The Brillant Paula Bean, J2ME Edition

  • JC 2005-12-30 13:12
    me reason I am reminded of Triumph the Insult Comic Dog.<br>
    <br>
    getPaula() ... FOR ME TO POOP ON!!!&nbsp;&nbsp; <br>
  • JC 2005-12-30 13:13
    Awesome... I got the first one in... now I can laugh at the idiots who
    proclaim proudly, "FIRST!" when they're the 3rd or 4th post. :)<br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2005-12-30 13:15
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    Being the end of the year and all, I thought it'd be appropriate to name the "Post of the Year." But, since that would involve trudging through a year's worth of posts, I decided instead to revisit the classic <a href="/forums/40043/ShowPost.aspx">Brillant Paula Bean</a> ...
    <br><br>Gah!&nbsp; Just when I though that "Brillant" (French for "brilliant", not that anyone cares) was finally on the way out.<br><br>And I missed first today (and eleventh yesterday), too.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • MikeB 2005-12-30 13:18
    My eyes! The goggles they once again do Nothing!&nbsp; ROFL it's even funnier the second time.
  • bugmenot 2005-12-30 13:18
    That's horrible.&nbsp; You should always start class names with an upper case letter.<br>
  • benvenista 2005-12-30 13:20
    yikes... I shudder to think what she billed for those months of doing absolutely nothing
  • mlathe 2005-12-30 13:21
    and no constructor... tisk tisk
  • Evets 2005-12-30 13:21
    Anonymous:
    Awesome... I got the first one in... now I can laugh at the idiots who
    proclaim proudly, "FIRST!" when they're the 3rd or 4th post. :)<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    FIRST!<br>
    <br>
    ah damn.<br>
    <br>
    I actually enjoyed reading the Paula Bean story when I first saw it.&nbsp; Sometimes I wonder how these people get hired.<br>
  • foxyshadis 2005-12-30 13:31
    Anonymous:
    <br>
    <br>
    FIRST!<br>
    <br>
    ah damn.<br>
    <br>
    I actually enjoyed reading the Paula Bean story when I first saw it.&nbsp; Sometimes I wonder how these people get hired.<br>
    <br>Well developed BS skills. Everyone technical needs to learn to hone their BS skills, because no matter how awesome (or inferior) your techie skill, most managers will always pick the one that BSes them the farthest.<br>
  • travisowens 2005-12-30 13:37
    Here testing code is umm... brilliant!
  • travisowens 2005-12-30 13:38
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    Awesome... I got the first one in... now I can laugh at the idiots who proclaim proudly, "FIRST!" when they're the 3rd or 4th post. :)
    HA!&nbsp; You weren't first.&nbsp; Now go and laugh at yourself.</P>
  • MighMoS 2005-12-30 13:40
    Yeah, but take a look at how many bugs are in the code.  Quality over quantity.<br>
  • anon 2005-12-30 13:44
    You may want to check the authors on the first and second posts, guy.   <br>
  • dshiznit 2005-12-30 13:49
    travisowens:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    Awesome... I got the first one in... now I can laugh at the idiots who proclaim proudly, "FIRST!" when they're the 3rd or 4th post. :)
    HA!&nbsp; You weren't first.&nbsp; Now go and laugh at yourself.</p>
    <br><br>He actually did have the first post. It was his second post that pointed out this fact. I almost sent the same reply, but caught myself.<br>
  • Anonymous 2005-12-30 13:51
    Reminds me of an incident early in my career - a new "experienced" fortran programmer was given the assignment of changing some code to copy one large COMMON block (remember those?) to another.  The next day his boss asked if he was done yet -- He wasn't!  Two days later, still not done!  At the end of the week the boss looked at the new employee's code (still incomplete) and found 5000 lines of:<br><br>blockB[1] = blockA[1]<br>blockB[2] = blockA[2]<br>blockB[3] = blockA[3]<br>...<br><br>The "experienced" programmer didn't think of using a loop...<br><br><br>
  • Rick 2005-12-30 13:59
    A number of years ago a friend told me about her friend who made a good living as a Java programmer in Manhattan without being able to speak a word of English, only Russian. <br><br>His business model was to find 5 to 7 people who could successfully get jobs as programmers without being actually able to code. They would email him their assignments and he would email back the code. <br><br>Maybe Paula misplaced his email address. <a href="">:)</a><br><br><br>
  • Daruku 2005-12-30 14:11
    What no unit tests?&nbsp; Paula should be fired!!!!!!<br>
  • flobi 2005-12-30 14:30
    This reminds me of a guy at my workplace who spends all day browsing the Internet and he's got a project due by the end of the year and he's not nearly done...doh!&nbsp; Oh shit, I guess I best get back to work.&nbsp;
  • KraGiE 2005-12-30 14:41
    this was awesome!&nbsp; haha.&nbsp; I love this site.&nbsp; It keeps me sane.
  • BiggBru 2005-12-30 14:45
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    <P>&nbsp;
    <BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>
    <BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><PRE><FONT color=#000099>package</FONT> test;

    <FONT color=#000099>public class</FONT> paulaBean {

    <FONT color=#000099>private String</FONT> paula = <FONT color=#009900>"Brillant"</FONT>;

    <FONT color=#000099>public String</FONT> getPaula() {
    <FONT color=#000099>return</FONT> paula;
    }
    }</PRE></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P>
    </P>
    <P>Two things:&nbsp;</P>
    <P>1)&nbsp;Is the statement "return paula" the result of the getPaula() function, or is it what the company wish they could have done sooner?</P>
    <P>2) Has anybody thought about the fact that Paula could potentially&nbsp;declare a variable <EM>String bean</EM>?</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
  • BiggBru 2005-12-30 14:46
    <P>Oh, and Happy New Year to all!</P>
    <P>[&lt;:o)]</P>
  • Chucara 2005-12-30 15:23
    The real WTF for me is how anyone can hire a completely unknown person, and have her work for months without actually checking her work.<br><br>Even if I'd never have suspected her of being this bad, I'd still want to ensure that she didn't code like a leprous gazelle.<br>
  • Dave L 2005-12-30 15:24
    That was actually version 2.0 of Paula's program.  Version 1.0 looked like this:<br><br><span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply"><pre><font>package</font> test;<br><br><font>public class</font> helloBean {<br><br> <font>private String</font> hello = <font>"Hello World!"</font>;<br><br> <font>public String</font> getHello() {<br> <font>return</font> hello;<br> }<br>}<br><br>It took extensive refactoring for her to update the code, I'm sure.<br></pre></span><br>
  • Eric the .5b 2005-12-30 15:52
    Rick:
    A number of years ago a friend told me about her friend who made a good living as a Java programmer in Manhattan without being able to speak a word of English, only Russian. <br><br>His business model was to find 5 to 7 people who could successfully get jobs as programmers without being actually able to code. They would email him their assignments and he would email back the code. <br>
    <br><br>If you can't make a good living as 5-to-7 Java programmers, you need to move somewhere with a lower cost of living...<br>
  • No one special 2005-12-30 15:58
    Hm, as this is my third post to the site over the last few months, maybe I should finally think about registering...<br><br>Anyway, I worked at a company once where I was tasked (along with two others who made up our team) to hire 5 to 10 people very quickly for a Java project.  This was during the dot-com days, obviously, where money was no object.  My boss actually said to me that we needed the team as quickly as possible, and not to worry too much about the quality... we could always fire some people and hire replacements if needed over the next few months.<br><br>Ugh.  We didn't like it at the time, but mainly because I thought it was unkind.  Today I look back on it and see it with new horror on all sorts of levels.<br><br>Anyway, we had our team in about two or three weeks or so.  We did actually do interviews, but none of us were too experienced on how you properly do interviews.  We looked at resumes, relevant experience, personalities (to see if the team would work together well), etc, but never did any technical questions beyond asking people to describe their prior work.  Miraculously, most of the team actually wound up being pretty good.  I think we hired around 7 people.  Maybe 6.  2 of them were fresh out of college.<br><br>Amazingly, only one guy was a total bust.  He had absolutely no real world knowledge of programming that I could detect.  He was one of our two kids recently out of school, to be sure, but his degree was in Computer Science!  I mean, I expected him to at least be able to do simple projects, but the questions he asked of myself and the other two "senior" team members were ludicrous.  Questions about simple case statements, the difference between passing by reference and passing by value, and so on, just basic stuff.  He was fired a week after he started.  But to this day, I wonder about his interview.  We asked him about specific Java technologies (not to quiz him, but to just ask if he had any experience with them) and he claimed he had all sorts of hobbyist experience along with his classwork in specifically what we were asking for.  What did he think he was going to do on the job?  How would he think he'd be able to get away with not really knowing anything?<br><br>Seeing a post like this, I now understand.  He must have thought we wouldn't review his work or even check up on him, possibly for years!  (But then why ask us the questions he did?)<br><br>Even more strange, I wonder how he graduated.<br><br>
  • No one special 2005-12-30 15:59
    Oh, almost forgot.&nbsp; He was surprised at being fired.<br><br>
  • Masklinn 2005-12-30 16:03
    Anonymous:
    Reminds me of an incident early in my career -
    a new "experienced" fortran programmer was given the assignment of
    changing some code to copy one large COMMON block (remember those?) to
    another.  The next day his boss asked if he was done yet -- He
    wasn't!  Two days later, still not done!  At the end of the
    week the boss looked at the new employee's code (still incomplete) and
    found 5000 lines of:<br><br>blockB[1] = blockA[1]<br>blockB[2] = blockA[2]<br>blockB[3] = blockA[3]<br>...<br><br>The "experienced" programmer didn't think of using a loop...<br><br><br>

    <p>A Real Programmer doesn't use loops, loops are for quiche-eaters. A Real Programmer uses GOTO, which is how God meant programs to be written.</p>
  • TankerJoe 2005-12-30 17:00
    travisowens:
    <p>
    Anonymous:
    Awesome... I got
    the first one in... now I can laugh at the idiots who proclaim proudly,
    "FIRST!" when they're the 3rd or 4th post. :)
    HA!&nbsp; You
    weren't first.&nbsp; Now go and laugh at yourself.</p>
    <br>
    <br>
    Bonus! You can laugh at travisowens also!&nbsp; I certainly did.<br>
  • Pain 2005-12-30 17:07
    I had similar experience myself with my first ever hiree. Nice Chinese lad with a good degree in Math/Comp-Sci, claimed to know C++ and a few bits of webby technologies. Bit on the quiet side during the interview but I put that down to nerves. Anyways, put him to work the first week with a relatively simple task (some simple HTML parsing if I recall) and kept checking up on him..asking him if he was OK, if he needed any help or pointers etc. (I even more or less did the code for him at one point on paper). On the 4th day though, with him STILL not having approached me with any work, I thought Id sit in with him and see how he was doing....in 4 days he'd managed to write 'cout << "<html> some html</html>";'. 1 line in 4 days. Needless to say we let him go on the 5th day.<br><br>In my defense for having hired him, we'd had only 3 candidates because the job was paying peanuts and although I didnt want to hire any of them my PHB had told me "Just f***** hire one of them, how hard can it be?". However I wish Id gone for the 50+ year old alcoholic with 5 teeth instead......<br><br><br>
  • TankerJoe 2005-12-30 17:09
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Reminds me of an incident early in my career -
    a new "experienced" fortran programmer was given the assignment of
    changing some code to copy one large COMMON block (remember those?) to
    another.&nbsp; The next day his boss asked if he was done yet -- He
    wasn't!&nbsp; Two days later, still not done!&nbsp; At the end of the
    week the boss looked at the new employee's code (still incomplete) and
    found 5000 lines of:<br><br>blockB[1] = blockA[1]<br>blockB[2] = blockA[2]<br>blockB[3] = blockA[3]<br>...<br><br>The "experienced" programmer didn't think of using a loop...<br><br><br>

    <p>A Real Programmer doesn't use loops, loops are for quiche-eaters. A
    Real Programmer uses GOTO, which is how God meant programs to be
    written.</p>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    This is true.&nbsp; One only has to read the story of mel to know.&nbsp; <br>
    <br>
    http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/mel.html<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
  • Albatross 2005-12-30 18:16
    <P>I&nbsp;vote we save Alex the trouble and&nbsp;call this the post of the year anyway.</P>
    <P>But why does this forum software edit in Times New Roman, and display in Arial?</P>
  • Kiss me, I'm Polish 2005-12-30 20:14
    I remember interviewing a bunch of unemployed girls for a "keyboard punching" post. All we needed was som basic computer knowledge, and ability to fill an Access form. We didn't actually need a girl, but no boys applied for the post.<br>One of the interviewees had an amazing resume, which claimed that she knew not only some common applications (like, say, MS Office), but there was also "Lotus". <br>We asked her what that Lotus thing was about (could be Notes, Domino, 1-2-3 or whatever) just out of curiosity. After some vague "you know, it does uh stuff like uh it works", the girl cracked and explained that she was supposed to learn it <br>in class, but she wasn't there that day.<br>We hired another girl, and that was a disaster too.<br>
  • Bob Balaban 2005-12-30 20:47
    Funny! I hope people will not confuse with Paula Dean (<A href="http://www.ladyandsons.com/">http://www.ladyandsons.com/</A>), fabulous cook and star of her own Food TV show. Paula Dean would kick PaulaBean's butt.
  • Djinn 2005-12-30 21:06
    I seriously think I'm depressed now for having read this. Truly a WTF, and though I've only been here a few months, I also vote this WTF of 05.<br>
  • Zlodo 2005-12-30 21:33
    Albatross:
    <p>I vote we save Alex the trouble and call this the post of the year anyway.</p>
    <p>But why does this forum software edit in Times New Roman, and display in Arial?</p>
    <br>
    <br>
    This forum software is an endless source of puzzlement. I think that by
    now its quirkiness can be considered part of the charm of this website
    :)<br>
  • Whatever. 2005-12-30 22:15
    Anonymous:
    <br>Even more strange, I wonder how he graduated.<br><br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Ah...I remember graduating with my CS degree back more than 10 years
    ago (damn...I'm getting old)   Some of my classmates who also
    graduated with a CS degree I would never hire in a million years. 
    Some of them actually could program, but would get stumped on how to
    copy a file from one floppy to another.   Jeez...you just
    spent four years pretty much saying "this is what I want my life to be
    about" (yes...CS is more about algorithims, and computers are just the
    tools to implement them, but in the real world over here, they were all
    wanting to get jobs as programmers, not thinkers of Big O).<br>
    <br>
    In our assembly class, I did two versions of my code.  One I would
    turn in, and one I would be nice and share on the mainframe.  This
    way if someone did copy it, I didn't get busted.  I usually left
    the last couple steps as an exercise for the user as
    well.    That's how these people get out there.<br>
    <br>
    Reminds me also of someone we interviewed for a job once - all the
    questions we asked about DNS, Perl, Unix, etc... (it was a Unix job)
    were answered with either "I have a friend that does that" or "I have a
    book on it".    I was told it'd be rude to ask if he had
    the friends number with him :)<br>
  • I Agree 2005-12-30 23:24
    <<span id="PostFlatView"> I was told it'd be rude to ask if he had
    the friends number with him><br><br>I'd rather hire 10 guys that know who to ask for the answer than 1 of the "experts" we've seen here repeatedly.<br><br>Thanks.<br></span>
  • htowninsomniac 2005-12-31 00:43
    I don't understand how something like this can happen. How can months
    go by without anything tangible? How can an employer hire someone who
    obviously doesn't have a clue? Hiring someone mediocre might happen,
    but THIS?<br>
  • htowninsomniac 2005-12-31 00:47
    Anonymous:
    Some of my classmates who also
    graduated with a CS degree I would never hire in a million years.
    <br>
    <br>
    Yes, unfortunately I have to agree. I've had some people that later
    graduated with a Bachelor of Science as partners who didn't know
    anything. Quickly I found out that it would actually be less work for
    me if I told them I'd do the assignment myself (they wouldn't have to
    do anything) than to explain everything I do. Mea culpa. That's how
    they get through.<br>
  • cg 2005-12-31 03:20
    I agree.

    It took her a couple of months to get that code out?

    Damn, as an inexperienced recent c.s. grad it would only take me, like, a week to do that...

    And I can't find a job.

    *rolls eyes*

    ---------------------
    See, I don't use emoticons...
  • K.Ovaska 2005-12-31 05:11
    I'm sure she was just following good software engineering practices.
    She had been gathering and analyzing requirements, assessing risks,
    doing research on the algorithms involved, doing user interface design
    and testing with paper prototypes, constructing detailed UML models,
    estimating the performance of the finished software and making detailed
    unit, integration, system and acceptance test plans. She was juuust
    about ready to start the implementation phase.
  • Guest 2005-12-31 06:21
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    <br>Even more strange, I wonder how he graduated.<br><br>
    <br>
    In our assembly class, I did two versions of my code.  One I would
    turn in, and one I would be nice and share on the mainframe.<br>
    ...   <br>
    That's how these people get out there.<br>
    <br>
    The real WTF here is why?<br>
  • Wodin 2005-12-31 07:37
    <div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply">A Real Programmer doesn't use loops,
    loops are for quiche-eaters. A Real Programmer uses GOTO, which is how
    God meant programs to be written.<br>
    </span></div>
    <br>
    What are you talking about?&nbsp; GOTO is only one way to implement a loop!<span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply"></span><br>
    <span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply"></span>
  • Yowza 2005-12-31 10:25
    Anonymous:
    <br><br>blockB[1] = blockA[1]<br>blockB[2] = blockA[2]<br>blockB[3] = blockA[3]<br>...<br>
    <br><br>I have actually written code that looks quite like that:<br><br>blockB1 = blockA1<br>blockB2 = blockA2<br>etc...<br><br>The trick was that those variables were differently aligned bit fields. The compiler does good job at combining the writes as much as possible. A loop could have been possible but certainly less maintenable and probably at least equally slow.<br>
  • Lon Varscsak 2005-12-31 13:29
    Has no one realized that Paula spelled brilliant wrong?
  • Ytram 2005-12-31 13:39
    <P>
    Lon Varscsak:
    Has no one realized that Paula spelled brilliant wrong?
    </P>
    <P>Congratulations Lon, you were the FIRST person to notice that.&nbsp; It wasn't one of the main things that made the original post hilarious.&nbsp; It didn't give the original WTF a complete element of irony.&nbsp; AND out of the over 150 comments spread out over more than 3 pages, YOU were the first to catch it.</P>
  • TankerJoe 2005-12-31 13:57
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    Has no one realized that Paula spelled brilliant wrong?
    </P>
    <P>Wow, It is indeed a good thing that we have <STRONG>Lon Varscsak </STRONG>around here to point these things out to us poor ignorant plebes.&nbsp; He must be brillant!</P>
  • Another Anonymous 2005-12-31 14:42
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    <br>Even more strange, I wonder how he graduated.<br><br>
    <br>
    In our assembly class, I did two versions of my code.  One I would
    turn in, and one I would be nice and share on the mainframe.<br>
    ...   <br>
    That's how these people get out there.<br>
    <br>
    The real WTF here is why?<br>
    <br><br>I did a similar thing in some of my CS classes.  I did the assignment and printed a single copy and gave it to a group of struggling people.  I would then go and redo the assignment differently for myself.<br><br>The reason I did this was that I would be pestered in all hours of the night for help on homework.  I got so many questions like, "What is a variable and why should I use one?" "How do I do this assignment?" "How do I make something happen sometimes?"  "Where's the command that generates this program?"<br><br>It was never ending.  I got so fed up with it.  The only way I could get sleep was if I just gave them the answer.  I figure it's their problem, when they don't know how to do anything on the test.  It's the professors fault they passed.  If you fail all the tests and ace all the homeworks, obviously something is wrong.  Also, the professors seemed to have a problem giving anything worse than a B if you showed up.<br>
  • rsynnott 2005-12-31 15:50
    Anonymous:

    <br>
    In our assembly class, I did two versions of my code.  One I would
    turn in, and one I would be nice and share on the mainframe.  This
    way if someone did copy it, I didn't get busted.  I usually left
    the last couple steps as an exercise for the user as
    well.    That's how these people get out there.<br>
    <br>


    So you mean it's your fault. Bad. (I've done this too, so I suppose I can't complain too much...)

    And yes, it's amazing how far people can get in quite decent CS degrees without actually being any good.
  • dave 2005-12-31 20:33
    Anonymous:
    all the
    questions we asked about DNS, Perl, Unix, etc... (it was a Unix job)
    were answered with either "I have a friend that does that" or "I have a
    book on it". 


    This is one of the common misconceptions of interviewing - the aim is not to find out what the person *knows* but how well a person can find out information and use it.

    For example, I was once asked about a switch for the 'ls' command in an interview. My answer was "Who cares? I can do a 'man ls' and find out" - that's the distinction - not that I know every tiny bit of easily found information about something, that I know where to look and how to use those resources...

    I'm always called an evil interviewer as I follow the above principle ;-)
  • hahas 2006-01-01 01:38
    It's like the people who try to be witty about it always end up looking stupid.<br>
  • Lon Varscsak 2006-01-01 19:26
    TankerJoe:
    <P>Wow, It is indeed a good thing that we have <STRONG>Lon Varscsak </STRONG>around here to point these things out to us poor ignorant plebes.  He must be brillant!</P>


    LOL!
  • anoni 2006-01-02 02:59
    Obviously the former wife of Mr. Bean.<br>
  • dhromed 2006-01-02 08:02
    In an interview, ask them to write a standard for loop on some array.<br><br>If someone applying for a programming job cannot write a for loop, they have no business in a programming job.<br>
  • Gravity 2006-01-02 08:12
    A really good idea.&nbsp; Although as a candidate I hate them, but interviews really should involve technical testing.<br>
    <br>
    I work for a big US multinational (as a Java contractor, albeit one who
    can actually code!) and about a year ago we hired a new guy to join our
    very small and specialised team.&nbsp; We use a custom framework and
    platform so were just looking for good Unix, Java, Perl and XML
    skills.&nbsp; My manager hired someone who refused to tell us where
    he'd worked before (very odd) and despite having Unix on his CV, I
    found myself having to teach him to use basic commands like ls.&nbsp;
    Talking about pipes got me a very blank look.&nbsp; He was fired within
    a week, but I just can't believe we hired him in the first place!<br>
  • jwenting 2006-01-02 08:48
    <P>
    dave:
    Anonymous:
    all the questions we asked about DNS, Perl, Unix, etc... (it was a Unix job) were answered with either "I have a friend that does that" or "I have a book on it".&nbsp;
    This is one of the common misconceptions of interviewing - the aim is not to find out what the person *knows* but how well a person can find out information and use it. For example, I was once asked about a switch for the 'ls' command in an interview. My answer was "Who cares? I can do a 'man ls' and find out" - that's the distinction - not that I know every tiny bit of easily found information about something, that I know where to look and how to use those resources... I'm always called an evil interviewer as I follow the above principle ;-)
    </P>
    <P>Quite the contrary. I've experienced interviews where everything was about knowledge of tiny details like that. As soon as I didn't have the exact answer, the interview was over.<BR>That seems to be ever more the norm in Europe and the US now that it's once again an employers' market and companies can again make impossible demands on candidates.<BR>After all, they can always pull out a can of Indians or Romanians instead.</P>
    <P>Remember the days in the mid/late '90s when they were asking for 10 years' experience worth in Java and Windows 2000? They're back.</P>
  • jwenting 2006-01-02 08:57
    <P>
    Gravity:
    A really good idea.&nbsp; Although as a candidate I hate them, but interviews really should involve technical testing.<BR><BR>I work for a big US multinational (as a Java contractor, albeit one who can actually code!) and about a year ago we hired a new guy to join our very small and specialised team.&nbsp; We use a custom framework and platform so were just looking for good Unix, Java, Perl and XML skills.&nbsp; My manager hired someone who refused to tell us where he'd worked before (very odd) and despite having Unix on his CV, I found myself having to teach him to use basic commands like ls.&nbsp; Talking about pipes got me a very blank look.&nbsp; He was fired within a week, but I just can't believe we hired him in the first place!<BR>
    </P>
    <P>Your problem for not having alarm bells go off when he refused to tell you where he'd worked before...<BR>Would you instead go asking people for minute details of your custom framework (yes, I've seen it happen)? That would ensure noone passes your interview except MAYBE people currently working on the team.</P>
    <P>You'd never hire me as I always do terrible on such "aptitude tests", despite doing quite well in my work. <BR>I've seen total failures do very good on them though.<BR><BR>And you'd likely hire one of the guys I used to work with. He did very well on interviews, was extremely slick.<BR>He knew all the buzzwords, and even knew enough about them to make people believe he knew more than just the words.<BR>But his entire CV was a fabrication (as we found out after 5 years, he fooled everyone for that long). His diplomas didn't exist (he'd claimed they had been lost in a housefire), his employment history was greatly exagerated (but impossible to track down as none of the companies existed anymore, something he has in common with me).<BR>Only when a customer found him lacking even basic skills he claimed to have and threatened to sue us for faking his CV was he investigated and were attempts made to find his education history which turned up none of the schools or universities he claimed to have attended had ever heard from him.</P>
    <P>He'd have passed your interviews, probably done well enough for a while too, until he wouldn't have someone to fall back on.</P>
  • Anonymous 2006-01-02 11:04
    I wonder how the weekly status meetings went. First few months; sounds
    like 8 meetings, at least. I've never had specs that I didn't have a
    question about. I've never been in a project where I didn't have to
    elaborate (during any meeting) to some detail how I solved a
    problem/issue/whatever. If the specs are that clear, it should be
    fairly easy to pin-point progress, so, what happend?<br>
    <br>
  • Gravity 2006-01-02 11:08
    jwenting:
    <br>
    Your problem for not having alarm bells go off when he refused to tell you where he'd worked before...<br>
    <p>Would you instead go asking people for minute details of your custom
    framework (yes, I've seen it happen)? That would ensure noone passes
    your interview except MAYBE people currently working on the team.</p>
    <p>You'd never hire me as I always do terrible on such "aptitude tests", despite doing quite well in my work. <br>I've seen total failures do very good on them though.<br><br>And you'd likely hire one of the guys I used to work with. He did very well on interviews, was extremely slick.<br>He knew all the buzzwords, and even knew enough about them to make people believe he knew more than just the words.<br>But
    his entire CV was a fabrication (as we found out after 5 years, he
    fooled everyone for that long). His diplomas didn't exist (he'd claimed
    they had been lost in a housefire), his employment history was greatly
    exagerated (but impossible to track down as none of the companies
    existed anymore, something he has in common with me).<br>Only when a
    customer found him lacking even basic skills he claimed to have and
    threatened to sue us for faking his CV was he investigated and were
    attempts made to find his education history which turned up none of the
    schools or universities he claimed to have attended had ever heard from
    him.</p>
    <p>He'd have passed your interviews, probably done well enough for a while too, until he wouldn't have someone to fall back on.</p>
    <br>
    <br>
    Unfortunately I wasn't allowed to help out in the interview process,
    being a contractor.&nbsp; The refusing to tell us where he'd worked
    before happened on his first day in the office. We certainly wouldn't
    have asked any questions about our framework and platform for the very
    reason that no-one would have a clue.&nbsp; <br>
    <br>
    And note I didn't say aptitude tests.&nbsp; I said technical
    tests.&nbsp; Like being asked to write some code, do some basic stuff
    in Unix, make the candidate prove that they really do know XPath.&nbsp;
    Simple, easy things that anyone who hasn't lied on their CV can
    do.&nbsp; I can't abide general aptitude tests because they don't give
    you any meaningful information about a person.<br>
  • FrostCat 2006-01-02 11:30
    "Charm?"&nbsp; Is that what you call it?
  • FrostCat 2006-01-02 11:35
    Regarding your second paragraph--I knew people like that too, and I eventually reached the point where I stopped providing freebies like that.&nbsp; It's only enabling, and it's not fair to them.&nbsp; If they're not cut out for it, better they learn while they can still hopefully change their major, rather than get fired a few times.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
  • FrostCat 2006-01-02 11:45
    <P>
    FrostCat:
    Regarding your second paragraph--I knew people like that too, and I eventually reached the point where I stopped providing freebies like that.&nbsp; It's only enabling, and it's not fair to them.&nbsp; If they're not cut out for it, better they learn while they can still hopefully change their major, rather than get fired a few times.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
    </P>
    <P>Grr.&nbsp; I got yer WTF right here, and it's the fact that the forum software omitted what I wanted to quote, which was this, from Whatever.:</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>
    In our assembly class, I did two versions of my code.&nbsp; One I would turn in, and one I would be nice and share on the mainframe.&nbsp; This way if someone did copy it, I didn't get busted.&nbsp; I usually left the last couple steps as an exercise for the user as well.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; That's how these people get out there.
    </P>
  • chttr 2006-01-02 11:50
    It's no problem to get far in anything if you always cheat.
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-01-02 12:25
    Anonymous:
    I did a similar thing in some of my CS classes.&nbsp; I did the assignment and printed a single copy and gave it to a group of struggling people.&nbsp; I would then go and redo the assignment differently for myself.
    <br><br>I never bothered.<br><br>
    The reason I did this was that I would be pestered in all hours of the night for help on homework.&nbsp; I got so many questions like, "What is a variable and why should I use one?" "How do I do this assignment?" "How do I make something happen sometimes?"&nbsp; "Where's the command that generates this program?"
    <br><br>It is in the textbook.<br><br>
    It was never ending.&nbsp; I got so fed up with it.&nbsp; The only way I could get sleep was if I just gave them the answer.&nbsp; I figure it's their problem, when they don't know how to do anything on the test.&nbsp; It's the professors fault they passed.&nbsp; If you fail all the tests and ace all the homeworks, obviously something is wrong.&nbsp; Also, the professors seemed to have a problem giving anything worse than a B if you showed up.
    <br><br>I did not have that problem.&nbsp; I was prepared to help people and I did so, but I resisted any efforts by them to make their homework my problem.&nbsp; You have to watch it.&nbsp; There is a certain point where you are simply enabling them.&nbsp; I also ran into this in the writing centre where I tutored.&nbsp; No, I will not give you the answer.&nbsp; You work for it.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • EvanED 2006-01-02 13:59
    Gene Wirchenko:
    I was prepared to help people and I did so, but I resisted any efforts by them to make their homework my problem.  You have to watch it.  There is a certain point where you are simply enabling them.  I also ran into this in the writing centre where I tutored.  No, I will not give you the answer.  You work for it.
    <br><br>I'm TI (teaching intern; similar in responsibilities as a TA except I don't have to grade and I'm an undergrad) for the second semester programming class at my college, and do things similarly. I almost always will sit down with someone and make them reason through how to solve it, asking questions intended to lead to the answer, but not detailed enough that they make it too easy. Sometimes if there's multiple ways to do things I'll explain both ways and the pros and cons of each way and let them pick which way they want to go.<br>
  • neek 2006-01-02 14:45
    <span style="font-family: Arial;"><font size="2">Send Paula picture! =)</font><br></span>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-01-02 14:49
    Anonymous:
    Gene Wirchenko:
    I was prepared to help people and I did so, but I resisted any efforts by them to make their homework my problem.&nbsp; You have to watch it.&nbsp; There is a certain point where you are simply enabling them.&nbsp; I also ran into this in the writing centre where I tutored.&nbsp; No, I will not give you the answer.&nbsp; You work for it.
    <br><br>I'm TI (teaching intern; similar in responsibilities as a TA except I don't have to grade and I'm an undergrad) for the second semester programming class at my college, and do things similarly. I almost always will sit down with someone and make them reason through how to solve it, asking questions intended to lead to the answer, but not detailed enough that they make it too easy. Sometimes if there's multiple ways to do things I'll explain both ways and the pros and cons of each way and let them pick which way they want to go.
    <br><br>My favourite question when tutoring is "Why do you say that?"<br><br>Sometimes, there is a bit of training time.&nbsp; "No, I did not say you are wrong, but why do you say that?"&nbsp; I want your reason.&nbsp; There is quite a difference between "That is what it says in the book." and "That is what it says in the book, and from what happened in my earlier projects, that makes sense."&nbsp; There is also, "I am guessing.&nbsp; I think it has to be around x because of y, but I do not know how to narrow it down further."<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • BenJammin 2006-01-02 15:51
    jwenting:
    <p>Remember the days in the mid/late '90s when
    they were asking for 10 years' experience worth in Java and Windows
    2000? They're back.</p>
    <br>
    <br>
    I don't think they ever left. I think it's only getting worse. In 2003, I saw a job on Monster.Com for a windows<br>
    admin needing 5 years of experience with Windows2000.<br>
    <br>Not that I wanted the job (windows, eww <a href="">:D</a> ), but I
    kindly wrote them an email stating that they would never find such a
    candidate as Windows 2000 came out in very late 1999. Sooooooo... they
    might want to consider revising their job ad.<br>
    <br>
    I ACTUALLY GOT A RESPONSE. The woman commented I was the only person to
    point it out... and that "touche' " and that she would have it changed
    immediately.<br>
    <br>Interestingly, she also did not ask for my resume, if I was available or if I would like to interview for the position.<br>
    <br>
    Because I can ALSO tell you that company owners SAY they want to hire
    people smarter than them (I've seen it quoted in magazines) but that's
    never the case. It's because they hire managers, and managers NEVER want to hire people smarter than them.
    Makes 'em look bad.<br>
    <br>
    :)<br>
    <br>
     -Ben<br>
    <br>
  • cg 2006-01-02 16:39
    Giving people my code always made me nervous. Where I went to school, the C.S. department was paranoid about cheating, to the point that showing ANY code was cheating (if they decided that you had cheated, you failed the class, do it again and you're no longer in school).<br><br>

    I solved the problem of people wanting to look at my code by not being there when they were coding. For most projects we got at least a week to complete it. So I'd just do it ASAP and try not to be there the night before it was due (which is when most people want to look at my code).<br><br>

    Other than that, I tried to have an open meeting before I got down to the actual coding of the more difficult projects, where my classmates and I could talk about different ways to get the project done (in broad terms, which the teachers had no problem with). If you were lucky, the teacher would show up and ask questions.<br><br>

    cg
  • taryn 2006-01-02 17:31
    Anonymous:
    <div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply">A Real Programmer doesn't use loops,
    loops are for quiche-eaters. A Real Programmer uses GOTO, which is how
    God meant programs to be written.<br>
    </span></div>
    <br>
    What are you talking about?&nbsp; GOTO is only one way to implement a loop!<span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply"></span><br>
    <span id="_ctl0_PostForm_Reply"></span>
    <br>
    <br>
    No-one else has pointed it out yet, so I will. This forum tends to have
    a higher-than-average sarcasm level... you may wish to keep that in
    mind as you read the posts.<br>
    <br>
    Cheers,<br>
    Taryn<br>
  • taryn 2006-01-02 17:36
    Anonymous:
    <br>The reason I did this was that I would be
    pestered in all hours of the night for help on homework.&nbsp; I got so
    many questions like, "What is a variable and why should I use one?"
    "How do I do this assignment?" "How do I make something happen
    sometimes?"&nbsp; "Where's the command that generates this program?"<br><br>It
    was never ending.&nbsp; I got so fed up with it.&nbsp; The only way I
    could get sleep was if I just gave them the answer.&nbsp; I figure it's
    their problem, when they don't know how to do anything on the
    test.&nbsp; It's the professors fault they passed.&nbsp; If you fail
    all the tests and ace all the homeworks, obviously something is
    wrong.&nbsp; Also, the professors seemed to have a problem giving
    anything worse than a B if you showed up.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Ouch, I was never pestered that much. But then I made it pretty clear
    up front that I was not in the mood to help people that just wanted to
    have their homework done for them. I'd happily answer general questions
    where the person seemed genuine, though. Still I have ot admit that I
    was pretty stereotypically geeky and didn't socialise much with the CS
    students... I guess keeping to yourself has some advantages.<br>
    <br>
    The down-side was that I had a lot of trouble learning the
    general-knowledge stuff that everybody else seemed to just get... I
    could always ask a tutor about the subject-matter, but nobody taught me
    how to, I dunno, view an image under unix, or whatever... all the
    incidental stuff that most people assume you can already do once you
    have a degree - I never learned until I was on the job.<br>
  • EvanED 2006-01-02 17:49
    Gene Wirchenko:
    My favourite question when tutoring is "Why do you say that?"<br><br>Sometimes, there is a bit of training time.  "No, I did not say you are wrong, but why do you say that?"  I want your reason.  There is quite a difference between "That is what it says in the book." and "That is what it says in the book, and from what happened in my earlier projects, that makes sense."  There is also, "I am guessing.  I think it has to be around x because of y, but I do not know how to narrow it down further."
    <br><br>I do something sort of similar, except my questions tend to be more focused on the code and less how they came up with it. Like "what's that supposed to do?" or "why is that there?" I'll often plop a "that's right" or a "that'll work" in there to not freak them out.<br><br>I think I'll try to go more for the how they got there questions in the future. Though it can sometimes be difficult, because when I'm doing this stuff are at bi-weekly (wait, is that twice a week or every other? I mean twice a week...) help sessions, and when stuff's due soon we get (1) a lot of people and (2) people who come in the night before it's due and go "okay, how do I start this?" on projects that I question if I could complete in 3 hours, having done them myself already. And then have problems with, say, a for loop when we're talking about recursion. Ah, good times. ;-)<br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-01-02 18:31
    Anonymous:
    Gene Wirchenko:
    My favourite question when tutoring is "Why do you say that?"<br><br>Sometimes, there is a bit of training time.&nbsp; "No, I did not say you are wrong, but why do you say that?"&nbsp; I want your reason.&nbsp; There is quite a difference between "That is what it says in the book." and "That is what it says in the book, and from what happened in my earlier projects, that makes sense."&nbsp; There is also, "I am guessing.&nbsp; I think it has to be around x because of y, but I do not know how to narrow it down further."
    <br><br>I do something sort of similar, except my questions tend to be more focused on the code and less how they came up with it. Like "what's that supposed to do?" or "why is that there?" I'll often plop a "that's right" or a "that'll work" in there to not freak them out.
    <br><br>I do that as well.&nbsp; It depends what level the discussion is at.&nbsp; It appears we operate similarly.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • Pope 2006-01-02 18:49
    <P>Yeah... I still don't believe it.&nbsp; This WTF&nbsp;can't be true.&nbsp; Nobody can spend "a few months" on coding a solution and come up with only 6 lines.&nbsp; At least, I hope not...&nbsp; </P>
    <P>This&nbsp;WTF&nbsp;reminds me of the recurring nightmares I had after I graduated from college: &nbsp;I had a class that I couldn't find or didn't go to and finals came up and I hadn't studied at all.&nbsp; </P>
    <P>Poor Paula Bean had to live my nightmares.&nbsp; I hope that she had underwear on, at least.</P>
  • sao 2006-01-02 21:52
    TankerJoe:
    Anonymous:

    <P>A Real Programmer doesn't use loops, loops are for quiche-eaters. A Real Programmer uses GOTO, which is how God meant programs to be written.</P>
    <P>
    <BR><BR><BR>This is true.&nbsp; One only has to read the story of mel to know.&nbsp; <BR><BR>http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/mel.html<BR>
    </P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>This story has given me great inspiration. Just when i thought *I* was beginning to write obscure code (which none of it has shown up here, thank God) i am shown a brief glimpse of a higher glory.</P>
    <P>Long live Mel!!</P>
  • sao 2006-01-02 22:07
    <P>
    Gene Wirchenko:
    <BR>&lt;snip&gt;</P>
    <P>My favourite question when tutoring is "Why do you say that?"<BR></P>
    <P>&lt;snip&gt;<BR>
    </P>
    <P>I had a teacher whos fav. question was 'are you sure of that?' and 'but is there a BETTER way to do it?'&nbsp; -- even if i was 100% spot on the first time.</P>
    <P>we once went on for 2hrs discussing other options, and at the end of it all, we agreed that my way, which i had said 5mins after he posed the problem, was indeed THE best way anyone could come up with.</P>
    <P>If it taught me anything, it is that i should go with my initial instinct and not waste time trying to find a 'better' way. i AM right. and yes, i AM sure. why? you tell me once I have finished it and YOU have thought about it.</P>
  • LarsW 2006-01-03 03:26
    I have to agree with the other people who say that if this did indeed
    happen, the greater WTF is not Paula, but the project team leaders who
    never checked up on what she was doing. You gave this woman salary for
    six months, and you didn't once ask for a demo, some junit test cases,
    some proof of how her code would integrate with the rest of the system?<br>
    <br>
    While we love to bash specific languages here, in my experience projects fail for the following reasons, in order of importance:<br>
    1) Bad project management. For instance incomplete specs, too few
    resources planned to solve the problem, doesn't tackle difficult
    problems such as team members not talking because they don't like each
    other.<br>
    2) Bad coders.<br>
    3) Wrong language. Here the problem isn't usually that the problem is
    impossible to solve, you can solve any problem in any language, but
    that the solution is too slow, or two complex to be maintainable.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
  • Niksi 2006-01-03 06:59
    Isn't one of the first posts (by Gene Wirchenko) saying that already?
  • Niksi 2006-01-03 07:03
    Anonymous:
    Isn't one of the first posts (by Gene Wirchenko) saying that already?

    Oh the "reply" does not sort the post into a thread but appends it instead.

    I intended this sentence to be a reply to the assuption, of Ytram at the end of page 1, that Lon Varscsak is the first to realize that brillant is written wrong.
  • jmroth 2006-01-03 07:36
    Chucara:
    The real WTF for me is how anyone can hire a completely unknown person, and have her work for months without actually checking her work.
    <br><br>Yeah, the boss should be fired.<br>
  • dhromed 2006-01-03 08:21
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Isn't one of the first posts (by Gene Wirchenko) saying that already?

    Oh the "reply" does not sort the post into a thread but appends it instead.

    I intended this sentence to be a reply to the assuption, of Ytram at the end of page 1, that Lon Varscsak is the first to realize that brillant is written wrong.
    <br><br>Multi-thread threads, such as on slashdot, should be destroyed because they're an unwieldy and unbrowsable labyrinth of posts.<br><br>The sane thing is to append so that a thread is indeed that: a thread. All decent online forums do that.<br><br>The insane thing is to include a 'reply' button on EACH AND EVERY post.<br><br>When in doubt, click 'Quote'.<br>
  • ParkinT 2006-01-03 08:22
    <P>To be fair to <SPAN class=inlineLink onclick="window.open('/user/Profile.aspx?UserID=1897')"><STRONG><FONT color=#555555>Gene Wirchenko</FONT></STRONG></SPAN> he was the first to point this out.</P>
    <P>Take a look at the FOURTH POST.</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>"If debugging is the process of removing errors, then programming must be the process of inserting them!"</P>
  • Skade 2006-01-03 09:22
    i wonder why nobody mentioned iterators yet?<br><br>6.times do <br>    stuff<br>end<br><br>or<br><br>[0..5].each do<br>    stuff<br>end<br><br><br>
  • hank miller 2006-01-03 09:23
    Anonymous:
    <br><br>I did a similar thing in some of my CS classes.&nbsp; I did the assignment and printed a single copy and gave it to a group of struggling people.&nbsp; I would then go and redo the assignment differently for myself.<br>
    <br><br>I only once did someone's homework.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In my final year a girl (I'm still not sure if gender was relavent) got me to help her with some intorduction to C stuff.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Write a function to find the length of a string [write strlen()].&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; So I wrote a recursive function that used the ?: operator, and relied on x++ doing a post-incriment (or may it relied on the pre-incriment, I can't recall).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Something that if she handed in would make the professor go WTF, and call her in, knowing that either she got someone else to do it (beginners course remember), or administration wouldn't count her 10 years of C experience as credit to skip the class.<br><br>Actually I left a off by one bug in there intentionally, so even if the professor wasn't paying attention, handing it in would cost some point because it didn't work.&nbsp;&nbsp; Debugging it of course would get her to the point where she understood when the program was doing.<br>
  • Skade 2006-01-03 09:24
    okay, when posts fail validation, the forget their reply-status?<br><br>this is a reply to the "GOTO"-discussion<br>
  • hank miller 2006-01-03 09:31
    This must be post of the year.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There are other posts that made me laugh harder, and still others that got my keyboard/monitor messier.&nbsp;&nbsp; However the Brillant Paula Bean has entered the collective mindshare like nothing else.&nbsp; Therefore this is the WTF of the year.<br><br><br>
  • cconroy 2006-01-03 10:10
    <font size="1" style="font-family: verdana;">
    Gene Wirchenko:
    My favourite question when tutoring is "Why do you say that?"
    <br>
    <br>
    <span style="font-family: verdana;"><font size="2">Ah, it all makes perfect sense now: Gene Wirchenko == Eliza!<br>
    <br>
    Insincerely,<br>
    Brian Boitano<br>
    <br>
    </font></span></font>
  • GoatCheez 2006-01-03 10:29
    sao:
    <p>
    Gene Wirchenko:
    <br><snip></snip></p>
    <p>My favourite question when tutoring is "Why do you say that?"<br></p>
    <p><snip><br>
    </snip></p>
    <p>I had a teacher whos fav. question was 'are you sure of that?' and 'but is there a BETTER way to do it?'&nbsp; -- even if i was 100% spot on the first time.</p>
    <p>we once went on for 2hrs discussing other options, and at the end of it all, we agreed that my way, which i had said 5mins after he posed the problem, was indeed THE best way anyone could come up with.</p>
    <p>If it taught me anything, it is that i should go with my initial instinct and not waste time trying to find a 'better' way. i AM right. and yes, i AM sure. why? you tell me once I have finished it and YOU have thought about it.</p>
    <br><br>Was this Rainer Typke? Sounds all too familiar ;-)<br>
  • Ben 2006-01-03 10:40
    mlathe:
    and no constructor... tisk tisk
    <br><br>what is wrong with implicit constructors?<br><br>nothing.<br>
  • RoRo 2006-01-03 12:06
    Gene Wirchenko:
    Alex Papadimoulis:
    Being the
    end of the year and all, I thought it'd be appropriate to name the
    "Post of the Year." But, since that would involve trudging through a
    year's worth of posts, I decided instead to revisit the classic <a href="/forums/40043/ShowPost.aspx">Brillant Paula Bean</a> ...
    <br><br>Gah!&nbsp; Just when I though that "Brillant" (French for "brilliant", not that anyone cares) was finally on the way out.<br><br>And I missed first today (and eleventh yesterday), too.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
    <br>
    WTF Lon was not the first to pick up on the misspelling!!!&nbsp; <br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-01-03 12:10
    ParkinT:
    <p>To be fair to <span class="inlineLink" onclick="window.open('/user/Profile.aspx?UserID=1897')"><strong><font color="#555555">Gene Wirchenko</font></strong></span> he was the first to point this out.</p>


    <p>Take a look at the FOURTH POST.
    </p><p>To be really fair, I was the first in this thread.&nbsp; It was mentioned first in the original thread.</p>Gene Wirchenko
  • dasmb 2006-01-03 12:52
    Yeah, the CS industry is consistantly shooting itself in the foot with the Big College Project.  Because the Big College Project isn't really all that big, one person solves the problem and the whole class cribs it and there's basically no way to detect it, if they're clever cribbers.<br><br>One of the reasons -- there are many -- that I opted for a rhetorical theory rather than a CS degree in college was that I knew what I was doing.  Which is a problem -- if CS students find out you know, and can solve, their problem, they use all manner of tactics to sweat it out of you.  For example, in my logic design class, I did 15 labs every week -- which usually meant doing mine last, and alas, shoddiest.  I got a D in Data Structures, because I had done the big project for the year completely differently from everybody else and two people had shoddily replicated code I'd stupidly left in the temp drive of the mainframe.  And computer architecture I should have failed outright, because I never completed a single lab write up...I was too busy acting as an adjunct TA.<br><br>The real way to teach CS, and to grade CS, would be to give every student a conceptually similar but fundamentally different task.  Yeah, you can re-use them from semester to semester, but right now all we're testing is a student's ability to parrot and crib -- which is precisely why there are so shoddy programmers, and so many overstressed, overworked people supporting them.<br><br>Also, I'm shocked at how many people I know who have CS degrees but "don't want to program."  Da hell?  We can't all think up strategies, manage projects and work as pocket dictator IT janitors.  Programming is to CS what writing is to a rhetorician and if you don't like it...well, switch to MIS or some other BS in BS.<br>
  • GoatCheez 2006-01-03 13:20
    Anonymous:
    Yeah, the CS industry is consistantly shooting itself in the foot with the Big College Project.&nbsp; Because the Big College Project isn't really all that big, one person solves the problem and the whole class cribs it and there's basically no way to detect it, if they're clever cribbers.<br><br>One of the reasons -- there are many -- that I opted for a rhetorical theory rather than a CS degree in college was that I knew what I was doing.&nbsp; Which is a problem -- if CS students find out you know, and can solve, their problem, they use all manner of tactics to sweat it out of you.&nbsp; For example, in my logic design class, I did 15 labs every week -- which usually meant doing mine last, and alas, shoddiest.&nbsp; I got a D in Data Structures, because I had done the big project for the year completely differently from everybody else and two people had shoddily replicated code I'd stupidly left in the temp drive of the mainframe.&nbsp; And computer architecture I should have failed outright, because I never completed a single lab write up...I was too busy acting as an adjunct TA.<br><br>The real way to teach CS, and to grade CS, would be to give every student a conceptually similar but fundamentally different task.&nbsp; Yeah, you can re-use them from semester to semester, but right now all we're testing is a student's ability to parrot and crib -- which is precisely why there are so shoddy programmers, and so many overstressed, overworked people supporting them.<br><br>Also, I'm shocked at how many people I know who have CS degrees but "don't want to program."&nbsp; Da hell?&nbsp; We can't all think up strategies, manage projects and work as pocket dictator IT janitors.&nbsp; Programming is to CS what writing is to a rhetorician and if you don't like it...well, switch to MIS or some other BS in BS.<br>
    <br><br>I KNEW I wasn't the only one who thought this way. What do we do about it though?<br>
  • Mung Kee 2006-01-03 13:39
    In Java, there's an implied no-arg constructor, provided that no other constructor is defined.<br>
  • Gene Wirchenko 2006-01-03 15:14
    Anonymous:
    The real way to teach CS, and to grade CS, would be to give every student a conceptually similar but fundamentally different task.&nbsp; Yeah, you can re-use them from semester to semester, but right now all we're testing is a student's ability to parrot and crib -- which is precisely why there are so shoddy programmers, and so many overstressed, overworked people supporting them.
    <br><br>No, you can not repeat them from semester to semester.&nbsp; They still get cribbed.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Gene Wirchenko<br><br>
  • dasmb 2006-01-03 15:46
    What do we do about it?<br><br>Well, we can insist on a fierce hiring policy like the one my company's adopted...pre-screenings, quizes about basic language and framework systems, applied solutions, etc -- all performed off-the-cuff and in person.  Failing a quiz isn't a problem, so long as you fail gracefully and know how to find the solution or at least where to start -- and we actually passed on a guy who failed by looking too deeply into the problem and creating a lot of cruft that wasn't in the spec.<br><br>It's a tough process, taking hours per candidate.  I think it's worth it -- but then again, I passed.<br><br>Ironically, even after six years in the industry there are a lot of doors that will remain closed to me because I don't have a C.S. degree, doors which these clowns waltz through.  I'd be bitter -- if there weren't so many companies in my area that thought exactly like this one, rewarding works over the grace of a fine resume.<br>
  • No one special 2006-01-03 16:38
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    <br>Even more strange, I wonder how he graduated.<br><br>
    <br>
    In our assembly class, I did two versions of my code.  One I would
    turn in, and one I would be nice and share on the mainframe.<br>
    ...   <br>
    That's how these people get out there.<br>
    <br>
    The real WTF here is why?<br>
    <br><br>I did a similar thing in some of my CS classes.  I did the assignment and printed a single copy and gave it to a group of struggling people.  I would then go and redo the assignment differently for myself.<br><br>The reason I did this was that I would be pestered in all hours of the night for help on homework.  I got so many questions like, "What is a variable and why should I use one?" "How do I do this assignment?" "How do I make something happen sometimes?"  "Where's the command that generates this program?"<br><br>It was never ending.  I got so fed up with it.  The only way I could get sleep was if I just gave them the answer.  I figure it's their problem, when they don't know how to do anything on the test.  It's the professors fault they passed.  If you fail all the tests and ace all the homeworks, obviously something is wrong.  Also, the professors seemed to have a problem giving anything worse than a B if you showed up.<br>
    <br><br>When I was a grad student and taught a fluid dynamics class, I gave one guy who didn't turn in over 50% of the lab work and failed the final a "D".  It's still technically a passing grade.  He complained to my advisor (I taught him in my last semester, so I got the call at home after I had already left with my M.E. degree) and I just told my advisor: look, do whatever you want, give him an "A" for all I care, but he doesn't even deserve what I gave him.<br><br>That's how this stuff happens.<br><br>When people pay to go to school, they feel entitled to good grades and complain if they don't get them.<br><br>
  • EvanED 2006-01-03 16:42
    Anonymous:
    The real way to teach CS, and to grade CS, would be to give every student a conceptually similar but fundamentally different task.  Yeah, you can re-use them from semester to semester, but right now all we're testing is a student's ability to parrot and crib -- which is precisely why there are so shoddy programmers, and so many overstressed, overworked people supporting them<br>
    <br><br>Do you really think this is the best solution? For each project, come up with (in the case of the class I'm TIing, based on this coming semester's numbers) almost 100 different projects? And Gene's right, you probably would have to change each semester. You might be able to get away with rotating every, say, three semesters, but I wouldn't do it more frequently than that. Your projects would have to be close enough that they test the same thing and different enough that copying is hard.<br><br>Then there's the added strain on the grader and instructor.<br><br>I'm not saying it's a bad idea, I just don't think it's workable unless you're a really small department.<br><br>And I'm not sure about how best to deal with this. I think I'd be in favor of having to write simple programs on tests. It's a situation where cheating is harder than with HW, but on the other hand there could be some people who don't cheat on the HW and yet would have a difficult time on a timed test.<br>
  • EvanED 2006-01-03 16:47
    dhromed:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Isn't one of the first posts (by Gene Wirchenko) saying that already?

    Oh the "reply" does not sort the post into a thread but appends it instead.

    I intended this sentence to be a reply to the assuption, of Ytram at the end of page 1, that Lon Varscsak is the first to realize that brillant is written wrong.
    <br><br>Multi-thread threads, such as on slashdot, should be destroyed because they're an unwieldy and unbrowsable labyrinth of posts.<br><br>The sane thing is to append so that a thread is indeed that: a thread. All decent online forums do that.<br><br>The insane thing is to include a 'reply' button on EACH AND EVERY post.<br><br>When in doubt, click 'Quote'.<br>
    <br><br>The other insane thing this place does (or one of them anyway) is load the separate pages with post messages instead of get. A consequence of this is that if you make a post, it sends you back to the first page in the thread.<br><br>(As an aside, the different threading models are good in different situations. Many /. discussions are big enough that an approach like this would be, in my opinion, completely unworkable. I think this site is about the limit of popularity for this model.)<br>
  • njkayaker 2006-01-03 17:37
    <P>-Unless- you are getting -tangible- benefits (eg sex or money), -never- do other people's work for them, in class or at work. It reduces the value of your work, either by making it seem commonplace or making you seem less productive.</P>
    <P>The -only- reason people do other people's work for them is EGO. And the people who manage to get other people to do their work are exercising a highly-developed social skill.</P>
    <P>Also, the manager who allowed Paula to get away with doing nothing for a "few months" is either lazy or (too) busy brown nosing his/her superiors. In fact, the amount if time it takes to review&nbsp;code, to determine productivity and a base-level of competence, is pretty minimal. The review of code, of course, should occur early and often for "unknown quantities".</P>
  • Jax 2006-01-03 19:44
    <P>It works the other way too. I've been a software developer for 16 years and it's becoming more common that I will leave a workplace because of incompetency of either the team or management. It doesn't look great on my work record I know, but after this length of time I'm not interested in doing or being part of a half-assed job for anyone.</P>
    <P>I don't&nbsp;possess the gift of the gab and it irritates me like hell when people like Paula are&nbsp;placed ahead of me.</P>
  • Peregrine Falcon 2006-01-03 22:01
    Ahhh, the advantages of earning my CS degree over the Internet. ;)<br>
    The most annoying part is that I am paying over US $30,000 and spending
    two years for a piece of paper and something I could have learned in
    about 2 months... I already know how to program, damnit, so don't give
    me three classes that have nearly identical textbooks that all tell me
    about loops, variables, switches, etc. Grrrrrr....<br>
  • psychobabble 2006-01-04 05:25
    you can make fun of Paula all you want, but she knew what she was doing. "Brillant" is actually propper spelling... in French!<br><br>(no, this is not yet another case of France-bashing... even though it sounds like one <a href="">6</a> )<br>
  • nobody 2006-01-04 10:34
    Anonymous:
    you can make fun of Paula all you want, but she knew what she was doing.


    Or she thought she knew what she was doing; too incompetent to realise her own inportetence.

    But, admittedly, she DID write something useful:

    return paula;
  • cconroy 2006-01-04 10:40
    <font size="1" style="font-family: verdana;">
    nobody:
    But, admittedly, she DID write something useful:

    return paula;
    <br>
    <br>
    <span style="font-family: verdana;"><font size="2">Hope they kept the receipt...<br>
    <br>
    </font></span></font>
  • Noim Porta 2006-01-04 12:11
    Come on people!<br>
    <br>
    This wasn't Paula's WTF...<br>
    This was the WTF of the company where she was doing the project.. Paula seems to be a smart gal after all :)...<br>
    She was prolly earning thousands of dollars a month sitting on her ass and doing nothing.<br>
    And SHAME on the company AND Paula's boss (AND possibly all the idiots that were interviewing her). <br>
    All of'em must be fired immediately... <br>
    <br>
    Dang.. there should be a managerial WTF board.....<br>F**king pathetic.... in this example Paula was the smart one.....<br>
  • Satanicpuppy 2006-01-04 12:59
    Anonymous:
    Hm, as this is my third post to the site over the last few months, maybe I should finally think about registering...<br><br>Anyway, I worked at a company once where I was tasked (along with two others who made up our team) to hire 5 to 10 people very quickly for a Java project.&nbsp; This was during the dot-com days, obviously, where money was no object.&nbsp; My boss actually said to me that we needed the team as quickly as possible, and not to worry too much about the quality... we could always fire some people and hire replacements if needed over the next few months.<br><br>Ugh.&nbsp; We didn't like it at the time, but mainly because I thought it was unkind.&nbsp; Today I look back on it and see it with new horror on all sorts of levels.<br><br>Anyway, we had our team in about two or three weeks or so.&nbsp; We did actually do interviews, but none of us were too experienced on how you properly do interviews.&nbsp; We looked at resumes, relevant experience, personalities (to see if the team would work together well), etc, but never did any technical questions beyond asking people to describe their prior work.&nbsp; Miraculously, most of the team actually wound up being pretty good.&nbsp; I think we hired around 7 people.&nbsp; Maybe 6.&nbsp; 2 of them were fresh out of college.<br><br>Amazingly, only one guy was a total bust.&nbsp; He had absolutely no real world knowledge of programming that I could detect.&nbsp; He was one of our two kids recently out of school, to be sure, but his degree was in Computer Science!&nbsp; I mean, I expected him to at least be able to do simple projects, but the questions he asked of myself and the other two "senior" team members were ludicrous.&nbsp; Questions about simple case statements, the difference between passing by reference and passing by value, and so on, just basic stuff.&nbsp; He was fired a week after he started.&nbsp; But to this day, I wonder about his interview.&nbsp; We asked him about specific Java technologies (not to quiz him, but to just ask if he had any experience with them) and he claimed he had all sorts of hobbyist experience along with his classwork in specifically what we were asking for.&nbsp; What did he think he was going to do on the job?&nbsp; How would he think he'd be able to get away with not really knowing anything?<br><br>Seeing a post like this, I now understand.&nbsp; He must have thought we wouldn't review his work or even check up on him, possibly for years!&nbsp; (But then why ask us the questions he did?)<br><br>Even more strange, I wonder how he graduated.<br><br>
    <br><br>I did a senior project with 3 other guys, a roommate of mine who was also a CS major, and two "Smart" guys who we interviewed. Well the two smart guys were in another class that I was in, and they spent the last three days before our first project was due, working on code for that class. (It was in C). So me and my roomie finished 4 out of 5, and they finished 1 out of 5, plus the code for the other class, which I then copied. (Yea yea, I know, wait for the punchline).<br><br>So I took their code home, and couldn't get it to work. Sonovabitch. Worked on it for a day, then said screw it, and slept for 48 hours, got up, did the second project from scratch, and turned it in 2 days late. Now every day late was -20% to your grade, so I could get at most a 60. I got a 58, which bummed me out until the "smart" guy asked me how the hell I got a 58 when he only got a 5 (!!!). We only got 4/5 on the other project as well. We ditched those bastards in a second. what a joke. But I'll never forget it. This was a SENIOR PROJECT, and they did NOTHING.<br><br>They ended up glomming onto some other group, and one of them even finished with a better grade in the class...I was taking way too many classes, and my roomie was a terrible test-taker, though an excellent programmer.<br>
  • hank miller 2006-01-04 16:23
    I had one professor that required the group members to agree on how to split points. And he did not allow even splits without proof that everyone really did equal amounts of works.

    The member who we gave the lowest grade didn't agree with our ratings, so we turned in our recommendations, and he turned in his. I don't know what happened, but I I got a good grade, and the TA was well aware that this guy never helped us - and he was taking the class as a grad student while the rest of us were undergrads.

    The downside is I let one BSer who didn't do much work get more points than he deserved. But he did deserve credit for doing some work. (The class was on user interfaces not programing, so lack of programming ability shouldn't have cost him much in that class, though I don't know how he got through the hardcore prerequisites that did demand programming)
  • Satanicpuppy 2006-01-04 17:59
    hank miller:
    I had one professor that required the group members to agree on how to split points. And he did not allow even splits without proof that everyone really did equal amounts of works.

    The member who we gave the lowest grade didn't agree with our ratings, so we turned in our recommendations, and he turned in his. I don't know what happened, but I I got a good grade, and the TA was well aware that this guy never helped us - and he was taking the class as a grad student while the rest of us were undergrads.

    The downside is I let one BSer who didn't do much work get more points than he deserved. But he did deserve credit for doing some work. (The class was on user interfaces not programing, so lack of programming ability shouldn't have cost him much in that class, though I don't know how he got through the hardcore prerequisites that did demand programming)
    <br><br>Heh. I got called in for cheating once, because some guy snagged a copy of my source off a printer where I'd made a copy of it. I hadn't, at the time, imagined that this would be a problem, so I hadn't rushed up to make sure no one stole it. It was a CS111 class, so I figured, who couldn't do this code? The programming project had been to write a "Tammagotchi" simulation...You feed the little guy, and they prosper, etc.<br><br>Well the guy who copied me clearly didn't know what the hell he was doing. He copied ALL of my code, and changed the variable names. He even copied the "Duel to the Death" simulation I'd put in, without apparently realizing that it was NOT part of the assignment to have your virtual pets enter into a virtual pet "There can be only one" highlander style fight to the death.<br><br>Moral of the story? Don't copy code from the guy who's just taking the class to fill out a requirement.<br>
  • Rich 2006-01-04 18:39
    In my school days we used 80x24 terminals and printed reams of Pascal source code.  So my friend Bruce is busy debugging his assignment, and some other kid comes up to him and asks if he'd take a look at his assignment.  A second pair of eyes, and all that.<br><br>So Bruce starts pouring over the five or six pages of code, and it slowly dawns on him that he's looking at an older version of his own code that the other kid had just pulled out of the recycling bin.<br>
  • Pops 2006-01-04 18:43
    I took an operating systems class from Alan Ashton (WordPerfect
    founder, for those old enough to recall). The final in the class? An
    oral exam in which you demonstrated your working OS and answered any
    questions he had about the code. I guess you could still cheat, but
    you'd have to be a good liar, too.<br>
  • Rich 2006-01-04 18:58
    Satanicpuppy:
    <br><br>Heh. I got called in for cheating once, because some guy snagged a copy of my source off a printer where I'd made a copy of it. I hadn't, at the time, imagined that this would be a problem, so I hadn't rushed up to make sure no one stole it. It was a CS111 class, so I figured, who couldn't do this code? The programming project had been to write a "Tammagotchi" simulation...You feed the little guy, and they prosper, etc.<br><br>Well the guy who copied me clearly didn't know what the hell he was doing. He copied ALL of my code, and changed the variable names. He even copied the "Duel to the Death" simulation I'd put in, without apparently realizing that it was NOT part of the assignment to have your virtual pets enter into a virtual pet "There can be only one" highlander style fight to the death.<br><br>Moral of the story? Don't copy code from the guy who's just taking the class to fill out a requirement.<br>
    <br><br>I once had two nearly identical assembly assignments handed in.  Since they also had to hand in their executable, and since the cheater was too dumb to re-compile to match the new "Student Name: " in the source, it was pretty easy to see which student was the cheat.<br>
  • EvanED 2006-01-04 21:45
    Anonymous:
    Satanicpuppy:
    <br><br>Heh. I got called in for cheating once, because some guy snagged a copy of my source off a printer where I'd made a copy of it. I hadn't, at the time, imagined that this would be a problem, so I hadn't rushed up to make sure no one stole it. It was a CS111 class, so I figured, who couldn't do this code? The programming project had been to write a "Tammagotchi" simulation...You feed the little guy, and they prosper, etc.<br><br>Well the guy who copied me clearly didn't know what the hell he was doing. He copied ALL of my code, and changed the variable names. He even copied the "Duel to the Death" simulation I'd put in, without apparently realizing that it was NOT part of the assignment to have your virtual pets enter into a virtual pet "There can be only one" highlander style fight to the death.<br><br>Moral of the story? Don't copy code from the guy who's just taking the class to fill out a requirement.<br>
    <br><br>I once had two nearly identical assembly assignments handed in.&nbsp; Since they also had to hand in their executable, and since the cheater was too dumb to re-compile to match the new "Student Name: " in the source, it was pretty easy to see which student was the cheat.<br>
    <br><br>Gotta be careful with that though, because if you can show that Person A gave Person B their code, Person A is (both actually and ethically) hardly any less of a cheater.<br>
  • EvanED 2006-01-04 21:47
    Satanicpuppy:
    Well the guy who copied me clearly didn't know what the hell he was doing. He copied ALL of my code, and changed the variable names. He even copied the "Duel to the Death" simulation I'd put in, without apparently realizing that it was NOT part of the assignment to have your virtual pets enter into a virtual pet "There can be only one" highlander style fight to the death.<br><br>Moral of the story? Don't copy code from the guy who's just taking the class to fill out a requirement.<br>
    <br><br>Man, our assignments were never even that fun. Ours are a lot more dry, and don't leave a ton of room for creativeness like that.<br>
  • Mac Java girl 2006-01-05 02:01
    Back when Java was just starting, and Sun was still trying to do their own Mac JVM, they hired a kid I called "Puppy" a week before they hired me. The closest they had to a Mac expert on the interview team was my former manager - and all he knew about Macs was what he'd picked up from sharing an office with me for 3 years while I wrote the Mac Smalltalk VM.

    The first sign of trouble happened during my first week there. Puppy asked if Java caused any INIT conflicts. Now, I had no idea whether Java even had an INIT (it didn't) so I asked if he'd tried the least-likely test (assuming he'd tried all the likely ones). Then the next least-likely. Then the next. Finally I asked if he'd at least rebooted with extensions off (if your Mac lore is as rusty as mine now - you hold the shift key down during the reboot).

    He didn't know how to do that.

    I went to my friend and asked how they'd hired this idiot - I knew he was supposed to do Mac I18N, so I assumed he was an I18N expert with a bit of Mac experience, but no, he was he supposed to be a Mac expert with some I18N skills. As nobody else on the interview team had so much as used a Mac, Puppy had BSed everyone except my friend - and he'd only been there a few weeks, so nobody listened.

    Now, since there was no Mac JVM on which to write Mac I18N stuff, they put Puppy on the I18N team and told him to write test cases. A year later, when he left, they went looking for his tests.

    He'd never written anything.
  • dhromed is a moron 2006-01-05 10:10
    <P>
    Anonymous:
    dhromed:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    Isn't one of the first posts (by Gene Wirchenko) saying that already?
    Oh the "reply" does not sort the post into a thread but appends it instead. I intended this sentence to be a reply to the assuption, of Ytram at the end of page 1, that Lon Varscsak is the first to realize that brillant is written wrong.
    <BR><BR>Multi-thread threads, such as on slashdot, should be destroyed because they're an unwieldy and unbrowsable labyrinth of posts.<BR><BR>The sane thing is to append so that a thread is indeed that: a thread. All decent online forums do that.<BR><BR>The insane thing is to include a 'reply' button on EACH AND EVERY post.<BR><BR>When in doubt, click 'Quote'.<BR>
    <BR><BR>The other insane thing this place does (or one of them anyway) is load the separate pages with post messages instead of get. A consequence of this is that if you make a post, it sends you back to the first page in the thread.<BR><BR>(As an aside, the different threading models are good in different situations. Many /. discussions are big enough that an approach like this would be, in my opinion, completely unworkable. I think this site is about the limit of popularity for this model.)<BR>
    </P>
    <P>You really are correct, the threaded model on /. works nicely, the format here is pretty primitive and additionally dhromed is generally acknowledged to be a complete moron.</P>
  • rjstanford 2006-01-05 16:37
    <BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
    <P><EM>Poor Paula Bean had to live my nightmares.&nbsp; I hope that she had underwear on, at least.</EM></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <P dir=ltr>Although if she didn't, it might explain why she kept the job so long...</P>
  • Robert 2006-01-05 22:50
    It's amazing to see how you believe these stories made&nbsp;up&nbsp;by the The Daily WTF crew.
  • jroch 2006-01-09 16:32
    My best "cheating" exercise in CS:<br><br>We were supposed to write a fairly medium-level program as an assignment, which really wouldn't have been a problem, but the language that we were using at the time was Ada.  I'm sure there may be some who love Ada, but I think it sucks dog balls.  Anyhow, after procrastinating for quite some time I finally sat down to write it.<br><br>Lo and behold I just couldn't get my mind into Ada's weirdness... so I tossed aside the book and did the whole assignment in C instead.  However, I wrote exception handlers that would catch the normal errors and return Ada-style errors instead of the normal C errors.  So, now I had an executable to submit that was functioning perfectly.<br><br>Then I sat down and faked up Ada source code.  It was a monstrous, uncompilable, unreadable conglomeration.  And I got an A.  ;)<br><br>For the team-based final project one of the team members got code from a friend that had taken the class a couple years prior.  I took that code, reverse-engineered it and found it to be extremely bad coding.  So I did it myself, from scratch, and gave everyon else credit as if they'd done their part.<br><br>Of course, now I'm an Enterprise Admin and don't code at all for my job.  I think I got the job that all of the slackers wanted to do rather than program... me, I'm thinking about going back to programming.<br>
  • Woody 2006-01-12 12:39
    <P>
    Chucara:
    The real WTF for me is how anyone can hire a completely unknown person, and have her work for months without actually checking her work.<BR><BR>Even if I'd never have suspected her of being this bad, I'd still want to ensure that she didn't code like a leprous gazelle.<BR>
    </P>
    <P>It happens more often than you'd think.</P>
    <P>I once worked for a company that made custom&nbsp;telephone switches. Real-time, multi-processor, shared memory, all of that nasty stuff. We were on a tight deadline so we hired a top guy from the competition who had "five years' intensive experience" and great references.</P>
    <P>We gave him the database to write--the most critical component--together with a detailed design of how to do it. Almost a&nbsp;year (!) later, when we were to start integrating the various bits and start system alpha testing, he went on vacation. We integrated and tested, and found that the only thing in the database that actually worked was a lookup by primary key. None of the other functions worked. That's when we looked at his code.</P>
    <P>Rather than following the spec, he had gone his own way. The resulting code was utterly unusable crap, and we had lost almost a man-year of our schedule. The head designer, who had come up with the original design, ended up rewriting the whole mess himself. Our highly experienced scoop from the competition was shunted onto a maintenance project and then fired a few months later.</P>
  • Anonymous 2006-01-15 12:35
    It got posted to another day's WTF under 'your_mom_naked'.<br>
  • Anonymous 2006-01-15 12:45
    Anonymous:
    <span style="font-family: Arial;"><font size="2">Send Paula picture! =)</font><br></span>
    <br><br>It got posted to the 'Imaging In Line' WTF under 'your_mom_naked'.<br><br>
    Satanicpuppy:
    Anonymous:
    I should note that I
    once worked with an PHP-based OSS photo album that worked in a similar
    manner. Every image in the album was one PHP script that loaded the
    image from disk and echo'd it to the browser with a faked MIME type.
    The justification for this was security -- the author wanted a simple
    way to enforce privacy levels for different images within the same
    directory. It worked, but prevented browser caches from operating
    properly and was terribly slow, all for a feature that very few people
    used. It was one of the first things I ripped out of the script.
    <br><br>The
    problem with that, for this, is that the "program" will serve whatever
    picture is passed to it in the $_GET['image'] field, which, as it's a
    get, can be hacked from the browser a la
    "http://www.stupidprogrammer.com/image.php?image=your_mom_naked.gif"<br><br>Completely insecure.<br>
    <br>
  • PirateKing 2006-01-18 05:53
    <P><CODE>&gt; -Unless- you are getting -tangible- benefits (eg sex or money), &gt;-never- do other people's work for them </CODE></P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>I couldn't agree more.&nbsp; </P>
    <P>On my postgrad course we had a Korean lad with a first class honours degree whose faultfinding abilities were a little less sophisticated than identifying where the smoke came from.</P>
    <P>His final report was full of nothing but buzzphrases - and pidgin buzzphrases at that - so a group of us rewrote it for him.</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
    <P>Stupidity is its own reward: he now writes code to control nuclear reactors...</P>
  • bob 2006-02-13 13:46
    dhromed:
    Multi-thread threads, such as on slashdot, should be destroyed because they're an unwieldy and unbrowsable labyrinth of posts.<br><br>The sane thing is to append so that a thread is indeed that: a thread. All decent online forums do that.<br><br>The insane thing is to include a 'reply' button on EACH AND EVERY post.<br><br>When in doubt, click 'Quote'.<br>


    That's obvious, especially since slashdot has had NO success and no one ever uses it. I'm amazed they get any visitors at all with their unwiedly format. Much easier to have to read through a thread of 1000 posts to find the replies you want.
  • bob 2006-02-13 13:47
    PirateKing:
    <P><CODE>> -Unless- you are getting -tangible- benefits (eg sex or money), >-never- do other people's work for them </CODE></P>
    <P> </P>
    <P>I couldn't agree more.  </P>
    <P>On my postgrad course we had a Korean lad with a first class honours degree whose faultfinding abilities were a little less sophisticated than identifying where the smoke came from.</P>
    <P>His final report was full of nothing but buzzphrases - and pidgin buzzphrases at that - so a group of us rewrote it for him.</P>
    <P> </P>
    <P>Stupidity is its own reward: he now writes code to control nuclear reactors...</P>


    Hopefully they are in Korea
  • ravi kumar 2006-02-15 05:54
    <P>if one application is written in j2me using cdma technology it is compatible to all cdma phones</P>
    <P>&nbsp;</P>
  • Some Middle-aged Guy 2006-03-03 22:46
    Brillant insight, Ravi!<br>
  • Merlin 2006-03-04 13:28
    Anonymous:
    <br>
    This wasn't Paula's WTF...<br>
    This was the WTF of the company where she was doing the project.. Paula seems to be a smart gal after all :)...<br>
    She was prolly earning thousands of dollars a month sitting on her ass and doing nothing.<br>
    And SHAME on the company AND Paula's boss (AND possibly all the idiots that were interviewing her). <br>
    All of'em must be fired immediately... <br>
    <br><br>I agree with that one, having seen this far too often in various companies.<br>Of course, managers are responsible for the quality of the persons they hire.<br><br>