-16 18:37
    Nearly 90 comments and I can't believe nobody has commented on the real WTF...

    Nonfat and Splenda in the coffee???? Say it isn't so!
  • An Onymous 2009-10-16 20:31
    Have to say, these are some of the best comments I've read here for quite some time.

    Well done, sirs and madams.
  • the beholder 2009-10-16 23:21
    Bim Job:
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:


    Captcha: et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
    Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.
    Vescere bracis meis
    Yeah, it's congenital. Mine's a pint.
    Too bad you did not follow up on my post. Its meaning was "Eat my shorts". But it is too late now.
    Yes, you win. I've temporarily mislaid my copy of "Bart Simpson's favorite Latin apothegms."

    Go on, do tell. Is is in Virgil, Book 6? Or perhaps it's Tiberius' favourite come-on line to his little fishes?

    Either way, I'm sure it wows them down at the Podunk baths.
    The fun is not in victory itself but in participating in - or at least watching - a great challenge. I liked some of your recent contributions too.

    You can enjoy yourself reading these quotations in Lucretius's book II*. I heard he was quite fond of Matt Groening's creations.
    Thus, here is another remarkable phrase:
    Ita erat quando hic adveni.
    Translation: It was that way when I got here.

    * Actually, that is Henry Beard's Latin for Everyday Occasions: Lingua Latina Omnibus
  • telmesrin 2009-10-17 02:58
    I wouldn't be too sure it's CSN. Given the spelling in that error message it's probably CNS.
  • hikari 2009-10-17 04:19
    Bim Job:
    SR:
    Re: Purple Monkey Dishwasher. In the days of writing ColdFusion webapps with just a fancy text editor (i.e. not a proper IDE) I'd leave "banana" to bookmark somewhere in a file I wanted to get back to after checking/tweaking elsewhere. I chose "banana" as I could be pretty sure it wouldn't be present as a variable name or whatever. I never had one leak out to production, though.

    If that's what the original code-monkey was doing he should know there are things such as comments. If not, WTF?
    Banana seems to be quite popular.

    Back in the days of supporting a client application on Win 3.1, a colleague used to search for "Unexpected Error" in various DLLs -- I think it was "Unexpected Error;" there were so many to choose from -- and replace it with "Unexploded Banana." Oh, how we laughed.

    Right up to the point where the banana exploded.

    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?


    One you know how to handle.
  • appellatio - when ape shit just doesn't cut it 2009-10-17 05:20
    Shredder:
    TRWTF is iced grande nonfat splenda coffee.

    Yeah. What makes is so splenda? Does it have sequins?
  • appellatio - when ape shit just doesn't cut it 2009-10-17 05:21
    mookers:
    Nearly 90 comments and I can't believe nobody has commented on the real WTF...

    Nonfat and Splenda in the coffee???? Say it isn't so!

    I will. It isn't.
    You lose.
  • P. Edant 2009-10-17 05:25
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym


    Wikipedia disagrees.


    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
  • noway! 2009-10-17 06:10
    CSN is an important part of my life.
    Please create more so I can have more money.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Board_of_Student_Aid_%28Sweden%29
  • Doozerboy 2009-10-17 07:45
    My particular favourite microsoft error message is
    "Reserved error (-1517); there is no message for this error" in access.

    Gee thanks for that. Quite how i would have fixed that without google i have no idea.
  • dkf 2009-10-17 10:56
    P. Edant:
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    Well, sure. Not in English. But that just marks you out as someone who is irrationally attached to vowels in their words. Not all languages are like that (we can forgive the rendering of it in latin characters) so your assertion might be massively off the mark.

    However I continue to have no idea what it might have been referring to originally.
  • chris 2009-10-17 11:39
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Letter_to_Russia_with_krokozyabry.jpg



    "An image of a post envelope with address written in krakozyabry (кракозя́бры) AKA Mojibake. The envelope contained a Harry Potter book. This letter was sent to a Russian student by her French friend, who manually wrote the address that he received by e-mail. His e-mail client, unfortunately, was not set up correctly to display Cyrillic characters, so they were substituted with diacritic symbols from the Western charset (ISO-8859-1) The original message was in KOI8-R.

    The address was deciphered by the postal employees and delivered successfully. Some of the correct characters (red) were written above the wrong ones (black)."
  • Bogbrush 2009-10-17 12:37
    An Onymous:
    Have to say, these are some of the best comments I've read here for quite some time.

    Well done, sirs and madams.
    Great stuff guys! Keep it up!

  • DaveK 2009-10-17 12:51
    Bim Job:
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    And his name is Grytpype-Thinne!
    Nice rewrite, but it's actually The Hampstead Building Society.

    Don't point that moot at me.
    But it's a nice clean moot! I was up all night polishing it, using nothing but my own ear-wax and a penknife with an attachment for getting boy scouts out of horses' hooves!
  • Bim Job 2009-10-17 12:57
    the beholder:
    Bim Job:
    Either way, I'm sure it wows them down at the Podunk baths.
    The fun is not in victory itself but in participating in - or at least watching - a great challenge. I liked some of your recent contributions too.

    You can enjoy yourself reading these quotations in Lucretius's book II*. I heard he was quite fond of Matt Groening's creations.
    Thus, here is another remarkable phrase:
    Ita erat quando hic adveni.
    Translation: It was that way when I got here.

    * Actually, that is Henry Beard's Latin for Everyday Occasions: Lingua Latina Omnibus
    Well, there are certainly worse ways to source a Latin quotation (horrible language); and it's very definitely more enjoyable than following up on some foolish misconstruction of an etymology (cf "Decade").

    Not too keen on Lucretius, any more than I am on Catullus (a spoilt pompous brat with bad breath and a penchant for mangling other people's best work, eg Sappho 31: Catullus 51). Frankly, I'm not too keen on semi house-trained aristocrats trying their hand at something they're not very good at:

    "Miser Catulle, desinas ineptire,
    et quod vides perisse perditum ducas."

    That was number eight, and the silly bastard still managed another hundred or so. Res ipsa loquitur. Or, as you would (justifiably) say,

    Dunuone Latine loquebar? Me ineptum. Interdum modo elabitur...
  • Bim Job 2009-10-17 13:09
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    And his name is Grytpype-Thinne!
    Nice rewrite, but it's actually The Hampstead Building Society.

    Don't point that moot at me.
    But it's a nice clean moot! I was up all night polishing it, using nothing but my own ear-wax and a penknife with an attachment for getting boy scouts out of horses' hooves!
    "Eccles? Eccles? Is that you?"

    Enter Bottle, with cardboard knees and things; also lovely sossinges. Listeners may be wondering about what has become of Count Moriarty. The truth is, he WAS suddenly attacked by a soaking wet elephant.

    Nice to know that we're all on the same page, though.

    (Explosion, long drawn out fall of debris)

    Bluebottle: You rotten swines you! Arrgh arggh ho! You have deaded me, oh you swines! Look what you have done to my new Alan Ladd-type sports shirt. I'm gonna tell my dad on you, my dad's a blacksmith. Ah hi. Exits left, with shattered bonce, crepe hair and loose feet.
  • DaveK 2009-10-17 19:31
    Bim Job:
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    DaveK:
    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    And his name is Grytpype-Thinne!
    Nice rewrite, but it's actually The Hampstead Building Society.

    Don't point that moot at me.
    But it's a nice clean moot! I was up all night polishing it, using nothing but my own ear-wax and a penknife with an attachment for getting boy scouts out of horses' hooves!
    "Eccles? Eccles? Is that you?"

    Enter Bottle, with cardboard knees and things; also lovely sossinges. Listeners may be wondering about what has become of Count Moriarty. The truth is, he WAS suddenly attacked by a soaking wet elephant.

    Nice to know that we're all on the same page, though.

    (Explosion, long drawn out fall of debris)

    Bluebottle: You rotten swines you! Arrgh arggh ho! You have deaded me, oh you swines! Look what you have done to my new Alan Ladd-type sports shirt. I'm gonna tell my dad on you, my dad's a blacksmith. Ah hi. Exits left, with shattered bonce, crepe hair and loose feet.

    FX: wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeSPLASH!

    Little Jim: Heeeeeee fallen in da water!
  • DaveK 2009-10-17 19:33
    THREAD FORK!

    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    They call the Rising Sun?

  • Nyquist 2009-10-18 04:32
    DaveK:
    THREAD FORK!

    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    They call the Dreaded Lurgy



    FTFY
  • P. Edant 2009-10-18 06:59
    dkf:
    P. Edant:
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    Well, sure. Not in English. But that just marks you out as someone who is irrationally attached to vowels in their words. Not all languages are like that (we can forgive the rendering of it in latin characters) so your assertion might be massively off the mark.

    However I continue to have no idea what it might have been referring to originally.


    If you can find me a language in which the word CSN exists, I'll concede that you "won", and award you over 9000 internets
  • Snoggums 2009-10-18 16:10
    My Name?:
    Pol:
    Keep comments nice plesae...

    ...and, plesae, definitely no pointing out obvious typos!
    You dit it all worg! It must bee:

    ...and, plees, definitelie no poynting out obwiuos taipos!
    You're a cat arn't you?
  • Laughing Jack 2009-10-18 16:12
    P. Edant:
    If you can find me a language in which the word CSN exists, I'll concede that you "won", and award you over 9000 internets
    It's ONE MILLION INTERNETS, you cheapskate.
  • Ludwig 2009-10-18 16:29
    P. Edant:
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
    Wikipedia disagrees.
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    If you're referring to the lack of periods, that has only every been an optional typographic convention. It was never consistantly used in the past (consider "HMS"), and has largely fallen out of favour.

    English you see, is a living language (hence it's inconsistancy, but also it's expressiveness). This may cause anxiety attacks in certain programmers who chose the career out of an inability to relate to other people, but that's their problem.
  • Poor sap 2009-10-18 16:44
    To solve the CSN riddle: CSN is the name of a kind of bug-tracking system that is used by SAP to process any sorts of messages. By ancient custom, system names consist of no more than three alphanumeric characters. So CSN is not an acronym but a proper name. To translate: The application is telling the user to open a bug report.

    TRWTF goes deeper, however: The programmer failed, among others, to specify a component for the bug report. SAP is a big company and there are lots of programs, reports, and whatnot. So, telling the user to "create a CSN" or something like that is not really useful.

    This kind of sloppiness is EXACTLY why Enterprise software sucks so badly...
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-10-18 21:19
    Ludwig:
    P. Edant:
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
    Wikipedia disagrees.
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    If you're referring to the lack of periods, that has only every been an optional typographic convention. It was never consistantly used in the past (consider "HMS"), and has largely fallen out of favour.

    I don't believe it's that.
    I rather believe Mrs. or Mr. Edant is one of those annoying people who have once heard a nitwit blabber about only pronounceable abbreviations formed by the initial letters of a sequence of words being acronyms, calling other such abbreviations initialisms (which word, interestingly, is unknown to all of my dictionaries as well as my spell-checker), and since then draw a completely misplaced feeling of superiority from 'correcting' others who use the word acronym in the also very common wider sense - in the most obnoxious way they can think of.
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-10-18 21:24
    Poor sap:

    TRWTF goes deeper, however: SAP is not really useful.

    Be concise. There's no need for more words.
  • P.E. Dant 2009-10-18 21:28
    Ludwig:
    P. Edant:
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
    Wikipedia disagrees.
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    If you're referring to the lack of periods, that has only every been an optional typographic convention. It was never consistantly used in the past (consider "HMS"), and has largely fallen out of favour.

    English you see, is a living language (hence it's inconsistancy, but also it's expressiveness). This may cause anxiety attacks in certain programmers who chose the career out of an inability to relate to other people, but that's their problem.


    What I think P. Edant -- pedant, get it? -- is referring to is not the lack of periods not making it an acronym, but that fact that CSN is not literally an acronyn, but an initialism. As any self-respecting pedant will tell you -- often without anyone actually asking -- an initialism is an acronym that is spoken as a word, like "laser". As in, CSN is pronounced "Cee Ess En", not "csn".

    Also, is English such a living language that it's OK to use "it's" and "its" interchangeably now? Who knew!

  • Ludwig 2009-10-18 21:53
    P.E. Dant:
    What I think P. Edant -- pedant, get it? ...
    Yes, both times. Pedentry isn't funny though. It's like straightening other people's ties in public.
    P.E. Dant:
    Also, is English such a living language that it's OK to use "it's" and "its" interchangeably now? Who knew!
    Oh noes! U haz dishcovered mi secretz! I is not a human, I is a lolcat!

    At least peoples liek catz.
  • Laughing Jack 2009-10-18 22:24
    P.E. Dant:
    Ludwig:
    English you see, is a living language (hence it's inconsistancy, but also it's expressiveness). This may cause anxiety attacks in certain programmers who chose the career out of an inability to relate to other people, but that's their problem.

    Also, is English such a living language that it's OK to use "it's" and "its" interchangeably now? Who knew!

    Take deep, slow breath's. The feeling of anxiety will pass.
  • P.E. Dant 2009-10-18 22:41
    Actually, if you added up all of the anxiety and anger felt by the pedants of the world, I think it would be only marginally more than the anxiety and anger of the anti-pedant get-a-life-you-losers / English-is-a-living-language crowd. Am I losing any sleep over the confusion over "it's" and "its"? No. I also don't usually point out the misuse unless someone is correcting someone else's grammar and they themselves confuse the two words. Then it's just too much to resist.

    In this particular case, I just thought it was funny that someone who was pointing out that English is a living language made a mistake that even proponents of the English-is-a-living-language argument wouldn't defend. I'd say that it was irony, but I wouldn't want to risk provoking the that's-not-irony-you-idiots! crowd. Now *those* guys are assholes.
  • Laughing Jack 2009-10-19 00:26
    P.E. Dant:
    Am I losing any sleep over the confusion over "it's" and "its"? No. I also don't usually point out the misuse unless someone is correcting someone else's grammar and they themselves confuse the two words. Then it's just too much to resist.

    That would be pretty funny. Unfortunately, Ludwig the Lolcat seem's to be again'st grammar pedantry, s'o pointing out their mi'stake doe'sn't work a's a joke a's well a's you might like, it ju'st come's acro's's a's further pedantry. That can be funny, but not in thi's ca'se.

    You s'eem to be taking thi's all very literaly. I don't think that's nece's'sarily the be'st approach. My remark about deep breath's for example was a humourou's device to draw attention to your pedentry (ca'sting you a's the s'traight man) rather than a s'eriou's s'ugge'stion that you s'uffer from anxiety in s'ocial s'ituation's. I would s'uggest a humourou's respon'se at thi's jucture, for example you could use your pedentry-to-date as the ba'si's for a joke by pointing out one of my s'pelling error's (I've left s'ome particularly appropriate one's) and ignoring the apostrophie's in this comment. Just keep it s'hort.
  • nanomagnetic 2009-10-19 02:39
    The real joke of the first picture is that drink!
  • AntiQuercus 2009-10-19 03:38
    This is mightily impressive! The dedication to getting the mail through includes transliterating across charsets. So was this the Russian postal service?

  • P. Edant 2009-10-19 03:51
    Laughing Jack:
    P. Edant:
    If you can find me a language in which the word CSN exists, I'll concede that you "won", and award you over 9000 internets
    It's ONE MILLION INTERNETS, you cheapskate.


    Isn't 1 million over 9000?
  • P. Edant 2009-10-19 03:53
    Ludwig:
    P. Edant:
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
    Wikipedia disagrees.
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    If you're referring to the lack of periods, that has only every been an optional typographic convention. It was never consistantly used in the past (consider "HMS"), and has largely fallen out of favour.

    English you see, is a living language (hence it's inconsistancy, but also it's expressiveness). This may cause anxiety attacks in certain programmers who chose the career out of an inability to relate to other people, but that's their problem.


    No, it's nothing to do with punctuation.

    ITT: people who are singularly unable to refrain from passive-aggressive ad hominem. Odd
  • P. Edant 2009-10-19 03:56
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    Ludwig:
    P. Edant:
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
    Wikipedia disagrees.
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym
    If you're referring to the lack of periods, that has only every been an optional typographic convention. It was never consistantly used in the past (consider "HMS"), and has largely fallen out of favour.

    I don't believe it's that.
    I rather believe Mrs. or Mr. Edant is one of those annoying people who have once heard a nitwit blabber about only pronounceable abbreviations formed by the initial letters of a sequence of words being acronyms, calling other such abbreviations initialisms (which word, interestingly, is unknown to all of my dictionaries as well as my spell-checker), and since then draw a completely misplaced feeling of superiority from 'correcting' others who use the word acronym in the also very common wider sense - in the most obnoxious way they can think of.


    Response to mild, inoffensive correction, directed at someone else's post? Typically presumptuous e-psychiatrist deconstruction of the character of a total stranger, with the sole purpose of trying to upset them. Talk to me about obnoxious
  • P. Edant 2009-10-19 03:58
    Ludwig:
    P.E. Dant:
    What I think P. Edant -- pedant, get it? ...
    Yes, both times. Pedantry isn't funny though.


    I fixed your spelling error for you. You're welcome!
  • P. Edant 2009-10-19 04:01
    Laughing Jack:
    P.E. Dant:
    Am I losing any sleep over the confusion over "it's" and "its"? No. I also don't usually point out the misuse unless someone is correcting someone else's grammar and they themselves confuse the two words. Then it's just too much to resist.

    That would be pretty funny. Unfortunately, Ludwig the Lolcat seem's to be again'st grammar pedantry, s'o pointing out their mi'stake doe'sn't work a's a joke a's well a's you might like, it ju'st come's acro's's a's further pedantry. That can be funny, but not in thi's ca'se.

    You s'eem to be taking thi's all very literaly. I don't think that's nece's'sarily the be'st approach. My remark about deep breath's for example was a humourou's device to draw attention to your pedentry (ca'sting you a's the s'traight man) rather than a s'eriou's s'ugge'stion that you s'uffer from anxiety in s'ocial s'ituation's. I would s'uggest a humourou's respon'se at thi's jucture, for example you could use your pedentry-to-date as the ba'si's for a joke by pointing out one of my s'pelling error's (I've left s'ome particularly appropriate one's) and ignoring the apostrophie's in this comment. Just keep it s'hort.


    What''s a "jucture"?
  • Mrs D. Pointe 2009-10-19 04:03
    Laughing Jack:
    P.E. Dant:
    Am I losing any sleep over the confusion over "it's" and "its"? No. I also don't usually point out the misuse unless someone is correcting someone else's grammar and they themselves confuse the two words. Then it's just too much to resist.

    That would be pretty funny. Unfortunately, Ludwig the Lolcat seem's to be again'st grammar pedantry, s'o pointing out their mi'stake doe'sn't work a's a joke a's well a's you might like, it ju'st come's acro's's a's further pedantry. That can be funny, but not in thi's ca'se.

    You s'eem to be taking thi's all very literaly. I don't think that's nece's'sarily the be'st approach. My remark about deep breath's for example was a humourou's device to draw attention to your pedentry (ca'sting you a's the s'traight man) rather than a s'eriou's s'ugge'stion that you s'uffer from anxiety in s'ocial s'ituation's. I would s'uggest a humourou's respon'se at thi's jucture, for example you could use your pedentry-to-date as the ba'si's for a joke by pointing out one of my s'pelling error's (I've left s'ome particularly appropriate one's) and ignoring the apostrophie's in this comment. Just keep it s'hort.


    Good grief, were you not paying attention in school when they taught you about the apostrophe? You're fired!
  • Level 2 2009-10-19 04:29
    The Purple monkey dishwasher idea is great. This way you can be sure to get accurate error reports from your users.

    User: "I had this error, it said something about a purple monkey."

    Instead of:
    User: "I had this error."
    RF Technician: "What was the error number?"
    User: "I don't know."
  • Mayhem 2009-10-19 05:10
    P. Edant:
    Herohtar:
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym


    Wikipedia disagrees.


    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says. CSN isn't an acronym


    To everything, turn turn turn, there is a CSN, turn turn turn ...

    augue: this joke makes my stomach churn?

    et sequiter ad nauseam spon
  • DaveK 2009-10-19 05:18
    Nyquist:
    DaveK:
    THREAD FORK!

    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    They call the Dreaded Lurgy



    FTFY
    Thank you very much! Here, try one of my purple monkey dishwashers; they're milder than those industrial baboon cleansers you've been smoking.
  • Mrs D. Pointe 2009-10-19 05:21
    So is it the monkeys that are purple, or their dishwasher's?
  • forbjok 2009-10-19 05:50
    The REAL WTF is in the dialog title.
    "Windows Internet Explorer"...
  • Anonymous 2009-10-19 08:06
    Anna Krzysztof:
    I guess I didn't have to pixelate my last name after all.
    Hello there Anna Krzysztof. Since I know your name and managed to figure out the blurred part of your address, can we be pen-pals? I just know we can, which is why I've anticipated your positive response and have posted my first three letters already. We're going to be the bestest of friends and it's great because I've always wanted to be friends with a Polish girl (to be honest, any girl). Anyway, we can share our life stories once you've replied to my letters, until then my new friend!
  • anon 2009-10-19 08:35
    Laughing Jack:
    P.E. Dant:
    Ludwig:
    English you see, is a living language (hence it's inconsistancy, but also it's expressiveness). This may cause anxiety attacks in certain programmers who chose the career out of an inability to relate to other people, but that's their problem.

    Also, is English such a living language that it's OK to use "it's" and "its" interchangeably now? Who knew!

    Take deep, slow breath's. The feeling of anxiety will pass.

    I see, the apostrophes were correct, so what you really meant was:
    Ludwig:
    English you see, is a living language (hence it's inconsistent, but also it's expressive).
  • ParkinT 2009-10-19 08:49
    Incourced:
    Ha:
    "cancled and tryied"


    occoured cencle plesae

    I just cancled and tryied agian
    That's Three-for-three!!!
  • Bim Job 2009-10-19 11:16
    DaveK:
    Nyquist:
    DaveK:
    THREAD FORK!

    Bim Job:
    Captcha: "There is a curse on the House of Moriarty..."
    They call the Dreaded Lurgy



    FTFY
    Thank you very much! Here, try one of my purple monkey dishwashers; they're milder than those industrial baboon cleansers you've been smoking.
    Rather in the manner of Mornington Crescent, you got to Little Jim before I could. Believe me, I tried. Obviously you're playing by the East Finchley rules.

    I sometimes wonder what Milligoon and Sykes would have made of this thread, though.

    P.Edant: Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all. lrn2acronym
    Bloodnok: Stop waving that acronym at me. Filth! Filth ... Aaaaaeaoughiuggh. Thank you, Gladys, and make a note in the mess-book. See you next Tuesday!
    Bluebottle: Eccles ... Eccles ... dere is a house in New Orleans ...
    Eccles: I know, Bottle, I know. I'm standin in it!
    FX: (Loud gurgling noise. George W Bush talking in strangulated hernia-type Texan accent at Pony Club meeting; speeding up to:)
    FX: Sploosh!
    Eccles: Werl ... I'm not standin in it any more.
    Bluebottle (agitated): I tole you that ball and chain was a bad idea!

    Well, that was where Little Jim was going to come in.

    Seagoon: Polish your nose with Ping and have a gorilla with me!

    PS I do not know, nor do I ever want to know, what an "industrial baboon cleanser" might be. Besides, I'm trying to give them up. Have a care, large bloated-type announcing gentleman, or I'll belt the back of that great fat greasy nut of yours.
  • Bim Job 2009-10-19 11:35
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    Poor sap:

    TRWTF goes deeper, however: SAP is not really useful.

    Be concise. There's no need for more words.
    Unwarranted continuation would be otiose. Avoid, at all costs, not least the cost of further verbiage, the twin perils of circumlocution and periphrasis. Make it your personal quest to evade the temptation of blathering on and on and on and ...

    We interrupt this programme with a word from our sponsor, the Oxford English Dictionary:

    Footilitarian

    And there's more where that came from ... the OED: bringing you a wholesome cascade of utterly useless new words, each and every day!

    Be concise.
  • Jay 2009-10-19 12:17
    Level 2:
    The Purple monkey dishwasher idea is great. This way you can be sure to get accurate error reports from your users.

    User: "I had this error, it said something about a purple monkey."

    Instead of:
    User: "I had this error."
    RF Technician: "What was the error number?"
    User: "I don't know."


    There's a fascinating idea there. I'm sure we've all had the problem of users being unable to communicate that the error was "polymorphic bifurcation error" or whatever. So why not instead make all the error messages use words that the users will easily be able to understand and repeat? Messages like "The truck has fallen into the ocean" or "Dragon out of steam". You could even have a system to it, like null pointer -> Robin Hood, SQL -> elf, etc.

    Yes, yes, I know, someone would complain that this was "unprofessional".
  • D. Travis North 2009-10-19 13:06
    whatever:
    FYI, "purple monkey dishwasher" is a Simpsons quote.

    And a classic at that. It was the episode where the teachers were on strike, and Bart was trying to keep them unhappy so that the strike would continue. He showed up at one of their rallies and whispered something into one of the teacher's ears - which then got passed up to Mrs. Kurbopel (sp?) ala whisper-down-the-lane.

    Simpsons - in its hey day, they were funny on so many levels.
  • meno 2009-10-19 17:00
    P. Edant:
    Ilya Ehrenburg:

    I don't believe it's that.
    I rather believe Mrs. or Mr. Edant is one of those annoying people who have once heard a nitwit blabber about only pronounceable abbreviations formed by the initial letters of a sequence of words being acronyms, calling other such abbreviations initialisms (which word, interestingly, is unknown to all of my dictionaries as well as my spell-checker), and since then draw a completely misplaced feeling of superiority from 'correcting' others who use the word acronym in the also very common wider sense - in the most obnoxious way they can think of.


    Response to mild, inoffensive correction, directed at someone else's post? Typically presumptuous e-psychiatrist deconstruction of the character of a total stranger, with the sole purpose of trying to upset them. Talk to me about obnoxious


    You're not really in a position to complain about obnoxious, passive agressive behaviour, given that you seem to take considerable pleasure in "straightening other people's ties in public" (lovely phrase, have to remember that one).

    Doubtless you're a smart fellow. You don't need to prove it by pissing people off.
  • Laughing Jack 2009-10-19 17:44
    meno:
    Doubtless you're a smart fellow. You don't need to prove it by pissing people off.


    They're probably all mental. Programmers you know; hard time at highschool, head stuffed in the toilet, buckets of insecurities, just like me really. So long as they keep making me laugh though, I don't mind too much. It keeps me off the gin.

    You're hardly going to solve their problems on the internet, you might as well have a good time.
  • ChiefCrazyTalk 2009-10-19 19:24
    Jay:
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?


    "Distant past" is a relative term.

    We had a new employee who was in her twenties. I was trying to give her a quick history of what our department has been doing, and to put some tidbit in context, I commented, that we did such-and-such "when Reagan was president". She looked blank for a moment, then said, "Oh, yes, Reagan, we learned about him in history class." I then did some quick math in my head and realized that Reagan was elected before she was born.

    I once read a joke that said, You know you're getting old when the schools are now teaching as "ancient history" what you learned as "current events". I didn't expect it to actually happen to me.

    Don't feel bad, I still remember when Nixon was president.
  • syr 2009-10-20 03:20
    ChiefCrazyTalk:
    Jay:
    IronMensan:
    When did 2000 become the distant past? Last time I checked it was still less than a decade ago. Have been in hypersleep?


    "Distant past" is a relative term.

    We had a new employee who was in her twenties. I was trying to give her a quick history of what our department has been doing, and to put some tidbit in context, I commented, that we did such-and-such "when Reagan was president". She looked blank for a moment, then said, "Oh, yes, Reagan, we learned about him in history class." I then did some quick math in my head and realized that Reagan was elected before she was born.

    I once read a joke that said, You know you're getting old when the schools are now teaching as "ancient history" what you learned as "current events". I didn't expect it to actually happen to me.

    Don't feel bad, I still remember when Nixon was president.


    I think I've seen that movie too
  • P. Edant 2009-10-20 05:12
    meno:
    P. Edant:
    Ilya Ehrenburg:

    I don't believe it's that.
    I rather believe Mrs. or Mr. Edant is one of those annoying people who have once heard a nitwit blabber about only pronounceable abbreviations formed by the initial letters of a sequence of words being acronyms, calling other such abbreviations initialisms (which word, interestingly, is unknown to all of my dictionaries as well as my spell-checker), and since then draw a completely misplaced feeling of superiority from 'correcting' others who use the word acronym in the also very common wider sense - in the most obnoxious way they can think of.


    Response to mild, inoffensive correction, directed at someone else's post? Typically presumptuous e-psychiatrist deconstruction of the character of a total stranger, with the sole purpose of trying to upset them. Talk to me about obnoxious


    You're not really in a position to complain about obnoxious, passive agressive behaviour, given that you seem to take considerable pleasure in "straightening other people's ties in public" (lovely phrase, have to remember that one).

    Doubtless you're a smart fellow. You don't need to prove it by pissing people off.


    And just exactly whose tie did I straighten? That's right: the perpetrator of the WTF being discussed. So why do I get singled out for The Wrath Of Lame? Why are you not flaming the site itself for drawing attention to this poor, defenseless idiot in the first place? Why do you not constantly berate ANYBODY making any comments on ANY of the stories on this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes? Why do you even bother to visit this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes, if you find such behaviour so abhorrent?

    Perhaps next time you go all "White Knight" on someone, you'd like to check up on exactly what you're protecting first.
  • P. Edant 2009-10-20 05:24
    ITT: people who imagine they can detect "considerable pleasure" in another, from a few words on a website
  • AdT 2009-10-20 11:41
    Oh please, where's the problem? Chris Martin just needs to write down the desired delivery date, wait a few years and send the package into the distant past.

    Likewise, Stephen can send a note to his former self instructing him not to eat pasta until he's taken this survey. Problem solved.

    And, sure, $0 a month may not sound like much but it really adds up over time...
  • meno 2009-10-20 18:59
    P. Edant:
    And just exactly whose tie did I straighten? That's right: the perpetrator of the WTF being discussed. So why do I get singled out for The Wrath Of Lame? Why are you not flaming the site itself for drawing attention to this poor, defenseless idiot in the first place? Why do you not constantly berate ANYBODY making any comments on ANY of the stories on this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes? Why do you even bother to visit this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes, if you find such behaviour so abhorrent?


    The "tie" phrase wasn't even coined until you'd turned your attention to the commentators who considered your pedentry juvenille, so like pedantic remarks in general, this is a red herring introduced to score points.

    Certainly there is plenty of passive (and naked) agression to go round, but let's just forget about the scoreboard shall we? After all, we're all anonymous here, the names are all disposible; none of this counts for anything. If it makes you feel better, I concede. I'm am wrong about everything and you are right. There.

    What intrigues me is your motivation, your understanding of the meta-dynamics of internet forum discussions, and your degree of self knowledge. I doubt many people are impressed by the pedentry, so why do you do it? Are you trying to appear even smarter than the other smart boys? Perhaps you can think about this and get back to me.

    You can analyse my motivation if you like. I'd be interested to see what you come up with.
  • Kerin 2009-10-20 19:11
    Bim Job:
    What is an "Expected Error," anyway?


    A handled one.
  • P. Edant 2009-10-21 03:06
    meno:
    P. Edant:
    And just exactly whose tie did I straighten? That's right: the perpetrator of the WTF being discussed. So why do I get singled out for The Wrath Of Lame? Why are you not flaming the site itself for drawing attention to this poor, defenseless idiot in the first place? Why do you not constantly berate ANYBODY making any comments on ANY of the stories on this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes? Why do you even bother to visit this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes, if you find such behaviour so abhorrent?


    The "tie" phrase wasn't even coined until you'd turned your attention to the commentators who considered your pedentry juvenille, so like pedantic remarks in general, this is a red herring introduced to score points.

    Certainly there is plenty of passive (and naked) agression to go round, but let's just forget about the scoreboard shall we? After all, we're all anonymous here, the names are all disposible; none of this counts for anything. If it makes you feel better, I concede. I'm am wrong about everything and you are right. There.

    What intrigues me is your motivation, your understanding of the meta-dynamics of internet forum discussions, and your degree of self knowledge. I doubt many people are impressed by the pedentry, so why do you do it? Are you trying to appear even smarter than the other smart boys? Perhaps you can think about this and get back to me.

    You can analyse my motivation if you like. I'd be interested to see what you come up with.


    Yeeeees, motivation. On the one hand, there's someone making a comment about the story, on the comment page. On the other, there's a bunch of people who prefer to insult those whose comments they find not quite tuned to their own taste. I don't come here to impress people, my friend, I wonder what nerve was touched for you to introduce that aspect
  • meno 2009-10-21 10:39
    Sorry. I dig hung dudes
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-10-21 18:21
    P. Edant:
    meno:
    P. Edant:
    And just exactly whose tie did I straighten? That's right: the perpetrator of the WTF being discussed. So why do I get singled out for The Wrath Of Lame? Why are you not flaming the site itself for drawing attention to this poor, defenseless idiot in the first place? Why do you not constantly berate ANYBODY making any comments on ANY of the stories on this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes? Why do you even bother to visit this site, where we come to make fun of others' mistakes, if you find such behaviour so abhorrent?


    The "tie" phrase wasn't even coined until you'd turned your attention to the commentators who considered your pedentry juvenille, so like pedantic remarks in general, this is a red herring introduced to score points.

    Certainly there is plenty of passive (and naked) agression to go round, but let's just forget about the scoreboard shall we? After all, we're all anonymous here, the names are all disposible; none of this counts for anything. If it makes you feel better, I concede. I'm am wrong about everything and you are right. There.

    What intrigues me is your motivation, your understanding of the meta-dynamics of internet forum discussions, and your degree of self knowledge. I doubt many people are impressed by the pedentry, so why do you do it? Are you trying to appear even smarter than the other smart boys? Perhaps you can think about this and get back to me.

    You can analyse my motivation if you like. I'd be interested to see what you come up with.


    Yeeeees, motivation. On the one hand, there's someone making a comment about the story, on the comment page. On the other, there's a bunch of people who prefer to insult those whose comments they find not quite tuned to their own taste. I don't come here to impress people, my friend, I wonder what nerve was touched for you to introduce that aspect

    Poor little lamb. All the mean bullies here are after you.
    You make the important observation
    P. Edant:
    Not only is CSN not an acronym he's heard of, it's not an acronym at all.
    and augment it by the humble suggestion
    P. Edant:
    lrn2acronym

    Then people start insulting you by providing links and quotations to show that CSN is actually an acronym (by one definition of the term).
    None of your posts
    P. Edant:
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says.

    P. Edant:

    If you can find me a language in which the word CSN exists, I'll concede that you "won", and award you over 9000 internets

    can be even remotely be considered aggressive, I'm sure.
    So I am also completely bewildered why the evil bullies may have decided to turn on you.

    Protip: Your credibility as a pedant would be higher if you acquired the habit of ending your sentences with a full stop.
  • Laughing Jack 2009-10-22 01:43
    P. Can I call you P?

    This is a car-wreak. I know people have been hard on you, the ones who don't have a morbid fascination with your brain-meats, but you're not covered in glory yourself. It doesn't matter who started it, down here at the bottom of page 3. Nobody is ever going to win this thing.

    Laugh it off dude. Learn from it, or don't, as you like, but none of this will sting so bad after you walk away. Try it:

    "Screw you guys, I'm going home."

    Feels good doesn't it?
  • meno 2009-10-22 05:02
    Ilya Ehrenburg:

    None of your posts
    P. Edant:
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says.

    P. Edant:

    If you can find me a language in which the word CSN exists, I'll concede that you "won", and award you over 9000 internets

    can be even remotely be considered aggressive, I'm sure.


    It's aggressive to challenge the authority of a source? It's aggressive to offer a joke reward in return for evidence for an argument? Seems to me, the way to operate round here is to simply invent new meanings for words as required.

    Kindly electrocute my bottletops, there is no chicken in this canal
  • meno 2009-10-22 05:04
    Laughing Jack:
    P. Can I call you P?


    Yeh, feel free.

    This is a car-wreak. I know people have been hard on you, the ones who don't have a morbid fascination with your brain-meats, but you're not covered in glory yourself. It doesn't matter who started it, down here at the bottom of page 3. Nobody is ever going to win this thing.

    Laugh it off dude. Learn from it, or don't, as you like, but none of this will sting so bad after you walk away. Try it:

    "Screw you guys, I'm going home."

    Feels good doesn't it?


    What on earth makes you think anything's stinging? Is a man not allowed to respond to a post, without inference of butthurt? Good grief! I argue with more fury than this with my closest friends!
  • Pedantwatch 2009 2009-10-22 06:17
    Dudes, dudes, dudes! Seems to me there is more than one user posting under the P. Edant handle! Trolls trolling trolls trolling trolls!
  • feugiat 2009-10-22 07:07
    Laughing Jack:
    P. Can I call you P?

    You can even call UPS, if you like.
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-10-22 09:04
    meno:
    Ilya Ehrenburg:

    None of your posts
    P. Edant:
    I don't care what Jimbo's big bag of trivia says.

    P. Edant:

    If you can find me a language in which the word CSN exists, I'll concede that you "won", and award you over 9000 internets

    can be even remotely be considered aggressive, I'm sure.


    It's aggressive to challenge the authority of a source?

    Calling wikipedia "Jimbo's big bag of trivia" is not "challenging the authority of a source".
    It's aggressive to offer a joke reward in return for evidence for an argument?

    Not per se, but it may be considered aggressive, depending on how it's phrased. In the case at hand, it can be read as a joking reply or as an arrogant belittling of the poster he responded to - or anything in between.
    Seems to me, the way to operate round here is to simply invent new meanings for words as required.

    There's mostly no need for that. Words have enough disparate meanings that you can screw around with already.
    But if that's not enough, yes, inventing new meanings is the way to go.
  • P. Edant 2009-10-22 16:31
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    Not per se, but it may be considered aggressive, depending on how it's phrased. In the case at hand, it can be read as a joking reply or as an arrogant belittling of the poster he responded to - or anything in between.


    Read as. Somewhat different to intended as
  • www.factopo.com 2009-11-16 15:33
    Hahaaaa, this is funny. I use computers too, sometimes!
    http://www.factopo.com/index/siteindex.html