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  • Dhamp 2013-07-10 06:50
    So trwtf is...

    The guys who transferred over were left with no support from the previous consultants working on the project?
  • RandomGuy 2013-07-10 07:02
    Definitely a fictional story. A system with meaningful/helpful documentation? When was the last time that happened?
  • pjt33 2013-07-10 07:18
    Is there any chance of posting the unedited story to see whether the way it sets up the scenario makes any sense? The first 9 paragraphs of this article seem to be deliberately written to make it hard to figure out what's going on.
  • Peter 2013-07-10 07:29
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...
  • enxorizo 2013-07-10 07:30
    pjt33:
    Is there any chance of posting the unedited story to see whether the way it sets up the scenario makes any sense? The first 9 paragraphs of this article seem to be deliberately written to make it hard to figure out what's going on.


    yep, the style provides a deliberately garbled up intertwined structure with the apparent goal of provoking increased interest in the unfolding of subsequent consequences.

    short, it's a mess. i feel conned and insulted.
  • Foo 2013-07-10 08:04
    enxorizo:
    pjt33:
    Is there any chance of posting the unedited story to see whether the way it sets up the scenario makes any sense? The first 9 paragraphs of this article seem to be deliberately written to make it hard to figure out what's going on.


    yep, the style provides a deliberately garbled up intertwined structure with the apparent goal of provoking increased interest in the unfolding of subsequent consequences.

    short, it's a mess. i feel conned and insulted.


    It's clever, isn't it - rather than just telling you, it makes you FEEL how Peter felt.
  • Anom nom nom 2013-07-10 08:20
    Consultants with proper documentation?
    Is TDWTF allowing science fiction now?
  • EvilSnack 2013-07-10 08:20
    The Daily Dogbert. Another tale of overpaid consultants who are not held to the same standard as underpaid employees, due to the bad business sense of pointy-haired bosses.

    Captcha tation: "tation, n. A portion of potatoes. (From a portmanteau of 'tater' and 'ration'.)"
  • dkf 2013-07-10 08:24
    RandomGuy:
    Definitely a fictional story. A system with meaningful/helpful documentation? When was the last time that happened?
    If you never actually tried to read the docs, why would you know if there was something useful written in them?
  • Wody 2013-07-10 08:25
    Of course Peter was then fired for interfering in a process at a location he shouldn't be, and causing extra consultant-costs and -fines due to not following proper described procedures that he himself then only executed after those unneeded consultants where brought in, according to said consultants?
  • I forget 2013-07-10 08:25
    The real WTF, as usual, is freaking SharePoint. BAAARRF.
  • DonaldK 2013-07-10 09:32
    ShareBarf, Windoze, Micro$wat.

    That about sums it up dunnit?
  • DonaldK 2013-07-10 09:33
    DonaldK:
    ShareBarf, Windoze, Micro$wat.

    That about sums it up dunnit?


    Actually my pet name for SharePoint is SharePointless. Not that anybody cares.
  • Nagesh 2013-07-10 09:37
    RandomGuy:
    Definitely a fictional story. A system with meaningful/helpful documentation? When was the last time that happened?


    We always provide documentation, but customer engineer refuses to read it.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2013-07-10 09:47
    Anom nom nom:
    Consultants with proper documentation?
    Is TDWTF allowing science fiction now?
    But they didn't read it, so all is still right with the world.
  • anonymous 2013-07-10 10:10
    RandomGuy:
    Definitely a fictional story. A system with meaningful/helpful documentation? When was the last time that happened?
    When you're required to write 8 metres of documentation, some of it's bound to be meaningful.
  • Bob 2013-07-10 10:13
    DonaldK:

    Actually my pet name for SharePoint is SharePointless. Not that anybody cares.

    When I had to use it, I called it Sh!tPoint. As in, have you ever tried to sharpen a turd?

    I was looking for feature the Sh!tPoint wiki didn't have (categorisation, trasnclusion, soft links to uploads, etc) and found an article like this:
    https://www.nothingbutsharepoint.com/sites/eusp/pages/wiki-in-the-box-is-sharepoint-wiki-really-that-bad.aspx
    This is from a Sh!tPoint developer, and basically opens "No-one chooses Sh!tPoint because it's the best (because it isn't); they use it because it's already in their company because their IT department trusts Microsoft. Suck it up." Not encouraging.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-10 10:15
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    Both those words mean exactly the same thing in both British and American English.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-10 10:21
    DonaldK:
    ShareBarf, Windoze, Micro$wat.

    That about sums it up dunnit?


    Name calling is an interesting cognitive bias, don't you think?

    Interesting, in that it is generally used by people who want to weigh in on a topic when they know very little about it. They deploy name-calling as an attempt to fool a weaker minded audience into agreeing with an argument that lacks any form of substance.
  • Spudley 2013-07-10 10:25
    eViLegion:
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    Both those words mean exactly the same thing in both British and American English.


    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.

  • Smouch 2013-07-10 10:27
    Perhaps, but in this case the fact remains, SharePoint really does suck.

  • Anomaly 2013-07-10 10:27
    Spudley:
    eViLegion:
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    Both those words mean exactly the same thing in both British and American English.


    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.



    He didn't say it was common use just that they have the same meaning in both languages.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-10 10:30
    Spudley:
    eViLegion:
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    Both those words mean exactly the same thing in both British and American English.


    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.



    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that it might well be an Americanism, but that is totally irrelevant. It IS in use in Britain, by British English speakers.

    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.

  • dkf 2013-07-10 10:52
    eViLegion:
    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.
    Of course. It's perfectly cromulent.
  • RakerF1 2013-07-10 11:06
    dkf:
    eViLegion:
    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.
    Of course. It's perfectly cromulent.

    Both are copacetic, man.
  • pjt33 2013-07-10 11:10
    eViLegion:
    Spudley:
    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.

    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that it might well be an Americanism, but that is totally irrelevant. It IS in use in Britain, by British English speakers.

    The British National Corpus contains 103 instances of the verb acclimatise/acclimatize and 0 (zero) instances of acclimate.

    COCA, on the other hand, has 70 acclimatize to 358 acclimate.
  • Jeremy 2013-07-10 11:11
    RandomGuy:
    Definitely a fictional story. A system with meaningful/helpful documentation? When was the last time that happened?


    I like it when the only documentation is a diagram of what systems are talking to what other things behind the wall of their black box.

    You make a request, it gets sent to our load balancer, that picks a database and that information gets sent to a response system, and that sends the response back to you! Also there's a cloud somewhere.

    Um, ok. And how do I actually make a request....
  • ANON 2013-07-10 11:11
    Documentation is most of the time meaningful AND helpful (AND outdated, but that's a different story...)
  • JAPH 2013-07-10 11:11
    eViLegion:
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    Both those words mean exactly the same thing in both British and American English.


    I admittedly grew up in Hawaii where we speak Pidgin instead of (American) English, but I thought the American spelling was acclimatize.

    Peter, beware of Muphry's Law; Acclimated is an adjective, while acclimatise is a verb.
  • Etherow 2013-07-10 11:19
    eViLegion:
    Spudley:
    eViLegion:
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    Both those words mean exactly the same thing in both British and American English.


    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.



    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that it might well be an Americanism, but that is totally irrelevant. It IS in use in Britain, by British English speakers.

    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.



    If 'acclimated' is in use anywhere in Britain by British English speakers, I've yet to hear it in my over half a century lifetime; certainly not used by anyone in the software business. I supposed it might by used by someone explaining how eccentric the 'English' spoken in that far away country about which we know little, the USA, can be.
  • T.R. 2013-07-10 11:29
    "empty bottles of Evian" ? perhaps a left-over of the original story, indicating it happened in France...
    or perhaps Evian is commonly found in whatever country it happened in.
  • Harrow 2013-07-10 11:34
    Peter peered over Bob’s shoulder, at the error message on his laptop. “It could be that the security log’s full. Have you checked the application’s internal registry?”

    Definitely the wrong thing to say. The proper observation to make would have been, “Hire me as an ad-hoc consultant and I'll fix this in five minutes. It'll cost you two grand but it'll be worth it: you guys can take the credit and look like geniuses.”

    Peter is evidently doomed to a life of abject honesty.

    -Harrow.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-10 11:35
    pjt33:
    eViLegion:
    Spudley:
    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.

    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that it might well be an Americanism, but that is totally irrelevant. It IS in use in Britain, by British English speakers.

    The British National Corpus contains 103 instances of the verb acclimatise/acclimatize and 0 (zero) instances of acclimate.

    COCA, on the other hand, has 70 acclimatize to 358 acclimate.


    So, you've come out with some statistics about two sets of arbitrary text data.

    Consider the number of words spoken, per hour, in both of these countries. That number will be higher than the total number of words in the respective corpora.

    So, if it only takes an hour to out-do a corpus, how can it possibly be representative of anything, and how relevant can it possibly be to this discussion?

    I'm British. I use the word 'acclimate'. I use it in the course of speaking British English. The people to whom I speak understand what I am talking about, therefore my use of British English has been successful. Now, you might want to erroneously deploy a "no true Englishman" argument, but the fact is, I only need one counter-example, me, to be correct on this issue.
  • Nagesh 2013-07-10 11:41
    Harrow:
    Peter peered over Bob’s shoulder, at the error message on his laptop. “It could be that the security log’s full. Have you checked the application’s internal registry?”

    Definitely the wrong thing to say. The proper observation to make would have been, “Hire me as an ad-hoc consultant and I'll fix this in five minutes. It'll cost you two grand but it'll be worth it: you guys can take the credit and look like geniuses.”

    Peter is evidently doomed to a life of abject honesty.

    -Harrow.


    How is this going to work in real life? Peter could get arrested for holding information critical to company.
  • Morry 2013-07-10 11:59
    I damned well hope Peter put that in his PMP. And told his boss. He needs to brag that up big time. There are times to help people, and there are times to let people do the job they're being paid for.
  • Calli Arcale 2013-07-10 12:11
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    About the only grammatical nitpick remaining is that if you're going to do a translation, at least use the same part of speech. Those don't mean the same thing, since the first one is an adjective. "Acclimated = acclimitised."

    Of course, then we can get into single versus double quotes if anyone wants another totally pointless row....
  • herby 2013-07-10 12:18
    This might beg the question, but WHY didn't Peter solve the problem BEFORE the highly paid consultants arrived back at the scene of the crime?
  • pjt33 2013-07-10 12:38
    eViLegion:
    pjt33:
    The British National Corpus contains 103 instances of the verb acclimatise/acclimatize and 0 (zero) instances of acclimate.

    COCA, on the other hand, has 70 acclimatize to 358 acclimate.


    So, you've come out with some statistics about two sets of arbitrary text data.

    Consider the number of words spoken, per hour, in both of these countries. That number will be higher than the total number of words in the respective corpora.

    So, if it only takes an hour to out-do a corpus, how can it possibly be representative of anything, and how relevant can it possibly be to this discussion?

    I'm British. I use the word 'acclimate'. I use it in the course of speaking British English. The people to whom I speak understand what I am talking about, therefore my use of British English has been successful. Now, you might want to erroneously deploy a "no true Englishman" argument, but the fact is, I only need one counter-example, me, to be correct on this issue.

    They're not "arbitrary text data": they're both carefully curated to be representative, i.e. typical.

    "British English" doesn't mean "the superset of all idiolects of people who claim to speak British English". If the word "ket" is used only in Yorkshire then that makes it Yorkshire English, not British English. You form a sample of one, so you're probably not a statistically representative sample of all British English speakers.
  • Bob 2013-07-10 12:49
    eViLegion:

    Name calling... is generally used by people who want to weigh in on a topic when they know very little about it.

    All the Ad Hominem in the world won't make the Sh!tPoint wiki feature complete. It lacks templates/transclusion, managed links to uploads, redirects, categorisation, the list goes on.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-10 12:58
    The Oxford English Dictionary defines British English to be English "as spoken or written in the British Isles; esp. the forms of English usual in Great Britain".

    So, while your definition of British English gets a special inclusion, mine is clearly included within that definition.

    What is more, the OED includes acclimate, and cites it in British English usage circa 1792.

    If you'd like to disagree with the OED about this, you're more than welcome. Just fuck off while you're doing it.
  • Rich 2013-07-10 13:02
    So. Peter gets to play high and mighty for 5 minutes, and he's still paid nothing compared to Bob. Poor Bob will need to drive his Porsche home that's twice as big as Peter's and think about what he's done.
  • Sannois 2013-07-10 13:05
    Many companies have successfully embraced the whiteboard-and-post-it documentation paradigm!
  • Joe 2013-07-10 13:27
    ANON:
    Documentation is most of the time meaningful AND helpful (AND outdated, but that's a different story...)

    Documentation either is readable, is helpful, or exists. Pick 2^H1.
  • Anon 2013-07-10 13:36
    Letting the consultants take the credit for fixing it is why OP is not a highly paid consultant.
  • jay 2013-07-10 13:45
    Hmm, the whole build-up of this story, about the consulting company and the contractual arrangement and all that, really had just about nothing to do with the punch-line. "You don't remember what you yourself wrote?" could be just as applicable to an in-house developer as a consultant. Well, I guess without the big build-up the story would have been too short.

    And frankly, the idea that someone might forget one tiny detail amidst all the thousands of details that go into a large system isn't particularly startling. I'm sure I've forgotten lots of things that I've written down at one point or another. That's why we write them down: so we have something to look back at when we forget. But finding the key fact among all the irrelevant facts is the challenge.
  • jay 2013-07-10 13:46
    eViLegion:
    DonaldK:
    ShareBarf, Windoze, Micro$wat.

    That about sums it up dunnit?


    Name calling is an interesting cognitive bias, don't you think?

    Interesting, in that it is generally used by people who want to weigh in on a topic when they know very little about it. They deploy name-calling as an attempt to fool a weaker minded audience into agreeing with an argument that lacks any form of substance.


    Yeah, that's just the sort of thing we expect one of you communist racist Nazis to say.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-10 13:48
    Also... As you have mentioned, those corpora have curators deciding what goes in and what doesn't, curators who are acting as the arbiters of the many inclusional/exclusional decisions. I think you'll find that is pretty much the definition of arbitrary data.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2013-07-10 14:06
    dkf:
    eViLegion:
    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.
    Of course. It's perfectly cromulent.
    If it was British, wouldn't it be perfectly Cromwellent?
  • Evan 2013-07-10 14:18
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    dkf:
    eViLegion:
    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.
    Of course. It's perfectly cromulent.
    If it was British, wouldn't it be perfectly Cromwellent?
    "The most interesting thing about Oliver Cromwell was he was 5 foot 6 inches tall at the start of his reign, but only 4 foot 8 inches tall at the end of it."
  • chubertdev 2013-07-10 14:46
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    dkf:
    eViLegion:
    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.
    Of course. It's perfectly cromulent.
    If it was British, wouldn't it be perfectly Cromwellent?


    Don't try to embiggen the word.
  • EvilCodeMonkey 2013-07-10 14:46
    Evan:
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    dkf:
    eViLegion:
    Also, the word antejentacular isn't in common use anywhere. It's still British English.
    Of course. It's perfectly cromulent.
    If it was British, wouldn't it be perfectly Cromwellent?
    "The most interesting thing about Oliver Cromwell was he was 5 foot 6 inches tall at the start of his reign, but only 4 foot 8 inches tall at the end of it."


    Interesting and apparently incorrect as well. They didn't behead his body until a couple years AFTER his death (and thus end of reign) according to the sources I found.
  • Anomaly 2013-07-10 14:48
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.
  • dilligaf 2013-07-10 14:49
    herby:
    This might beg the question, but WHY didn't Peter solve the problem BEFORE the highly paid consultants arrived back at the scene of the crime?


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question

    The second paragraph claims that "some authorities" consider your misuse of the phrase as proper, but those people suck.
  • Sean 2013-07-10 14:57
    Wow, the various uses of the vernacular in these comments is bound to embiggen us all.
  • Hangman 2013-07-10 15:33
    Anomaly:
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.


    Shhhh! That's my trump card for hangman, don't tell everyone about it!
  • Mark 2013-07-10 16:32
    So if he was able to figure this out in about 30 seconds, WTF did they need to bring in consultants. He should of just done his job adn ran the script.
  • Benjamin Smith 2013-07-10 17:20
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...


    I find the whole subject of suffixation to be amusing. We have standardized suffixes, many of which are interchangeable. Why are some suffixations considered to be "a real word" and others not so?

    "Derivation" can be used as a past tense verb, as in "His derivation of the word took several weeks of research", but you can't say "derivement" which adds "-ment" to "derive" to mean the same thing. The latter is rejected. (sigh)

    Also, you forgot the "ed" suffix which puts the verb "acclimatise" into the past tense: "acclimatised".
  • Matt Westwood 2013-07-10 18:03
    Anomaly:
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.


    It's not archaic, it's Welsh.
  • Anonomous Cow 2013-07-10 20:28
    Harrow:
    Definitely the wrong thing to say....Peter is evidently doomed to a life of abject honesty.

    -Harrow.


    It took way too long for someone to point this out.
  • a key in f# minor 2013-07-10 21:00
    Matt Westwood:
    Anomaly:
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.


    It's not archaic, it's Welsh.

    Isn't that the same thing?
  • Eternal Density 2013-07-10 21:48
    enxorizo:
    pjt33:
    Is there any chance of posting the unedited story to see whether the way it sets up the scenario makes any sense? The first 9 paragraphs of this article seem to be deliberately written to make it hard to figure out what's going on.


    yep, the style provides a deliberately garbled up intertwined structure with the apparent goal of provoking increased interest in the unfolding of subsequent consequences.

    short, it's a mess. i feel conned and insulted.
    Maybe it's a deleted scene from Primer.
  • Dan 2013-07-11 02:04
    Well said, I agree completely.

    Worst. WTF. Ever.
  • Gunslnger 2013-07-11 02:58
    So, TRWTF is that a feature was actually documented accurately and usefully. Fancy that.
  • eViLegion 2013-07-11 05:07
    a key in f# minor:
    Matt Westwood:
    Anomaly:
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.


    It's not archaic, it's Welsh.

    Isn't that the same thing?


    No... no it isn't... you blithering ignoramus.
  • RandomGuy 2013-07-11 08:33
    Evan:
    "The most interesting thing about Oliver Cromwell was he was 5 foot 6 inches tall at the start of his reign, but only 4 foot 8 inches tall at the end of it."

    No, that's the most interesting thing about King Charles the First. And it was because of ... (please sing-along while playing Chopin's Heroic Polonaise):
    "Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England ..."
  • eViLegion 2013-07-11 09:14
    "Heroic" is pretty difficult dude. If you can play it well AND sing at the same time, I doff my hat to you.
  • RandomGuy 2013-07-11 09:25
    eViLegion:
    "Heroic" is pretty difficult dude. If you can play it well AND sing at the same time, I doff my hat to you.

    I would also accept to just play a recording (I assume Monty Python did so, too). Or have someone else play while you sing (or vice versa).
  • eViLegion 2013-07-11 10:05
    RandomGuy:
    eViLegion:
    "Heroic" is pretty difficult dude. If you can play it well AND sing at the same time, I doff my hat to you.

    I would also accept to just play a recording (I assume Monty Python did so, too). Or have someone else play while you sing (or vice versa).


    But it's less heroic that way!
  • xaade 2013-07-11 10:07
    pjt33:
    eViLegion:
    Spudley:
    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that 'acclimated' is an Americanism. It isn't in common use over here.

    Hmm, no. As a British English speaker, I can tell you that it might well be an Americanism, but that is totally irrelevant. It IS in use in Britain, by British English speakers.

    The British National Corpus contains 103 instances of the verb acclimatise/acclimatize and 0 (zero) instances of acclimate.

    COCA, on the other hand, has 70 acclimatize to 358 acclimate.


    But the word acclimatize is redundant.

    The fact that you're adjusting to a climate is already implied by the ac- part of the word.

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ac-

    ac- Prefix: To, toward.
    -ize Suffix: become, become like

    It's redundant.

    cli•ma•tize (ˈklaɪ məˌtaɪz)
    v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.
    1. to acclimate to a new environment.
    2. to prepare or modify (a building, etc.) for use or comfort in a specific climate.

    climatize == acclimate.

    There's literally NO need for the word "acclimitize".
  • Herr Otto Flick 2013-07-11 10:33
    Anomaly:
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.


    So archaic, it is actually Welsh, or technically, Common Brittonic.
  • anon 2013-07-11 11:21
    Bob:
    eViLegion:

    Name calling... is generally used by people who want to weigh in on a topic when they know very little about it.

    All the Ad Hominem in the world won't make the Sh!tPoint wiki feature complete. It lacks templates/transclusion, managed links to uploads, redirects, categorisation, the list goes on.


    And by adding this description you've stepped out of pure name calling and demonstrated that you actually have a reason for it.
  • Paul Neumann 2013-07-11 11:21
    eViLegion:
    "Heroic" is pretty difficult dude. If you can play it well AND sing at the same time, I doff my hat to you.
    Please, let's keep the comments SFW. Doffing should be done on off time.
  • asdf 2013-07-11 11:33
    pjt33:
    Is there any chance of posting the unedited story to see whether the way it sets up the scenario makes any sense? The first 9 paragraphs of this article seem to be deliberately written to make it hard to figure out what's going on.

    ok, glad I wasn't the only one. I had to re-read the first couple paragraphs 3 times before I could figure out wtf was going on
  • EatenByAGrue 2013-07-11 12:41
    Man, Peter missed an opportunity here:
    "Hey boss, these consultants can't fix your problem. I can, and want, in return, for you to negotiate a 10% cut in fees to ConsultPro (on account of them being idiots), giving me a raise in the amount of 1/4 of the savings. Do that, and I'll have things running for within 15 minutes."
  • chubertdev 2013-07-11 13:17
    eViLegion:
    a key in f# minor:
    Matt Westwood:
    Anomaly:
    My favourite archaic English word is cwm. Thank you House of Leaves.


    It's not archaic, it's Welsh.

    Isn't that the same thing?


    No... no it isn't... you blithering ignoramus.


    You went Matt Westwood on a user quoting Matt Westwood.

    [/article]
  • Evan 2013-07-11 14:46
    RandomGuy:
    Evan:
    "The most interesting thing about Oliver Cromwell was he was 5 foot 6 inches tall at the start of his reign, but only 4 foot 8 inches tall at the end of it."

    No, that's the most interesting thing about King Charles the First. And it was because of ... (please sing-along while playing Chopin's Heroic Polonaise):
    "Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England ..."
    Oh balls, you're right. Well I feel silly. "Doowwwwwwwnnn came the axe..."
  • eViLegion 2013-07-11 14:49
    chubertdev:


    You went Matt Westwood on a user quoting Matt Westwood.

    [/article]
    Yeah I did a little bit. Sometimes you know there'll be a whooshing sound, but you've gotta bite anyway. Besides, I hadn't used ignoramus, nor blithering for that matter, for some time and I felt the thread title warranted it.
  • Matt Westwood 2013-07-11 18:08
    eViLegion:
    chubertdev:


    You went Matt Westwood on a user quoting Matt Westwood.

    [/article]
    Yeah I did a little bit. Sometimes you know there'll be a whooshing sound, but you've gotta bite anyway. Besides, I hadn't used ignoramus, nor blithering for that matter, for some time and I felt the thread title warranted it.


    Finally I'm a meme. Bless you guys.
  • urza9814 2013-07-11 20:55
    T.R.:
    "empty bottles of Evian" ? perhaps a left-over of the original story, indicating it happened in France...
    or perhaps Evian is commonly found in whatever country it happened in.


    It's one of the more expensive brands of bottled water (an already extremely overpriced product) commonly found in the US. Not sure if it's that expensive elsewhere, but I took that as another jab at how highly-paid these consultants are.
  • ForFoxSake 2013-07-12 15:51
    If the answer was in the documentation provided to them and they didn't read the documentation, I would bill them for the entire day.
  • real-modo 2013-07-13 04:16
    xaade:
    There's literally NO need for the word "acclimitize".


    ... and by a strange coincidence, there's no such word.
  • DifferentANON 2013-07-14 16:10
    Joe:
    Documentation either is readable, is helpful, or exists. Pick 2


    Documentation that doesn't exist is neither readable or helpful.
  • Diogenes 2013-07-15 04:05
    Good documentation can exist: it's usually written by interns and (possibly expert) late comers who don't know enough about the project to neglect certain areas, and didn't have time to learn to hate the system, and therefore they conservatively try to make a good job.
  • abjdhoaz 2013-07-16 07:18

    صورمشبات .مشبات . ديكورات مشبات .صورمشبات
    http://shomane.blogspot.com/


    صورمشبات
    http://12abjdhoaz.blogspot.com/


  • Neil 2013-07-16 12:46
    Benjamin Smith:
    Peter:
    For English readers - 'acclimated' = 'Acclimatise' ...
    I find the whole subject of suffixation to be amusing.
    Suffixation? Is that a fixation with suffixes?
  • Mr. Bob 2013-07-18 16:29
    Nagesh:
    Harrow:
    Peter peered over Bob’s shoulder, at the error message on his laptop. “It could be that the security log’s full. Have you checked the application’s internal registry?”

    Definitely the wrong thing to say. The proper observation to make would have been, “Hire me as an ad-hoc consultant and I'll fix this in five minutes. It'll cost you two grand but it'll be worth it: you guys can take the credit and look like geniuses.”

    Peter is evidently doomed to a life of abject honesty.

    -Harrow.


    How is this going to work in real life? Peter could get arrested for holding information critical to company.


    I don't see how it would be illegal for Peter to withhold information from his employer. Might get him a one way ticket to the exit, but I doubt the police would be interested.

    Am I the only one who felt like I somehow missed the first half of the story?