The Dream Customer

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  • Piercy 2008-08-06 10:04
    Connection problems again. Quite literally not connected. Horrifyingly suprising how often things like this come up!

    first btw :)
  • akatherder 2008-08-06 10:06
    She needs to think outside the box. Or at least the shrink wrap.
  • snoofle 2008-08-06 10:10
    akatherder:
    She needs to think INside the box. Or at least the shrink wrap.

    FTFY
  • Chahk 2008-08-06 10:11
    I wonder what prompted her neighbor to finally put the password on their wireless. I'm betting their 10 year-old computer expert relative came by for a visit.
  • Muuttaa 2008-08-06 10:11
    When I worked for Applecare some years back, I got a customer who believed that Apple was his ISP, because he bought his notebook computer from Apple, turned it on, and was online instantly. Makes sense, right?

    It took me 30 tedious minutes to convince him that he was connected to his next door neighbor's AT&T DSL router.
  • Alan 2008-08-06 10:15
    I personally cant wait until they bring out wireless power - then all I will need is wireless gas and I will be set.
  • Matt 2008-08-06 10:23
    Well, i dont know about you but my gas comes in pipes or canisters, not wires
  • Matt S 2008-08-06 10:27
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??
  • Jamie 2008-08-06 10:31
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.
  • me 2008-08-06 10:35
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
  • Vollhorst 2008-08-06 10:35
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.
    No way, I have a wireless phone!
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 10:35
    My girlfriend moved into a renthouse several months ago and discovered that someone in the neighborhood had an unsecured wireless network. She spent six months there using their network and never ordered her own service. She used to complain to me, "I couldn't get on yesterday during the day. I think they turn it off when they leave."
    Matt:
    Well, i dont know about you but my gas comes in pipes or canisters, not wires
    Mine comes in beans.
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 10:37
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
  • bstorer 2008-08-06 10:38
    She'd be any ISP's dream customer.

    Not her neighbor's ISP...
  • Vollhorst 2008-08-06 10:39
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)
  • Andrew 2008-08-06 10:40
    Chahk:
    I wonder what prompted her neighbor to finally put the password on their wireless. I'm betting their 10 year-old computer expert relative came by for a visit.


    I'm betting the neighbor moved, or changed ISP. We have a similar event in my low-tech neighborhood. It's called the free newspaper.
  • Former Junior Programmer 2008-08-06 10:41
    Vollhorst:
    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    Should have pulled a Jim Halpert and sent them messages from their future selves.
  • Saaid 2008-08-06 10:45
    We have a rotation where one week a month we have to answer the support phone. A couple of our users are this clueless. It's tough to support someone like this because we're practically speaking different languages.
  • Saaid 2008-08-06 10:49
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
  • wireless 2008-08-06 10:53
    But it is wireless, no wires needed....
  • jtl 2008-08-06 10:53
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    Probably also it needs to be plugged in to a electrical socket...
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 10:53
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.
  • jtl 2008-08-06 10:55
    Saaid:
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?


    Yea...and fire engines aren't on fire either! WTF!?!?!
  • Matt S 2008-08-06 10:58
    I'm looking at it from her perspective maybe.
  • jtl 2008-08-06 11:03
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".


    There is no line between the router and the CPU. This is different from regular routers. This is why it's called wireless.

    There is a line between the phone jack and the router, because it is more efficient to have a hard line to the internet then say, have some sort of wireless router than got internet in the same way an iPhone does, and then rebroadcasted it in your home. That would be slow as death when compared to a direct ADSL line.

    An iPhone also has a wireless router though, it's called a huge ass antenna with a blinking light on top, which has wires connected to it. Same concept, bigger scale.
  • Dude 2008-08-06 11:03
    Ahhhh. So merimeds me simular storry.

    A Customer called Tech Support. He said that his comp doesnt turn on. Supporter ask if all wires connected properly.

    He said: "Wait, till i get FlashLight"
    Supporter: "Huh, why FlashLight?"
    He: "Electricty is out"
    Supporter: "Pack Your computer and return to the shop, you are too stupid to use it"

    Costumer did that, but also he complaind to supporter boss. Next day Supporter lost his job
  • Foreign Student 2008-08-06 11:04
    Code Dependent:
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.


    I'm starting to see why MFD isn't funny: most posters would be annoyed by it!
  • DeLos 2008-08-06 11:07
    Alan:
    I personally cant wait until they bring out wireless power - then all I will need is wireless gas and I will be set.


    Check out Tesla or if you depend on wiki for all your info: wikipedia

    .
  • shepd 2008-08-06 11:10
    Having also worked at an ISP local to KW, Ontario, definitely NOT providing service outside Ontario and Quebec we would get all sorts of calls. A very memorable one went something like this:

    (Caller ID displays Clearwater, FL.)
    Cx: "I can't send email."
    Me: "Okay, where are you located?"
    Cx: "My _expensive_ _exclusive_ _private_ _resort_ _villa_ in _exclusive_ Clearwater, FL"
    Me: "We don't offer service there.
    Cx: "Of course my _exclusive_ _resort_ _villa_ has service from you!"
    Me: "If you could go to www.whatismyip.com and let me know what it tells you."

    (10 minutes of struggling to get her to do it)

    Me: "That IP address is for SBC global. I am sorry, you aren't using our internet at this time, although you do have your email with us. They are known for blocking port 25 and thereby interfering with outgoing mail. You will need to either phone them for their mailserver information, or you will need to use our webmail service at webmail.example.com."

    (Note that we did offer SMTP authentication on port 25 only at the time, so no point trying another port. Yes, that's a WTF. This ISP had plenty of WTFs past that.)

    Cx: "Excuuuuuuuuuuuse me, but I pay a _lot_ of _money_ for my _exclusive_ _resort_ _villa_ and I can assure you they have your internet. I have a report due in the morning and must email it immediately!"
    Me: "I'd really suggest you contact the concierge there and I'm sure their billing will show this not to be the case. We don't offer service outside of ON and PQ. If you'd like to follow my instructions and try webmail I'm sure we can get your report emailed out during this call."

    (30 minutes of arguing ensues, Cx starts logging in to her POP account rather than webmail with the wrong password, hits cancel on outlook 30 times in a row)

    Me: "Your account is now locked due to our IDS. You'll need to wait 15 minutes for it to release."

    (This repeats itself for the next hour while she won't wait for her account to release so we can fix the password issue)

    Cx (screaming at this point): "I'm going to call corporate [she was a corporate customer, she'd called residential service as corp. service is closed at 1 am] and cancel my account tomorrow. Your service is terrible. You're incompetent because my _private_ _exclusive_ _resort_ _villa_ must have your service and you're lying."
    Me: "I'm sorry if you feel that way, clearly there's no way we can resolve this issue to your satisfaction. Thank you for calling XYZ ISP. Bye."

    I checked that account for the next month every few days, not a single callback, and no cancellation call. I'm assuming she really did ask the concierge and at that point followed my instructions.

    (The _words_ were actually said by Cx as description points on where she was staying, at least that many times.)
  • Piercy 2008-08-06 11:12
    the sad thing is half the things u guys said.. happen to a support guy on a daily basis.

    poor guys.
  • JimM 2008-08-06 11:14
    jtl:
    There is no line between the router and the CPU.
    If you keep trying to plug RJ45s into your CPU I'm amazed your computer has remained operational long enough for you to make a comment on here...
    jtl:
    ... it is more efficient to have a hard line to the internet then say, have some sort of wireless router than got internet in the same way an iPhone does, and then rebroadcasted it in your home.
    You mean like a 3G dongle? Like many people who live in forward thinking countries that have 3G networks now possess? Like I have and (if I really wanted to) could easily share completely wirelessly?

    Yes, the technology exists to very easily have completely wireless internet. I will concede, however, that it is VERY slow and not really suitable for shared access...
  • K&T 2008-08-06 11:16

    I personally cant wait until they bring out wireless power...


    Does induction through EMF count as wireless?
  • Sepp 2008-08-06 11:18
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    Oh really? Thanks for explanation ... *rolleyes*
  • El Duderino 2008-08-06 11:19
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??

    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.

    Right, but it connects wirelessly. Why do you think they call it wireLESS if you have to have wires!?
  • Saaid 2008-08-06 11:20
    Foreign Student:
    Code Dependent:
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.


    I'm starting to see why MFD isn't funny: most posters would be annoyed by it!
    Ok. I see the problem. They should call them LESSwires routers not wireLESS routers. I still smell a lawsuit. They are clearly misrepresenting their products.
  • Satanicpuppy 2008-08-06 11:25
    bstorer:
    She'd be any ISP's dream customer.

    Not her neighbor's ISP...


    Guess that's why he got pissed off and turned on WEP. Blows my mind the people who just don't understand that the internet isn't magically available everywhere, and it always makes me laugh when someone starts trying to criminalize connecting to an unsecured WAP...Think of all the grannies in PMITA prison.
  • Zecc 2008-08-06 11:27
    bstorer:
    She'd be any ISP's dream customer.

    Not her neighbor's ISP...
    She was making her neighbour consume more bandwidth. Assuming it's being paid, her neighbor's ISP is glad too.
  • ComputerForumUser 2008-08-06 11:29
    The problem isn't when they call the routers wireless, it's when the ISPs sell their broadband/ADSL as wireless - usually with the term “Wireless Broadband”, for something that you still get down a wire.
  • jMo 2008-08-06 11:33
    TRWTF is the combination of sarcasm and actual responses in this thread with explanations of what a wireless device is/is not/should/could be.

    BOOOOOORING!
  • Jason the Terrible 2008-08-06 11:40
    Well, she's obviously not the dream customer of the ISP she was leeching from.
  • WhiskeyJack 2008-08-06 11:43
    jtl:
    Probably also it needs to be plugged in to a electrical socket...


    Batteries. Duh!

    OK, this isn't really funny anymore.
  • Flywheel25a 2008-08-06 11:47
    I think that one was a joke.
  • WhiskeyJack 2008-08-06 11:48
    Code Dependent:
    My girlfriend moved into a renthouse several months ago and discovered that someone in the neighborhood had an unsecured wireless network. She spent six months there using their network and never ordered her own service. She used to complain to me, "I couldn't get on yesterday during the day. I think they turn it off when they leave."


    I had a friend live exactly like that during his university years. We would chat on ICQ and he would apologize for his poor connection, saying that it was tricky picking up his neighbor's wireless signal sometimes! To be fair I think eventually he did talk to said neighbor about sharing the service and splitting the cost.

    When my sister moved into her apartment in downtown Toronto I remember doing something similar for the first few days before she got her own internet hookup. Unfortunately the best places to connect to the neighbor's unsecured router was from inside the garbage room on her floor, or in the stairwell one floor above. Both awkward places to be caught crouched with a laptop.

    And what's even more fun are the people who literally plug-and-play: unsecured router with default SSID and default admin password! Oh, the fun you can have (by changing their SSID to something more interesting, for one).
  • JimM 2008-08-06 11:49
    WhiskeyJack:
    OK, this isn't really funny anymore.
    You mean it was funny to start with?!?
  • Leak 2008-08-06 12:00
    Dude:
    Ahhhh. So merimeds me simular storry.

    A Customer called Tech Support. He said that his comp doesnt turn on. Supporter ask if all wires connected properly.

    He said: "Wait, till i get FlashLight"
    Supporter: "Huh, why FlashLight?"
    He: "Electricty is out"
    Supporter: "Pack Your computer and return to the shop, you are too stupid to use it"

    Costumer did that, but also he complaind to supporter boss. Next day Supporter lost his job

    You know - you might want to pack that English of yours (or at least your spelling) and return it to the shop; it clearly doesn't work either...

    np: Saul Williams - Convict Colony (The Inevitable Rise and Liberation of Niggy Tardust!)
  • Rick 2008-08-06 12:04
    Saaid:
    Foreign Student:
    Code Dependent:
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.


    I'm starting to see why MFD isn't funny: most posters would be annoyed by it!
    Ok. I see the problem. They should call them LESSwires routers not wireLESS routers. I still smell a lawsuit. They are clearly misrepresenting their products.


    Except LESSwires is grammatically incorrect. It should be FEWERwires.
  • Ivan Milosavljevic 2008-08-06 12:04
    SSID was Norris? OMG, her neighbour must have been Chuck Norris!
  • Saaid 2008-08-06 12:11
    Ivan Milosavljevic:
    SSID was Norris? OMG, her neighbour must have been Chuck Norris!
    I pity the fool that would leach off Chuck's FEWER wires DSL connection
  • Outside the Box 2008-08-06 12:16
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    Does it? What of a wireless-to-wireless peer network?
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 12:20
    jMo:
    TRWTF is the combination of sarcasm and actual responses in this thread with explanations of what a wireless device is/is not/should/could be.

    BOOOOOORING!
    Thanks for spicing things up with your insightful, entertaining post.
  • Auz 2008-08-06 12:22
    I must live near Alex's cousin. There's an open network called "piss of my network mug". He did change it from a more vulgar version though.
  • Shakespeare 2008-08-06 12:23
    Dram Customers don't call to complain. They ask their brother-in-law what's wrong.
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 12:23
    Rick:
    Saaid:
    Ok. I see the problem. They should call them LESSwires routers not wireLESS routers. I still smell a lawsuit. They are clearly misrepresenting their products.


    Except LESSwires is grammatically incorrect. It should be FEWERwires.
    Nah, doesn't roll easily off the tongue. How about, "NotAsManyWires"?
  • Jimbo 2008-08-06 12:24
    Oh wow...
  • PolkSaladAndie 2008-08-06 12:26
    Vollhorst:

    (snipped)
    ... I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos... fat daughter (real ugly monster)... diary... I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!"...


    Wow, you're kind of a jerk, aren't you?
  • :) 2008-08-06 12:27
    whoooooosh
  • Sutherlands 2008-08-06 12:28
    Satanicpuppy:
    bstorer:
    She'd be any ISP's dream customer.

    Not her neighbor's ISP...


    Guess that's why he got pissed off and turned on WEP. Blows my mind the people who just don't understand that the internet isn't magically available everywhere, and it always makes me laugh when someone starts trying to criminalize connecting to an unsecured WAP...Think of all the grannies in PMITA prison.
    It's called "Theft of Services"
  • Some dude 2008-08-06 12:30
    But it's wireLESS! That means no wires!
  • P 2008-08-06 12:41
    Some dude:
    But it's wireLESS! That means no wires!


    I agree, she should stay wireless. It only takes a couple of minutes to crack a WEP key these days.
  • Andrew Trumper 2008-08-06 12:51
    This is not a WTF, this is like, everyone I've ever known with a wireless router / laptop combo.

    Unfortunate but still very funny since somewhere there's got to be two people using wireless routers with laptops which are both open and they are each using each other's connections.
  • Andrew 2008-08-06 12:55
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    She bought one of those cheap ones..
  • amischiefr 2008-08-06 13:00
    Rick:
    Saaid:
    Foreign Student:
    Code Dependent:
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.


    I'm starting to see why MFD isn't funny: most posters would be annoyed by it!
    Ok. I see the problem. They should call them LESSwires routers not wireLESS routers. I still smell a lawsuit. They are clearly misrepresenting their products.


    Except LESSwires is grammatically incorrect. It should be FEWERwires.


    Maybe even LessWiresThanWellNothingSinceYouNeedwires.
  • Powerlord 2008-08-06 13:04
    Just for fun,someone should invent a battery powered wireless router that connects to a cellular data network... and see exactly how long it will run.
  • me 2008-08-06 13:10
    But as we all (might) know, LESSwire primarily uses Bluetooth: http://www.lesswire.com/start.php

    Anyone remember NOWIRESNEEDED? I think they were bought by Lucent, weren't they?
  • RYan 2008-08-06 13:12
    you are SOOOO good are sarcasrm.
  • blah 2008-08-06 13:14
    "alexsprivatenetworkbiotch"
    is nice, but my personal favorite was a network named
    "8=======>  ~  ~~ ~"
  • review xtrac do not use 2008-08-06 13:18
    When I was a kid, the term "wireless" used to confuse me. My dad would occasionally refer to the radio as the "wireless". I asked him why it was called that and he said it was because it didn't use wires. I knew a little electronics, so this comment seemed odd to me, sine everythin I build needed wires. So, I opened up a radio and, sure enough it was *full* of wires. That really confused me.
  • Mark 2008-08-06 13:26
    Muuttaa:
    When I worked for Applecare some years back, I got a customer who believed that Apple was his ISP, because he bought his notebook computer from Apple...


    That reminds of when (in the early 90s) I saw a woman at the pharmacy insisting that she had to use Panasonic AA batteries in her Panasonic personal cassette player.
  • Irishlyrucked 2008-08-06 13:47
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    whoosh!
  • David 2008-08-06 13:48
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.

  • Bob N Freely 2008-08-06 13:51
    WhiskeyJack:
    And what's even more fun are the people who literally plug-and-play: unsecured router with default SSID and default admin password! Oh, the fun you can have (by changing their SSID to something more interesting, for one).


    Most routers I've encountered have wireless configuration disabled by default, so you need a wired connection to access the web interface.

    I'm curious: how much security do you people put on your routers? I settle for restricting wireless clients by mac address, which has worked well. I've never caught any leechers spoofing (I do check occasionally). But should I be using packet encryption as well? Sometimes I have guests (parents, in-laws) use my wireless and I don't relish the idea of walking them through configuration, so I just grab their mac address and add them to the list.
  • Izzy 2008-08-06 14:04
    Me too, but I still have to plug in the charger cord sometimes. The charger plugs into the car. The car doesn't plug into anything.
  • Rich 2008-08-06 14:05
    I can't find a reference, but I thought i read that a huge percentage, something on the order of 30% or more, or AOL customers didn't actually use AOL as their ISP, but just paid them cash because they thought they needed to for some reason
  • Flash 2008-08-06 14:28
    Rich:
    I can't find a reference, but I thought i read that a huge percentage, something on the order of 30% or more, or AOL customers didn't actually use AOL as their ISP, but just paid them cash because they thought they needed to for some reason

    I saw this firsthand. I have a friend who always sent email from sbcglobal. When I visited her house (3000 miles away), I was surprised to see her logging on to AOL. She was paying for both AOL and her local ISP. I reconfigured her computer to dial in locally to sbcglobal, cancelled her AOL account (with the usual run-around), and saved her about $200/year. She was very happy.
  • James 2008-08-06 14:29
    A Zen question for you:

    Is it still a WTF if it happens to pretty much everybody? I mean, I got like 2 sentences in before I knew how it was going to end...
  • Real Old Fart 2008-08-06 14:39
    David:
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.
  • Jay 2008-08-06 14:43
    I naively didn't put any security on my wireless network when I first installed it. Then one day I turned on my laptop and it asked me which wireless network I wanted to connect to, giving me two choices. One obviously mine, one obviously someone else's. At that point I figured that if I was picking up my neighbor's wireless network, he was probably picking up mine, and I hastily turned on passwords.

    Captcha "eros"? I consider this sexual harassment!
  • James 2008-08-06 14:47
    ComputerForumUser:
    The problem isn't when they call the routers wireless, it's when the ISPs sell their broadband/ADSL as wireless - usually with the term “Wireless Broadband”, for something that you still get down a wire.


    Every ad I've ever seen for "wireless broadband" was for EDGE/3G/whatever data networks, like AT&T Laptop Connect. It's "broadband" in the sense that the speed is markedly faster than dial-up, the same sense of the word used when describing the lowest-tier Verizon DSL (something like 256k?) as "broadband".

    At any rate, that kind of "wireless broadband" actually doesn't require any wires.
  • duder 2008-08-06 14:55
    Vollhorst:
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    I like to print a simple '666', but on multiple pages.
  • James 2008-08-06 14:55
    Powerlord:
    Just for fun,someone should invent a battery powered wireless router that connects to a cellular data network... and see exactly how long it will run.


    One of the major US auto manufacturers (GM?) is going to start selling cars that have a built-in wireless broadband receiver tied to an 802.11 access point, so people in the car can get online. I think I was thinking GM because OnStar already uses the cellular network, so most of their cars already have all the hardware installed.

    There have been numerous projects to rig such a device out of off-the-shelf parts, as well. I specifically remember one that ran from a system-on-chip that supported 2 PCMCIA cards. The guy used one cellular-network card and one WiFi card, and ran some embedded linux distro to route between the two. Hey presto, instant go-anywhere access point. I'm too lazy to google it, but I think you can find examples if you want.
  • Andy 2008-08-06 14:59
    James:

    ComputerForumUser:

    The problem isn't when they call the routers wireless, it's when the ISPs sell their broadband/ADSL as wireless - usually with the term “Wireless Broadband”, for something that you still get down a wire.

    Every ad I've ever seen for "wireless broadband" was for EDGE/3G/whatever data networks, like AT&T Laptop Connect. It's "broadband" in the sense that the speed is markedly faster than dial-up, the same sense of the word used when describing the lowest-tier Verizon DSL (something like 256k?) as "broadband".

    At any rate, that kind of "wireless broadband" actually doesn't require any wires.

    Visiting my parents reminds me that "256k Verizon DSL" really means "90k Verizon DSL," and that even watching a crappy YouTube video is awful. The neighbors have a better connection :P

    CAPTCHA: oppeto
  • jmroth 2008-08-06 15:02
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    why ? the router might have better wireless performance and might be able to connect to another unsecured WLAN further away and just 'put it through'
  • Benanov 2008-08-06 15:07
    Real Old Fart:
    David:
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.


    You've still got a wire there, sonny. None of this fancy cable talk--I think that's got 4 wires in it.
  • DropDeadThread 2008-08-06 15:19
    What I learned in this thread:

    1) Wireless devices do, in fact, have wires.
    2) Pedantic hairsplitting quibblers make me want to kill all living things.
  • WhiskeyJack 2008-08-06 15:36
    Bob N Freely:
    I'm curious: how much security do you people put on your routers? I settle for restricting wireless clients by mac address, which has worked well.


    I'm not too worried about leechers. I use a WPA password, I don't bother with MAC address restriction for the same reason you said - easier for friends and family when they come over and bring their laptops.

    My laptop and desktop (iMac) are now both "n"-capable so I'm thinking of switching my router from mixed b/g/n to n-only, which ought to speed things up a bit as well as have the added side effect of restricting others who do not have n-capable equipment (e.g. most people). I could buy a cheapie b/g router to run on the side for visitors, which I could control with a power strip and only turn on while they're here.

    When I scan my networks I see about a dozen other SSIDs, some of them open, so I figure as long as I'm not the most vulnerable of the bunch, I'm probably fine. It's the old joke about outrunning your friend instead of the bear.
  • Cam Tardi 2008-08-06 15:43
    ComputerForumUser:
    The problem isn't when they call the routers wireless, it's when the ISPs sell their broadband/ADSL as wireless - usually with the term “Wireless Broadband”, for something that you still get down a wire.


    Well...don't forget, there also is "Wireless Broadband". I happen to work for a company that manufactures equiptment primarily for the WISP industry.
  • draeath 2008-08-06 15:45
    Some people simply should not be allowed to use a computer without going through some kind of class or training. Real class or training, that would give you an idea of what a computer is besides some "magical internet box."

    Elitist? Hell yes, give me back my internet!
  • dandin1 2008-08-06 15:48
    When I switched ISP (to Teksavvy) for a month I had two DSL services, and connected with the old ISP since I didn't have time to set it up. The new ISP sent me an e-mail wondering why there was no activity and asking me if I was having problems. I thought it was rather nice of them, but I couldn't understand why they'd bother! I mean, after 20 days of 0 bandwidth usage, it's certain that any customer would have called them by then! But after reading this, it seems like it's not such a bad idea.
  • AlpineR 2008-08-06 15:53
    bstorer:
    She'd be any ISP's dream customer.

    Not her neighbor's ISP...

    If she lives in my town then:

    1) She and her neighbor have the same ISP.
    2) They are both billed at a flat rate.

    So it makes no difference to her ISP or to anybody's bill. The only downside is that all the torrents she downloads have been slowing her neighbor's email.
  • Mitch 2008-08-06 16:11
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    That's not an entirely idiot assumption to make. People are told it's wireless, so they assume they don't have to plug in any wires. Maybe a power cable to turn it on, but nothing else.

    Then again, any sympathy I'd have for that erroneous assumption goes out the window when you consider the giant, fold out, big picture, easy to read quick-start guide they get.
  • Flash 2008-08-06 16:19
    draeath:
    Some people simply should not be allowed to use a computer without going through some kind of class or training. Real class or training, that would give you an idea of what a computer is besides some "magical internet box."

    Elitist? Hell yes, give me back my internet!

    I share your view. However, requiring some training might be the opposite of elitism. If everyone must have some minimum knowledge of what to do and what not to do, then that makes the Internet better for everyone. That might be considered egalitarian. Everyone shares the duty of responsible behavior.

    When someone wants the privilege of using this shared resource but doesn't want to learn the basics...that's elitism. (Do we need a new word for this? Or will "selfish" suffice?)
  • webrunner 2008-08-06 16:31
    DropDeadThread:
    What I learned in this thread:

    2) Pedantic hairsplitting quibblers make me want to kill all living things.


    Even yourself, various bacteria, and ones on other planets? What about Coral?
  • WhiskeyJack 2008-08-06 16:33
    Mitch:
    That's not an entirely idiot assumption to make. People are told it's wireless, so they assume they don't have to plug in any wires. Maybe a power cable to turn it on, but nothing else.


    But you'd think some common sense might apply. For example, I don't think most people would have a problem with the concept of a cordless phone having to be plugged into the phone line. Yeah, the handset is cordless to the base station, but the base station still has to be connected to the phone line somehow.

    Same thing, except you say "computer" instead of "phone", and suddenly people get all confused.
  • webrunner 2008-08-06 16:36
    WhiskeyJack:
    Mitch:
    That's not an entirely idiot assumption to make. People are told it's wireless, so they assume they don't have to plug in any wires. Maybe a power cable to turn it on, but nothing else.


    But you'd think some common sense might apply. For example, I don't think most people would have a problem with the concept of a cordless phone having to be plugged into the phone line. Yeah, the handset is cordless to the base station, but the base station still has to be connected to the phone line somehow.

    Same thing, except you say "computer" instead of "phone", and suddenly people get all confused.


    I've noticed this a lot: If you take something everyone's familiar with, then put it on a computer using exactly the same method they'd use outside of the computer, they suddenly get confused. The same person who knows how to turn on his TV will suddenly be confused when he sees a power button on his laptop, for instance.
  • Anon 2008-08-06 16:37
    Real Old Fart:
    David:
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.


    lolwut
  • Mike 2008-08-06 16:38
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    Unless the wireless router was getting its signal from another wireless router, these things traditionally have to be connected to a wired connection. Otherwise, how would it get the signal?
  • Casey 2008-08-06 16:42
    Who the F connects a router to a phone line???
  • Garth 2008-08-06 16:44
    Piercy:
    first btw :)


    First what?
  • Thogek 2008-08-06 16:45
    LOL. Ah, well. Gotta remember (for a bit of context) that I don't exactly have to know much about the inner workings of my car in order to drive it to work every day...
  • Garth 2008-08-06 16:49
    Vollhorst:
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    hmm, I doubt your story but funny anyway. Why waste the printout with a ghost scare when you could have embarrassed the daughter by printing out her "cybersex" correspondence?
  • Mike H. 2008-08-06 16:50
    Uneducated people and stupid contractors that's who...

    I served as a resident IT technician for an apartment complex I was living in during my college days. When the complex was built they forgot to put in wiring for ethernet connections. So all we had were 2-3 closets per building with one huge switch for 30+ residents. In each of the resident's rooms there was one panel with 2 jacks (Ethernet CAT5 jack and a phone jack) and in the main room there was only a jack for a phone line.

    At least 90% of the time when someone called saying "My Internet doesn't work" was because someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack. I'd ask them if they had tried the other jack and they usually said they did and it didn't work. When I actually had to go up to their room, I saw that the cable was still in the phone jack. Low and behold... when I plugged the ethernet cable in the right jack their connection magically worked.

    WHODATHUNK!
  • Walleye 2008-08-06 16:59
    jtl:
    Saaid:
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?


    Yea...and fire engines aren't on fire either! WTF!?!?!


    And hot water heaters don't heat hot water, either. They heat cold water until it's hot, then they STOP! Perfect for a class action.
  • Mitch 2008-08-06 17:30
    WhiskeyJack:
    Mitch:
    That's not an entirely idiot assumption to make. People are told it's wireless, so they assume they don't have to plug in any wires. Maybe a power cable to turn it on, but nothing else.


    Same thing, except you say "computer" instead of "phone", and suddenly people get all confused.


    And therein lies the problem. Take an already understood concept, apply it to computers, and all common sense and prior knowledge goes out the window. It's self imposed, voluntary stupidity.
  • Mitch 2008-08-06 17:36
    Garth:
    Vollhorst:
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    hmm, I doubt your story but funny anyway. Why waste the printout with a ghost scare when you could have embarrassed the daughter by printing out her "cybersex" correspondence?


    How is that story doubtful?

    I remember years ago when cable broadband first came out. You'd be on a local network with everyone else on your street. If someone was running windows 98 w/ shared folders or shared printers, everyone else on the "network" (street) could see it. My provider at that time even sent a notice about this and recommended people not share their folders.

    Not sure if etherreal would work in a situation like that. If it did, you could have a lot of fun.
  • paratus 2008-08-06 17:49
    JimM:
    If you keep trying to plug RJ45s into your CPU I'm amazed your computer has remained operational long enough for you to make a comment on here...
    If YOU keep trying to plug RJ-45's into your NIC, you need to find a field other than IT...

    Desktop NICs most commonly use a 8P8C modular jacks to mate with 8P8C modular connector wired to the TIA/EIA-568-A or TIA/EIA-568-B cable spec used in Ethernet...

    I've never seen a NIC that requires a RJ-45 connector, better yet I'll doubt you have even seen a real RJ-45 and if you've seen one I know you work at an OLD American Telecomm.
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 17:55
    DropDeadThread:
    What I learned in this thread:

    1) Wireless devices do, in fact, have wires.
    2) Pedantic hairsplitting quibblers make me want to kill all living things.
    What you contributed in this thread:

  • Franz Kafka 2008-08-06 18:02
    paratus:
    JimM:
    If you keep trying to plug RJ45s into your CPU I'm amazed your computer has remained operational long enough for you to make a comment on here...
    If YOU keep trying to plug RJ-45's into your NIC, you need to find a field other than IT...

    Desktop NICs most commonly use a 8P8C modular jacks to mate with 8P8C modular connector wired to the TIA/EIA-568-A or TIA/EIA-568-B cable spec used in Ethernet...

    I've never seen a NIC that requires a RJ-45 connector, better yet I'll doubt you have even seen a real RJ-45 and if you've seen one I know you work at an OLD American Telecomm.


    You're a pedantic asshole, which is to be expected in IT. So what if it's actually an RJ49? People call it RJ45 _everywhere_.
  • Franz Kafka 2008-08-06 18:07
    Mitch:
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    That's not an entirely idiot assumption to make. People are told it's wireless, so they assume they don't have to plug in any wires. Maybe a power cable to turn it on, but nothing else.

    Then again, any sympathy I'd have for that erroneous assumption goes out the window when you consider the giant, fold out, big picture, easy to read quick-start guide they get.


    People are stupid because we allow it. If idiocy like expecting your wireless router to work without plugging it into anything or not making an effort to understand the very basic principles of the stuff you use every day were met with mockery instead of sympathy, people would change.
  • Josh 2008-08-06 18:16
    I've got a friend that works tech support at one of the large cable ISPs and this is a call they get extremely frequently. As in, a couple of times a week at least for the whole call center.
  • Maurits 2008-08-06 18:47
    Mike H.:
    someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack.


    !!

    How do you fit a six-pin cable in a four-pin jack?
  • Jake Cohen 2008-08-06 18:48
    TRWTF is that upon discovering that this customer is, shall we say, a novice computer user, the first question he asks is, "can you tell me what router you're connecting to?"

    Hell, if a support tech asked me that, I'd probably say, "uh.. mine?"
  • P 2008-08-06 18:53
    Casey:
    Who the F connects a router to a phone line???


    Erm, well, I do, for starters. To call it just a router is a bit misleading though. It's an ADSL modem, router, 4 port switch and wireless access point all combined in one unit. Netgear DG834G if you're interested.
  • frustrati 2008-08-06 19:15
    David:
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.

    Oh, really?

    Thanks for clearing that up for us, Dave.
  • frustrati 2008-08-06 19:16
    Izzy:
    Me too, but I still have to plug in the charger cord sometimes. The charger plugs into the car. The car doesn't plug into anything.
    I would assume that it occasionally plugs into the gas station.
  • danixdefcon5 2008-08-06 19:22
    ComputerForumUser:
    The problem isn't when they call the routers wireless, it's when the ISPs sell their broadband/ADSL as wireless - usually with the term “Wireless Broadband”, for something that you still get down a wire.
    Oh so very true. When Telmex started giving modems with integrated APs, they started selling the "Infinitum Inalambrico" package (Infinitum is Telmex's ADSL service brand). Thanks to this idiot marketing gimmick, I suddenly got a lot of inquiries about this service not requiring a phone line.

    It even got better because back then, both my landline and broadband were provided by actual wireless solutions!
  • Carnildo 2008-08-06 19:27
    Maurits:
    Mike H.:
    someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack.


    !!

    How do you fit a six-pin cable in a four-pin jack?


    Because the wall panel usually has an eight-pin socket. The modular wiring system was deliberately designed so that a smaller plug works properly with a larger jack, so that a one-line telephone (RJ-11 plug) could connect to a four-line telephone system (RJ-45 socket).

    As a side note, twisted-pair Ethernet uses an eight-pin connector, and telephones usually use a six-pin connector (of which two or four wires are actually connected).
  • v.dog 2008-08-06 19:34
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??
    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.
    I think you missed the point: Matt was pointing out her logic, not his own.
  • BentFranklin 2008-08-06 20:35
    Back to Tesla, I highly recommend the biography Man out of Time, which happens to be the first reference in Tesla's Wikipedia page:

    Cheney, Margaret "Tesla: Man Out of Time". Simon and Schuster, October 2, 2001. ISBN 0-7432-1536-2 (The first edition was 1981.)

    Did you know that Tesla once caused Mark Twain to literally shit his pants in his laboratory?

  • Pingmaster 2008-08-06 20:42
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcasm?
  • lokey 2008-08-06 21:18
    Code Dependent:
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.


    I call bullshit on this - common sense is not required (by law) in the US, or we would not be inundated with "warning labels" like "caution hot beverage" on a cup of coffee. What, you are a moron and can't figure that out? My favorite warning label (if it is possible to have one) says:

    "WARNING - NO WARNING LABEL"

    common sense is not common...
  • Andrew 2008-08-06 21:52
    This must be an Apple thing.

    Some Apple users DO know they are connected to the router next door and don't see anything wrong with that.

    Can it be considered stealing if the access point is left completely insecure?

    A bit like leaving your laptop sitting on the front seat of your car with all your windows wound down...
  • Concerned Citizen 2008-08-06 22:16
    review xtrac do not use:
    When I was a kid, the term "wireless" used to confuse me. My dad would occasionally refer to the radio as the "wireless". I asked him why it was called that and he said it was because it didn't use wires. I knew a little electronics, so this comment seemed odd to me, sine everythin I build needed wires. So, I opened up a radio and, sure enough it was *full* of wires. That really confused me.


    It was called that because the signal itself (ie, the guy talking) arrived without wires, rather than coming over a wire like a telephone.

    Now get off my lawn!
  • Bobby 2008-08-06 22:17
    That's almost as good as the customer I spoke with when I worked at AppleCare that was CONVINCED that her estranged husband was hacking into her computer... through the power cable... and wanted to know how to power her computer without a wire.
  • Dagfari 2008-08-06 22:48
    *facepalm*
  • Robotech_Master 2008-08-06 22:57
    I've worked tech support too long. I guessed what the problem was the moment she said the network ID was the same but it was asking for a password now.

    Some computers really do make it too easy to get on wireless networks.
  • Markku Uttula 2008-08-06 23:04
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?


    You've never worked on a helpdesk, have you?

    Interestingly some clients go as far as thinking the router needs no electricity either; after all, a power cable is a wire too - in their minds.
  • Rob 2008-08-06 23:19
    When I moved into the block of units I live in now, I was told that there was a wireless internet connection set up for the building, and that if I wanted I just needed a wireless whatever and could use it.

    So, I asked him, "What's the password for it?" He just stared at me blankly and said, "No, you just need the wireless modem." I started to say, "There isn't.. like a password or anything?" But after 'password' he just shook his head and interrupted, "Have you ever used a wireless network before? All you need is the modem and you'll be able to use it."
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-06 23:25
    lokey:
    Code Dependent:
    Common sense must be applied.
    I call bullshit on this - common sense is not required (by law) in the US, or we would not be inundated with "warning labels" like "caution hot beverage" on a cup of coffee. What, you are a moron and can't figure that out? My favorite warning label (if it is possible to have one) says:

    "WARNING - NO WARNING LABEL"

    common sense is not common...
    I stand corrected. Very well, then: uncommon sense must be applied. And this post had better have its own warning.

    CAUTION: reading this post may cause actual thought.
  • Markku Uttula 2008-08-06 23:27
    Mark:
    That reminds of when (in the early 90s) I saw a woman at the pharmacy insisting that she had to use Panasonic AA batteries in her Panasonic personal cassette player.


    Interestingly, that sounds like she had actually read the user's manual... in the 90's (at least, don't know these days) the Panasonic manuals used to say something to the effect of "for best performance, you should use Panasonic AA batteries at all times", which - for some people - get's interpreted in their brain as "you should only use Panasonic AA batteries on this device". Go figure :)
  • Markku Uttula 2008-08-06 23:31
    Maurits:
    Mike H.:
    someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack.


    !!

    How do you fit a six-pin cable in a four-pin jack?


    On recent buildings, RJ11 is seldom used anymore. All the connections, computer, telephone, even Audio and Video, are on six-pin outlets (at least that's how it is in Finland - wouldn't know about other parts of the world).
  • Zemm 2008-08-06 23:33
    Real Old Fart:
    David:
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.


    Still a wire/cable there! Could just use bluetooth between your phone and laptop.
  • shepd 2008-08-06 23:39
    paratus:
    I've never seen a NIC that requires a RJ-45 connector, better yet I'll doubt you have even seen a real RJ-45 and if you've seen one I know you work at an OLD American Telecomm.


    Actually, NICs really do take RJ45 connectors. You're just not old enough to know that there actually is no Registered Jack #45. You're thinking of RJ45S.

    Yes, the name RJ45 has been co-opted by NIC and network cable manufacturers. That doesn't mean it isn't valid, since the term never really existed to start with.

    Remember! No matter how pedantic you are, there's always someone just a little bit more pedantic.
  • Zemm 2008-08-06 23:41
    Robotech_Master:
    Some computers really do make it too easy to get on wireless networks.


    When I first moved into my current house I was listening to music on my old Windows XP laptop when I heard the chime noise of a new MSN message. I was about to go WTF (as it was before the ADSL2 was connected) then I saw it had connected to a neighbour's wireless network securely named "default".

    Being the good citizen I only used it sparingly :) until my own connection was setup. (though it did take weeks due to a Telstra WTF, but that's another story)

    It's still there and I haven't been able to track down the owner.
  • -- 2008-08-06 23:44
    Why do everyone assume that an unsecured wireless network must have an idiot behind?

    I always assume that someone leaving his wireless network open is doing me a favour so I can use it if I am in urgent need, or just bored away from home and want to check my email. I leave my own network open as a common courtesy.

    Of course, I pay a flat rate, no matter how much data I transfer during the month, so I'm not incuring in any extra costs.
  • Brunkeberg 2008-08-07 00:10
    Code Dependent:
    Saaid:
    Code Dependent:
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".
    You are joking about this, right?
    If you have to plug it in (for power or communications) it's not really wireless is it? Any lawyers want to start a class action suit?
    My access is over DSL, which comes via a phone line. I bought a wireless router so that I could connect all throughout the house instead of just where the phone line is. There is a phone wire from the router to the DSL; otherwise the router would be of no use. There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless".

    Common sense must be applied.


    Common sense of humour should be applied.
  • Joe 2008-08-07 01:18
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    fwoosh
  • nex 2008-08-07 01:22
    Maybe you, Jamie, need to be connected to a clue: it was a joke.
  • donniel 2008-08-07 01:24
    Vollhorst:

    (snipped)
    ... I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos... fat daughter (real ugly monster)... diary... I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!"...


    It's interesting to me that some people think it's ok to victimize people who don't know better. Expecting everybody who's bought a wireless router to configure it to be secure is illogical.

    Please don't start with the house/open-doors analogy. It doesn't apply because the victim doesn't even realize that they have an unsecured network, because they are not technologically competent enough - which, you may not realize, is not a crime.

    Besides, are you the kind of person who would walk into a house and vandalize their property, eavesdrop on private communication, just because their front door happened to be open?

    </rant>
  • donniel 2008-08-07 01:35
    Andrew:
    This must be an Apple thing.

    Can it be considered stealing if the access point is left completely insecure?

    A bit like leaving your laptop sitting on the front seat of your car with all your windows wound down...


    No it's not.

    In the second case, you're aware of the risk of having the bike stolen, and the steps to prevent it.
  • Phil! 2008-08-07 01:56
    Or just some energy? ... Na... that's not important :)
  • Marco 2008-08-07 02:06

    o <- Joke

    O
    /--\ <-You
    |
    / \

  • Vollhorst 2008-08-07 02:12
    donniel:
    Vollhorst:

    (snipped)
    ... I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos... fat daughter (real ugly monster)... diary... I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!"...


    It's interesting to me that some people think it's ok to victimize people who don't know better. Expecting everybody who's bought a wireless router to configure it to be secure is illogical.
    Morally it may be wrong but at least it is legal as long as you don't change anything (and the computers aren't protected). ;)

    @a little bit above, forgot the name, shame on me:
    I was tempted to print her sex-mails but it is one thing to read their stuff and piss them of by using their printer and a whole another thing to shame the daughter in front of her parents.

    I wouldn't have done the whole thing if they were neightbours I knew. They were just some random people living there which I never met personally.
  • 40k3T 2008-08-07 02:15
    Hey, I got a wireless watch! Kewl.

  • Krane 2008-08-07 02:30
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.
    Maybe, just maybe, the router isn't battery/solar operated and would need a power cable too.....
  • eliza 2008-08-07 02:44
    a local college put wifi in one of their classroom blocks, about 4 stories, posibly several hundred computers... it was rather slow

    then they found they were connecting through some unsuspecting homeowners network nearby

    i think his connection must have been rather slow as well
  • vt_mruhlin 2008-08-07 03:05
    My first assumption about the "it used to not ask for a password" problem is that one of her neighbors decided to teach her a lesson about not securing her router.

    I used to do that all the time, until I moved here and had to wait 3 weeks for the cable guy to come, and realized that some kind person provides just enough wifi for my iphone at the workout room. Someday I may open up my own router to the public.
  • Thomas 2008-08-07 03:16
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??

    Because it is called wireLESS not wireNONE.

  • synp 2008-08-07 03:18
    Code Dependent:
    Common sense must be applied.


    What? Where does it say that?
  • RiptoR 2008-08-07 03:24
    Oh sweet irony :)
  • Phr34ker 2008-08-07 03:40
    First of all, cudos to the support-guy that managed to find out this quite complex problem dispite the customer beeing less tech-savvy than a bowl of gravy.


    Worked in ADSL-support for a couple of years while studying, and got quite a few weird calls.

    There was the guy that somehow had managed to drop his ADSL-modem in the bath tub while it was filled with water. I suggested a rubber duck might be a better bathing toy :)

    There was the slightly mentally handicapped guy who called about 7 times a day to report that he had seen a red house with white corners (since one of the other techs couldn't help but tell him that the fiber-layers used such a house on their coffie breaks), and to hear if this meant that he'd get a faster connection (but mostly, it was because he wanted someone to talk to).

    There was the incredibly patient guys from the northern parts of Sweden, that simply responded "Jo, men då vet ja" ("Ok, now I know") when we told them that it would take at least 6-12 months until their extreme ADSL-problems was going to be fixed (simply because Telia (the company I worked for) didn't want too). In contrast, the people from our capital city got extremely pissed off when they called in 03:00 a sunday night, and heard that the technicians wouldn't handle the problem until the next morning... Several hours of not beeing able to play WoW... What a catastrophy...

    There was the woman, that after having helped her with some registry-hacking, started sending me flowers and loveletters...

    And so on...
  • BloodyLivid 2008-08-07 03:52
    Or the power supply...?
  • Dude 2008-08-07 04:02
    Jamie:

    Matt S:

    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??

    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    -> Joke ->
    o
    -|- <- you
    / \

  • Me 2008-08-07 04:03
    Had an almost identical experience myself. I was working for a major ISP, and this lady called our support centre and claimed her Internet connection didn't work anymore.
    After some troubleshooting, it turned out that she never picked up the Wireless ADSL router we had shipped her from the post office, and the postal service had returned it to us.
    Apparently, she had just leeched on a neighbor all the time, believing it was supposed to be this way, because she had ordered the "wireless package".
  • Browsem 2008-08-07 04:10
    Ill take polite & consfused over angry and "think i know better" any day.
    Actually i think my mother or my girlfriend could have done just the same
  • me 2008-08-07 04:13
    me:
    It's not wireless if you attach a "LINE" which if you were any sort of IT professional you would know is another word for "WIRE".


    //Sarcasm!

    I can't believe how many people thought I was serious?!
  • SteveB 2008-08-07 04:18
    My uncle called me because he was having problems sending emails, and his ISP's tech support had drawn a blank.

    Having gone through the usual troubleshooting, I got him to do a tracert to the SMTP server and found it was getting stuck at a box belonging to another ISP.

    Turned out that he was connecting to his neighbour's router and his own ISP's SMTP server would only accept mail from their own subnets.
  • gr 2008-08-07 05:16
    I also did Applecare a few years ago and that makes complete sense to me for someone to say on a phone call.
  • V 2008-08-07 05:39
    Code Dependent:
    DropDeadThread:
    What I learned in this thread:

    1) Wireless devices do, in fact, have wires.
    2) Pedantic hairsplitting quibblers make me want to kill all living things.
    What you contributed in this thread:
    <snip>lame attempt at being funny</snip>

    No, his contribution was proving that there are some sane people left here. Thanks for the info though, Sherlock.

    Code Dependent:

    "There is no wire between the computers and the router, which is why they call it "wireless". "
  • Real Old Fart 2008-08-07 05:48
    Anon:
    Real Old Fart:
    David:
    Um, a wireless router needs a minimum of two things plugged in to ensure proper function.

    1. Power. This should be a BIG clue.
    2. Cable/DSL Line.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.


    lolwut

    OK, if you want to split hairs (or hares), then use a miniUSB (phone) to regular USB adapter (router) and forgo the wire.

    CAPTCHA illum - something needed here
  • ? 2008-08-07 06:05
    I sometimes deal with people like that.

    And people wonder why IT guys are the ones most likely to go on a rampage in the workplace...
  • Rhialto 2008-08-07 06:13
    shepd:
    (Caller ID displays Clearwater, FL.)

    Clearwater? Must have been a high-ranking $cientologist. They have issues, yes.
  • RF 2008-08-07 06:21
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    Someone needs to remove Matt S from his shrink wrap too.
  • RF 2008-08-07 06:22
    Dude:
    Jamie:

    Matt S:

    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??

    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    -> Joke ->
    o
    -|- <- you
    / \



    AND Jamie. H'e also within the shrink wrap. *phew, dodged.*
  • Monzo 2008-08-07 06:49
    Hello, good story.

    First you mention 2 months and later on 2 years. Which one is it?
  • whoa 2008-08-07 06:52
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    yeah, I heard that some extra electrons, also called "power" are nice to have as well
  • 4VAlien 2008-08-07 07:06
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    No dummy, its a wireless router so of course you dont need cables!
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-07 07:19
    Vollhorst:
    I wouldn't have done the whole thing if they were neightbours I knew. They were just some random people living there which I never met personally.
    Yeah, depersonalizing them is important in dulling the conscience. I believe the same logic was used by German citizens during WWII to explain their tolerance of genocide.
  • Code Dependent 2008-08-07 07:24
    V:
    DropDeadThread:
    ...make me want to kill all living things.
    ...proving that there are some sane people left here.
    We're probably using different definitions of "sane".
  • deralaand 2008-08-07 07:24
    Unfortunately (or maybe not) 9 out of 10 people have this level of tech skill.

    My aunt lives in a 4-plex where they have purposely shared a wireless connection to save money. The guy that has set this all up also put the free Norton virus scanner (found in Google Pack) on my aunts computer. He, of course never bothered to see if she was currently using any type of other virus scanner. (dumbass!)

    Norton and AVG conflict in a bad way and she would call on me to fix her computer issues. I told her to tell the guy that she allready has an anti-virus program and that when he installs the Norton it screws things up.

    ...and yes, I have gone through her computer to see if he has happened to accidentally installed any type of secret key logger or drive access programs. Not that it would matter though. The only thing she uses the computer for is playing on Pogo...
  • ? 2008-08-07 07:35
    lol.

    Scientologists suxx0rz
  • piptheGeek 2008-08-07 07:54
    We had (still have i think) an unsecured wireless network near us, it was on a channel that overlapped with mine, so i connected to it and moved it. I had a few months where all the networks in the area were down one end of the channel range, and I was all alone at the other end. :)
    Things have evened out again now as new default settings have turned up but I have moved the router nearer the PC so it doesn't matter.
  • Jiom McDosh 2008-08-07 07:58
    LOL, who cares what them Chinese people think.

    JT
    www.FireMe.To/udi
  • snoofle 2008-08-07 08:05
    Maurits:
    Mike H.:
    someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack.


    !!

    How do you fit a six-pin cable in a four-pin jack?
    Sheer determination and persistence, coupled with brute force.

    And you'd be surprised how often you see it.
  • Mr 2008-08-07 08:27
    DeLos:
    I personally cant wait until they bring out wireless power - then all I will need is wireless gas and I will be set.

    You don't need gas when you have electicity. Both heating and cooking can be done with electricity you know...
  • Vollhorst 2008-08-07 08:33
    Code Dependent:
    Vollhorst:
    I wouldn't have done the whole thing if they were neightbours I knew. They were just some random people living there which I never met personally.
    Yeah, depersonalizing them is important in dulling the conscience. I believe the same logic was used by German citizens during WWII to explain their tolerance of genocide.
    I hope for your sanity that that was meant as a bad joke.
  • KenW 2008-08-07 08:35
    jtl:
    There is no line between the router and the CPU. This is different from regular routers. This is why it's called wireless.


    There never is a line "between the router and the CPU" unless you've managed to connect your router to your Core 2 Duo or Pentium D processor. You might, however, have a line between the router and the network connection on your motherboard.

    Do us all a favor and stay away from computers, please, until you learn the difference between a network card and a CPU.
  • KenW 2008-08-07 08:50
    Real Old Fart:
    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.

    The minute you "Add a USB cable to connect the two" you've added a wired connection, idiot, and therefore it still isn't a real wireless network.

    Work on your language comprehension skills. A child could read what you wrote and see the flaw in logic.
  • pglewis 2008-08-07 08:59
    Vollhorst:
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    Congrats, you are TRWTF.
  • Crabs 2008-08-07 09:02
    snoofle:
    Maurits:
    Mike H.:
    someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack.


    !!

    How do you fit a six-pin cable in a four-pin jack?
    Sheer determination and persistence, coupled with brute force.

    And you'd be surprised how often you see it.


    Where do you find a 6 pin ethernet jack!?!?
  • Real Old Fart 2008-08-07 09:24
    KenW:
    Real Old Fart:
    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.
    My cell phone functions as an aircard (AT&T 8525). Cradlepoint manufacturers battery powered WiFi routers. Add a USB cable to connect the two and 'Presto - a real wireless network'.


    Um, no it doesn't. You need a technology refresher.

    The minute you "Add a USB cable to connect the two" you've added a wired connection, idiot, and therefore it still isn't a real wireless network.

    Work on your language comprehension skills. A child could read what you wrote and see the flaw in logic.


    Not only are you dense, you're also a slow reader with questionable language skills. Someone else already pointed that issue out (above) and I noted that you could replace the USB cable with a USB conversion connector between the two components.

    And no, there's no wires in the phone or the router - they're called leads or traces.
  • alex 2008-08-07 09:51
    umm its a ROUTER not a modem, its not magic.
  • bmez 2008-08-07 09:55
    or even better... how about some power?
  • Nate 2008-08-07 11:11
    I'm pretty sure that was a joke, genius.
  • dudeman 2008-08-07 11:24
    Is the article its self. The guy identifies she is obviously not a power user and then assumes she knows what a router is? I only see one idiot here.
  • DWalker59 2008-08-07 12:02
    Apparently only two of us readers were confused by the two months/two years difference. She changed ISPs two months ago, yet she had been leeching off a neighbor for two years? Slightly confusing.
  • Chris V 2008-08-07 12:12
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    Not exactly a "power user" are you? ;-)
  • Chris V 2008-08-07 12:14
    DWalker59:
    Apparently only two of us readers were confused by the two months/two years difference. She changed ISPs two months ago, yet she had been leeching off a neighbor for two years? Slightly confusing.


    She changed ISPs maybe to get a lower price? The assumed that her setup had remained the same and continued using her neighbors wifi. The neighbor probably suddenly decided to put a password on their connection. Hence her call in to tech support.
  • Kuba 2008-08-07 12:17
    Phr34ker:
    First of all, cudos to the support-guy that managed to find out this quite complex problem dispite the customer beeing less tech-savvy than a bowl of gravy.

    Worked in ADSL-support for a couple of years while studying, and got quite a few weird calls.

    [...]
    There was the woman, that after having helped her with some registry-hacking, started sending me flowers and loveletters...
    Wow. You're lucky. That's like winning a $100M jackpot twice in a week. Kudos on being good to the customers!
  • Rich 2008-08-07 12:31
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??
    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.
    Whoosh!
  • anotherITguy 2008-08-07 12:32
    webrunner:
    WhiskeyJack:
    Mitch:
    That's not an entirely idiot assumption to make. People are told it's wireless, so they assume they don't have to plug in any wires. Maybe a power cable to turn it on, but nothing else.


    But you'd think some common sense might apply. For example, I don't think most people would have a problem with the concept of a cordless phone having to be plugged into the phone line. Yeah, the handset is cordless to the base station, but the base station still has to be connected to the phone line somehow.

    Same thing, except you say "computer" instead of "phone", and suddenly people get all confused.


    I've noticed this a lot: If you take something everyone's familiar with, then put it on a computer using exactly the same method they'd use outside of the computer, they suddenly get confused. The same person who knows how to turn on his TV will suddenly be confused when he sees a power button on his laptop, for instance.


    This happened to my wife (who is an above average user). First time watching a DVD on our HTPC and I hand her the media center remote. She couldn't figure out how to pause it, handed it to our 3-year old to give to me and he paused it for her. Pretty much a standard remote, but it's "on the computer"
  • LightStyx 2008-08-07 15:03
    Maurits:
    Mike H.:
    someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack.


    !!

    How do you fit a six-pin cable in a four-pin jack?


    <-- Mike H. ---- They were CAT5 and CAT5E jacks
  • notJoeKing 2008-08-07 15:09
    Dude:
    Ahhhh. So merimeds me simular storry.

    A Customer called Tech Support. He said that his comp doesnt turn on. Supporter ask if all wires connected properly.

    He said: "Wait, till i get FlashLight"
    Supporter: "Huh, why FlashLight?"
    He: "Electricty is out"
    Supporter: "Pack Your computer and return to the shop, you are too stupid to use it"

    Costumer did that, but also he complaind to supporter boss. Next day Supporter lost his job


    Meri-meds? Is that what you took before posting this?
  • AccessGuru 2008-08-07 16:34
    Well, then it's not really wireless, is it?
  • Edc 2008-08-07 16:37
    As a former ISP tech support rep, I can tell you this is common enough that I have spoken with several customers doing the exact same thing. It is so common I wouldn't even consider it noteworthy.
  • coolio 2008-08-07 16:40
    hahaha what an idiot!#!@# I bet she voted for Bush!!! I always wondered who those people were...
  • Maimon Mons 2008-08-07 17:30
    I was troubleshooting my brother's home network the other day. I could connect to the wireless router but not getting anything off the internet.

    So I powered down (via the power strip that everything was connected to) and power up again.

    No dice.

    Then I decided to disconnect the router and reset it.

    It was then I noticed the router was still working after I removed the power cord. The freakin' thing had some sort of battery backup.

    A quick hard reset and everything worked fine.
  • Mike 2008-08-07 17:37
    Because routers don't just pluck internet from the air....

    I think this is a failure on the side of the ISP to ensure their customer had correctly installed the equipment and they should be fined for the 2 years of service that she had paid for and hadn't used. Just because a customer is a Ludite doesn't give anyone the right to take advantage of them.
  • crazyfinx 2008-08-07 19:31
    but its wireLESS?!
  • Tourist 2008-08-08 01:54
    Saaid:
    Ivan Milosavljevic:
    SSID was Norris? OMG, her neighbour must have been Chuck Norris!
    I pity the fool that would leach off Chuck's FEWER wires DSL connection


    leach? geez get a dictionary dude!
  • Tourist 2008-08-08 01:57
    Mike H.:
    Uneducated people and stupid contractors that's who...

    I served as a resident IT technician for an apartment complex I was living in during my college days. When the complex was built they forgot to put in wiring for ethernet connections. So all we had were 2-3 closets per building with one huge switch for 30+ residents. In each of the resident's rooms there was one panel with 2 jacks (Ethernet CAT5 jack and a phone jack) and in the main room there was only a jack for a phone line.

    At least 90% of the time when someone called saying "My Internet doesn't work" was because someone put the ethernet cable in the phone jack. I'd ask them if they had tried the other jack and they usually said they did and it didn't work. When I actually had to go up to their room, I saw that the cable was still in the phone jack. Low and behold... when I plugged the ethernet cable in the right jack their connection magically worked.

    WHODATHUNK!


    I always wondered why did have the same connection type for phones and for ethernet. Wouldn't it have been smarter to design one of them differently? A WTF for sure.
  • Just Another Bloke 2008-08-08 03:25
    And then there's this thing about a power cord....
  • Simon 2008-08-08 06:43

    Friend of mine worked for a local ISP and had a similar issue. Customer had a dodgy network card (phone support). She went through all the steps to diagnose the issue. tried plugging in different cables as well to get it working. But the lights were not coming on. Looked like a busted or wrong seated card.

    She asked the guy to remove the card from the machine to send back, at which point the guy explained that it was ok as the card was already sitting on his desk. It was never in the machine to begin with.
  • Smash King 2008-08-08 08:24
    KenW:
    jtl:
    There is no line between the router and the CPU. This is different from regular routers. This is why it's called wireless.


    There never is a line "between the router and the CPU" unless you've managed to connect your router to your Core 2 Duo or Pentium D processor. You might, however, have a line between the router and the network connection on your motherboard.

    Do us all a favor and stay away from computers, please, until you learn the difference between a network card and a CPU.
    Do us all a favor and stop jumping to conclusions about people you know nothing about. There are places where it is common habit to call the whole tower a CPU. And in fact it is not wrong in the literal meaning; after all IT IS the Central Processing Unit - ya know, the "big part of the computer that is not a monitor, it is where all the processing is made".
  • Greg, the tech-support guy 2008-08-08 09:01
    I've worked at an ISPs call center for quite some time, and stories like this are common. I once was yelled at for quite some time by a man who had lost his internet connection. (He never had one, and was not a customer of ours). He had bought a "wireless" computer, and leeched his neighbours network (who was a customer of ours) until the neighbour contacted us because of a slow connection, and was helped through securing the network. It was our fault, because we had broken his computer, and he needed a new one.
  • StMarc 2008-08-08 11:02
    Or, y'know, a power cord.

    M
  • StMarc 2008-08-08 11:09
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    Darn it, I blipped the quote. Sorry.

    This was what the "Or, y'know, a power cord" was meant to reply to.

    M
  • curtmack 2008-08-08 15:20
    Jamie:
    Matt S:
    Wait, why would she need to connect any wires to the wireLESS router??


    The wireless router needs to be connected to a phone/cable line maybe.


    No, haven't you heard? There are new wireless routers which get Internet through the power of dreams. They use unicorn horns as antennae.
  • Jim McDuff 2008-08-08 23:25
    LOL, typical NOOB if I ever saw one.

    JT
    http://www.FireMe.To/udi
  • Timothy 2008-08-09 21:24
    The wireless router still needs to be connected to the modem, not to mention you can still wire things to a wireless router if it's more convenient, the wireless is just an option.
  • Peter Munges 2008-08-10 07:29
    *wooooosh*
  • KenW 2008-08-11 08:51
    Smash King:
    Do us all a favor and stop jumping to conclusions about people you know nothing about. There are places where it is common habit to call the whole tower a CPU. And in fact it is not wrong in the literal meaning; after all IT IS the Central Processing Unit - ya know, the "big part of the computer that is not a monitor, it is where all the processing is made".


    Because "there are places where it is common habit" doesn't make it any less wrong (or stupid), just like saying "I'm Smash King and I'm intelligent" doesn't make it so. If you're a big enough idiot to try and defend calling a computer case a "CPU", stay away from computers. You're the kind of dolt that makes so much more work for those of us who know what we're doing.
  • anotherITguy 2008-08-11 10:09
    KenW:
    Smash King:
    Do us all a favor and stop jumping to conclusions about people you know nothing about. There are places where it is common habit to call the whole tower a CPU. And in fact it is not wrong in the literal meaning; after all IT IS the Central Processing Unit - ya know, the "big part of the computer that is not a monitor, it is where all the processing is made".


    Because "there are places where it is common habit" doesn't make it any less wrong (or stupid), just like saying "I'm Smash King and I'm intelligent" doesn't make it so. If you're a big enough idiot to try and defend calling a computer case a "CPU", stay away from computers. You're the kind of dolt that makes so much more work for those of us who know what we're doing.


    It isn't wrong to use a term for what it is. The entire case can be called a CPU. You need to learn that words can have multiple meanings.
  • Aran 2008-08-12 08:35
    The real WTF is that it took the neighbor two years to get fed up with her leeching off the wireless and securing it. :P
  • gno 2008-08-13 05:40
    anotherITguy:
    KenW:
    Smash King:
    Do us all a favor and stop jumping to conclusions about people you know nothing about. There are places where it is common habit to call the whole tower a CPU. And in fact it is not wrong in the literal meaning; after all IT IS the Central Processing Unit - ya know, the "big part of the computer that is not a monitor, it is where all the processing is made".


    Because "there are places where it is common habit" doesn't make it any less wrong (or stupid), just like saying "I'm Smash King and I'm intelligent" doesn't make it so. If you're a big enough idiot to try and defend calling a computer case a "CPU", stay away from computers. You're the kind of dolt that makes so much more work for those of us who know what we're doing.


    It isn't wrong to use a term for what it is. The entire case can be called a CPU. You need to learn that words can have multiple meanings.


    Except that CPU isn't a word, and it has a very specific meaning that Merriam-Webster and every reasonable reference you'll find can point out to you. Even Wikipedia doesn't stoop to the level of mentioning the usage of "CPU" to refer to the entire computer.
  • blunder 2008-08-13 18:04
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  • Amedee 2008-08-14 18:06
    I challenge your battery powered wireless router and raise with a solar powered wireless router.
    Google it, those already exist!

    Captcha: luptatum
    Sounds like something from Harry Potter.
  • Amedee 2008-08-14 18:23
    Garth:
    Vollhorst:
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    hmm, I doubt your story but funny anyway. Why waste the printout with a ghost scare when you could have embarrassed the daughter by printing out her "cybersex" correspondence?


    I do *not* doubt it.
    In my case it wasn't wireless but nmapping the /24 subnet. It's surprising how many windows boxen I found with shared drives as read/write, and no password. most of them were residential users, but also two local computer shops. In one shop I leeched the MP3 collection off their demo pc, and snooped around in their administration. The next day, I stopped by the shop and told them that their local network wasn't secure. They didn't believe me until I gave them a directory listing of their demo pc. They immediatly offered me a job, but I declined.

    captcha: plaga
  • Amedee 2008-08-14 18:37
    Code Dependent:
    lokey:
    Code Dependent:
    Common sense must be applied.
    I call bullshit on this - common sense is not required (by law) in the US, or we would not be inundated with "warning labels" like "caution hot beverage" on a cup of coffee. What, you are a moron and can't figure that out? My favorite warning label (if it is possible to have one) says:

    "WARNING - NO WARNING LABEL"

    common sense is not common...
    I stand corrected. Very well, then: uncommon sense must be applied. And this post had better have its own warning.

    CAUTION: reading this post may cause actual thought.


    Actually most IT people and most legal people have similar mindsets but applied in opposite directions. Both classes of people are usually experts in dissecting a problem and describing it in great detail.

    The biggest difference between IT people and legal people is when dealing with variables that aren't explicitly set.
    IT people: assume defaults, apply principle of least surprise
    legal people: ERROR - no precedent found. Make new case to be used as precedent for future occurences of same variable


    catcha: caecus
  • Amedee 2008-08-14 18:41
    donniel:
    Please don't start with the house/open-doors analogy. It doesn't apply because the victim doesn't even realize that they have an unsecured network, because they are not technologically competent enough - which, you may not realize, is not a crime.

    It should be a crime!
    </rant>
  • Amedee 2008-08-14 18:46
    Code Dependent:
    Vollhorst:
    I wouldn't have done the whole thing if they were neightbours I knew. They were just some random people living there which I never met personally.
    Yeah, depersonalizing them is important in dulling the conscience. I believe the same logic was used by German citizens during WWII to explain their tolerance of genocide.


    Godwin!
  • Amedee 2008-08-14 18:55
    Tourist:
    Saaid:
    Ivan Milosavljevic:
    SSID was Norris? OMG, her neighbour must have been Chuck Norris!
    I pity the fool that would leach off Chuck's FEWER wires DSL connection


    leach? geez get a dictionary dude!

    It is a common misspelling for someone who is not a native English speeker (sic). When spoken, /ee/ and /ea/ can sound very similar , and a lot of people learn English from subtitled Hollywood flicks.
  • tinman 2008-08-18 08:04
    I consider myself fairly tech savvy and I used a router without a connection password for several weeks as I had set the admin password and didn't realise there were two separate passwords

    sometimes it pays to RTFM
  • tinman 2008-08-18 08:13
    Amedee:
    Garth:
    Vollhorst:
    I was able to connect to a neighbour's network and none of his computers was protected. So I leached some new movies from him and looked at his family photos. Oh, his fat daughter (real ugly monster) had quite a diary. And the mails she had send (and received from) to a strange guy in Switzerland was quite disturbing. But quite funny when you compared her photos with her description of herself she has sent to him. And all the cybersex... via mail?! Strange folk.

    But they protected their wireless some hours after I used their printer to print some nice pages like "Woooohoooo, I am the ghost in the machine! You will die today!". The usual stuff. ;)


    hmm, I doubt your story but funny anyway. Why waste the printout with a ghost scare when you could have embarrassed the daughter by printing out her "cybersex" correspondence?


    I do *not* doubt it.
    In my case it wasn't wireless but nmapping the /24 subnet. It's surprising how many windows boxen I found with shared drives as read/write, and no password. most of them were residential users, but also two local computer shops. In one shop I leeched the MP3 collection off their demo pc, and snooped around in their administration. The next day, I stopped by the shop and told them that their local network wasn't secure. They didn't believe me until I gave them a directory listing of their demo pc. They immediatly offered me a job, but I declined.

    captcha: plaga


    an in-law told me about an incident they had with a video sender several years back. They used it to rebroadcast from their downstairs vcr to the TV upstairs so they could watch videos in bed. One evening tuning about they found that they were watching a view of a living room similar to but not identical to their own. After watching it for a while they realised that it was that of their reclusive neighbours next door who normally kept the curtains shut. From the height and angle it seemed to be from a home video camera rather than a security camera. Disappointingly they didn't see any hot action but they did wonder just what the neighbours were taping and why they were broadcasting it?
  • This thread is funny 2008-08-29 05:33
    Because routers don't just pluck internet from the air...


    They dont? - Odd, I had a ISP account with a company called iBurst, you get a "wireless" router which connects to your computer via USB, and you get a power cable. The router has an antennae on it which receives an internet connection through the air (wireless) from a base station several kilometers away.

    It is considered true Wireless Broadband because the actual internet connection is streamed via Wireless from the base station (of course the Base Station most likely has a hardline for the internet but the actual connection from the base station to my home is wireless).

    So yes, this particular router did "pluck" the internet out of the air :P

    But it didn't magically create an internet connection out of nothing (thin air). If that is what u meant then ignore this post :P

    Ahh I laughed at some of these comments lol

  • This thread is funny 2008-08-29 05:36
    Oh, and yes it was Broadband - for what passes as Broadband in this country anyway :/
  • NotVeryImportant 2008-08-30 16:40
    We get that kind of thing all the time here, 'here' being a place where the public comes in to use our computers. Some folks think WE run the Internet, or WE store their Yahoo, etc emails, or WE are somehow responsible for X, Y, and/or Z. Amazing. They get the basic idea of how to use the computer, but it's still all magic to them. Makes me feel like I should be wearing robes and speaking in tongues. Oh, wait, I speak Geek, so I do speak in tongues to them, the unwashed.
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  • Izzy 2011-03-16 14:27
    gno:
    anotherITguy:
    KenW:
    Smash King:
    Do us all a favor and stop jumping to conclusions about people you know nothing about. There are places where it is common habit to call the whole tower a CPU. And in fact it is not wrong in the literal meaning; after all IT IS the Central Processing Unit - ya know, the "big part of the computer that is not a monitor, it is where all the processing is made".


    Because "there are places where it is common habit" doesn't make it any less wrong (or stupid), just like saying "I'm Smash King and I'm intelligent" doesn't make it so. If you're a big enough idiot to try and defend calling a computer case a "CPU", stay away from computers. You're the kind of dolt that makes so much more work for those of us who know what we're doing.


    It isn't wrong to use a term for what it is. The entire case can be called a CPU. You need to learn that words can have multiple meanings.


    Except that CPU isn't a word, and it has a very specific meaning that Merriam-Webster and every reasonable reference you'll find can point out to you. Even Wikipedia doesn't stoop to the level of mentioning the usage of "CPU" to refer to the entire computer.


    Okay, so I know it's been over 2 years, but this I have to respond to: gno and KenW, you are wrong. "Tower" is a recent term for that part of a computer - before, when they were laid horizontal, that box was commonly referred to as the CPU.