The Sixth Guy, The Company Pond, and More

« Return to Article
  • louis 2011-04-19 12:42
    first to comment!
  • Wazzat 2011-04-19 12:42
    Oh no. Must resist.
  • Bit Head 2011-04-19 12:49
    I wasn't going to comment, but then I decided to go ahead and just do it.
  • snoofle 2011-04-19 12:49
    Re: sixth guy - I've had a few like that - I indulge up to three questions, then respond: you've wasted enough of my time, thank you for yours
  • Jeff 2011-04-19 12:49
    He's right, to compile a COBOL program you "just do it". And if you get a compiler error, you call tech support and say "it won't let me."
  • Larry 2011-04-19 12:54
    can you at least tell me how DRAM memory cell works?
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.

    "Will I need to know that for this job?"

    No: "Then why are you asking this type of question?"

    Yes: "Why wasn't this mentioned in the job description?"
  • Interviewer 2011-04-19 13:00
    Larry:
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.
    It sounds like a Stress Interview. The sixth guy's entire purpose may have been a psychological test of the applicant.
  • @Deprecated 2011-04-19 13:01
    So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?


    Did you actually read the job posting before interviewing me, or did you think you can just wing it?
  • gazza 2011-04-19 13:08
    The Sixth Guy

    An hour of being asked off-topic questions? I wouldn't hire you either.
  • Charles 2011-04-19 13:09
    Never in my life, before or since, have I received such a tirade of abuse at the declination of the position. Apparently, I was throwing away my career and giving up the opportunity of a lifetime.
    I can top that. My first ever job was as a dishwasher in a small cafe, owned by a fat slob whose business skills topped out at paying the vendors from the cash register and calculating his success by peering in the drawer at the end of each day. As it turned out, he paid employees only when there was "enough" left over, and there was a pecking order: cook first, waitresses second, dishwasher last.

    Oddly there never seemed to be "enough" for the dishwasher. But -- "tomorrow will be better".

    Naive as I was, I took it for a little while. But on the morning of the last day of my fourth week, I decided that was enough. "Pay me now -- right NOW -- or I quit."

    "Quit! You little *******! After all I've done for you! I took a chance and gave you a job when you had no experience and all you want to do is f*** me in the a** and kick me in the b****!"

    Yeah. So I quit, went back to school, and now I make enough that if I ever find the guy I'm thinking of hiring him to wash my dishes.
  • Zaratustra 2011-04-19 13:09
    That might just lead to a tirade on how the fundamentals of electronics are basic knowledge for any programmer and how you'd be a fool to think differently.
  • pnieuwkamp 2011-04-19 13:11
    snoofle:
    Re: sixth guy - I've had a few like that - I indulge up to three questions, then respond: you've wasted enough of my time, thank you for yours
    Well, if the rest went ok, explain to him he must've mistaken the room number, as you're there for a programming job, not for low level hardware design.

    The way the interview is going he isn't going to recommend you anyway, and that way you can at least try and salvage the situation if there really is a miscommunication at play. Unless it's going to be your boss, letting one interviewer out of a whole procedure get to you isn't worth it.
  • McFly 2011-04-19 13:19
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!
  • Dave 2011-04-19 13:20
    @Deprecated:
    So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?


    Did you actually read the job posting before interviewing me, or did you think you can just wing it?


    That's how I read it, too...sounds like the guy just got called back from his day off, and didn't give a damn.
  • eric 2011-04-19 13:23
    I once turned down a frankly middling job offer and received a similar tirade. They'd put me through a wringer of an interview - not difficult, but loooong, including one phase where the CEO took me into his office and spent about 25 minutes berating my resume ("C++? Pft. Who DOESN'T know that?") and telling me what an awesome programmer he was (which was, actually, true, he was sort of locally legendary). I found all this odd, but let it slide.

    They did apparently decide I was the best candidate for the job...and then promptly offered me about 10% less than the salary I had at the time, with fewer benefits.

    I called them back, and very politely said I appreciated their offer but would not be accepting it. If they were willing to negotiate I would consider it, etc etc. All the kind of diplomatic niceties you go through when you get an offer you can't take.

    I was not expecting the head of the department to then start calling me names, accusing me of "wasting their valuable time and costing them money" and the litany of things about how my career was now over, I'd made a horrible mistake, I'd regret this for life, etc. I was sort of stunned. In fact I was so stunned that I just sat there listening to this ongoing rant instead of at least attempting to cut them off. Eventually she just hung up on me.

    A few months later I met the guy who eventually did get the job, and apparently he had lasted all of six weeks in the position. He didn't have to quit, although he considered it, because the company hit some financial bumps and laid off the entire IT department. Last I heard that department manager was selling hats. The CEO runs a startup somewhere, and the rest of the company got chopped up and sold off to a few different organizations.

    I've not really had much in the way of regret.
  • Steve H. 2011-04-19 13:27
    Those hardware questions are rough, even for the average hardware guy. Well, maybe not the first question, depending on how in-depth physics you want to get (i.e. what it does is easy, how and why it does it is much harder).

    The question about duractance made me look up the word only to find the joke. Well played.
  • akatherder 2011-04-19 13:27
    snoofle:
    Re: sixth guy - I've had a few like that - I indulge up to three questions, then respond: you've wasted enough of my time, thank you for yours


    It's a game more than anything. They're trying to see how long he can ask questions before you give up. Nobody knows everything so they want to know how you react when presented with something you don't understand.

    Will you waste everyone's time by declining each question individually, hoping to stumble on an easy enough question that you can formulate an answer and earn the interviewer's approval?

    Will you throw a hissyfit and whine about him wasting your time?

    Or will you explain that there must be some misunderstanding? This wasn't part of the job description and given the line of questioning, he might as well be speaking Greek. You're willing to hear him out, but you have zero knowledge/experience with the subject matter.
  • Where's the Wtf? 2011-04-19 13:33
    New rule: when reporting on weird-as-hell interviews, you must report the year the interview took place, and more importantly, the name of the company. Otherwise, nobody will take your report seriously and assume you are just winging it.
  • boog 2011-04-19 13:34
    The sixth guy sounds like he had somebody else in mind for the job and was trying to sabotage John's chances of getting it. I know that's pretty cynical, but I can't imagine why else he'd ask such useless questions.

    I'd like to think I'd have asked him to please just stick to questions relating to the job's ultimate responsibilities, but I know I really would have just declined the position halfway through the interview.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 13:42
    You Just Do It:
    Reminds me of a guy I worked with many a year ago at a insurance company. I was already there for several months and as the project was winding up, we needed another developer on the project to help with the work load. My non-technical boss hired Yugoslavia Bob without checking with me first... I still remember the first day he showed up: dude with a wicked cookie duster (always with a piece of food in it of course), tinted glasses and always wore a corduroy blazer with jeans...

    He was nice enough, though he didn't know the difference between a value type and a bag of peanuts (it was a .Net role). His answer for when he didn't understand or know was always "yes, yes, conceptually... yes, yes." I would say "conceptually what? I was asking you if you were passing in an integer as a parameter". Then if you pressed him, he would just ignore you until you went away! He would literally just turn back to his computer and keep looking at you from the corner of his eye until you left.

    I also remember he would go running over to random strangers if they were having a conversation and start laughing with them. I remember he did this several times a day: his ears would perk up, then he would stand up to acquire his target, then like a flash he would run over and start laughing with complete strangers...

    I wasn't sad to see him leave (he got end-dated, and also black-listed for future positions). I don't mind inexperience, but when you flat out lie and waste everyone’s time, that pisses me off.

    The funny thing is that I remember seeing him walking into the building a couple of months later... Apparently he was working under a different group in the organization. I looked him up in the email address book, and strangely couldn't find him until I accidentally misspelled his name. He applied for (and got) a role under a fake name...
  • The Great Lobachevsky 2011-04-19 13:42
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    I wonder how many other people here got the Retroencabulator reference :)

    damnum - damnum Askismet...
  • shadowman 2011-04-19 13:44
    Charles:
    Never in my life, before or since, have I received such a tirade of abuse at the declination of the position. Apparently, I was throwing away my career and giving up the opportunity of a lifetime.
    I can top that. My first ever job was as a dishwasher in a small cafe, owned by a fat slob whose business skills topped out at paying the vendors from the cash register and calculating his success by peering in the drawer at the end of each day. As it turned out, he paid employees only when there was "enough" left over, and there was a pecking order: cook first, waitresses second, dishwasher last.

    Oddly there never seemed to be "enough" for the dishwasher. But -- "tomorrow will be better".

    Naive as I was, I took it for a little while. But on the morning of the last day of my fourth week, I decided that was enough. "Pay me now -- right NOW -- or I quit."

    "Quit! You little *******! After all I've done for you! I took a chance and gave you a job when you had no experience and all you want to do is f*** me in the a** and kick me in the b****!"

    Yeah. So I quit, went back to school, and now I make enough that if I ever find the guy I'm thinking of hiring him to wash my dishes.


    Wow, he really did a lot for you. An opportunity to do shit work for no pay! And who the hell needs experience to get a dishwashing job? Sad thing is, I've seen some small-time restaurant owners like that. The guy probably really did think he was doing you a favor.
  • cappeca 2011-04-19 13:45
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"


    You just do it.
  • frits 2011-04-19 13:55
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!

    Hardly...

    The correct answer is to provide inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors and to automatically synchronize cardinal grammeters. Everybody knows that.
  • nonpartisan 2011-04-19 13:59
    Interviewer:
    Larry:
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.
    It sounds like a Stress Interview. The sixth guy's entire purpose may have been a psychological test of the applicant.

    Possibly, but I'd say that Occam's Razor says he thought he was interviewing someone else or was told the wrong position for this interviewee. If the first five interviewers were on topic, it seems totally bizarre that the sixth would be so completely off-base.
  • John Smith 2011-04-19 14:03
    Where's the Wtf?:
    New rule: when reporting on weird-as-hell interviews, you must report the year the interview took place, and more importantly, the name of the company. Otherwise, nobody will take your report seriously and assume you are just winging it.


    Well You Just Do It didn't give a year but had a decade, but that just made it less believable as the IBM DBMS was named DB2 in 1983.
  • Dazed 2011-04-19 14:08
    The last one is a mirror image of one of my experiences. We were looking for a programmer in a boom period when programmers were hard to find. I did the general interview for one young lady who came over pretty well, and then passed her on to a couple of the technical guys (who I didn't know very well) for the technical interview. Their report was negative, but they were a bit vague on just why they rejected her. This put me in a quandary - were they just being sexist?

    Eventually I decided to go with their judgement, and rang her to let her know that we weren't interested. The response was a torrent of abuse which at least let me know that I'd made the right decision ...
  • Jellineck 2011-04-19 14:10
    How exactly do you work with the Stress Interviewer if you end up getting and accepting the job? The way I've always seen it, I am interviewing prospective coworkers as well.

    I imagine I would think that there are five people I can work with, but be surprised that someone higher up thinks that presenting a clueless and pompous ass to a candidate would reflect positively on the company.

    I guess on the other hand, I have never been asked to be "that guy", so I must have done something right.
  • imgx64 2011-04-19 14:20
    I'm pretty certain that the big-name company is Google.
  • Hasteur 2011-04-19 14:25
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.
  • nonpartisan 2011-04-19 14:28
    nonpartisan:
    Interviewer:
    Larry:
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.
    It sounds like a Stress Interview. The sixth guy's entire purpose may have been a psychological test of the applicant.

    Possibly, but I'd say that Occam's Razor says he thought he was interviewing someone else or was told the wrong position for this interviewee. If the first five interviewers were on topic, it seems totally bizarre that the sixth would be so completely off-base.

    Or, in finishing reviewing other comments, it's likely Occam's Razor says I've been very, incredibly lucky, haven't done enough interviews, and have no idea what I'm talking about. Yes, that's much more likely . . .
  • Ken B. 2011-04-19 14:34
    I hear that the COBOL guy went to work for Nike. :-)
  • neminem 2011-04-19 14:35
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    While I would agree entirely with the first two, depending on the age of the children (or possibly not), it's entirely possible to imagine that they were certainly *not* being brought up to think that that was perfectly ok... but decided that they were going to do it anyway. Possibly even specifically for that reason. Did you never do anything your parents didn't want you to as a small child?
  • Calli Arcale 2011-04-19 14:37
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!


    Heh -- nope. More of a turboencabulator. ;-)
  • Bert Glanstron 2011-04-19 14:38
    frits:
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!

    Hardly...

    The correct answer is to provide inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors and to automatically synchronize cardinal grammeters. Everybody knows that.

    You are an idiot and should be banned from using your mommy and daddy's modem.
  • Nagesh 2011-04-19 14:38
    Looks like COBOL guy rejected call with Google.
  • Joe 2011-04-19 14:45
    Just like back in the Academy.
  • JJ 2011-04-19 14:49
    "Things were looking up great."

    As opposed to, you know, things looking up badly.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 14:51
    JJ:
    "Things were looking up great."

    As opposed to, you know, things looking up badly.


    No, things were looking down terrible.

    PS - didn't you know Nagesh does the proof reading around here?
  • Mike 2011-04-19 14:54
    "Define the universe - give three examples"
  • abadidea 2011-04-19 15:00
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."
  • Nagesh 2011-04-19 15:08
    C-Octothorpe:
    JJ:
    "Things were looking up great."

    As opposed to, you know, things looking up badly.


    No, things were looking down terrible.

    PS - didn't you know Nagesh does the proof reading around here?


    You're damn iritiating mosquito!
  • da Doctah 2011-04-19 15:13
    cappeca:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"


    You just do it.


    And if you need anything further, you can find me out front, skinny dipping in the pond.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 15:15
    Nagesh:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JJ:
    "Things were looking up great."

    As opposed to, you know, things looking up badly.


    No, things were looking down terrible.

    PS - didn't you know Nagesh does the proof reading around here?


    You're damn iritiating mosquito!


    See? Damn, you're good...
  • frits 2011-04-19 15:15
    da Doctah:
    cappeca:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"


    You just do it.


    And if you need anything further, you can find me out front, skinny dipping in the pond.

    I'm pretty sure you be arrested and charged with indecent exposure if you did that.

    Your not too smart, are you?
  • pasqldba 2011-04-19 15:15
    I interviewed at a dinosaur computer company in suburban Philadelphia back in 1999. The manager of the department had three teams that reported to him. During the interviews I got along well with the leaders of two of those teams, but no so well with the leader of the third. They extended me an offer, but were unsure of which team I would work in. I think I was supposed to rotate through the three teams at some point.

    When I arrived for my first day at orientation, I discovered that I reported to the person I didn't get along with. I only lasted four months. He wasn't a terrible guy, he just didn't seem to want to be bothered with having me report to him.
  • cheap jersey slink 2011-04-19 15:19
    For this comment, inspired me, feeling this author words into my heart.
  • cheap jersey slink 2011-04-19 15:19
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    For this comment, inspired me, feeling this author words into my heart.
  • Kensey 2011-04-19 15:25
    In the part of Unisys I worked in, up to at least early last year they had the opposite of the Exclusive Interview: employees were apparently expected to apply and interview for outside jobs regularly. They implemented a years-long salary freeze (including transfers and promotions within corporate units), but if you had a written offer for an outside job, they would try to match it to get you to stay.

    Oddly, I didn't know anyone who took the matching offer.
  • boog 2011-04-19 15:32
    C-Octothorpe:
    Nagesh:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JJ:
    "Things were looking up great."

    As opposed to, you know, things looking up badly.

    No, things were looking down terrible.

    PS - didn't you know Nagesh does the proof reading around here?

    You're damn iritiating mosquito!

    See? Damn, you're good...
    It's surprising what excellent grammar he exhibits when he really wants to (or more likely, when he forgets to stay in character).
  • Marvin the Martian 2011-04-19 15:36
    Hasteur:

    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    Not everybody lives in la-di-dah landscaped suburbs with ponds so you can impart this valuable lesson one way or the other. Many city centre neighbourhoods are entirely pond-free.

    (As are many trailer parks, of course.)
  • Harrow 2011-04-19 15:36
    "Can you describe the physics of a transistor?"

    "Field, junction, or point? You don't see point transistors much any more; the maximum beta is just too small, although you can't beat 'em where extreme sensitivity is required in the pre-amp stage. All serious power transistors are junctions. FETs are for wimps."

    "So can you describe the physical structure of a Flash memory cell?"

    "It's like a field-effect transistor with a floating gate between the control gate and the junction. To write a one, for instance, the control gate simply pushes the floating gate closer to the junction. Writing a zero pulls it away. The NOR structure connects the cells vertically, whereas the NAND structure connects the cells horizontally. I'm pretty sure Chen did a paper on this. NAND flash requires less layout area, so you get more capacity at lower cost."

    "Ok, can you at least tell me how DRAM memory cell works?"

    "You're talking destructive read-out, right? Because otherwise every cell has to have a field-effect switch as direct output. If you want to get a serious amount of
    megadogs onto a chip, you just don't have the real estate for a lot of FETs. One of the biggest problems with DRAM is the charge state could be at any phase when the read signal arrives, so you don't know when the Schmidt trigger will fire. That's why they have those pulse wideners on every column."

    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    "That question reminds me of the time I took the ferry over to Shelbyville; I needed a new heel for my shoe. So, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on them. 'Give me five bees for a quarter,' you’d say. Now where were we? Oh yeah, the important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have any white onions, because of the war; the only thing you could get was those big yellow ones."

    "So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?"

    "Actually, I thought I was going to be interviewed by somebody who knows at least a little bit about hardware. Do you have anyone like that here?"

    -Harrow.
  • PRMan 2011-04-19 15:48
    neminem:
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    While I would agree entirely with the first two, depending on the age of the children (or possibly not), it's entirely possible to imagine that they were certainly *not* being brought up to think that that was perfectly ok... but decided that they were going to do it anyway. Possibly even specifically for that reason. Did you never do anything your parents didn't want you to as a small child?


    My younger daughter as a 2 year old would always answer the front door naked. 5 seconds ago she had clothes on but then the doorbell would ring and she was naked! I had no idea how she did that. But I can tell you that at certain ages, parenting has little to do with it. (She came to work with me recently and everyone remarked at how mature and well-behaved she was as a 10-year-old.)
  • Machtyn 2011-04-19 15:49
    frits:
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!

    Hardly...

    The correct answer is to provide inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors and to automatically synchronize cardinal grammeters. Everybody knows that.


    Yes, yes. But if you forget to inverse or you get a proactive current. The multilateral phase destructors will kick in and we all know what happens when that occurs!

    "I never thought I'd live to see a resonance cascade!"
  • Nagesh 2011-04-19 15:50
    cheap jersey slinkquote user:
    =abadidea"It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."/quote]

    For this comment, inspired me, feeling this author words into my heart.


    I agree, Ababidea's post is some of Best writing I have seen!
    Cheap, your words convey beauty as well as the best written Indian poetry. You should come to Hyderabad and work writing code comments, clients would pay highly for my quality code with your beautiful comments. I am very good programer, I prove so by typing all codes by hand in this reply and not previewing. Quote buttons are for lazy programmers and preview button is for bad programmers who make mistake!
  • Trippy 2011-04-19 16:05
    Post of the day! El Oh freaking El.

    My single desire today is now to go on a stress interview solely to talk about tying an onion to my belt.
  • dyslexicbunny 2011-04-19 16:09
    So did John get the job or not?
  • kindall 2011-04-19 16:14
    Should I ever have someone berate me for not taking a job, I think the only appropriate response is something along the lines of, "So hurling abuse at me is supposed to make me want to take this job, is it? Could I expect more of this sort of treatment if I did come to work for you?" I don't understand how people think this is even remotely useful behavior, if "think" is indeed the correct word.
  • cheap jersey slink 2011-04-19 16:19
    Trippy:
    Post of the day! El Oh freaking El.

    My single desire today is now to go on a stress interview solely to talk about tying an onion to my belt.


    Inspiring onion, verifying desire to cry, on with the transistor junction, most beautiful.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 16:20
    kindall:
    Should I ever have someone berate me for not taking a job, I think the only appropriate response is something along the lines of, "So hurling abuse at me is supposed to make me want to take this job, is it? Could I expect more of this sort of treatment if I did come to work for you?" I don't understand how people think this is even remotely useful behavior, if "think" is indeed the correct word.


    It's not, but it sure makes you feel better, A**HOLE!

    Ahh...
  • Dragnslcr 2011-04-19 16:21
    PRMan:
    My younger daughter as a 2 year old would always answer the front door naked. 5 seconds ago she had clothes on but then the doorbell would ring and she was naked! I had no idea how she did that. But I can tell you that at certain ages, parenting has little to do with it. (She came to work with me recently and everyone remarked at how mature and well-behaved she was as a 10-year-old.)


    Look for a clip of Dana Carvey's stand-up routine about his children and "naked time".
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-19 16:23
    Harrow:
    "Can you describe the physics of a transistor?"

    "Field, junction, or point? You don't see point transistors much any more; the maximum beta is just too small, although you can't beat 'em where extreme sensitivity is required in the pre-amp stage. All serious power transistors are junctions. FETs are for wimps."

    "So can you describe the physical structure of a Flash memory cell?"

    "It's like a field-effect transistor with a floating gate between the control gate and the junction. To write a one, for instance, the control gate simply pushes the floating gate closer to the junction. Writing a zero pulls it away. The NOR structure connects the cells vertically, whereas the NAND structure connects the cells horizontally. I'm pretty sure Chen did a paper on this. NAND flash requires less layout area, so you get more capacity at lower cost."

    "Ok, can you at least tell me how DRAM memory cell works?"

    "You're talking destructive read-out, right? Because otherwise every cell has to have a field-effect switch as direct output. If you want to get a serious amount of
    megadogs onto a chip, you just don't have the real estate for a lot of FETs. One of the biggest problems with DRAM is the charge state could be at any phase when the read signal arrives, so you don't know when the Schmidt trigger will fire. That's why they have those pulse wideners on every column."

    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    "That question reminds me of the time I took the ferry over to Shelbyville; I needed a new heel for my shoe. So, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on them. 'Give me five bees for a quarter,' you’d say. Now where were we? Oh yeah, the important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have any white onions, because of the war; the only thing you could get was those big yellow ones."

    "So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?"

    "Actually, I thought I was going to be interviewed by somebody who knows at least a little bit about hardware. Do you have anyone like that here?"

    -Harrow.


    "So what technique did you use to tie the onion to your belt? The big yellow ones don't have anything to tie the string to, and you're not going to be able to pierce the onion without discombobulating the proformisationals, and if that happens you'll catch nirdle blight. So, your technique was ... ?"
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-19 16:29
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    With any luck the kids will catch typhoid and die (they must be retards to do something as stupid as that) and she won't have to worry about childminders any more. Hey, it gets better - she could sue the company for not providing a child-proof barrier (e.g 6 foot wall) round the pond, or a sign saying: "Visitors are requested to refrain from bodily immersion herein whilst engaging in ecdysiastics."
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 16:33
    Matt Westwood:
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    With any luck the kids will catch typhoid and die (they must be retards to do something as stupid as that) and she won't have to worry about childminders any more. Hey, it gets better - she could sue the company for not providing a child-proof barrier (e.g 6 foot wall) round the pond, or a sign saying: "Visitors are requested to refrain from bodily immersion herein whilst engaging in ecdysiastics."


    Bored?
  • Rich the Engineer 2011-04-19 16:34
    Only a fool would accept a matching offer.
  • snoofle 2011-04-19 16:41
    pnieuwkamp:
    snoofle:
    Re: sixth guy - I've had a few like that - I indulge up to three questions, then respond: you've wasted enough of my time, thank you for yours
    Well, if the rest went ok, explain to him he must've mistaken the room number, as you're there for a programming job, not for low level hardware design.

    The way the interview is going he isn't going to recommend you anyway, and that way you can at least try and salvage the situation if there really is a miscommunication at play. Unless it's going to be your boss, letting one interviewer out of a whole procedure get to you isn't worth it.

    I agree, with the slight difference that I wouldn't want to work with someone like that (whether they're being a jerk on purpose (which serves no real purpose for a programming job) or they simply are a jerk). I never let an interviewer "get to me", but if it's painfully clear that my time is being wasted, I have no problem saying that I know they're wasting my time and cutting it short.
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-19 16:42
    C-Octothorpe:
    Matt Westwood:
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    With any luck the kids will catch typhoid and die (they must be retards to do something as stupid as that) and she won't have to worry about childminders any more. Hey, it gets better - she could sue the company for not providing a child-proof barrier (e.g 6 foot wall) round the pond, or a sign saying: "Visitors are requested to refrain from bodily immersion herein whilst engaging in ecdysiastics."


    Bored?


    Yeah, now you mention it. Procrastinating. Supposed to be documenting (and proving) the fact that separability and compactness are continuous invariants but I'm too tired (been a stressful day in a client's impossibly hot office (now there's the WTF: spanking brand new business park, no air conditioning) and I can't think straight). Perhaps I ought to read another chapter of that Iain M. Banks novel instead.
  • Anon 2011-04-19 16:43
    kindall:
    Should I ever have someone berate me for not taking a job, I think the only appropriate response is something along the lines of, "So hurling abuse at me is supposed to make me want to take this job, is it? Could I expect more of this sort of treatment if I did come to work for you?" I don't understand how people think this is even remotely useful behavior, if "think" is indeed the correct word.


    Quite. What exactly do they think the candidate is going to say? "I was going to turn down your offer, but your torrent of abuse has changed my mind."
    Same applies to candidates who launch into a torrent of abuse after being turned down for a job.
  • Anon 2011-04-19 16:44
    I would have commented earlier, but I was pursuing commenting opportunities on other websites.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 16:45
    Matt Westwood:
    C-Octothorpe:
    Matt Westwood:
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    With any luck the kids will catch typhoid and die (they must be retards to do something as stupid as that) and she won't have to worry about childminders any more. Hey, it gets better - she could sue the company for not providing a child-proof barrier (e.g 6 foot wall) round the pond, or a sign saying: "Visitors are requested to refrain from bodily immersion herein whilst engaging in ecdysiastics."


    Bored?


    Yeah, now you mention it. Procrastinating. Supposed to be documenting (and proving) the fact that separability and compactness are continuous invariants but I'm too tired (been a stressful day in a client's impossibly hot office (now there's the WTF: spanking brand new business park, no air conditioning) and I can't think straight). Perhaps I ought to read another chapter of that Iain M. Banks novel instead.


    Lol, I thought the same thing about my comment too... Long day, but almost over.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-19 16:47
    Anon:
    I would have commented earlier, but I was pursuing commenting opportunities on other websites.


    We'll beat the other forum's offer by 5%, plus an additional 3 days vacation... Whaddya say?
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-19 16:53
    C-Octothorpe:
    Anon:
    I would have commented earlier, but I was pursuing commenting opportunities on other websites.


    We'll beat the other forum's offer by 5%, plus an additional 3 days vacation... Whaddya say?


    That sounds ... argh - sorry, got to go - my grandmother's running naked through the bandtoband.com Complete Shambles forum ...
  • Nagesh 2011-04-19 16:54
    boog:
    C-Octothorpe:
    Nagesh:
    C-Octothorpe:
    JJ:
    "Things were looking up great."

    As opposed to, you know, things looking up badly.

    No, things were looking down terrible.

    PS - didn't you know Nagesh does the proof reading around here?

    You're damn iritiating mosquito!

    See? Damn, you're good...
    It's surprising what excellent grammar he exhibits when he really wants to (or more likely, when he forgets to stay in character).


    I stand surprised!
  • boog 2011-04-19 16:59
    Harrow:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    "That question reminds me of the time I took the ferry over to Shelbyville; I needed a new heel for my shoe. So, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on them. 'Give me five bees for a quarter,' you’d say. Now where were we? Oh yeah, the important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have any white onions, because of the war; the only thing you could get was those big yellow ones."
    Thank you for the classic Simpsons reference. It made my day.
  • Hasteur 2011-04-19 17:42
    neminem:
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    While I would agree entirely with the first two, depending on the age of the children (or possibly not), it's entirely possible to imagine that they were certainly *not* being brought up to think that that was perfectly ok... but decided that they were going to do it anyway. Possibly even specifically for that reason. Did you never do anything your parents didn't want you to as a small child?

    Acutally, no. I was a "Keep your hands to yourself" kind of kid. The only really bad thing I did was steal a taste of cookie dough at the local grocery store along with some friends, lie about stealing it when the others got punished, and get a cookie afterwords.
  • Hasteur 2011-04-19 17:44
    Marvin the Martian:
    Hasteur:

    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    Not everybody lives in la-di-dah landscaped suburbs with ponds so you can impart this valuable lesson one way or the other. Many city centre neighbourhoods are entirely pond-free.

    (As are many trailer parks, of course.)


    And I'm sure your parents let you swim around the drainage creek when you were a child?
  • Sten 2011-04-19 18:16
    Harrow:
    "So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?"

    "Actually, I thought I was going to be interviewed by somebody who knows at least a little bit about hardware. Do you have anyone like that here?"


    Every other answer is a bit crappy, you know, just boring, trying to be jokes but in fact ending in disasters. Well, except for the Simpsons one, that one is nice but strongly off-topic so I can't count that.

    However *this* answer is really state of the art and for that, you shall be remembered.
  • da Doctah 2011-04-19 18:18
    Matt Westwood:
    "So what technique did you use to tie the onion to your belt? The big yellow ones don't have anything to tie the string to, and you're not going to be able to pierce the onion without discombobulating the proformisationals, and if that happens you'll catch nirdle blight. So, your technique was ... ?"


    "...subject to a binding non-disclosure agreement. I'm sure you'll understand why I can't elaborate further."
  • Simple SImon 2011-04-19 19:41
    The Great Lobachevsky:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    I wonder how many other people here got the Retroencabulator reference :)

    damnum - damnum Askismet...


    Not me. Please explain.
  • havokk 2011-04-19 19:45
    "So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?"

    I think an appropriate reply would be:
    So, did you actually read the job description of the position I am interviewing for or did you think you can just wing it?
  • Simple SImon 2011-04-19 19:50
    "Can you describe the physics of a transistor?"
    I think so.

    "So can you describe the physical structure of a Flash memory cell?"
    Why yes, yes I could.

    "Ok, can you at least tell me how DRAM memory cell works?"
    As a matter of fact, I can.

    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"
    Can't I just use both?

    "So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?"
    Sure I prepared, but you didn;t ask very good questions.

  • Janine 2011-04-19 19:57
    C-Octothorpe:
    Matt Westwood:
    C-Octothorpe:
    Matt Westwood:
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    With any luck the kids will catch typhoid and die (they must be retards to do something as stupid as that) and she won't have to worry about childminders any more. Hey, it gets better - she could sue the company for not providing a child-proof barrier (e.g 6 foot wall) round the pond, or a sign saying: "Visitors are requested to refrain from bodily immersion herein whilst engaging in ecdysiastics."


    Bored?


    Yeah, now you mention it. Procrastinating. Supposed to be documenting (and proving) the fact that separability and compactness are continuous invariants but I'm too tired (been a stressful day in a client's impossibly hot office (now there's the WTF: spanking brand new business park, no air conditioning) and I can't think straight). Perhaps I ought to read another chapter of that Iain M. Banks novel instead.


    Lol, I thought the same thing about my comment too... Long day, but almost over.


    Get a room, guys!
  • Gunslinger 2011-04-19 20:33
    Hasteur:
    Marvin the Martian:
    Hasteur:

    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    Not everybody lives in la-di-dah landscaped suburbs with ponds so you can impart this valuable lesson one way or the other. Many city centre neighbourhoods are entirely pond-free.

    (As are many trailer parks, of course.)


    And I'm sure your parents let you swim around the drainage creek when you were a child?


    Who hasn't done this?
  • ObiWayneKenobi 2011-04-19 21:10
    I probably would have said something like "Can I roll an Intelligence check to figure out what you just said to me?" to the 6th guy, or went on some sci-fi pseudo technobabble out of Star Wars/Star Trek

    How anyone can think that kind of interview does any good is totally beyond me.
  • Icky Wiki 2011-04-19 21:57
    ObiWayneKenobi:
    I probably would have said something like "Can I roll an Intelligence check to figure out what you just said to me?" to the 6th guy, or went on some sci-fi pseudo technobabble out of Star Wars/Star Trek

    How anyone can think that kind of interview does any good is totally beyond me.


    Wikipedia needs you:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_interview#Validity_and_predictive_power
    You could be the "Who?" at the end of the paragraph
  • abadidea 2011-04-19 22:52
    My first comment at dailywtf after lurking for a while, and I get complimented by Nagesh... I'm not sure how to take this :)
  • Mahaha 2011-04-20 00:14
    abadidea:
    My first comment at dailywtf after lurking for a while, and I get complimented by Nagesh... I'm not sure how to take this :)


    Bend over, I'll show you ;)
  • SomeGuy 2011-04-20 00:16
    You're not too smart, are you?
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-20 01:15
    Janine:
    C-Octothorpe:
    Matt Westwood:
    C-Octothorpe:
    Matt Westwood:
    abadidea:
    It's sad how many brilliant people there are who simply cannot communicate. I wouldn't be surprised at all if he could boondoggle the frabbulators in his sleep, but he literally has no idea how to put the process into English..., which means that on the face of it, he could do the job great, but he couldn't document anything nor train anybody.

    RE: interviewing mother, poor thing - everyone with kids is put into a mortifyingly embarrassing situation by said child processes at least once. The real kicker is she was probably thinking, "Once I get this job, this will be the last time I have to take my kids out because I can't afford a babysitter."


    With any luck the kids will catch typhoid and die (they must be retards to do something as stupid as that) and she won't have to worry about childminders any more. Hey, it gets better - she could sue the company for not providing a child-proof barrier (e.g 6 foot wall) round the pond, or a sign saying: "Visitors are requested to refrain from bodily immersion herein whilst engaging in ecdysiastics."


    Bored?


    Yeah, now you mention it. Procrastinating. Supposed to be documenting (and proving) the fact that separability and compactness are continuous invariants but I'm too tired (been a stressful day in a client's impossibly hot office (now there's the WTF: spanking brand new business park, no air conditioning) and I can't think straight). Perhaps I ought to read another chapter of that Iain M. Banks novel instead.


    Lol, I thought the same thing about my comment too... Long day, but almost over.


    Get a room, guys!


    Great idea. Cocto, you get the drinks in, I'll turn down the sheets and see if I can find something appropriate on the pay-per-view channel, I'll meet you up there ...
  • Roger Garrett 2011-04-20 01:27
    COBOL, no. But if anyone needs a DIBOL programmer, let me know.
  • Pyrexkidd 2011-04-20 02:25
    frits:
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!

    Hardly...

    The correct answer is to provide inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors and to automatically synchronize cardinal grammeters. Everybody knows that.


    hehe, cardinal grammeters--it must be going really, really, really... fast... I mean because the cardinal grammeters are automagically configured and all. BTW these special grammeters measure in Kilogram-Newton-ohms-per-mile-hour-ounce. abbreviated to (KgNO/MHOz * sqrt( X^2 ) / sqrt( X^2))...

    Incaseyoudidntknow...
  • csrster 2011-04-20 02:55
    Pyrexkidd:
    frits:
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!

    Hardly...

    The correct answer is to provide inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors and to automatically synchronize cardinal grammeters. Everybody knows that.


    hehe, cardinal grammeters--it must be going really, really, really... fast... I mean because the cardinal grammeters are automagically configured and all. BTW these special grammeters measure in Kilogram-Newton-ohms-per-mile-hour-ounce. abbreviated to (KgNO/MHOz * sqrt( X^2 ) / sqrt( X^2))...

    Incaseyoudidntknow...

    Wouldn't it be easier just to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow?
  • daMage 2011-04-20 04:36
    the real wtf of the last story is that the guy prays :D
  • Don 2011-04-20 04:42
    akatherder:
    snoofle:
    Re: sixth guy - I've had a few like that - I indulge up to three questions, then respond: you've wasted enough of my time, thank you for yours


    It's a game more than anything. They're trying to see how long he can ask questions before you give up. Nobody knows everything so they want to know how you react when presented with something you don't understand.

    Will you waste everyone's time by declining each question individually, hoping to stumble on an easy enough question that you can formulate an answer and earn the interviewer's approval?

    Will you throw a hissyfit and whine about him wasting your time?

    Or will you explain that there must be some misunderstanding? This wasn't part of the job description and given the line of questioning, he might as well be speaking Greek. You're willing to hear him out, but you have zero knowledge/experience with the subject matter.


    TBH... I don't have time for this kind of malarkey. An interviewer is there to impress, and WILL act differently at an interview compared to real life.
  • Don 2011-04-20 04:45
    frits:
    da Doctah:
    cappeca:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"


    You just do it.


    And if you need anything further, you can find me out front, skinny dipping in the pond.

    I'm pretty sure you be arrested and charged with indecent exposure if you did that.

    Your not too smart, are you?

    Well, depends. If it's a pretty girl, I'm unlikely to call the cops in the first place.... hell it might even help with the interview... :)
  • toshir0 2011-04-20 04:50
    Matt Westwood:
    Harrow:
    "Can you describe the physics of a transistor?"

    [...Harrow's answer...]

    "So can you describe the physical structure of a Flash memory cell?"

    [...Harrow's answer...]

    "Ok, can you at least tell me how DRAM memory cell works?"

    [...Harrow's answer...]

    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    [...Harrow's answer...]

    "So did you actually prepare for the interview at all, or did you think you can just wing it?"

    "Actually, I thought I was going to be interviewed by somebody who knows at least a little bit about hardware. Do you have anyone like that here?"

    -Harrow.


    "So what technique did you use to tie the onion to your belt? The big yellow ones don't have anything to tie the string to, and you're not going to be able to pierce the onion without discombobulating the proformisationals, and if that happens you'll catch nirdle blight. So, your technique was ... ?"
    You just do it.
  • Billy Goat Gruff #1 2011-04-20 04:50
    C-Octothorpe:
    Anon:
    I would have commented earlier, but I was pursuing commenting opportunities on other websites.


    We'll beat you to death if you visit other websites. What are you doing, wasting our time...


    FTFY
  • Yanni Depp 2011-04-20 04:58
    Harrow:
    "That question reminds me of the time I took the ferry over to Shelbyville; I needed a new heel for my shoe. So, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on them. 'Give me five bees for a quarter,' you’d say. Now where were we? Oh yeah, the important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have any white onions, because of the war; the only thing you could get was those big yellow ones."

    We can't bust heads like we used to, but we have our ways. One trick is to tell 'em stories that don't go anywhere.

    The single best Simpsons episode ever. 4:17 'Last Exit to Springfield'
  • Chris 2011-04-20 05:00
    Charles:
    Never in my life, before or since, have I received such a tirade of abuse at the declination of the position. Apparently, I was throwing away my career and giving up the opportunity of a lifetime.
    I can top that. My first ever job was as a dishwasher in a small cafe, owned by a fat slob whose business skills topped out at paying the vendors from the cash register and calculating his success by peering in the drawer at the end of each day. As it turned out, he paid employees only when there was "enough" left over, and there was a pecking order: cook first, waitresses second, dishwasher last.

    Oddly there never seemed to be "enough" for the dishwasher. But -- "tomorrow will be better".

    Naive as I was, I took it for a little while. But on the morning of the last day of my fourth week, I decided that was enough. "Pay me now -- right NOW -- or I quit."

    "Quit! You little *******! After all I've done for you! I took a chance and gave you a job when you had no experience and all you want to do is f*** me in the a** and kick me in the b****!"

    Yeah. So I quit, went back to school, and now I make enough that if I ever find the guy I'm thinking of hiring him to wash my dishes.


    Had the same once (Was a cashier in a cafe).

    He gave the same old tirade of abuse, and refused to pay me.

    I went back to the shop with a baseball bat.

    I got paid.

    Captcha: vulputate. This could mean many things, all of which sound nasty.
  • dkf 2011-04-20 05:00
    csrster:
    Wouldn't it be easier just to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow?
    Not without a good neutrino coupler, and they don't exactly grow on trees.
  • Marge Simpson 2011-04-20 05:03
    Lisa needs braces.
  • Lenny Leonard 2011-04-20 05:04
    Dental Plan

    (thank you Akismet for being awful)
  • Design Pattern 2011-04-20 05:05
    SomeGuy:
    You're not too smart, are you?

    YHBT. YHL. HAND.
  • Mr^B 2011-04-20 05:38
    Sixth Guy just sounds like a bog standard stress interview.

    I would have asked the relevance of the first question, which is probably what the guy was expecting.

    Either way, simply asking the relevance would have either prevented you from wasting your time, or got you through the interview.

    A WTF, but not on behalf of the interviewer.
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-20 08:40
    dkf:
    csrster:
    Wouldn't it be easier just to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow?
    Not without a good neutrino coupler, and they don't exactly grow on trees.


    Fail. Any engineer worth his salt would have a sonic screwdriver about his person.
  • taylonr 2011-04-20 08:54
    Re: The sixth interview
    Maybe the interviewee came across as super cocky in some of the other interviews. I've seen that first hand (on a team of interviewers) where on guy decided he'd had enough and just kept asking questions he knew the candidate couldn't answer. He wanted to show the guy he wasn't as good as he thought he was.
  • Billy Goat Gruff #1 2011-04-20 08:59
    taylonr:
    Re: The sixth interview
    Maybe the interviewee came across as super cocky in some of the other interviews. I've seen that first hand (on a team of interviewers) where on guy decided he'd had enough and just kept asking questions he knew the candidate couldn't answer. He wanted to show the guy that he was an overbearing, bullying dick.


    FTFY ;)
  • ennio 2011-04-20 09:10
    But the built-in AS/400 database was not rebranded as DB/2 back then.
  • F 2011-04-20 09:24
    dkf:
    csrster:
    Wouldn't it be easier just to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow?
    Not without a good neutrino coupler, and they don't exactly grow on trees.


    You must be looking in the wrong sort of orchard.
  • Gobby 2011-04-20 10:27
    Matt Westwood:
    Yeah, now you mention it. Procrastinating. Supposed to be documenting (and proving) the fact that separability and compactness are continuous invariants but I'm too tired (been a stressful day in a client's impossibly hot office (now there's the WTF: spanking brand new business park, no air conditioning) and I can't think straight). Perhaps I ought to read another chapter of that Iain M. Banks novel instead.


    Wow! Double nested brackets (as in an onion (any kind, white, yellow or sweet (or Vidalia in Georgia)))!
  • cheap nfl trolls 2011-04-20 10:32
    Gobby:

    Wow! Double nested brackets (as in an onion (any kind, white, yellow or sweet (or Vidalia in Georgia)))!

    For this comment (inspired me (feeling this author words into my heart)).
  • Gobby 2011-04-20 10:35
    I once conducted interviews for a whole week. At the last day, I wasn't even listening. I was thinking about how good a nice cold beer would be right now. Next time I'm the one being interviewed, if it's like 4:30 on a Friday, then after pleasantries, I'll offer to buy him a beer. Not the canned or bottled shit, but on tap, fresh keg. Pretty sure I'll get the job -- probably any job: nuclear technician, weapons designer, submarine pilot, King of Spain.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 10:41
    Gobby:
    I once conducted interviews for a whole week. At the last day, I wasn't even listening. I was thinking about how good a nice cold beer would be right now. Next time I'm the one being interviewed, if it's like 4:30 on a Friday, then after pleasantries, I'll offer to buy him a beer. Not the canned or bottled shit, but on tap, fresh keg. Pretty sure I'll get the job -- probably any job: nuclear technician, weapons designer, submarine pilot, King of Spain.


    That's probably how Nagesh got his job at a CMMi5 company...

    Seriously though, that is a great idea. Although I usually go to interviews during the day, so after spending 2-5 hours with the interviewer(s), I would like to be on my way, whether to go home or go back to work.
  • SQLDave 2011-04-20 10:59
    Dazed:
    The last one is a mirror image of one of my experiences. We were looking for a programmer in a boom period when programmers were hard to find. I did the general interview for one young lady who came over pretty well, and then passed her on to a couple of the technical guys (who I didn't know very well) for the technical interview. Their report was negative, but they were a bit vague on just why they rejected her. This put me in a quandary - were they just being sexist?

    Eventually I decided to go with their judgement, and rang her to let her know that we weren't interested. The response was a torrent of abuse which at least let me know that I'd made the right decision ...


    So SHE is the person responsible for companies no longer letting interviewees know when a decision has been made. Bitch.
  • boog 2011-04-20 11:01
    Gobby:
    Pretty sure I'll get the job -- probably any job: nuclear technician, weapons designer, submarine pilot, King of Spain.
    I once applied to be King of Spain. I even managed to get an interview, but I had to excuse myself after the first few questions because I just couldn't understand a word they were saying.

    Something about transistors or relative motion of conductors or some shit. Not my strong suit...
  • operagost 2011-04-20 11:02
    cappeca:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"


    You just do it.

    ... in COBOL. Because it's stable.
  • Amadeo 2011-04-20 11:26
    boog:
    Gobby:
    Pretty sure I'll get the job -- probably any job: nuclear technician, weapons designer, submarine pilot, King of Spain.
    I once applied to be King of Spain. I even managed to get an interview, but I had to excuse myself after the first few questions because I just couldn't understand a word they were saying.

    Something about transistors or relative motion of conductors or some shit. Not my strong suit...


    I held that job for awhile. Some say it was nepotism, but I say I was elected fair and square.

    Off topic FYI - My wedding reception killed.
  • cheezburger 2011-04-20 11:29
    i once went to an interview and spent 2 days doing their stupid programming tests. i had to write code on a piece of paper, with a pen, on plain paper (no lines) and was barred internet access. i got called a week later to tell me that my IT knowledge wasn't strong enough. 10 minutes later i got a call from the leading social networking company in my country and got a job at double the salary the other company was offering for the position... interviewers are idiots in general.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 11:41
    Obviously, I correct answer is this:

    Mwa-hey, bwa-hai. The compression and expansion of the longitudinal waves cause the erratic oscillation, you can see it there, of the neighbouring particles.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 11:42
    C-Octothorpe:
    Obviously, I correct answer is this:

    Mwa-hey, bwa-hai. The compression and expansion of the longitudinal waves cause the erratic oscillation, you can see it there, of the neighbouring particles.


    Wow, proof reading isn't my strong suit...
  • boog 2011-04-20 11:51
    Yanni Depp:
    We can't bust heads like we used to, but we have our ways. One trick is to tell 'em stories that don't go anywhere.

    The single best Simpsons episode ever. 4:17 'Last Exit to Springfield'
    They just don't make them like they used to.
    I loved the McBain opening.

    "Ice to see you."
    "McBain!"
  • hoodaticus 2011-04-20 11:53
    SQLDave:
    Dazed:
    The last one is a mirror image of one of my experiences. We were looking for a programmer in a boom period when programmers were hard to find. I did the general interview for one young lady who came over pretty well, and then passed her on to a couple of the technical guys (who I didn't know very well) for the technical interview. Their report was negative, but they were a bit vague on just why they rejected her. This put me in a quandary - were they just being sexist?

    Eventually I decided to go with their judgement, and rang her to let her know that we weren't interested. The response was a torrent of abuse which at least let me know that I'd made the right decision ...


    So SHE is the person responsible for companies no longer letting interviewees know when a decision has been made. Bitch.
    I idealistically started letting my candidates know when they didn't make the cut. Three candidates later, I gave up.

    Fucking Indian dude started arguing with me about my decision. Not wanting a lawsuit, I added him to my spam filter, and that was that.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 12:00
    hoodaticus:
    SQLDave:
    Dazed:
    The last one is a mirror image of one of my experiences. We were looking for a programmer in a boom period when programmers were hard to find. I did the general interview for one young lady who came over pretty well, and then passed her on to a couple of the technical guys (who I didn't know very well) for the technical interview. Their report was negative, but they were a bit vague on just why they rejected her. This put me in a quandary - were they just being sexist?

    Eventually I decided to go with their judgement, and rang her to let her know that we weren't interested. The response was a torrent of abuse which at least let me know that I'd made the right decision ...


    So SHE is the person responsible for companies no longer letting interviewees know when a decision has been made. Bitch.
    I idealistically started letting my candidates know when they didn't make the cut. Three candidates later, I gave up.

    Fucking Indian dude started arguing with me about my decision. Not wanting a lawsuit, I added him to my spam filter, and that was that.


    Yeah, I would think it's better to implement a "don't call us, we'll call you" policy.

    Except when it comes to contracts and recruiters. I hate the never ending "you're a perfect fit, they need someone to start asap, fill out this matrix at work because the submission cutoff is in 2 hours, blah blah blah", then 3 months later they call you and regurgitate the same garbage about another role having completely forgotten about the previous role.

    ... but I'm not cynical...
  • SQLDave 2011-04-20 12:27
    PRMan:
    neminem:
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    While I would agree entirely with the first two, depending on the age of the children (or possibly not), it's entirely possible to imagine that they were certainly *not* being brought up to think that that was perfectly ok... but decided that they were going to do it anyway. Possibly even specifically for that reason. Did you never do anything your parents didn't want you to as a small child?


    My younger daughter as a 2 year old would always answer the front door naked. 5 seconds ago she had clothes on but then the doorbell would ring and she was naked! I had no idea how she did that. But I can tell you that at certain ages, parenting has little to do with it. (She came to work with me recently and everyone remarked at how mature and well-behaved she was as a 10-year-old.)


    Tasers are remarkable behavior modification tools.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 12:31
    SQLDave:
    PRMan:
    neminem:
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    While I would agree entirely with the first two, depending on the age of the children (or possibly not), it's entirely possible to imagine that they were certainly *not* being brought up to think that that was perfectly ok... but decided that they were going to do it anyway. Possibly even specifically for that reason. Did you never do anything your parents didn't want you to as a small child?


    My younger daughter as a 2 year old would always answer the front door naked. 5 seconds ago she had clothes on but then the doorbell would ring and she was naked! I had no idea how she did that. But I can tell you that at certain ages, parenting has little to do with it. (She came to work with me recently and everyone remarked at how mature and well-behaved she was as a 10-year-old.)


    Tasers are remarkable behavior modification tools.


    Especially with invincible ninjas: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/04/19/modern_day_ninja/

    I hate akismet... Piece of garbage... blah blah blah
  • Anon 2011-04-20 12:37
    cheezburger:
    i once went to an interview and spent 2 days doing their stupid programming tests. i had to write code on a piece of paper, with a pen, on plain paper (no lines) and was barred internet access. i got called a week later to tell me that my IT knowledge wasn't strong enough. 10 minutes later i got a call from the leading social networking company in my country and got a job at double the salary the other company was offering for the position... interviewers are idiots in general.


    Which ones where the idiots? The ones who passed on you or the ones that hired you?
  • Harrow 2011-04-20 13:07
    cheezburger:
    ... i had to write code on a piece of paper, with a pen, on plain paper (no lines) ...

    You had paper? They made me mash up some reeds and roll it flat with a AriZona bottle before I could begin the test. And I had to cut my own quill pen -- the hardest part was chasing that goose around the decorative pond.

    -Harrow.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 13:15
    Harrow:
    cheezburger:
    ... i had to write code on a piece of paper, with a pen, on plain paper (no lines) ...

    You had paper? They made me mash up some reeds and roll it flat with a AriZona bottle before I could begin the test. And I had to cut my own quill pen -- the hardest part was chasing that goose around the decorative pond.

    -Harrow.


    That's nothing...

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass. Then they asked me to architect a solution for an automated taxi notification system with the blood I just bled. And then it got wierd: they asked me do something called a fizz-buzz test. It was then that I walked out of there...
  • fritters 2011-04-20 13:21
    boog:
    I once applied to be King of Spain. I even managed to get an interview, but I had to excuse myself after the first few questions because I just couldn't understand a word they were saying.


    Once I was the King of Spain.
    Now I eat humble pie.
  • Nagesh 2011-04-20 13:37
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.

    This is for programmer candidate only. For other candidate, test are different. Political aspiration given task like how to bribe, how to cheat, how to kill without remorse.
  • frits 2011-04-20 13:45
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?

  • hoodaticus 2011-04-20 13:46
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.

    This is for programmer candidate only. For other candidate, test are different. Political aspiration given task like how to bribe, how to cheat, how to kill without remorse.
    It's official: no one can deny now that Nagesh is both fake and a troll.
  • hoodaticus 2011-04-20 13:47
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?
    I'm getting high right now.
  • Nagesh 2011-04-20 13:49
    hoodaticus:
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.

    This is for programmer candidate only. For other candidate, test are different. Political aspiration given task like how to bribe, how to cheat, how to kill without remorse.
    It's official: no one can deny now that Nagesh is both fake and a troll.


    hoodarino,
    Label of troll doesn't bother me (since you make definition, I don't care), but label of fake is too much.
    you can go look for INFOSYS SELECTION PROCESS!
    come back after you have googled well.
    INFOSYS is #1 company in India.

    I work with #2.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 14:11
    hoodaticus:
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?
    I'm getting high right now.


    Damnit, I thought you were driving today!
  • trtrwtf 2011-04-20 14:13
    Matt Westwood:
    Perhaps I ought to read another chapter of that Iain M. Banks novel instead.


    Always a correct answer.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 14:20
    Nagesh:
    hoodaticus:
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.

    This is for programmer candidate only. For other candidate, test are different. Political aspiration given task like how to bribe, how to cheat, how to kill without remorse.
    It's official: no one can deny now that Nagesh is both fake and a troll.


    hoodarino,
    Label of troll doesn't bother me (since you make definition, I don't care), but label of fake is too much.
    you can go look for INFOSYS SELECTION PROCESS!
    come back after you have googled well.
    INFOSYS is #1 company in India.

    I work with #2.


    Nagesh is the guy on the right in the jacket... You can see biryani in his hand.

    http://www.rediff.com/money/2008/jul/17sd4.htm

    PS - Infosys isn't the #1 company in India
  • The Great Lobachevsky 2011-04-20 14:31
    Simple SImon:
    The Great Lobachevsky:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    I wonder how many other people here got the Retroencabulator reference :)

    damnum - damnum Askismet...


    Not me. Please explain.


    I can't get to youtube from work, but search for Rockwell Retroencabulator and I'm sure you'll find their brilliant marketing video :)
  • Nagesh 2011-04-20 14:44
    C-Octothorpe:
    Nagesh:
    hoodaticus:
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.

    This is for programmer candidate only. For other candidate, test are different. Political aspiration given task like how to bribe, how to cheat, how to kill without remorse.
    It's official: no one can deny now that Nagesh is both fake and a troll.


    hoodarino,
    Label of troll doesn't bother me (since you make definition, I don't care), but label of fake is too much.
    you can go look for INFOSYS SELECTION PROCESS!
    come back after you have googled well.
    INFOSYS is #1 company in India.

    I work with #2.


    Nagesh is the guy on the right in the jacket... You can see biryani in his hand.

    http://www.rediff.com/money/2008/jul/17sd4.htm

    PS - Infosys isn't the #1 company in India


    I should have said software company. My mistake.
    If you are thinking TCS, then it is company that most programmer want to leave ASAP. So don't go there.


    Also don't give me link to old dated article.
  • hoodaticus 2011-04-20 14:49
    Nagesh:
    hoodaticus:
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.

    This is for programmer candidate only. For other candidate, test are different. Political aspiration given task like how to bribe, how to cheat, how to kill without remorse.
    It's official: no one can deny now that Nagesh is both fake and a troll.


    hoodarino,
    Label of troll doesn't bother me (since you make definition, I don't care), but label of fake is too much.
    you can go look for INFOSYS SELECTION PROCESS!
    come back after you have googled well.
    INFOSYS is #1 company in India.

    I work with #2.
    I withdraw both the troll comment and the fake comment. I just couldn't fathom having candidates iterate through a collection of puzzles that belong on an IQ or LSAT test. My problem hasn't been the intelligence of my candidates - it's their utter lack of programming potential.
  • hoodaticus 2011-04-20 14:50
    C-Octothorpe:
    hoodaticus:
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?
    I'm getting high right now.


    Damnit, I thought you were driving today!
    Whoa dude, I guess I forgot. I wonder how that happened.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 14:54
    Nagesh:

    I should have said software company. My mistake.
    If you are thinking TCS, then it is company that most programmer want to leave ASAP. So don't go there.


    Also don't give me link to old dated article.


    Didn't realize that the artice was from 2008 until I posted. I'm thinking Wipro, HCL or iGate.
  • Anon 2011-04-20 15:08
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?



    Hitler's birthday - Alex is a well know neo-Nazi

    #notintendedtobeafactualstatement
  • hoof 2011-04-20 15:47
    The REAL wtf is "sheepishly burst". Those two things do not belong in a sentence together, let alone right next to each other.

    CAPTCHA: dolor dolor bills y'all
  • Nagesh 2011-04-20 15:48
    Anon:
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?



    Hitler's birthday - Alex is a well know neo-Nazi

    #notintendedtobeafactualstatement


    Stop spreding rumours like this. HItler is not liked by anybody I know.
  • Nagesh 2011-04-20 15:50
    C-Octothorpe:
    Nagesh:

    I should have said software company. My mistake.
    If you are thinking TCS, then it is company that most programmer want to leave ASAP. So don't go there.


    Also don't give me link to old dated article.


    Didn't realize that the artice was from 2008 until I posted. I'm thinking Wipro, HCL or iGate.


    i impress that you know so much about india companies. iGate is trying to catch up. infy is still #1 place to go to work for. tcs paying peanut to programer and getting monkeys. i think lot of client all over world hire tcs for cheap price.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 15:55
    Nagesh:
    Anon:
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?



    Hitler's birthday - Alex is a well know neo-Nazi

    #notintendedtobeafactualstatement


    Stop spreding rumours like this. HItler is not liked by anybody I know.


    I'm not too sure about the skin-head scene in hyderabad, but everywhere else in the world, unfortunately it still lives on... Usually consists of extremists who are usually ignored by society as a whole, but nonetheless they do exist. You can usually spot the types from a mile away: eyes spaced close together, sloping forehead; almost like there was a little too much chlorine in the very shallow gene pool.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 15:57
    Nagesh:
    C-Octothorpe:
    Nagesh:

    I should have said software company. My mistake.
    If you are thinking TCS, then it is company that most programmer want to leave ASAP. So don't go there.


    Also don't give me link to old dated article.


    Didn't realize that the artice was from 2008 until I posted. I'm thinking Wipro, HCL or iGate.


    i impress that you know so much about india companies. iGate is trying to catch up. infy is still #1 place to go to work for. tcs paying peanut to programer and getting monkeys. i think lot of client all over world hire tcs for cheap price.


    I've personally worked with about 4 vendors from India, but I would say I had the best (least worst?) experience with iGate developers.
  • boog 2011-04-20 16:04
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.
    So top companies in India prefer to hire people on the basis of whether or not they think puzzles are really neat? Sounds very Job Interview 2.0.

    But it explains a lot.
  • Nagesh 2011-04-20 16:08
    boog:
    Nagesh:
    In interview process in India, top companies will often give puzzles to aspiring candidates. Once candidate has solved 50 puzzle in less than 1 hour, he can go for next level of interview. If you fail, you go home.
    So top companies in India prefer to hire people on the basis of whether or not they think puzzles are really neat? Sounds very Job Interview 2.0.

    But it explains a lot.


    i am person with bad english, but you're having reading comprehension trouble, madarchod! I said first level of interview. What part of that statement, you are not able to digest?
  • hoodaticus 2011-04-20 16:11
    Nagesh:
    Anon:
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".

    One a side note, is 4/20 a holiday at TDWTF?



    Hitler's birthday - Alex is a well know neo-Nazi

    #notintendedtobeafactualstatement


    Stop spreding rumours like this. HItler is not liked by anybody I know.
    Not in India, sure. But they basically worship him in Pakistan.
  • The Seventh Guy 2011-04-20 16:15
    Yeah, this one sounds like what'd I'd call a "pushback" interview. To see if you ever confront the interviewer, and how you go about it.

    For example for the question:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    You state: Well clearly it has to be that way or otherwise you'll never get the 1.21 gigawatts to the flux capacitor! Then follow up with, so for this software development position, just why are you so interested in my knowledge of electronic engineering? In my XX years of experience in this field I've never come across any need for deep-level understanding of the hardware at this level.... blah blah blah...

  • boog 2011-04-20 16:26
    Nagesh:
    boog:
    So top companies in India prefer to hire people on the basis of whether or not they think puzzles are really neat? Sounds very Job Interview 2.0.

    But it explains a lot.

    i am person with bad english, but you're having reading comprehension trouble, madarchod! I said first level of interview. What part of that statement, you are not able to digest?
    Apparently I also have "writing comprehension" trouble, since I completely failed to indicate my inability to "digest" your statement. Did I imply at all that you weren't talking about just the first level of interviews? Damn, looks like I didn't. In fact it looks almost like I didn't have any trouble "digesting" your statement at all. That can't possibly be right.

    Please except my sincere apologies, and in the future I'll try harder to demonstrate my supposedly-poor reading comprehension skills.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 16:35
    boog:
    Nagesh:
    boog:
    So top companies in India prefer to hire people on the basis of whether or not they think puzzles are really neat? Sounds very Job Interview 2.0.

    But it explains a lot.

    i am person with bad english, but you're having reading comprehension trouble, madarchod! I said first level of interview. What part of that statement, you are not able to digest?
    Apparently I also have "writing comprehension" trouble, since I completely failed to indicate my inability to "digest" your statement. Did I imply at all that you weren't talking about just the first level of interviews? Damn, looks like I didn't. In fact it looks almost like I didn't have any trouble "digesting" your statement at all. That can't possibly be right.

    Please except my sincere apologies, and in the future I'll try harder to demonstrate my supposedly-poor reading comprehension skills.


    The first step is admitting you have a problem, madarchod!
  • Satanicpuppy 2011-04-20 16:49
    Interviewer:
    Larry:
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.
    It sounds like a Stress Interview. The sixth guy's entire purpose may have been a psychological test of the applicant.


    I had one of those once, and I (apparently, from what they told me later) passed with flying colors, but it made me so angry I refused to have anything to do with the company.

    A couple of people in the interview chain really wanted me (again, apparently, since they kept calling, even after I'd taken a different job) but while I can handle abuse, I'm not going to work for a company that thinks that the *ability* to handle abuse is so necessary for their employees that they feel the need to test for it.
  • ÃÆâ€â„ 2011-04-20 17:01
    Satanicpuppy:
    Interviewer:
    Larry:
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.
    It sounds like a Stress Interview. The sixth guy's entire purpose may have been a psychological test of the applicant.


    I had one of those once, and I (apparently, from what they told me later) passed with flying colors, but it made me so angry I refused to have anything to do with the company.

    A couple of people in the interview chain really wanted me (again, apparently, since they kept calling, even after I'd taken a different job) but while I can handle abuse, I'm not going to work for a company that thinks that the *ability* to handle abuse is so necessary for their employees that they feel the need to test for it.


    You should have taken it, not many companies accept pussies.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-20 17:02
    Satanicpuppy:
    Interviewer:
    Larry:
    Being the third hardware question for what is apparently a programming job, it is time to stop answering and start asking.
    It sounds like a Stress Interview. The sixth guy's entire purpose may have been a psychological test of the applicant.


    I had one of those once, and I (apparently, from what they told me later) passed with flying colors, but it made me so angry I refused to have anything to do with the company.

    A couple of people in the interview chain really wanted me (again, apparently, since they kept calling, even after I'd taken a different job) but while I can handle abuse, I'm not going to work for a company that thinks that the *ability* to handle abuse is so necessary for their employees that they feel the need to test for it.


    Yeah, I had one of those too once where they kept calling to ask if I'm going to take the offer... The guy who interviewed me was a total douche bag, and of course would eventually be my boss. One of those book smart people (Masters in mathematics I believe) who looks down their nose at anybody without a PhD. I don't have a digree, but he was so impressed with me, we offered me the job. Unfortunately he had already made so many comments about people without digrees and how they make terrible developers that it was too much for me.

    It was nice to know that I was the only person ever that was offered a position in the company who didn't have a digree, and it felt even better to tell them to FOAD...
  • boog 2011-04-20 17:26
    C-Octothorpe:
    ...he was so impressed with me, we offered me the job. Unfortunately he had already made so many comments about people without digrees and how they make terrible developers that it was too much for me.
    Probably a good choice anyway. From what I can tell, people who repeatedly talk about how they "don't take kindly to" your type (whether it be gender/race/nationality/generation/education/work-history/language-backgrounds/preference-for-puzzles/etc) but offer you a job anyway often pay shit for wages.
  • drusi 2011-04-20 17:44
    hoof:
    The REAL wtf is "sheepishly burst". Those two things do not belong in a sentence together, let alone right next to each other.

    CAPTCHA: dolor dolor bills y'all


    You clearly haven't been watching the right sheep.

    Captcha points out that watching the right sheep can be illuminating.
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-20 17:58
    frits:
    C-Octothorpe:

    At one of my interviews, they made me write pseudo code on my skin with a piece of broken glass.


    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".



    I carved "Ave Sathanas" into my arm once. Sorry, twice.
  • Matt Westwood 2011-04-20 18:00
    hoof:
    The REAL wtf is "sheepishly burst". Those two things do not belong in a sentence together, let alone right next to each other.

    CAPTCHA: dolor dolor bills y'all


    I had a sheep once that burst. Messy.
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-21 00:34
    boog:
    C-Octothorpe:
    ...he was so impressed with me, we offered me the job. Unfortunately he had already made so many comments about people without digrees and how they make terrible developers that it was too much for me.
    Probably a good choice anyway. From what I can tell, people who repeatedly talk about how they "don't take kindly to" your type (whether it be gender/race/nationality/generation/education/work-history/language-backgrounds/preference-for-puzzles/etc) but offer you a job anyway often pay shit for wages.


    Oh, and I can't believe that I forgot to mention the real kicker: he has, for some really odd reason, a huge fetish with string interning (for the non.Netters: a mechanism for using the same string reference).

    He went on a tirade for about 45 minutes about it's design, etc. He likes it so much so that his entire data access layer was, get this, using interned strings! Yes, you read that right: the entire DAL was all dynamic SQL, BUT it's using string interning to improve performance.

    If that wasn't the worst case of preemtive optimization, and at the cost of security, that I have ever heard of, then punch me in the face and call me an ugly woman...

    I gave him a guarded "you're kidding, right?" look, just in case he was trying to test me. He then went on to say that LINQ to SQL does that anyway (parameters anyone?). I asked him if he's ever heard of SQL injection, to which he responded that he would ask me to fix that should I accept the position (I have a white-hat hacker, IT security background). He then went on another interesting tangent about how events were added by MS for security reasons (well no, but I won't argue with you because you're starting to scare me a bit).

    Hmm, starting to think that I should've submitted this as a interview WTF.
  • Darth Alex 2011-04-21 08:23
    I have reverenced Hitler's Birthday...pray I don't reverence the birthdays of any other mass murders.
  • Polar Bear 2011-04-21 08:37
    neminem:
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.

    While I would agree entirely with the first two, depending on the age of the children (or possibly not), it's entirely possible to imagine that they were certainly *not* being brought up to think that that was perfectly ok... but decided that they were going to do it anyway. Possibly even specifically for that reason. Did you never do anything your parents didn't want you to as a small child?


    Reminds me of my son. At age three, he was warned not to get his clothes muddy (he had a habbit of doing so) one spring day as he went outside to play. Fifteen minutes later, I looked out the window to see his clothes neatly piled on the grass, as he sat naked in a mud puddle...he was careful not to get his clothes muddy. I've since learned that his analytical skills far exceed most adults.
  • Anon 2011-04-21 08:51
    C-Octothorpe:

    One of those book smart people (Masters in mathematics I believe) who looks down their nose at anybody without a PhD.


    Odd for someone without a PhD. Did he look down on himself?

    I don't have a digree, but he was so impressed with me, we offered me the job.


    Clearly not in English anyway.
  • \m/ 2011-04-21 10:29
    frits:

    The only text I ever carved into my skin was "Slayer".


    SLAYER!!!
  • Nagesh 2011-04-21 11:14
    C-Octothorpe:
    boog:
    Nagesh:
    boog:
    So top companies in India prefer to hire people on the basis of whether or not they think puzzles are really neat? Sounds very Job Interview 2.0.

    But it explains a lot.

    i am person with bad english, but you're having reading comprehension trouble, madarchod! I said first level of interview. What part of that statement, you are not able to digest?
    Apparently I also have "writing comprehension" trouble, since I completely failed to indicate my inability to "digest" your statement. Did I imply at all that you weren't talking about just the first level of interviews? Damn, looks like I didn't. In fact it looks almost like I didn't have any trouble "digesting" your statement at all. That can't possibly be right.

    Please except my sincere apologies, and in the future I'll try harder to demonstrate my supposedly-poor reading comprehension skills.


    The first step is admitting you have a problem, madarchod!


    Cool, you're learning Hindi gaalis (bad words)!
  • boog 2011-04-21 12:06
    Nagesh:
    C-Octothorpe:
    The first step is admitting you have a problem, madarchod!

    Cool, you're learning Hindi gaalis (bad words)!
    And before too long he'll be able to impersonate Indian programmers too. Way to go, C-Octo!
  • C-Octothorpe 2011-04-21 13:16
    boog:
    Nagesh:
    C-Octothorpe:
    The first step is admitting you have a problem, madarchod!

    Cool, you're learning Hindi gaalis (bad words)!
    And before too long he'll be able to impersonate Indian programmers too. Way to go, C-Octo!


    Sorry, was I encouraging him?
  • Chris 2011-04-26 10:30
    The Sixth Guy is my hero! I once went on an interview for a Programming position where the interviewer peppered me with programming theory questions that I could not have possibly anticipated, could not have possibly answered without having an OOP textbook at the ready, and had nothing to do with everyday coding ability. It's nice to see the tables get turned for once :-)
  • JohnB 2011-04-26 14:03
    Hasteur:
    Wow... I'm not going to begin to consider how messed up it is to

    1. Bring your kids to a job interview
    2. Leave them in the car during the day
    3. parent them in the fact that it's perfectly ok to get naked in public and swim in strange pools.
    Life is filled with minor "emergencies" and the lack of an available baby sitter falls into that category. So ...

    1. As an interviewee: I'd have brought them into the building with me, explained the situation to the company and, based on their recation, immediately have found out what kind of company I'd be working for.

    2. As an interviewer: Yeah, that was truly dumb.

    3. As an interviewer: I'd have gone into panic-stricken mode ... who knows what the corporate insurance policy would specify in a situation like that. OTOH, they're little kids ... naked and swimming should be part of their lives (have you *never* gone skinny dipping!) so going naked in public is hardly an issue.
  • anno 2011-04-26 14:52
    McFly:
    "Moving on, why would one choose a power generation using the relative motion of conductors and fluxes instead of the modial interaction of magneto reluctance and capacitive duractance?"

    There is only one correct answer to this:

    Flux capacitor... fluxing!


    correct answer would be:
    because they did not know any better!
    the relative motion of conductors and fluxes can be avoided by bypassing it altogether and tying the flux capacitor directly with the arc reactor. This will increase the power output by 200% ..
  • Mr. Reed 2011-05-27 11:57
    I don't think you get that this is another description of the Turboencabulator.

    The 6th guy was definitely just messing with him since he asked such a tricky question meant to confuse layman. Finally, he was most likely an engineer considering the questions and the fact that the Turboencabulator is an engineering inside joke.
  • Mike 2012-11-13 10:47
    One is real the other is techno-babble: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turboencabulator .