We Need a Body

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  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 10:05
    A candidate who is a SQL expert but can't do a SELECT. What do you do with him?

    Buy him to lunch and keep considering him for the job, of course. Fist!
  • meg (not in IT) 2008-03-06 10:07
    Having no IT experience or knowledge whatsoever, I'm looking forward to sending my resume to this company when I'm in the market for a new job.
  • SnapShot 2008-03-06 10:07
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?
  • Andy Goth 2008-03-06 10:09
    Seriously, it took me a couple years to figure out that C# really is pronounced "C-sharp". I had assumed "C-pound" on account of "C-sharp" being too punny and already in use for several projects.

    I can't figure out if that disqualifies me from commenting here or makes me a valued asset to the WTF community.
  • Andy Goth 2008-03-06 10:09
    Ooh, I know! C-tictactoe!
  • Jim 2008-03-06 10:11
    1 - If you have only ever really learned from books, you may be very proficient, but wouldn't know the difference between C-Sharp or C-Pound. Though, if he is claiming to have experience in C#, I'm sure his past job would have corrected him at some point.

    2 - Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple. Asking them if they know a certain API isn't a good question. Finding out how their approach would be to learning a new API or language, on the other hand, would be more important. Especially when the C# and VB.NET API's are the same anyway, just a different language syntax. Just because he didn't use XML before doesn't make him weak. More appropriate questions would be to ask him about his past experiences, explaining problems he has faced in the past, and see how he has solved them.

  • J 2008-03-06 10:11
    Maybe in spanish... C-Gato (Gato = Tictactoe)


  • Vollhorst 2008-03-06 10:12
    It is not C-zing?
  • webrunner 2008-03-06 10:19
    If you know the difference between C-Sharp and C-Pound it means you spent too much time talking about it and not on a computer using it.
  • apetrelli 2008-03-06 10:20
    Now I know what "body rental" thingy, so typical in Italy, is all about.
    Now I have to investigate what The Body Shop sells.
  • Hexamaniac 2008-03-06 10:20
    Ooh, I know! C-tictactoe!


    I prefer C-0x23.

    Oops, time for some

    CAFEBABE

    Love,
    FFFF FFFF
  • mccoyn 2008-03-06 10:22
    I'm a little disappointed he didn't ask what the letters in SQL stand for, just to be sure this guy knew absolutely nothing about it.
  • DeLos 2008-03-06 10:23
    FredSaw:
    A candidate who is a SQL expert but can't do a SELECT. What do you do with him?

    Buy him to lunch and keep considering him for the job, of course. Fist!


    The things people will do for a free (company paid) lunch!
  • Karellen 2008-03-06 10:23
    I prefer C-hash or C-octothorpe.
  • Simetrical 2008-03-06 10:24
    "I think I have some work he can do" sounded like a setup for a non-WTFy ending (from the company's point of view). I thought the next part was going to say how he was the new janitor or something. But no, we're dropped straight to the hiring with no explanation. Didn't the boss have some reason not to interview the next guy? Was there a next guy?
  • Smeghead 2008-03-06 10:24
    In UK that would be C-Hash ;)
  • Smeghead 2008-03-06 10:25
    I'm also sure that we have hired Corey and all his friends and family recently :(
  • McGuffin 2008-03-06 10:27
    But did he say "see-kwal" or "ess-cue-ell"?
  • boh 2008-03-06 10:30
    What datatype would you use to store a string of characters?


    Can I only choose one? Otherwise, it depends on what I want to do with it:

    CString, char*, std::string, BSTR*, CComBSTR, _bstr_t, BSTR wrapped in a VARIANT, various string classes supplied by libraries such as Xerces or TinyXml, whatever...
  • pitchingchris 2008-03-06 10:33
    Jim:

    Just because he didn't use XML before doesn't make him weak.


    Maybe not, but XML was around even back in VB 6.0, and if this company did most of its stuff in xml, they should at least expact a basic understanding of the topic. Most programming books mention and even scratch the surface on what you can use XML with the language. Doesn't seem like Corey was volunteering any strong experience anyway.
  • Mateo_LeFou 2008-03-06 10:33
    alas, is this joint void of *nixers? No one's suggested the obvious

    "C-she"
  • SomeCoder 2008-03-06 10:34
    I feel like this story just abruptly ends. How did SQL get on his resume? How did a "VB to C#" typo get on there?

    Good WTF, I just feel like it ended without all the details being told.
  • Rik 2008-03-06 10:39
    We could do with a new body.
    Any body!

    A body of water!
  • A. Heinz 2008-03-06 10:39
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    No, it's clearly C-mesh.
  • ObiWayneKenobi 2008-03-06 10:39
    SomeCoder:

    I feel like this story just abruptly ends. How did SQL get on his resume? How did a "VB to C#" typo get on there?


    If the guy was sent there via a recruiting firm, that might be why. I've heard that a lot of these headhunters will add buzzwords to a candidate's resume, in order to increase the chance of you getting hired - even if you get canned in three months because you can't do the job, the headhunter's already been paid their fee.
  • Outlaw Programmer 2008-03-06 10:41
    SomeCoder:
    I feel like this story just abruptly ends. How did SQL get on his resume? How did a "VB to C#" typo get on there?

    Good WTF, I just feel like it ended without all the details being told.


    I think it's pretty obvious this guy just dropped a whole bunch of buzzwords on his resume without knowing the technologies or even knowing what they are.

    It's a pretty standard practice but the WTF here is that they recognized this guy was full of crap and they hired him anyway.
  • Rootbeer 2008-03-06 10:44
    Jim:
    1 - If you have only ever really learned from books, you may be very proficient, but wouldn't know the difference between C-Sharp or C-Pound.


    It would be pretty hard to find a book on C# that doesn't explain in the preface (if not on the jacket) that the language's name is pronounced "C sharp".

    2 - Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple.


    Agreed, but I didn't see anything in the story that indicated Corey knew how to code in ANY language.

    Besides which, individual languages may not vary much except for syntax, but there are a variety of language paradigms (procedural, object-oriented, declarative), and knowledge of or even expertise in one does not guarantee that someone will be capable of developing in others.

    Corey isn't a weak candidate because he's never worked with XML before. He's a weak candidate because it's 2008 and he doesn't have the foggiest idea what XML even IS.
  • Anon Fred 2008-03-06 10:44
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    You idiot.

    It's C tic-tac-toe sign.
  • Anon Fred 2008-03-06 10:46
    Anon Fred:
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    You idiot.

    It's C tic-tac-toe sign.


    Nuts, you guys beat me to it. I swear I searched for that string before commenting but assumed y'all'd use my punctuation. Sorry for the pollution.
  • jason 2008-03-06 10:49
    Even if you never heard it pronounced, you can tell its c sharp, from the visual studio file extension .cs. I mean, if it was c pound, it would be .cp.
  • shakin 2008-03-06 10:50
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I prefer C3. It sounds almost explosive that way.
  • Andy Goth 2008-03-06 10:52
    Anon Fred:
    It's C tic-tac-toe sign. [...] Nuts, you guys beat me to it. I swear I searched for that string before commenting but assumed y'all'd use my punctuation. Sorry for the pollution.
    I didn't want to pollute my post with excess punctuation. :^)
  • Obviously... 2008-03-06 10:52
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    ... it's C tic-tac-toe
  • savar 2008-03-06 10:53
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    edit: comment withdrawn ( i should read all the comments before making my tic-tac-toe jokes)
  • Haditinspades 2008-03-06 10:54
    Had a nearly identical experience, except I wasn't asked to sit in on the interview; the new body just suddenly appeared one day. After six months of attempting to explain daily such things as how to navigate the Windows desktop and how to check code in and out of source control, I surrendered and emailed my resignation.
  • Pawel 2008-03-06 10:55
    I always thought it was spelled: C plus plus plus plus
  • XIU 2008-03-06 10:55
    Andy Goth:
    Seriously, it took me a couple years to figure out that C# really is pronounced "C-sharp". I had assumed "C-pound" on account of "C-sharp" being too punny and already in use for several projects.

    I can't figure out if that disqualifies me from commenting here or makes me a valued asset to the WTF community.


    The giveaway is probably the extension though or .cs should stand for "Cpound classeS"
  • KTC 2008-03-06 10:58
    "I think I have some work he can do."

    Response with "He'll have a lot of work he can do if you hire him as I'll be gone that very day."?
  • yougetme? 2008-03-06 10:59
    <quote>
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?
    </quote>

    None of the above, its C-tic-tac-toe-board
  • DOA 2008-03-06 11:00
    Outlaw Programmer:
    It's a pretty standard practice but the WTF here is that they recognized this guy was full of crap and they hired him anyway.


    This is what happens when the boss doesn't listen to the employee he put in charge of screening candidates. This really annoys me sometimes. If you're gonna put someone in charge of making a decision, listen to them. Otherwise just do the job yourself and don't waste his time.

    Still it could be worse. My boss whose last programming project was in BASIC when he was a kid, hired a developer without asking any of his developer staff. No interview either, he just knew the guy from somewhere. Turns out that despite some programming experience he hasn't a clue when it comes to the technologies we use.

    A few near misses later (think 4 letter admin passwords on public sites) we're all a little bit wiser. And I keep my eye on him.
  • James Bender 2008-03-06 11:02
    OK, I'm calling BS on this one.
  • CorXy 2008-03-06 11:02
    C Brady Bunch? Anyone?

    Clearly the problem with Corey was the "e" in his name. We Corys are much more knowledgeable and efficient.
  • Mizchief 2008-03-06 11:04
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    Naa, it's C-deez nutz
  • RP 2008-03-06 11:05
    MS calls it "C sharp"
  • Zylon 2008-03-06 11:05
    yougetme?:
    <quote>
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?
    </quote>

    None of the above, its C-tic-tac-toe-board

    You fail this thread.
  • sol 2008-03-06 11:07
    Even if you never heard it pronounced, you can tell its c sharp, from the visual studio file extension .cs. I mean, if it was c pound, it would be .cp.


    To be fair, people without any musical background and no knowledge of the sharp sign would not know how to pronounce it. The ".cs" file extension only hints that it might not be "C pound" or "C hash", but does not indicate what the "s" stands for.

    Interestingly, my girlfriend, who has no programming experience but lots of music experience immediately pronoucned it as "C sharp", and then assumed she'd gotten it wrong.
  • SomeCoder 2008-03-06 11:09
    ObiWayneKenobi:
    SomeCoder:

    I feel like this story just abruptly ends. How did SQL get on his resume? How did a "VB to C#" typo get on there?


    If the guy was sent there via a recruiting firm, that might be why. I've heard that a lot of these headhunters will add buzzwords to a candidate's resume, in order to increase the chance of you getting hired - even if you get canned in three months because you can't do the job, the headhunter's already been paid their fee.



    Yeah that's what I was expecting the story to say but it never did. You're probably right.
  • akatherder 2008-03-06 11:12
    You rarely see anyone hired entirely out of pity.
  • feep 2008-03-06 11:12
    C plus plus plus plus :)
  • E.M.H. 2008-03-06 11:15
    C tic-tac-toe
  • E.M.H. 2008-03-06 11:16
    E.M.H.:
    C tic-tac-toe


    Awww, crud, someone above beat me to it... :(
  • Xaox 2008-03-06 11:18
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
  • Zauderer 2008-03-06 11:18
    I'd recommend C Raute.
  • Zylon 2008-03-06 11:21
    SQL should clearly be pronounced "squill".
  • Matthew 2008-03-06 11:21
    C Tick-Tak-Toe
  • eekee 2008-03-06 11:22
    Okay, this isn't precisely relevant to this article, but I've got to say it some time. The very fact that # even could be described as a pound sign is a huge WTF to me! As far as I can tell, the only way it got that name was via ancient 7-bit ascii printers, which sometimes substituted the pound sign for the hash character. How it could have spread from that to such widespread usage, I don't know, unless perhaps it was an acceptable substitute for the true pound sign for a long time before that. Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 11:23
    CorXy:
    C Brady Bunch? Anyone?

    Clearly the problem with Corey was the "e" in his name. We Corys are much more knowledgeable and efficient.
    So CorXy must be how it's spelled in l337, eh?
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 11:25
    Xaox:
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
    How does saying "ess cue ell" change the CFO's understanding of the word "server"?
  • dabigjhall 2008-03-06 11:29
    Clearly, the only correct answer is C waffle.

    Mmmm....waffles....
  • Kederaji 2008-03-06 11:33
    It's pronounced C-durIdon'treadthethreadbeforeposting.
  • Reader X 2008-03-06 11:36
    eekee:
    Okay, this isn't precisely relevant to this article, but I've got to say it some time. The very fact that # even could be described as a pound sign is a huge WTF to me! As far as I can tell, the only way it got that name was via ancient 7-bit ascii printers, which sometimes substituted the pound sign for the hash character. How it could have spread from that to such widespread usage, I don't know, unless perhaps it was an acceptable substitute for the true pound sign for a long time before that. Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".


    # was used for pound back in the days when the apothecary wrote out your order in longhand with a pencil on a scrap of paper.
  • Keith 2008-03-06 11:37
    OK, this is a pound sign -> £
    This is a hash sign -> #
    This is a sharp sign -> ♯ (Unicode U+266F)

    .. the sharp sign isn't supported by all fonts so you'll probably get a block or something there.
  • Paolo G 2008-03-06 11:39
    Jim:
    1 - If you have only ever really learned from books, you may be very proficient, but wouldn't know the difference between C-Sharp or C-Pound.


    Come on, any decent book on C# is going to explain in the introduction how to pronounce it.

    Here's a question... what do American's call "£"? *That* is the pound sign (and was the pound sign long before the US was even a twinkle in the Founding Fathers' eyes...).
  • pscs 2008-03-06 11:41
    eekee:
    Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".


    According to wikipedia, the "pound sign" is referring to the lb pounds, not the GBP pounds.
  • Paolo G 2008-03-06 11:43
    Paolo G:
    what do American's call "£"


    Oops... always proofread before posting... that should be "Americans", of course.
  • poochner 2008-03-06 11:44
    eekee:
    Okay, this isn't precisely relevant to this article, but I've got to say it some time. The very fact that # even could be described as a pound sign is a huge WTF to me! As far as I can tell, the only way it got that name was via ancient 7-bit ascii printers, which sometimes substituted the pound sign for the hash character. How it could have spread from that to such widespread usage, I don't know, unless perhaps it was an acceptable substitute for the true pound sign for a long time before that. Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".


    Similarly, the # was used for pounds weight, not pounds sterling, on bills of lading, invoices and so on. I've never known it to be used for money, though I have seen keyboards with the sterling sign at shift-3, rather than the hash.
  • Paolo G 2008-03-06 11:45
    pscs:
    eekee:
    Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".


    According to wikipedia, the "pound sign" is referring to the lb pounds, not the GBP pounds.


    Not so, unless someone has edited it since you posted:

    "It is never called the pound sign in the UK, where that term always denotes the symbol for pounds sterling (£) rather than that for pounds weight (lb)."
  • Divide By Zero 2008-03-06 11:45
    This site needs more pictures like the hot Irish girl.
  • Pope 2008-03-06 11:46
    James Bender:
    OK, I'm calling BS on this one.


    And I'm going to disagree with you. At my first job, they hired people that got fired from the previous job of answering phones, and every one of those tools had a similar sob story. A large company in the area had a LOT of layoffs and we got a lot of "programmers." I wasn't in the interview process, but I can imagine the questions a little like this, "Have you seen a computer before? [...] What is a 'mouse'?" I say that because the other 2 good programmers and I put in a great deal of extra work on our hands putting out fires, mentoring and just straight doing other people's work, then when they FINALLY strolled out at 4:35 - "I hope the boss doesn't see me leave early" - we could actually get some work done.

    But, we needed people. Our company was growing at a rate that we couldn't sustain and the answer was to put more people in the mix. I've heard that even to this day management views the title of Programmer as slightly more experienced than Janitor, concerning computers. Even after they lost half of their business from several outages and other crises.

    Out.
    01001001001000000110110001101111011101100110010100100000011000100110000101100011011011110110111000101110
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 11:49
    Paolo G:
    Here's a question... what do American's call "£"? *That* is the pound sign (and was the pound sign long before the US was even a twinkle in the Founding Fathers' eyes...).
    We don't call it anything. We don't use it. What do you call this? $

    Examples of its use:
    $100
    $get(chkApproval);
    Dim SomeString$
    $accountingSystemVendor
  • jpk 2008-03-06 11:50
    That's bull sharp, right?
  • dabean 2008-03-06 11:51
    God I hope "C tic-tac-toe" doesn't become a meme.
  • ddd 2008-03-06 11:52
    It's C-hurdle

    Captcha:
    He pointed his wand at his vile standrads-mangling enemy, and yelled "conventio!"
  • Cope with IT 2008-03-06 11:52
    C batten fence
  • masonReloaded 2008-03-06 11:52
    Doesn't matter, both are widely used and "ess-cue-ell" is the 'official pronunciation':

    "SQL was adopted as a standard by ANSI in 1986 and ISO in 1987. In the original SQL standard, ANSI declared that the official pronunciation for SQL is "es queue el". However, many English-speaking database professionals still use the nonstandard pronunciation /ˈsiːkwəl/ (like the word "sequel")"
  • Manu 2008-03-06 11:54
    That's what SHE said !
  • Yawarakai 2008-03-06 11:54
    C tic-tac-toe board!
  • T 2008-03-06 11:55
    I thought it was C tic-tac-toe
  • themagni 2008-03-06 11:57
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I call it D flat.
  • tezoatlipoca 2008-03-06 11:59
    C-grid!
  • notJoeKing 2008-03-06 12:01
    Kederaji:
    It's pronounced C-durIdon'treadthethreadbeforeposting.


    This made me LOL... has anyone mentioned C-tictactoe or C-plusplusplusplus yet? Cause I think I'm hilareous and I need to post those RIGHT AWAY without seeing if someone beat me to it!!!!
  • Jimmy L 2008-03-06 12:03
    We should commend Brice for leaving (I'm assuming he left voluntarily). That's like walking into a McDonald's and hiring the first asshole you see... Just make sure he has a custody hearing and other real-life problems.

    WTF: Why couldn't that guy just go get a job at McDonald's like a real man would?

    If you're a drudge fan: drudgetracker.com
  • A Gould 2008-03-06 12:05
    Simetrical:
    "I think I have some work he can do" sounded like a setup for a non-WTFy ending (from the company's point of view). I thought the next part was going to say how he was the new janitor or something. But no, we're dropped straight to the hiring with no explanation. Didn't the boss have some reason not to interview the next guy? Was there a next guy?


    James Bender:
    OK, I'm calling BS on this one.


    I buy it - it's amazing how "we only hire the right person" turns into "we need a body". They tend to forget that "we can train them" requires that the person is trainable for the job. Also, you need the extra hours required for existing staff to train the new staff.

    It's been a year since our last "need a guy" left, and we're still finding little landmines in the filing...

    (For the original story, I had him pegged for assistant myself. Assistant manager, I mean. :)
  • WPlinge 2008-03-06 12:06
    Anything *except* C-sharp simply for having the temerity to attempt inflicting that on people.
  • mathew 2008-03-06 12:10
    I deliberately call it C hash, because it's a crude hash of C and Java.
  • Mike 2008-03-06 12:13
    Since it is spelled/typed: "C#", it can't be called C "sharp" because there's no "sharp" key on any computer keyboards.... there's a symbol that looks similar to a sharp sign but if it were a sharp sign, then keyboards would have flat signs and natural signs too.

    So, it has to be anything *but* "C sharp".
  • MarkLD 2008-03-06 12:15
    If MS had wanted to call it "C Pound", surely they would have called if C£. i.e. using a British currency symbol.

    So how did Americans get to pronounce the "hash symbol" as "pound" anyway?

    Whenever I see it used in American stuff, it seems to mean "number", as in "Issue #1"...

    Anyway, it's clearly derived from C++ with an extra ++. So if you didn't call it "C Sharp" it would have to be "C plus plus plus plus".

    How about "C plus fours"?
  • Ren 2008-03-06 12:15
    I used to call it C-swastika.

    I wonder why I never got that job as a java+c#-developer...
  • Xorandnotor 2008-03-06 12:18
    Octothorpe? First time I hear that one. I *love* it.
  • Gamma 2008-03-06 12:20
    I suggest firing the person who interviewed and hired the boss.
  • m 2008-03-06 12:21
    So what is it?

    The Daily WTF, or Worse Than Failure?

    Remember... if you HESITATE for even a SPLIT SECOND, Alex will destroy you. And then ask you to spell Papadimoulis.
  • Harsh Responder 2008-03-06 12:22
    Andy Goth:
    Seriously, it took me a couple years to figure out that C# really is pronounced "C-sharp". I had assumed "C-pound" on account of "C-sharp" being too punny and already in use for several projects.

    I can't figure out if that disqualifies me from commenting here or makes me a valued asset to the WTF community.


    Both. We always need someone or something to comment on.
  • m 2008-03-06 12:23
    > Is it C sharp or C pound?

    'true'.
  • Flashback 2008-03-06 12:31
    I believe this story. Just reading it gave me a flashback to when I was hiring for the programming team I managed. The big boss decided to come for the interview and nearly hired a guy with next to no programming experience.

    I told the big boss hiring the guy was a huge mistake; the big boss (by a miracle of God?) agreed to give him a project on a consulting basis instead of hiring the guy.

    After the guy missed two appointments to discuss the project; no call, no show, the boss finally said, "Good thing we didn't hire that guy, huh?"

    I didn't care that the boss was an idiot. I was just relieved that it only took two missed phone calls instead of four weeks of training.
  • Moo 2008-03-06 12:32
    D-flat
  • Dave 2008-03-06 12:33
    It's pronounced C-sharp.
  • Tei 2008-03-06 12:34
    Here in spain is "C-almohadilla", hence back in english is C-pillow. Good nights guyszzzZZZZ!
  • WhiskeyJack 2008-03-06 12:37
    DOA:
    ...we're all a little bit wiser. And I keep my eye on him.


    My favourite quote is a signature phrase from the Cold War days -- "Trust, but verify." Apparently Ronald Reagan used to say it a lot.

    I have found it to be an immensely useful life motto.
  • Peers 2008-03-06 12:38
    C Tic-Tac-Toe, I thought...
  • Alcari 2008-03-06 12:39
    Rootbeer:

    It would be pretty hard to find a book on C# that doesn't explain in the preface (if not on the jacket) that the language's name is pronounced "C sharp".


    You would be hard pressed to find anyone who reads the preface of coding books.
  • Someone You Know 2008-03-06 12:39
    FredSaw:
    Xaox:
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
    How does saying "ess cue ell" change the CFO's understanding of the word "server"?


    It doesn't. The joke is that the CFO heard "SQL" as the word "sequel", and (fairly logically) thought that a "sequel server" was an additional server related to one the company already had, by analogy with a sequel to a novel or a film. If "SQL" had been spelled out instead of pronounced as "sequel", this blunder would not have occurred.
  • Nada 2008-03-06 12:47
    It's pronounced "C Sharp", the pronunciation is derived from music terminology where # indicates the note is to be played sharp rather than on key or flat.
  • russ 2008-03-06 12:47
    it's c++++ :)
  • Josh 2008-03-06 12:49
    Actually, it's B Flat.

    C Sharp is half an octave higher than C. B is a full octave higher than C. B Flat is half an octave lower than B, which just happens to be equal to C#.

    So, C-Sharp is B Flat.
  • Anon 2008-03-06 12:50
    The real WTF is the number of "it's c tic-tac-toe" posts.
    It wasn't funny the first time and it isn't funny after the tenth time either.
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 12:51
    Someone You Know:
    FredSaw:
    Xaox:
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
    How does saying "ess cue ell" change the CFO's understanding of the word "server"?


    It doesn't. The joke is that the CFO heard "SQL" as the word "sequel", and (fairly logically) thought that a "sequel server" was an additional server related to one the company already had, by analogy with a sequel to a novel or a film. If "SQL" had been spelled out instead of pronounced as "sequel", this blunder would not have occurred.
    Why? That was my original question... why would it not have occurred? He heard "sequel server" and thought it meant another computer. My question: why would he not have thought the same thing when he heard "ess cue ell server"? If he doesn't know what "MS Sequel Server" is, then he doesn't know what "MS Ess Cue Ell Server" is, either.

    Addendum (2008-03-06 12:57):
    Cancel that... I just got it. "Sequel" as in, a followup to the one they already have. Sorry, maybe I need another cuppa.
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 12:54
    Josh:
    C Sharp is half an octave higher than C. B is a full octave higher than C.
    Silly me, imagining that C is a full octave above C.
  • dave 2008-03-06 12:55
    Hmmm. is it ess cue el or see quel?
  • DiverKas 2008-03-06 13:00
    Bleh.. you guys are all wrong...


    Its C-Matrix. It only caught on as a language since the movie ;-}
  • Matthew Wakeling 2008-03-06 13:00
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    Come on, do your research. The Register did an in-depth study on this very subject, and determined that it should in fact be "C Splat".

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2002/07/04/why_microsoft_makes_a_complete/
  • - 2008-03-06 13:02
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    are you retarded?
  • Fernando 2008-03-06 13:02
    Well... I have no idea who taugh you spanish, but where I live

    Gato == Cat and tictactoe == 'Tres en raya'

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tres_en_raya

    Nice history... A bit sad, but still nice.

    It explains why this site has so many articles.
  • mister 2008-03-06 13:06
    In english, it's C shift-3. In spanish, C altGr-3.
  • zolf 2008-03-06 13:06
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    Number C
  • mister 2008-03-06 13:08
    Fernando:
    Well... I have no idea who taugh you spanish, but where I live

    Gato == Cat and tictactoe == 'Tres en raya'

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tres_en_raya

    From that same page, first paragraph: "also known as 'the cat game'". On my country (Chile) it's called "Gato". On Argentina, I think it's called 'ta-te-ti'.
  • my name is missing 2008-03-06 13:13
    C you later!
  • RK 2008-03-06 13:17
    [quote user=SnapShot]So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?[/quote]

    Octothorp for certain...
  • James R. Twine 2008-03-06 13:18
    Well, MS calls it "See-Sharp," and developers that use it call it See-Sharp. But since it is usually written with a hash/pound/octothorpe (#) instead of a real sharp symbol (♯ - use &#9839 in HTML), I think we should call it as written.

    Using the word octothorpe for the "#" symbol, it becomes C-octothorpe, pronounced as COCKTOTHORPE!

    Just a little venting, nothing to see here...

    * In case you cannot see the differences, a hash/pound/octothorpe symbol has angled vertical lines and straight horizontal lines, while a sharp symbol has straight vertical lines and angled horizontal lines.
  • MA 2008-03-06 13:19
    J:
    Maybe in spanish... C-Gato (Gato = Tictactoe)




    Where I live in Spansih it would be C-Michi (Michi = Tictactoe)
  • ZakuSupporter 2008-03-06 13:23
    There's a lot of misinformation here, but thats understandable as its all due to the internationalisation of .NET

    C-pound is used by the UK
    C-yen is used by Japan
    C-franc is used by the Swiss
    C-lira by the italians
    Only the US uses C-sharp because C-dollar was taken by the canadians
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 13:23
    James R. Twine:
    * In case you cannot see the differences, a hash/pound/octothorpe symbol has angled vertical lines and straight horizontal lines, while a sharp symbol has straight vertical lines and angled horizontal lines.
    Man, I thought the grammar nazis were anal. That gives us some perspective.
  • Jeff 2008-03-06 13:32
    >C octothorp?

    I am now using that in all my C# conversations
  • Spectre 2008-03-06 13:33
    Smeghead:
    In UK that would be C-Hash ;)


    Why not C-marijuana then?

    Anyway, its C-equals sign-equals sign.
  • Mathieu C 2008-03-06 13:34
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    It's obviously C tic-tac-toe
  • AMerrickanGirl 2008-03-06 13:36
    Back in the 80s I worked for an office of General Motors in New York City. Due to reorganization, some employees' positions were eliminated, but rather than lay them off, GM decided to train them as PL1 programmers. Mind you, none of these people were at all technically savvy.

    I'll never forget one woman, a former clerk and not the sharpest tool in the shed, who was trying to work her way through the training exercises. One exercise came with a test input file with 50 records. The program was simply supposed to read in the file and output some sort of report.

    She coded away for several days, with the scent of overworking brain cells lingering in the stuffy office air.

    Finally she asked, "What do I do if the input file has more than 50 records?"

    We looked at her code. Turned out there were 50 read statements, 50 write statements ... you get the picture.
  • Digitalbath 2008-03-06 13:36
    Pope:

    ...snip...
    But, we needed people. Our company was growing at a rate that we couldn't sustain and the answer was to put more people in the mix.
    ...snip...


    I have always wondered about being in a situation like that. Would it be possible, since your productivity is being decimated by all the hand holding, to go in and tell your boss something along the lines of, "Hey, if you fire 2 people that we have recently hired, I will take over all their responsibilities if you pay me 3x my salary." Of course, you would need free time, but it seems like it's feasible from a work load standpoint if they aren't doing anything. Maybe do it for a year, save up a bunch of money and then quit for a job that doesn't take 80 hours a week. Would this work? Has anybody ever tried doing it?

  • Benanov 2008-03-06 13:38
    Josh:
    Actually, it's B Flat.

    C Sharp is half an octave higher than C. B is a full octave higher than C. B Flat is half an octave lower than B, which just happens to be equal to C#.

    So, C-Sharp is B Flat.


    You have an octave and a step confused.

    An octave is 12 half-steps:
    C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C
    (alternately, if you like your flat accidentals)
    C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C

    Half an octave is 6 steps, an interval known for sounding really dissonant to a listener (yay diminished chords).

    C# is a half-step higher than C.
    B is a half-step lower than C.
    Bb is half-step lower than B.
    C# is three half-steps higher than Bb.

    Therefore your post makes no sense.

    (Unless you're not using the full 12-step western music scale, in which case you're still not making any sense because you didn't present the scale you are using.)
  • john 2008-03-06 13:38
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.
  • IvyMike 2008-03-06 13:39
    I haven't read the other comments, but I presume I will be the first to hilariously suggest that it is "C Tic-Tac-Toe", which is a completely original joke of my own devising.
  • Jon 2008-03-06 13:42
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    It's C-Tic-Tac-Toe-Board
  • PeriSoft 2008-03-06 13:42
    themagni:
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I call it D flat.


    You bastard. *shakes fist*
  • nat42 2008-03-06 13:43
    What's in a name? That which we call code by any other name doth still compile; So C-Splatt should, Twere it said sharp, would still remain that bloody MS construction. Without that symbol: C-Splatt, doff thy name; And for that name, which seems so ill conceived, I call WTF!
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 13:46
    AMerrickanGirl:
    We looked at her code. Turned out there were 50 read statements, 50 write statements ... you get the picture.
    Here we go loop de loop...
  • Troy McClure 2008-03-06 13:47
    James Bender:
    OK, I'm calling BS on this one.


    This one is actually believable to me. I've worked with people who supposedly had 15+ years of Oracle experience who were asking me (I have MUCH less than 15+ years) very rudimentary questions. Things you would have learned in your first sql class. How they got hired I dont know - but we needed someone to pick up some extra work and magically they appeared.

    Lucikly in our case it didn't take long for them to be discovered and rolled off our account - but more than likely right onto another account who had no clue what a waste of space they were getting.
  • mr.Y 2008-03-06 13:48
    Wow.
    An executive with that ammount of human compassion is a rare species.
    I think I have a pretty good idea why.
    They just have a tendency for becoming extinct. Together with their whole departments :)
  • morry 2008-03-06 13:49
    I prefer C tic-tac-toe
  • KattMan 2008-03-06 13:49
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    Are you saying that an understanding of theory and basic logical constructs are useless against the way different language form those constructs?

    Tell me, how hard is it to go from:
    If x = 3 Then
    do something
    End If
    to this:
    if(x==3)
    {
    do something;
    }

    Doesn't seem to hard to me. The theory and logical construct is the exact same and they are used the exact same way for the exact same reasons. The only different is the syntax. To take this further, if you are a poor developer in one language, you will be a poor developer in any language.
  • ChiefCrazyTalk 2008-03-06 13:49
    Haditinspades:
    Had a nearly identical experience, except I wasn't asked to sit in on the interview; the new body just suddenly appeared one day. After six months of attempting to explain daily such things as how to navigate the Windows desktop and how to check code in and out of source control, I surrendered and emailed my resignation.


    That's the REAL WTF - you shouldn't have resigned, he should have been fired.
  • CorXy 2008-03-06 13:51
    C Sphincter

    Also, if you look closely at "#", it kind of looks like a little Abraham Lincoln with his top hat and his arms outstretched.

    Don't judge me.





  • PotataChipz 2008-03-06 13:53
    Josh:
    Actually, it's B Flat.

    C Sharp is half an octave higher than C. B is a full octave higher than C. B Flat is half an octave lower than B, which just happens to be equal to C#.

    So, C-Sharp is B Flat.

    How is C sharp an octave higher than C? Isn't that a half-step higher? And since when is a B higher than a C, unless you've gone an octave (i.e., eight steps) higher?

    I mean, I played the violin in middle school. I could very well be wrong. But... what?
  • TGV 2008-03-06 13:53
    It's not called any of the above. It is C railroad crossing.

    If it were C sharp, would it be C sharp major or C sharp minor (or even another mode)? Not many works have been written in C sharp major (except a prelude or etude here and there), but C sharp minor is the key of a few (word punt alert) major works: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-sharp_minor
  • JoC 2008-03-06 13:53
    john:
    if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    Yeah, I mean, how crazy are you to think having any sort of fundamentals could possibly help? Don't you know java programmers come out of the womb that way!? Oh, they don't? Well then, I guess you need to just go erase your brain of the VB madness before you ever expect to do anything Java.

    john, you are an idiot.
  • SuperousOxide 2008-03-06 13:54
    McGuffin:
    But did he say "see-kwal" or "ess-cue-ell"?


    What's wrong with "skwil"?
  • m0ffx 2008-03-06 13:55
    It's C Portcullis: Defending the castle Gates.
  • Franz Kafka 2008-03-06 13:57
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    D flat :)
  • test 2008-03-06 13:57
    C♯произносится как «Си-диез»?
  • unum 2008-03-06 13:57
    It's D flat. Ask any linux guy.
  • Franz Kafka 2008-03-06 14:01
    FredSaw:
    Someone You Know:
    FredSaw:
    Xaox:
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
    How does saying "ess cue ell" change the CFO's understanding of the word "server"?


    It doesn't. The joke is that the CFO heard "SQL" as the word "sequel", and (fairly logically) thought that a "sequel server" was an additional server related to one the company already had, by analogy with a sequel to a novel or a film. If "SQL" had been spelled out instead of pronounced as "sequel", this blunder would not have occurred.
    Why? That was my original question... why would it not have occurred? He heard "sequel server" and thought it meant another computer. My question: why would he not have thought the same thing when he heard "ess cue ell server"? If he doesn't know what "MS Sequel Server" is, then he doesn't know what "MS Ess Cue Ell Server" is, either.

    Addendum (2008-03-06 12:57):
    Cancel that... I just got it. "Sequel" as in, a followup to the one they already have. Sorry, maybe I need another cuppa.


    The bigger question is this: shouldn't a CFO know what SQL server is?
  • glwtta 2008-03-06 14:01
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.
  • KattMan 2008-03-06 14:05
    glwtta:
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.


    So you don't expect to demonstrate your claim of expertise even with a simple task? Sorry if you can't demonstrate it (like this guy couldn't) why should you be hired?
  • jimlangrunner 2008-03-06 14:06
    Smeghead:
    In UK that would be C-Hash ;)

    here in the 'states, Hash is not legal, so the folks at Microsoft, being the politically correct bunch they are, chose a less incendiary name.
  • Tom JP 2008-03-06 14:10
    glwtta:
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.


    You may not get a job, but at least you'll not have to suffer the indignity of saying/writing "SELECT * FROM ..."
  • Homer 2008-03-06 14:10
    MMMmmmmmm, C hash.
  • Jim 2008-03-06 14:15
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    I was hired, despite my lack of Java, being told what I mentioned, though, I came from C++, and was told I inherently know Java. If ALL they know is VB, or any single language for that matter, then maybe you have a point. However, if they seem to have a wide range of languages (any decent programmer should have at LEAST 2, if not more), any decent programmer should be able to pick up any language you need, unless it is a huge paradigm shift, such as web programming to mainframe programming, OO to functional, etc.
  • astine 2008-03-06 14:16
    You fail at music.

    C sharp is a half-step above C, not a half octave. C is a full active above C and visa-versa. B flat is a step and a half below C sharp.
  • Franz Kafka 2008-03-06 14:17
    Homer:
    MMMmmmmmm, C hash.


    And the question is: what happens when you let an intern work unsupervised for months?
  • Anomie 2008-03-06 14:19
    C Tic-Tac-Toe
  • AccessGuru 2008-03-06 14:19
    Doesn't matter, as long as it's not VB.
  • Vladekk 2008-03-06 14:20
    Reminds me of my former job. They had crazy worker turnaround - 5 of us left in a few months.
  • Heccy 2008-03-06 14:20
    C Plus Plus Plus Plus
  • Zylon 2008-03-06 14:23
    I love this thread. It's like a perfectly distilled head-on collision between our resident wannabe-but-clueless "geeks" ("It's tic-tac-toe!" "It's tic-tac-toe!" "It's tic-tac-toe!" "It's tic-tac-toe!" "It's tic-tac-toe!"), and the actual geeks who are at least attempting to be somewhat clever about it.
  • glwtta 2008-03-06 14:23
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.

    Well, yeah, if you know "VB programming" you are pretty much useless, if on the other hand, you are a skilled programmer you should be able to become productive in a (reasonable) new language in a couple of weeks.

    Say someone has close to 10 years programming experience, primarily in Java and Perl, with a working knowledge of C, C++, Lisp, Pascal (why not), a bunch of the HTML markup scripts (ASP, PHP, ColdFusion, etc) and the DHTML-related dialects.

    Would you seriously not hire that person to write, let's say, Python? (Assuming they are, in fact, competent in the above, of course.)

    I'm always weary of people who, when describing themselves as a programmer, qualify it with a language. Programming isn't learning syntax.
  • Southern 2008-03-06 14:24
    They needed a body .. *fear*
  • Someone You Know 2008-03-06 14:26
    Franz Kafka:
    FredSaw:
    Someone You Know:
    FredSaw:
    Xaox:
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
    How does saying "ess cue ell" change the CFO's understanding of the word "server"?


    It doesn't. The joke is that the CFO heard "SQL" as the word "sequel", and (fairly logically) thought that a "sequel server" was an additional server related to one the company already had, by analogy with a sequel to a novel or a film. If "SQL" had been spelled out instead of pronounced as "sequel", this blunder would not have occurred.
    Why? That was my original question... why would it not have occurred? He heard "sequel server" and thought it meant another computer. My question: why would he not have thought the same thing when he heard "ess cue ell server"? If he doesn't know what "MS Sequel Server" is, then he doesn't know what "MS Ess Cue Ell Server" is, either.

    Addendum (2008-03-06 12:57):
    Cancel that... I just got it. "Sequel" as in, a followup to the one they already have. Sorry, maybe I need another cuppa.


    The bigger question is this: shouldn't a CFO know what SQL server is?


    Maybe. A CFO makes high-level financial decisions along the lines of allocating $X to this department and $Y to that project, and so on. If the IT department asks for something like a new server, the CFO doesn't necessarily need to know what it is, just how much the IT department needs it, how much it will benefit the company, and whether it is more important than various other things the CFO needs to spend money on.
  • Brandon 2008-03-06 14:34
    thought Gato was spanish for cat.... maybe you know another spanish
  • sf 2008-03-06 14:36
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    I prefer C-crosshatch.
  • alegr 2008-03-06 14:37
    themagni:
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I call it D flat.


    Have you ever checked what flat-D is? (www.flat-d.com)
  • Pope 2008-03-06 14:38
    Digitalbath:


    I have always wondered about being in a situation like that. Would it be possible, since your productivity is being decimated by all the hand holding, to go in and tell your boss something along the lines of, "Hey, if you fire 2 people that we have recently hired, I will take over all their responsibilities if you pay me 3x my salary." Of course, you would need free time, but it seems like it's feasible from a work load standpoint if they aren't doing anything. Maybe do it for a year, save up a bunch of money and then quit for a job that doesn't take 80 hours a week. Would this work? Has anybody ever tried doing it?



    I didn't try that... *grumbles* I should have. If I ever get into that situation again, I'll definitely consider it...

    Because what I did do was set up an application that helped our "programmers" set up clients on our "portal." *shiver* Gobs of WTF-ery involved, I'm sure. Before that it was done by fat-fingering and copy-pasting records into a single, bloated 1NF SQL database, which, to me was even more WTF-itude. Then, when that and other applications I built (in my personal time) had prospered for long enough, I added up all the time I saved and created a report on how much money I would save the company if I were put to the task of solely developing internal software which would make processes standard and efficient. I had already saved the company over 4000 man hours for the year, there's no way they wouldn't let me do that, right? Wrong. They caught my game. They found out I just wanted my own department away from the mayhem and destruction and said, "N-O." And stamped it.

    I cried and hollered, but it fell on deaf ears. When my two year mark came around, I was out the door. Despite all the hardship, I loved that place. It was a lot of fun. Stressful, but fun. But man did I ever get baptized by fire.

    I did check back about a year ago and heard that they now have a whole team of people doing what I proposed to do myself. At least I never had to manage anyone.
  • FredSaw 2008-03-06 14:39
    glwtta:
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.
    Good man. Save us all some time.
  • dtech 2008-03-06 14:40

    What datatype would you use to store a string of characters?

    That one is easy. Just make an int array. Each number in the array corresponds with the UTF-8 number of the character. Of course, if you want to save memory, you could also make a multidimensional array. The first dimension being the character's number and the second being the location(s) in the string.
  • please 2008-03-06 14:41
    duh! It's C tic tac toe!
  • Haackers 2008-03-06 14:44
    no it's C++++.
  • Troy McClure 2008-03-06 14:44
    Franz Kafka:
    FredSaw:
    Someone You Know:
    FredSaw:
    Xaox:
    I've always liked "ess-cue-ell", here's why:

    CFO - "$accountingSystemVendor says we need a 'MS-sequal' server. Why do we need another server if we already have one?"
    How does saying "ess cue ell" change the CFO's understanding of the word "server"?


    It doesn't. The joke is that the CFO heard "SQL" as the word "sequel", and (fairly logically) thought that a "sequel server" was an additional server related to one the company already had, by analogy with a sequel to a novel or a film. If "SQL" had been spelled out instead of pronounced as "sequel", this blunder would not have occurred.
    Why? That was my original question... why would it not have occurred? He heard "sequel server" and thought it meant another computer. My question: why would he not have thought the same thing when he heard "ess cue ell server"? If he doesn't know what "MS Sequel Server" is, then he doesn't know what "MS Ess Cue Ell Server" is, either.

    Addendum (2008-03-06 12:57):
    Cancel that... I just got it. "Sequel" as in, a followup to the one they already have. Sorry, maybe I need another cuppa.


    The bigger question is this: shouldn't a CFO know what SQL server is?


    A CFO pays an IT staff to understand what it is. Just like a developer shouldn't be expected to understand the discount cash flow model intimately, a CFO shouldn't be expected to understand the in's and out's of technology.

    They are paid to make business decisions on what benefits the company. Because if it doesnt somehow have value to the company then its not worth doing.
  • alegr 2008-03-06 14:54
    The read WTF is an ad on the front page, of www . ezgsa . com, which reminds me of another recent WFT (Government suppliers guide).
  • Beernutts 2008-03-06 15:00
    I bet he doesn't even know what ESPN stands for.

    Sheesh.

    Andy Goth:
    Seriously, it took me a couple years to figure out that C# really is pronounced "C-sharp". I had assumed "C-pound" on account of "C-sharp" being too punny and already in use for several projects.

    I can't figure out if that disqualifies me from commenting here or makes me a valued asset to the WTF community.
  • R 2008-03-06 15:04
    Pope:
    They found out I just wanted my own department away from the mayhem and destruction and said, "N-O."


    Your mistake, of course, is that you expected to be promoted to head of your own department and not have to handle mayhem and destruction, aka Politics.

    People should practice political skill to be promoted to that sort of position. Otherwise, the best you could do is redefine your job description but stay in the same department, and that's if your manager is sympathetic.
  • Jonathan Holland 2008-03-06 15:04
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    It is D Flat.
  • M.C. Sarbanes-Oxalot 2008-03-06 15:05
    McGuffin:
    But did he say "see-kwal" or "ess-cue-ell"?



    His type always, always says "see-kwal".
  • Anteater 2008-03-06 15:06
    No, you're not even close. It's either C web or C net.
  • Southern 2008-03-06 15:08
    Brandon:
    thought Gato was spanish for cat.... maybe you know another spanish


    Gato is spanish for cat, but Gato can mean a lot of things depending on which country you are...

    For example, in Argentina they also call Gato to women who sell theirselves for big amounts of money to spend the night with, or even the jack to lift the car when you get a flat tire.

    -- End of useless information, for now --
  • some random lurker 2008-03-06 15:11
    cocktothorpe gets my vote.
  • zip 2008-03-06 15:12
    C-blog? C-2.0? C-intertubes?

    Seriously, lets keep this awesome humor goldmine rolling! C-your mama!
  • jimlangrunner 2008-03-06 15:12
    alegr:
    The read WTF is an ad on the front page, of www . ezgsa . com, which reminds me of another recent WFT (Government suppliers guide).

    Are you refering to "The Secure Site"?
  • akatherder 2008-03-06 15:15
    Is anyone else getting a Billy Madison "dumber for having read this thread" feeling?
  • themagni 2008-03-06 15:18
    dtech:

    What datatype would you use to store a string of characters?

    That one is easy. Just make an int array. Each number in the array corresponds with the UTF-8 number of the character...


    Try using strings in C or Assembly for an embedded chip without native string support in the compiler.

    I'm not talking about ancient coding practices here - most computers are embedded.
  • Andy 2008-03-06 15:23
    eekee:
    Okay, this isn't precisely relevant to this article, but I've got to say it some time. The very fact that # even could be described as a pound sign is a huge WTF to me! As far as I can tell, the only way it got that name was via ancient 7-bit ascii printers, which sometimes substituted the pound sign for the hash character. How it could have spread from that to such widespread usage, I don't know, unless perhaps it was an acceptable substitute for the true pound sign for a long time before that. Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".


    I have also seen it used in engineering to refer to a pound. (weight or mass) This is going back 20+ years.
  • themagni 2008-03-06 15:23
    PeriSoft:
    themagni:
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I call it D flat.


    You bastard. *shakes fist*


    Nah, my parents were married for about two years before I was born.

    I have noticed that some other folks have started calling it D-flat in the thread, which is kind of cool. That's my second meme.

    I'm a musician as well, so it was the first thing I thought of was the enharmonic equivalent. By the way, that guy who went on about the octaves and the B-flat thing was totally out to lunch. You could say that a Bb instrument playing in treble clef would play an Eb / D# to play C# major. There might be other instruments where the Bb thing would be true, but I'm not interested in spending my lunch looking it up.
  • themagni 2008-03-06 15:23
    akatherder:
    Is anyone else getting a Billy Madison "dumber for having read this thread" feeling?


    NO YOURE ARE!
  • Scurvy 2008-03-06 15:24
    glwtta:
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.


    "...that the men of Gilead said unto him, Art thou an Ephraimite? If he said, Nay; Then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth: and he said Sibboleth: for he could not frame to pronounce it right. Then they took him, and slew him at the passages of Jordan: and there fell at that time of the Ephraimites forty and two thousand."

    It's not a test. It's a shibboleth.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibboleth
  • Jaspion 2008-03-06 15:28
    it's C fence
  • john 2008-03-06 15:31
    KattMan:
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    Are you saying that an understanding of theory and basic logical constructs are useless against the way different language form those constructs?

    Tell me, how hard is it to go from:
    If x = 3 Then
    do something
    End If
    to this:
    if(x==3)
    {
    do something;
    }

    Doesn't seem to hard to me. The theory and logical construct is the exact same and they are used the exact same way for the exact same reasons. The only different is the syntax. To take this further, if you are a poor developer in one language, you will be a poor developer in any language.


    i'm saying that anyone who says 'programming is programming' is fundamentally mistaken. it's not. i've seen enough C-savvy programmers write procedural java, and it's not pretty (not trying to pick on C programmers, i admire them for what they can do)
  • Movie Mogul 2008-03-06 15:51
    McGuffin:
    But did he say "see-kwal" or "ess-cue-ell"?

    Ess Cue Ell - The Sequel

    That is one of my favorite print vs spoken confusions. When you write, which is correct?
    1) Use an SQL statement.
    2) Use a SQL statement.

    Depends on how you pronounce "SQL" in your mind when you read it. When I'm speaking (and pay attention), it seems that I use them interchangeably.
  • john 2008-03-06 15:52
    glwtta:
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.

    Well, yeah, if you know "VB programming" you are pretty much useless, if on the other hand, you are a skilled programmer you should be able to become productive in a (reasonable) new language in a couple of weeks.

    Say someone has close to 10 years programming experience, primarily in Java and Perl, with a working knowledge of C, C++, Lisp, Pascal (why not), a bunch of the HTML markup scripts (ASP, PHP, ColdFusion, etc) and the DHTML-related dialects.

    Would you seriously not hire that person to write, let's say, Python? (Assuming they are, in fact, competent in the above, of course.)

    I'm always weary of people who, when describing themselves as a programmer, qualify it with a language. Programming isn't learning syntax.


    i think we actually agree. i'm saying i wouldn't hire someone who thinks that it's all about syntax. i am not saying i wouldn't hire someone who wasn't expert at whatever language my project is using. the guy i interviewed knew the language i was looking for (yeah, it's java), but he saw it as just another syntax to throw his bad idea of software engineering around in, and his statement that he could program in pretty much any old language i had was indicative to me that he didn't understand some fundamentals of software development.
  • quarnel 2008-03-06 15:52

    RP:
    MS calls it "C sharp"


    Are You Sure!
    Where are your references?!
  • ingenium 2008-03-06 15:55
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    It's C number sign: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_Sharp_%28programming_language%29#Language_name
  • y0y 2008-03-06 15:57
    john:
    Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple.
    = bullshit.

    i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    Right.

    I know once I learned my first language I was forever stuck. Unable to learn a new one. Simply confounded when new syntactic structures were presented to me. Unable to fathom the same conceptual design under a different tongue. Aye, in other words: no hablo. </sarcasm>

    Some languages have a larger barrier to entry than others, and if you mean that for one to say they can come in and immediately be productive and useful when making a huge switch is absurd then I would agree. However, if the person is a good developer, they should have little trouble picking up the missing pieces, putting them together, and becoming productive in fairly short order as long as the language is around the same level (meaning high to low level languages) as the one they are transitioning from. Going from VB to ASM is quite a leap, but VB to Java is perfectly reasonable. I will concede, however, that there are some syntaxes and language structures that can pose quite a mental block when switching from some language types to others. C style languages to something like Ruby or LISP, for example.
  • Jim 2008-03-06 15:57
    john:
    KattMan:
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    Are you saying that an understanding of theory and basic logical constructs are useless against the way different language form those constructs?

    Tell me, how hard is it to go from:
    If x = 3 Then
    do something
    End If
    to this:
    if(x==3)
    {
    do something;
    }

    Doesn't seem to hard to me. The theory and logical construct is the exact same and they are used the exact same way for the exact same reasons. The only different is the syntax. To take this further, if you are a poor developer in one language, you will be a poor developer in any language.


    i'm saying that anyone who says 'programming is programming' is fundamentally mistaken. it's not. i've seen enough C-savvy programmers write procedural java, and it's not pretty (not trying to pick on C programmers, i admire them for what they can do)


    Procedural programming is procedural programming
    Functional programming is functional programming
    Mainframe programming is mainframe programming
    Object oriented programming is object oriented programming

    Happy? "Programming is programming" seemed to save me keystrokes when I wrote it. I suspected people would be able to realize what I meant. Anyway, any decent programmer will realize that Java is inherently different from C, in that one is procedural, and the other is object oriented, and will adjust their thinking accordingly. Trying to force procedural programming in an object oriented world is dumb, and vice versa.
  • Benanov 2008-03-06 16:02
    themagni:
    I'm a musician as well, so it was the first thing I thought of was the enharmonic equivalent. By the way, that guy who went on about the octaves and the B-flat thing was totally out to lunch. You could say that a Bb instrument playing in treble clef would play an Eb / D# to play C# major. There might be other instruments where the Bb thing would be true, but I'm not interested in spending my lunch looking it up.


    Which guy was out to lunch? Me, speaking from a music-theory/composing perspective, or the guy I responded to?
  • Code Dependent 2008-03-06 16:04
    themagni:
    NO YOURE ARE!
    Did you mean to say, "Know your R? Or was it perhaps "Know your R's"?

    No, wait, now I've got it. You wanted to tell us, "Know your arse." I'm sure you do.
  • Andy Goth 2008-03-06 16:04
    Beernutts:
    I bet he doesn't even know what ESPN stands for.
    Isn't a television network devoted to paranormal activity, extra sensory perception in particular?
  • snoofle 2008-03-06 16:05
    Tom JP:
    glwtta:
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.


    You may not get a job, but at least you'll not have to suffer the indignity of saying/writing "SELECT * FROM ..."

    I was once in an interview in front of someone who obviously couldn't write a SQL statement at gunpoint. The guy asks me to write down how to do some join. While I'm no DB person, it was pretty simple, so I just dictated it back to him. He said to please write it down. I looked at him with one eye and asked why. He said I need to have it written down so I can take it to someone who can see if you did it right. I asked him if I could speak to the person he was going to see. He said no. I thanked him for his time and said that I too, was too busy for this nonsense, and left.
  • Andy Goth 2008-03-06 16:05
    Andy Goth:
    Isn't a television network devoted to paranormal activity, extra sensory perception in particular?
    Damnit, make that "Isn't IT a television network". Bah, what little humor was in my joke has now fled.

  • KattMan 2008-03-06 16:06
    john:

    i think we actually agree. i'm saying i wouldn't hire someone who thinks that it's all about syntax. i am not saying i wouldn't hire someone who wasn't expert at whatever language my project is using. the guy i interviewed knew the language i was looking for (yeah, it's java), but he saw it as just another syntax to throw his bad idea of software engineering around in, and his statement that he could program in pretty much any old language i had was indicative to me that he didn't understand some fundamentals of software development.


    I still think you are off. Someone who said they could program in any language probably understands the fundamentals of programming far better; as long as the paradigm of those languages were similar (procedural as opposed to object oriented).
    Although you may give a clue as to the real reason not to hire him, his bad idea of software engineering. As I stated before, if you are a poor developer, you will be a poor developer regardless of language chosen.
    Even with all that said, some languages are more appropriate for some tasks than others. I wouldn't use FORTRAN for report generation, but I also wouldn't use VB for scientific number crunching.
  • Zydeco 2008-03-06 16:07
    I always thought it was C crosshatch
  • themagni 2008-03-06 16:08
    Benanov:
    themagni:
    I'm a musician as well, so it was the first thing I thought of was the enharmonic equivalent. By the way, that guy who went on about the octaves and the B-flat thing was totally out to lunch. You could say that a Bb instrument playing in treble clef would play an Eb / D# to play C# major. There might be other instruments where the Bb thing would be true, but I'm not interested in spending my lunch looking it up.


    Which guy was out to lunch? Me, speaking from a music-theory/composing perspective, or the guy I responded to?


    Sorry about the delay. I was out having lunch.

    The guy who I said was out to lunch before I went out to lunch was Josh, the guy who said that it was Bb and that C# was an octave above C. There were at least eight things wrong with his post, and it was only about 40 words long.

    That post was bad, and I'm saying that as "the shenanigans guy".
  • Kasper 2008-03-06 16:09
    You can call it what you want, I will keep calling it C-havelåge.
  • Harrow 2008-03-06 16:17
    nat42:
    What's in a name? That which we call code by any other name doth still compile; So C-Splatt should, Twere it said sharp, would still remain that bloody MS construction. Without that symbol: C-Splatt, doff thy name; And for that name, which seems so ill conceived, I call WTF!
    A poem is never finished, only abandoned. -Paul Ambroise Valery

    None too soon, in some cases...

    -Harrow.
  • KT 2008-03-06 16:18
    function createComment () {
    var names = ["C sharp", "C pound", "C hash", "C octothorpe", "C tic-tac-toe", "C++++", "D flat", FILE_NOT_FOUND, "... Profit!"];
    COMMENTS.post( "No, it's " + names[parseInt(Math.random()*names.length)] );
    }
    createComment();
  • Code Dependent 2008-03-06 16:20
    snoofle:
    I was once in an interview in front of someone who obviously couldn't write a SQL statement at gunpoint. The guy asks me to write down how to do some join. While I'm no DB person, it was pretty simple, so I just dictated it back to him. He said to please write it down. I looked at him with one eye and asked why. He said I need to have it written down so I can take it to someone who can see if you did it right. I asked him if I could speak to the person he was going to see. He said no. I thanked him for his time and said that I too, was too busy for this nonsense, and left.
    When I first applied for my present position (going on eight years now), they did not ask me any technical questions or give me a test. I wondered about this, since the other three interviews I'd been to since Monster.coming my resume had all done so. I got hired, and in short order so did another guy based on the same tactic: "tell us your experience". He lasted two weeks, and was fired when he didn't understand why his VBScript code kept showing up as text in his web pages. (Hint: use a .asp extension rather than a .htm extension)

    Next they hired a guy who was a total incompetent but could talk the obfuscospeak to managers. This time they were forced to keep him on for a full year so that it wouldn't look like they (management) were incompetent when it came to hiring. During that time his total accomplishment was to create a one-page web form which gathered user input and emailed it to a given destination. When they finally fired him I was given the task of "finishing" his project. It was such complete crap that I asked, and was given, permission to scrap it and start fresh. It took me about a day and a half to complete.

    Yes indeed, hirers: interview based on tales of past exploits. Don't test your applicants. Don't ask for a practical demonstration of ability. God forbid that the pretenders should get up and walk out on you in a huff.


    Addendum (2008-03-06 16:29):
    This is for you, dude.

    glwtta:
    If some tool expected me to write trivial SQL in an interview, I would walk out right there.

    I'm there to be interviewed about my experience, not to do tricks on command.
  • A. Cube 2008-03-06 16:31
    I'm betting on C-tic-tac-toe.
  • StupidPeopleTrick 2008-03-06 16:39
    Let me guess... the company was a state agency. Those guys will sometimes hire someone just to get them off of the street.

    - SPT
  • DeLos 2008-03-06 16:43
    Beernutts:
    I bet he doesn't even know what ESPN stands for.

    Sheesh.


    Wow, I thought I knew it. Got "Entertainment, Sports, ... Network". Guess I have no idea.

    Wikipedia says: Entertainment and Sports Programming Network

    I think they have dropped the old acronym though and now ESPN stands for nothing.
    http://www.espnmediazone.com/corp_info/
  • Jon 2008-03-06 16:45
    There's no precedent in English for inserting vowels other than schwas into the pronunciation of abbreviations. So, unless you want to pronounce SQL as "suckle," you should probably stick to spelling it out. (It's also fun to annoy people by calling it "squirrel.")
  • nzruss 2008-03-06 16:47
    What, no option for "D Flat"?

  • desmo 2008-03-06 16:49
    Actually, no. C sharp is 1/2 a tone higher than C, not 1/2 an octave. B is half a tone lower than C. C# == D flat.
  • notJoeKing 2008-03-06 16:51
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.


    If that was me you had rejected, I would drop to my knees and thank God that you didn't hire me.

    I know plenty of people that have years of experience in a specific language that couldn't program their way out of a paper sack. It all breaks down to 1s and 0s so what really matters is if a person can actually program... not be an idiot with 10 years experience who can't figure out the inverse of a condition so he puts no code in the if statement and all the code in the else... of uses an if-else statement to copy one boolean into another... both of which I've seen generated by programmers with 5+ years experience...
  • Josh 2008-03-06 16:52
    C-Mesh. Sheesh, ain't nobody ever written any INTERCAL before?
  • JL 2008-03-06 16:56
    Clearly, it's C not-not-equal-to.
  • VGR 2008-03-06 16:59
    KattMan:
    john:

    i think we actually agree. i'm saying i wouldn't hire someone who thinks that it's all about syntax. i am not saying i wouldn't hire someone who wasn't expert at whatever language my project is using. the guy i interviewed knew the language i was looking for (yeah, it's java), but he saw it as just another syntax to throw his bad idea of software engineering around in, and his statement that he could program in pretty much any old language i had was indicative to me that he didn't understand some fundamentals of software development.


    I still think you are off. Someone who said they could program in any language probably understands the fundamentals of programming far better; as long as the paradigm of those languages were similar (procedural as opposed to object oriented).
    Although you may give a clue as to the real reason not to hire him, his bad idea of software engineering. As I stated before, if you are a poor developer, you will be a poor developer regardless of language chosen.
    Even with all that said, some languages are more appropriate for some tasks than others. I wouldn't use FORTRAN for report generation, but I also wouldn't use VB for scientific number crunching.

    I think john originally had a good point but used words that were a little too blanketing.

    It is frequently the case that people take the same programming practices they used in Pascal in 1985 and try to apply them to an object-oriented language.

    Sure, "programming is programming" ... for some values of the word "programming." Namely, the value which defines it as "the union of procedural programming, object-oriented programming, et al." The words themselves, "programming is programming," seem to frequently lead to people trying to apply obsolete and even harmful programming practices to modern languages and design.
  • Mogri 2008-03-06 17:00
    C tic-tac-toe, duh.
  • kthxbai 2008-03-06 17:03
    LOL GUYS I CAME UP WITH A NEW ONE

    IT'S C TIC TAC TOE

    BET YOU HAVEN'T HEARD THAT ONE BEFORE LOL
  • themagni 2008-03-06 17:08
    Code Dependent:
    themagni:
    NO YOURE ARE!
    Did you mean to say, "Know your R? Or was it perhaps "Know your R's"?

    No, wait, now I've got it. You wanted to tell us, "Know your arse." I'm sure you do.


    It was in response to the comment about getting dumber by reading the thread, and it was the dumbest thing I could think of to say.

    I'm not sure if you were trying to top me.
  • Exodus 2008-03-06 17:10
    C Spot Run!
  • Zylon 2008-03-06 17:24
    notJoeKing:
    an idiot with 10 years experience who can't figure out the inverse of a condition so he puts no code in the if statement and all the code in the else...

    Be aware that some shop rules actually mandate coding conditionals exactly that. Something about code readability, maintainability, yadda yadda etc, I'd imagine.
  • Anonymous 2008-03-06 17:26
    None of the above. It's C Splat.
  • mister 2008-03-06 17:34
    In the typewriting era, it was called C equal-backspace-verticalbar-backspace-verticalbar
  • It's C tic-tac-toe! 2008-03-06 17:35
    Please also be sending me the tic-tac-todes?

  • Gitsnik 2008-03-06 17:39
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    C-don't_use_this_if_you_want_to_live ;)
  • Konrad 2008-03-06 17:41
    Lack of skills aside, that is a very hard position to be in. I've been the technical expert where the person being interviewed didn't have anywhere near the technical skills needed, but was obviously desperate for a job.

    Cold business interests meets being human and responding emotionally. I did the cold business thing and said no you can't hire this person. but it was not an easy thing to do, for me or my boss.
  • notJoeKing 2008-03-06 17:46
    Zylon:
    notJoeKing:
    an idiot with 10 years experience who can't figure out the inverse of a condition so he puts no code in the if statement and all the code in the else...

    Be aware that some shop rules actually mandate coding conditionals exactly that. Something about code readability, maintainability, yadda yadda etc, I'd imagine.


    Trust me, it wasn't that. When he wasn't busy sleeping on the job, he was writing for 1 to 4 loops with giant select cases in them with code only in case 2 and case 3. But hey, with all his "experience" in the language, he'd make a much better hire than anyone stupid enough to think Java is similar to VB.Net with different syntax, right?
  • mauve 2008-03-06 17:50
    I'm not sure I can tell any more whether people genuinely think the "C-tic-tac-toe" comments are witty or whether they are just sadistic griefers trying to damage my brain with their banality. Either way, this thread has more tossers than slashdot.

    I was once rejected for a job specifically because I didn't already know MFC. They told me "You may be a programmer but you're not a software engineer."

    They were right in that I wasn't a software engineer then, but they were wrong because they didn't know what a software engineer was, and thought that a software engineer is different from a programmer in that he knows more APIs or languages. That's not the distinction at all: a programmer is someone who can write programs in a language; a software engineer is someone who works not on a level of syntactic obstacles but a level of problem domains, efficiency and maintainability.

    If you're interviewing a programmer, different languages could cause them problems. A software engineer should be productive in different language pretty quickly. As an interviewer your job is to work out where on that path your candidate is.
  • WTF 2008-03-06 17:55
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    I like Cash, personally.

    Besides, I'm pretty sure Coctothorps aren't legal in this state.
  • Franz Kafka 2008-03-06 17:58
    Troy McClure:

    A CFO pays an IT staff to understand what it is. Just like a developer shouldn't be expected to understand the discount cash flow model intimately, a CFO shouldn't be expected to understand the in's and out's of technology.

    They are paid to make business decisions on what benefits the company. Because if it doesnt somehow have value to the company then its not worth doing.


    If the CFO is working at the level where it matters what a SQL server is:
    the CFO heard "SQL" as the word "sequel", and (fairly logically) thought that a "sequel server" was an additional server related to one the company already had, by analogy with a sequel to a novel or a film. If "SQL" had been spelled out instead of pronounced as "sequel", this blunder would not have occurred.


    then he had damn well better know what a SQL server is. I'd expect this sort of thing in a smaller shop where the CFO is also the Director of IT - otherwise, it's the director's job to present things properly.
  • ColinA 2008-03-06 17:58
    Jim:
    1 - If you have only ever really learned from books, you may be very proficient, but wouldn't know the difference between C-Sharp or C-Pound. Though, if he is claiming to have experience in C#, I'm sure his past job would have corrected him at some point.


    I would actually consider this something of a litmus test for an interviewer. If they care so deeply about how I pronounce C# that they'll make it the deciding factor of an interview, they may very well be someone I don't want to work with (or for).
  • 28% Genius 2008-03-06 18:00
    dabean:
    God I hope "C tic-tac-toe" doesn't become a meme.


    I think your comment made it reach critical mass.

    So, who is going to tell it to Microsoft?
  • real_aardvark 2008-03-06 18:31
    akatherder:
    You rarely see anyone hired entirely out of pity.
    It should happen more often.

    I've had to deal with fifteen-man (and token woman) projects that include at least three or four entirely useless, and potentially dangerous, individuals. Deal with it. Push them into testing, push them into business analysis, push them into customer support ... hell, push them into high-level management, if you really need to embarrass the poor sods.

    Corey sounds like he needs some help. (I've been on the other side of a custody case.) Give the poor guy a shot at it, and, if he doesn't work out, fire his sorry ass two weeks later.

    Me, I thought that was what made America great. I seem to be behind the times, though.
  • real_aardvark 2008-03-06 18:40
    FredSaw:
    Josh:
    C Sharp is half an octave higher than C. B is a full octave higher than C.
    Silly me, imagining that C is a full octave above C.
    Actually, I'm still trying to get my head around the idea that B flat is half an octave below B.

    Ya think we could get Josh interested in rhythm? I can see a whole new interpretation of Trout Mask Replica opening up here...
  • Meh 2008-03-06 18:48
    Good move for Brice. His boss is really smoking something. He and Corey would make a good couple.
  • BA 2008-03-06 18:52
    It's spelled C-pound, but pronounced C-sharp (honestly http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_Sharp_%28programming_language%29#Language_name)
  • Roman 2008-03-06 18:55
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    Ain't C a bitch?
  • Hmmm 2008-03-06 19:07
    WTF:
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    I like Cash, personally.

    Besides, I'm pretty sure Coctothorps aren't legal in this state.


    More wood to the fire:

    What's SQL + C#?

    SQL = Squirrel
    C# = C Hash = Cash
    SQL + C# = Squirrel with cash!

    There - mystery solved. We have a lot of rich squirrels. Isn't perverted logic fun?




  • Bill Ablehours 2008-03-06 19:26
    What kind of company was this? If they do contract work and bill by the hour, I can believe they would hire the most incompetent guy they could find, as long as they had one competent guy to complete the job.
  • hash1978 2008-03-06 19:47
    C-tic-tac-toe!
  • hash1978 2008-03-06 19:48
    Oh frak, someone already said that :P
  • Moekandu 2008-03-06 20:16
    C curse

    Because it's short for C#$%*&!

    As for T-T-T...
    "Interesting game. The only way to win is not to play."
  • Colm 2008-03-06 20:23
    C Tic Tac Toe.
  • KevinT 2008-03-06 20:37
    It's C-Waffle.
  • Jim 2008-03-06 20:40
    Java-- ??
  • ClaudeSuck.de 2008-03-06 21:02
    eekee:
    Okay, this isn't precisely relevant to this article, but I've got to say it some time. The very fact that # even could be described as a pound sign is a huge WTF to me! As far as I can tell, the only way it got that name was via ancient 7-bit ascii printers, which sometimes substituted the pound sign for the hash character. How it could have spread from that to such widespread usage, I don't know, unless perhaps it was an acceptable substitute for the true pound sign for a long time before that. Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".


    I always wondered who-TF invented c-pound. Not even Wiki mentions it under wrong names:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_Sharp_(programming_language)#Language_name

    Good explanation though. Just some older guys with old habits first talked about c-pound, that's all.
  • Not a .NET developer 2008-03-06 21:28
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    C shit.
  • Mark 2008-03-06 21:38
    It's D-flat!
  • ClaudeSuck.de 2008-03-06 22:14
    Xorandnotor:
    Octothorpe? First time I hear that one. I *love* it.


    Has anyone used C-square yet? It is kind of legal, too.

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-oct1.htm
  • Rick 2008-03-06 23:21
    'Oglethorpe'?
  • Anonymous Coward 2008-03-06 23:53
    feep:
    C plus plus plus plus :)
    Actually, that's how I explain to the occasional-programmer engineery types what it is. Mind you I make a point to explain that it's actually called C-Sharp.
  • emurphy 2008-03-07 00:52
    Bill Ablehours:
    What kind of company was this? If they do contract work and bill by the hour, I can believe they would hire the most incompetent guy they could find, as long as they had one competent guy to complete the job.


    As always, this is the stupid way to deal with hourly billing: a rival who demonstrates themselves as competent and fair can steal the client. The smart way is to be competent and fair yourself, and make money by way of the client finding more useful work for you to do.
  • ActionMan 2008-03-07 01:36
    I always called it C hash, because the # symbol is most commonly pronounced "hash" in these parts...
  • J 2008-03-07 01:56
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    In Germany it's also called C Gartenzaun.
  • Ubiquitous 2008-03-07 02:01
    C-whothefuckcares
  • captain obvious 2008-03-07 03:27
    Andy Goth:
    Seriously, it took me a couple years to figure out that C# really is pronounced "C-sharp". I had assumed "C-pound" on account of "C-sharp" being too punny and already in use for several projects.

    I can't figure out if that disqualifies me from commenting here or makes me a valued asset to the WTF community.

    If you have done more than a few hour's work in C#, you would eventually need help and need references time to time, often the quickest way to do this is online. The number of sites that have "sharp" in the URL means you should pick it up very quickly.
  • Fernando 2008-03-07 04:03
    He was partly right, tictactoe is also called the cat's game, and probably it's called "gato" (cat) in some regions.

    It's called "tres en raya" where I live.
  • erisdiscordia 2008-03-07 04:24
    Andy Goth:
    Ooh, I know! C-tictactoe!


    If God were just, that would be a featured comment.

    e.
  • Bitter Like Quinine 2008-03-07 04:38
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    You are forgetting to take into account that this is a Microsoft language.

    First, the 'c' is hard as in "ker", everyone makes the mistake of using the soft 'c' ("see"), but Bill-ville thought that there was room in the pronunciation market for another standard.

    Second, the Microsoft standard pronunciation of '#' is not sharp or pound but "ching!" (complete with exclamaion mark).

    So, obviously, the correct pronunciation of C# is "Ker-ching!"
  • Steve 2008-03-07 04:46
    It's C# - C Sharp
  • Kiss me I'm Polish 2008-03-07 04:54
    Steve:
    It's C# - C Sharp

    C-tictactoe and get over it already!
  • Kiss me I'm Polish 2008-03-07 04:57
    desmo:
    Actually, no. C sharp is 1/2 a tone higher than C, not 1/2 an octave. B is half a tone lower than C. C# == D flat.
    Actually, no.
    C# is slightly higher than D flat. Every violin player will tell you that.
  • betlit 2008-03-07 05:05
    actually, it's 'C garden fence'.

    here in switzerland (and i think in (some parts of?) germany as well) the # sign is called 'garden fence' by many people ;)
  • Cope with IT 2008-03-07 05:21
    Spectre:
    Smeghead:
    In UK that would be C-Hash ;)


    Why not C-marijuana then?

    Anyway, its C-equals sign-equals sign.

    Could actually also be C-double-non-parallel...
  • Anon Barbarzyńca 2008-03-07 05:21
    Kederaji:
    It's pronounced C-durIdon'treadthethreadbeforeposting.


    No, it's spelled C-durIdon'treadthethreadbeforeposting but you pronounce it as Throat Warbler Mangrove.
  • jo-82 2008-03-07 05:36
    betlit:
    actually, it's 'C garden fence'.

    here in switzerland (and i think in (some parts of?) germany as well) the # sign is called 'garden fence' by many people ;)


    Yes, my little niece would call it like this.
    In germany it is called "C-Raute". According to my dictionary, the proper english word would be C-Diamond or C-Lozenge.
  • Bussola 2008-03-07 05:39
    From the official C# language specification 3.0:
    "C# (pronounced “See Sharp”) is a simple, modern, object-oriented, and type-safe programming language. C# has its roots in the C family of languages and will be immediately familiar to C, C++, and Java programmers. C# is standardized by ECMA International as the ECMA-334 standard and by ISO/IEC as the ISO/IEC 23270 standard. Microsoft’s C# compiler for the .NET Framework is a conforming implementation of both of these standards."
  • dkf 2008-03-07 05:56
    poochner:
    I've never known it to be used for money, though I have seen keyboards with the sterling sign at shift-3, rather than the hash.
    That's a UK keyboard layout.

    This reminds me of when there used to be a disagreement over what ASCII meant which resulted in my having to write code like this:

    £include "yaddayadda.h"
    ...

    I presume it was because the definition of ASCII had been communicated over the Atlantic by telephone, and not fax...
  • Zagyg 2008-03-07 06:30
  • Oitzu 2008-03-07 07:01
    ZakuSupporter:
    There's a lot of misinformation here, but thats understandable as its all due to the internationalisation of .NET

    C-pound is used by the UK
    C-yen is used by Japan
    C-franc is used by the Swiss
    C-lira by the italians
    Only the US uses C-sharp because C-dollar was taken by the canadians


    whats about C-euro? :/
    my fav. is C-raute, german version ;)
    some other german:
    C-gitter
    C-gartenzaun
  • Vituiksman from Finland 2008-03-07 07:05
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    C sharp (see Sharp), altough some of the C# developers tend to cry a lot.
  • s. 2008-03-07 07:05
    Tell me people please why in the world would you ever call '#' a pound?

    £ is a pound. # is a hash.

    It's just like calling '@' a dollar sign.
  • Dan 2008-03-07 07:12
    Originally, I think it was C plus plus plus plus.
  • Dan 2008-03-07 07:12
    Originally, I think it was C plus plus plus plus.
  • Anonymous Comic Critic 2008-03-07 07:16
    I choose C - None of the above

    BustedTeesGirl++
  • Benn 2008-03-07 07:36
    Kiss me I'm Polish:
    C# is slightly higher than D flat. Every violin player will tell you that.

    Forgive my pedantry, but this completely depends on what key you're playing in, and on what instrument. When using just intonation, the C# in A major (ie, a major 3rd above the keynote) is a different note to the C# in B major, which are both different to the Db which is note 4 of Ab major. If the notes are 'accidentals', then, depending upon the style of music, a C# may be just a smidge above a C, and a fair deal flatter than Db, which is a smidge below D.

    By the way, the reason that C# Major is so rare (can't be bothered to find the previous post) is that note 3 (an 'F' on the keyboard) should strictly be written as 'E#', and note 7 (a 'C') as 'B#'. That's 8 Sharps/Hashes/Octothorpes/Tic-Tac-Toe boards in the key signature, as opposed to Db major, its enharmonic equivalent, which only has the 5 flats.
  • RainyRat 2008-03-07 07:40
    Neither; it's pronounced "Squirrel".
  • Cope with IT 2008-03-07 08:19
    Oitzu:
    whats about C-euro? :/
    my fav. is C-raute, german version ;)
    some other german:
    C-gitter
    C-gartenzaun

    C-Lattenzaun is also quite wide-spread over here, btw.

    Apart from that: C-two-sheffer-strokes-and-an-equal-sign
  • KittyKat 2008-03-07 08:22
    WHY do I think from that smirk, he expected to get the job no mater what went on in the interview? relatives in the ocmpany prehapse?
  • James 2008-03-07 08:34
    C - Noughts and crosses
  • De 2008-03-07 08:37
    It's "Zeh Schweinegatter" in german.
    Literally translated it would be "toe pig gate"...

    (joking!)
    "C" is pronounced like "zeh" and "zeh" is indeed "toe"
    "Schweinegatter" is the name some peaople give that litte #-sign... sigh.
  • John Doe 2008-03-07 08:45
    C
  • TInkerghost 2008-03-07 09:26
    Still seems a case of extreme carelessness on the part of a great many people for # to aquire the name "pound sign".

    Um, long before printers & computers .... you would indicate the bag weighed in at 24# ... hence the 'pound sign' reference.
  • KattMan 2008-03-07 09:35
    s.:
    Tell me people please why in the world would you ever call '#' a pound?

    £ is a pound. # is a hash.

    It's just like calling '@' a dollar sign.


    Because you fail to understand the different forms of measurement.

    £ is a monetary pound.
    # is a weight pound.

    With that in mind, @ is nothing like dollar sign. To take this further, Europeans use grams for their weights, and we Americans use pounds. Therefore, in America we are not programmers, we are propounders, hence it should be c-pound in the USA.

    Try finding the flaw in THAT logic.
  • DaveK 2008-03-07 09:46
    Zylon:
    yougetme?:
    <quote>
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?
    </quote>

    None of the above, its C-tic-tac-toe-board

    You fail this thread.


    Damn right! That's a noughts-and-crosses board, not a tic-tac-toe one!

  • DaveK 2008-03-07 09:49
    KittyKat:
    WHY do I think from that smirk, he expected to get the job no mater what went on in the interview? relatives in the ocmpany prehapse?

    I believe his mater works there...
  • DaveK 2008-03-07 09:51
    erisdiscordia:
    Andy Goth:
    Ooh, I know! C-tictactoe!


    If God were just, that would be a featured comment.

    e.


    God is not just. She is a crazy woman.

    Bu you ought to already know that...
  • Beernutts 2008-03-07 10:12
    DeLos:
    Beernutts:
    I bet he doesn't even know what ESPN stands for.

    Sheesh.


    Wow, I thought I knew it. Got "Entertainment, Sports, ... Network". Guess I have no idea.



    That was the point. no-one really knows what ESPN stnds for :)
  • Pope 2008-03-07 10:38
    R:
    Pope:
    They found out I just wanted my own department away from the mayhem and destruction and said, "N-O."


    Your mistake, of course, is that you expected to be promoted to head of your own department and not have to handle mayhem and destruction, aka Politics.

    People should practice political skill to be promoted to that sort of position. Otherwise, the best you could do is redefine your job description but stay in the same department, and that's if your manager is sympathetic.


    Completely agree. I thought I was doing enough by presenting solutions rather than whining about problems. Be proactive rather than reactive! But being a year out of college I still didn't know much about the work force. I still don't. I do remember saying that I would be on a six month probationary period and said I would come right back to my position if it didn't work out. I also listed all the different projects that could be done and an estimate on how much time/money it would save the company. However, I think I handled it all wrong. I should have offered to stay in my department and work on my internal applications part time. If everything worked out, and I met goals that a panel of peers and I set, eventually I could start working on my internal applications full time. I would still be a part of the regular IT department, but I would have a different title. People could still come to me for help.

    I have to admit, I still don't completely understand the psychology behind the politics and beauracracy presented in the work force. What I think is logical and what happens are two completely different things.

    So, for me and for everyone else who has been or is already in a similar position, how could I have done better? Thanks in advance!
  • some guy 2008-03-07 10:43
    Or is it C double++?
  • hikari 2008-03-07 11:30
    C Sharp.
  • Josh 2008-03-07 11:55
    Oh, come on. I was discussing the scale according to Microsoft. You Microsoft developers should feel right at home, since Microsoft likes to embrace, extend, and break the other standards they use.

    Had this been a Slashdot posting, I would have posted the correct scale, which is what musicians have used for centuries, since most open source stuff is Standards based. But to blend in with the Microsoft paradigm, I had to present a bastardized standard.
  • PeniWize 2008-03-07 12:15
    HAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!! Ridiculous. I laugh because nearly the exact same thing recently happened to me (I’m the one who left).
  • Anonymous 2008-03-07 12:32
    I'm only a sophomore in college, but when I read things like this, it makes me happy knowing there's a job out there for me, even if it is a WTF job. I'm not even in CS, or any kind of Software, but I feel confident that I know more than this guy. I'll probably be able to keep the job for six months, rather than three.
  • George 2008-03-07 12:56
    Oh my f***ing God!
  • Worf 2008-03-07 13:37
    ClaudeSuck.de:

    I always wondered who-TF invented c-pound. Not even Wiki mentions it under wrong names:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_Sharp_(programming_language)#Language_name


    I always took it as a Daily WTF meme that came about a couple of years ago.

    Just like "Brillant" and other WTF memes used in these comments daily.
  • real_aardvark 2008-03-07 13:47
    Benn:
    Kiss me I'm Polish:
    C# is slightly higher than D flat. Every violin player will tell you that.

    Forgive my pedantry, but this completely depends on what key you're playing in, and on what instrument. When using just intonation, the C# in A major (ie, a major 3rd above the keynote) is a different note to the C# in B major, which are both different to the Db which is note 4 of Ab major. If the notes are 'accidentals', then, depending upon the style of music, a C# may be just a smidge above a C, and a fair deal flatter than Db, which is a smidge below D.

    By the way, the reason that C# Major is so rare (can't be bothered to find the previous post) is that note 3 (an 'F' on the keyboard) should strictly be written as 'E#', and note 7 (a 'C') as 'B#'. That's 8 Sharps/Hashes/Octothorpes/Tic-Tac-Toe boards in the key signature, as opposed to Db major, its enharmonic equivalent, which only has the 5 flats.

    Well, that buggers my theory that Hans Pfitzner's symphony is in C# major (a theory based on inadequate reading of the record sleeve, plus an inability to believe that it's possible to write a symphony in C major that's not as god-awful as Wagner's). As an added bonus, I've just discovered that my prized original version of Palestrina is now worthless, because the bastards have re-issued it.

    Still without reading the earlier post on this, but it's fairly indicative that the most likely place to find a piece in C# major is in "The Well-Tempered Clavier." Pick a key. Pick any key...
  • NotanEnglishMajor 2008-03-07 13:48
    masonReloaded:
    Doesn't matter, both are widely used and "ess-cue-ell" is the 'official pronunciation':

    "SQL was adopted as a standard by ANSI in 1986 and ISO in 1987. In the original SQL standard, ANSI declared that the official pronunciation for SQL is "es queue el". However, many English-speaking database professionals still use the nonstandard pronunciation /ˈsiːkwəl/ (like the word "sequel")"


    Dates back to the early days of mainframe database technology (please forgive the pun). The actual name of the language is:

    Standard English Query Language - SEQL

    This was later sortened to Standard Query Language - SQL

    By the time this happened, however, the common usage of "sequel" had already become entrenched.

    -Notan
  • NotanEnglishMajor 2008-03-07 13:51
    NotanEnglishMajor:
    masonReloaded:
    Doesn't matter, both are widely used and "ess-cue-ell" is the 'official pronunciation':

    "SQL was adopted as a standard by ANSI in 1986 and ISO in 1987. In the original SQL standard, ANSI declared that the official pronunciation for SQL is "es queue el". However, many English-speaking database professionals still use the nonstandard pronunciation /ˈsiːkwəl/ (like the word "sequel")"


    Dates back to the early days of mainframe database technology (please forgive the pun). The actual name of the language is:

    Standard English Query Language - SEQL

    This was later sortened to Standard Query Language - SQL

    By the time this happened, however, the common usage of "sequel" had already become entrenched.

    -Notan


    Ugh! That would be Structured NOT Standard.
  • real_aardvark 2008-03-07 13:52
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.

    Why? Because it's utterly impossible to become a useful java programmer?

    Man, I look forward to the flames on that one.
  • ... 2008-03-07 14:13
    I smell BS or just too much drama in this story...

    When Corey was asked about C# while eating, there would be no way that he'd confused it by saying "C pou- er- sharp."
    because Corey would already have pronounced the word C#.

    If that's the author's attempt at humor,

    you fail. WTF.

    Don't make stories up.
  • javaweeny 2008-03-07 15:13
    I promise this story is not made up. Simplified for the sake of the post, yes. It is true, it was a terrible place to work. The fact that several of you think this is B.S. shows how ridiculous this place is and I'm glad I'm not there anymore.
  • C. F. Martin 2008-03-07 15:35
    But his most outrageous statement during the interview went like this:

    "...but I know that if I were asked to redesign the application I work on from the ground up, I could do a good job of it."
  • The General 2008-03-07 15:42
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    It's C-štvorlístok!

    ...er, should have read through the thread first. I bet someone's already said that. In that case, my second choice is C-tic-tac-toe.
  • The General 2008-03-07 15:48
    Rick:
    'Oglethorpe'?

    Been there. There's not much to see.
  • The General 2008-03-07 15:53
    Anon Barbarzyńca:
    Kederaji:
    It's pronounced C-durIdon'treadthethreadbeforeposting.


    No, it's spelled C-durIdon'treadthethreadbeforeposting but you pronounce it as Throat Warbler Mangrove.

    You are a very silly person and I'm not going to quote you.
  • octavian 2008-03-07 15:59
    Octothorp, anyone knows that! hgello!
  • dmitriy 2008-03-08 05:12
    I have read this thread and believe many of you missed the point of this story. The point is the management WTF of hiring a clearly incompetent worker.
  • Péter 2008-03-08 09:02
    C# may be pronounced as C-tic-tac-toe, but I am sure it should be thoughtread as "Cis" [tsis].

  • DaveK 2008-03-08 14:11
    Homer:
    MMMmmmmmm, C hash.

    C hash.
    C hash run.
    Run, hash, run!

  • Ghlar'kuul 2008-03-08 15:24
    oh yes, this sounds just about right... packing in bodies , just on the VERBAL / superficial assurance from the candidate "i can do C#" and then the candidate ends up not knowing what a webservice /SQL stored procedure is.

    im no know-it-all , but hey, we cant always do EVERYTHING with NOTHING....
  • justme 2008-03-09 03:12
    I LOL.

    I think that's the case. I also work with someone that basically does nothing because he just can't do it, yeah the boss knows.
  • Victor 2008-03-09 17:14
    Brice was happy this guy was not hired to be his boss for the perfect soft skills.
  • Victor 2008-03-09 17:17
    Brilliant! Are we in the same company?
  • Hamstray 2008-03-09 20:43
    C♯ != D♭

    C♯ (C sharp) is a musical note lying a chromatic semitone above C and a diatonic semitone below D.
    D♭ (D flat) is a musical note lying a diatonic semitone above C and a chromatic semitone below D.

    this is not the same thing unless you assume lame-ass equal temperament
  • real_aardvark 2008-03-09 21:05
    Hamstray:
    C♯ != D♭

    C♯ (C sharp) is a musical note lying a chromatic semitone above C and a diatonic semitone below D.
    D♭ (D flat) is a musical note lying a diatonic semitone above C and a chromatic semitone below D.

    this is not the same thing unless you assume lame-ass equal temperament

    And we're back to the Well-Tempered Clavier: and not before time. I'm interested that you think that equal temperament is lame-ass, because it appears to be something of an ongoing issue amongst musicologists (at least with regard to JSB's work, which is as good a place to start as any).

    However, the distinction between a chromatic semitone and a diatonic semitone is new to me (because I'm ignorant -- ok, I admit it). Nice and simple, and I can understand it.

    I wonder what the rest of the crap on this thread was about?
  • Indima 2008-03-09 21:06
    Ehh, so what is this WTF? Brice is an assh*le and his boss is a good decent guy? The applicant got the break he deserved and Brice learnt a lesson... Looking at the comments here just makes me sad. Were you all raised in a strerile cyberspace where compassion and care for your fellow man has no value. Some of u are just pathet*c.
  • Ashar 2008-03-10 08:41
    In France, it is "C dièse".
  • Pope 2008-03-10 10:11
    Hamstray?! A fellow HR enthusiast. Good jorb.
  • Keith 2008-03-10 10:25
    It's C Sharp. Really. It is.
  • nymous 2008-03-10 10:57
    I fell lucky I don't have a gay boss.

    (captcha: eros)
  • Rhialto 2008-03-10 11:51
    mccoyn:
    I'm a little disappointed he didn't ask what the letters in SQL stand for, just to be sure this guy knew absolutely nothing about it.

    Why, it means Silly Question Language. Everybody knows that, right?
  • Pfft... WHAT?! 2008-03-10 13:27
    Indima:
    Ehh, so what is this WTF? Brice is an assh*le and his boss is a good decent guy? The applicant got the break he deserved and Brice learnt a lesson... Looking at the comments here just makes me sad. Were you all raised in a strerile cyberspace where compassion and care for your fellow man has no value. Some of u are just pathet*c.


    I hope this is sarcasm. Not everyone deserves a fair chance because they have a sob story. I mean, I feel bad for the guy, but... There is such a thing as lying and some do it all the time to get something they don't deserve. And lying on a resume is grounds for being written off completely. He obviously lied about the abilities needed to function at this place, which means he doesn't deserve the job because he will prove to be incompetent.

    Incompetence breeds excessive bureaucracy. If you want more of that in your company, hire every charity case that you come across. You will have processes upon useless, banal processes watching processes. I promise you.

    Sorry... probably a bit of misdirected hostility, but this welfare system where mediocrity is celebrated is what's destroying America's ability to function. Why try when you get rewarded for nothing? What's the point of becoming specialized and going that extra mile if you're going to be replaced by a theology major that took a Web Interfaces class? (That didn't happen to me, but it did happen to one of my friends.)
  • Hamstray 2008-03-10 16:36
    Excellent. We have Body.
    Now, Igor go out and fetch me a fresh brain!
  • real_aardvark 2008-03-10 16:39
    Pfft... WHAT?!:
    Incompetence breeds excessive bureaucracy.

    Oh, look, a knee-jerk Republican. Isn't he cute? I wonder when they'll come up with syllogisms that actually make sense, or can be measured in the real world.

    There are more incompetencies in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Halliburton, for one.

    Pfft... WHAT?!:
    What's the point of becoming specialized and going that extra mile if you're going to be replaced by a theology major that took a Web Interfaces class? (That didn't happen to me, but it did happen to one of my friends.)

    Tell your friend to take a Master's in the appropriate degree -- in this case, Theology. That's the American Way. Tailor your talents to what the Market wants.

    Otherwise, stop bleating.
  • kayeff 2008-03-10 16:52
    Okay, I swear I have read every comment here, so I am very sorry if I missed this one:

    I think it's C+=2.
  • Craig 2008-03-10 21:35
    I don't think anyone has posted this one yet.

    It is clearly called "C double double dagger".

    Explanation: The little cross shaped symbol (†) used for postscripts is often called a dagger. The double of the symbol (‡) is a double dagger. So the # symbol is clearly a double double dagger.

    Additionally I have heard it secribed (in my country at least) as "hatch" (from "crosshatch") rather than "hash".

    As an aside, "C pound" confused me until I remembered that you Americans don't use SI units.

    Cheers
    Craig
  • Jay 2008-03-11 03:32
    john:
    "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.

    I guess I won't be applying for a job at your company either. If a Java programmer can't learn the rudiments of VB (I originally wrote "basics" but that would have led to a pun even more tired by now than "c tic-tac-toe") in a couple of weeks, I don't believe he was any good at Java, either. Sure, every language has its intricacies, and I suppose becomeing an expert <anything> programmer takes considerable time.

    Let's put it this way: There's a big difference between "knowing Java" and "knowing how to develop computer systems". People in category B can pick up a new language pretty easily.
  • Jay 2008-03-11 03:34
    I worked with a guy years ago who pronounced "ASCII" as "ask two". It took me a little while to realize that he apparently thought the "II" were Roman numerals.
  • Sam 2008-03-11 09:21
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I think it's C ALT+0035

    Captcha: ... wait, no. My first post on here will NOT include *that* whole thing
  • Sam 2008-03-11 09:47
    quarnel:

    RP:
    MS calls it "C sharp"


    Are You Sure!
    Where are your references?!



    using Microsoft.Developer.Network.Languages.CSharp;


    There.
  • Sam 2008-03-11 09:59
    I'll stop multi-posting now, but I just came across this and I just had to say:

    Jon:
    There's no precedent in English for inserting vowels other than schwas into the pronunciation of abbreviations. So, unless you want to pronounce SQL as "suckle," you should probably stick to spelling it out. (It's also fun to annoy people by calling it "squirrel.")


    A simple search on Wikipedia would tell you that SQL was originally supposed to be SEQL, for Structured English Query Language, but there was a trademark issue with the SEQL acronym, so they removed the "English" word and it became SQL.

    Hence the, what is considered "old school", pronunciation of "sequel".

  • Jack 2008-03-11 11:41
    Please share the name of this company, so I can be EXTRA, EXTRA certain to never buy their product.

    Good heavens, I would have quit on the spot, pushed the boss out of my car (without stopping) and made him walk back to the office for hiring that idiot.
  • Pfft... WHAT?! 2008-03-11 13:15
    real_aardvark:
    Pfft... WHAT?!:
    Incompetence breeds excessive bureaucracy.

    Oh, look, a knee-jerk Republican. Isn't he cute? I wonder when they'll come up with syllogisms that actually make sense, or can be measured in the real world.

    There are more incompetencies in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Halliburton, for one.

    Pfft... WHAT?!:
    What's the point of becoming specialized and going that extra mile if you're going to be replaced by a theology major that took a Web Interfaces class? (That didn't happen to me, but it did happen to one of my friends.)

    Tell your friend to take a Master's in the appropriate degree -- in this case, Theology. That's the American Way. Tailor your talents to what the Market wants.

    Otherwise, stop bleating.


    Uhh.... Thanks for arguing my point? You are being sarcastic, right?

    I mean... Talking about crappy syllogisms, lets quote Shakespeare and then give an example of supreme incompetence breeding bureaucracy. Halliburton is an excellent reason why we have to make rules that shouldn't have to be there in the first place. But people are d'bags and liars, and rules are made so the interested parties don't get screwed. (Ermm... no pun intended. Seriously.)

    I'm not sure what you're trying to say. You think that my web developer friend needs to get a Master's in theology so he can be a better programmer? I mean, he has a Master's in CS, but if you think he should go back for a Theology degree to better function in his job I'll let him know. "Hey, Mike? [...] Yeah, I just wanted to let you know that this guy real_aardvark on this website thinks you could be better at your job if you went back to school. [...] Well, no. He thinks you should go back for a Theology degree. [...] A Master's in Theology. [...] Well, he thinks that you'll be a better developer if you do. [...] Okay, I'll let him know."

    Mike says you're an idiot.
  • delltech 2008-03-12 21:39
    According to the Wikipedia article on the C# programming language, the correct pronunciation is "C sharp".

    And like Corey, I don't know anything about it either.
  • Strike 2008-03-13 09:58
    It's C Tic-Tac-Toe, get it right ><
  • OBloodyhell 2008-03-14 12:45
    None of the above... it's c-four-pluses. Or C-double-double-plus. Cause we all know, it's a Microsoft product, which makes it double-double-plus-ungood.
  • OBloodyhell 2008-03-14 13:01
    > "Programming is programming. As long as the person knows how to code, picking up new languages is pretty simple." = bullshit. i rejected someone last week for saying approximately the same thing. if you/he think you/he can become a useful java programmer when all you know is VB programming, you/he are crazed.

    There is some truth to this, but the more you know about coding the easier it is to pick up something in the same vein. I've used numerous procedural languages over the last thirty years. I've also programmed and used a number of procedural database tools, DBase II, III, IV, etc., as well as other more obscure ones. I picked up Oracle SQL, which is, at heart, still a procedural language well enough inside of two months to utilize one of its constructs in a unique enough way that my boss, who's been using it for over 10 years, and posts responses regularly on Tom Kite's webpage, had never seen the construct used that way before. I would not say I'm an expert at it, but I'm probably at least as good as 30-40% of the Oracle coders out there... I can and have set up 3 and 4 level select statements to tease data into the form and organization I wanted (and yes, I know I might be doing it the "hard" way by that, if I'm doing it wrong).

    OTOH, I've yet to do anything with actual event-driven coding. I'm sure that, when I pick that up, it will take me a lot longer to add the paradigm to my toolset than it would to "just add a new language", if the language is essentially procedural in nature as opposed to event driven coding.

    I think the key issue is the amount of paradigm shifting that needs to be done to "pick up the new language" -- are the languages similar underneath? Are the design constructs alike? This is far more important than the actual language involved. It is a lot easier for an English speaker to pick up French than Mandarin Chinese.
  • Admin password 2008-03-14 13:45
    DOA:
    A few near misses later (think 4 letter admin passwords on public sites) we're all a little bit wiser.
    What The Four letter admin password!!??
  • lrucker 2008-03-16 16:47
    I worked with a guy years ago who pronounced "ASCII" as "ask two". It took me a little while to realize that he apparently thought the "II" were Roman numerals.


    Back in HS, I'd just come from computer class to English where one of my classmates asked me what AS stood for in a dictionary entry. Still being in programming mode, I said "American Standard" as in ASCII - of course it really meant Anglo-Saxon.
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  • Micah Rousey 2008-03-20 10:36
    Ooooohhhhh. I think I'm going to start calling it

    C octothorp.
  • Earl Purple 2008-04-06 05:15
    what's this tic-tac-toe nonsense?

    It's C Noughts And Crosses.
  • nex 2008-04-13 00:13
    *looks as if suspecting a trick question*

    Where I used to work we always called it C doubleplusgood.
  • SpamBot 2008-04-13 08:54
    FredSaw:
    Paolo G:
    Here's a question... what do American's call "£"? *That* is the pound sign (and was the pound sign long before the US was even a twinkle in the Founding Fathers' eyes...).
    We don't call it anything. We don't use it. What do you call this? $

    Examples of its use:
    $100
    $get(chkApproval);
    Dim SomeString$
    $accountingSystemVendor


    dollar

    </obvious>
  • Dippsle 2008-04-14 08:02
    Always C-hash.

    A musical sharp sign looks totally different (slanted and different thicknesses of lines)

    A pound sign looks like £

    And an octothorpe was an early attempt to patent an existing generic object

    Plus it made a hash of the C language!
  • David Arno 2008-05-02 06:00
    You forgot C gate.
  • James Q Murphy 2008-06-04 12:27
    I thought it was C tic-tac-toe?
  • facilisi 2008-06-14 04:06
    For its promoters, it's C sharp;
    for its detractors, it's C pound.
  • Mumkey 2008-07-21 16:56
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?


    I'd say D flat
  • Anonymous 2008-09-12 05:06
    SnapShot:
    So which is it, C Sharp, C pound, C hash, C number sign or C octothorp?

    C Mesh.
  • Sofox 2008-09-17 06:38
    You're forgetting B Flat.
  • Travis 2008-10-25 01:54
    Gee, I always called it C Tilted-Tic-Tac-Toe-Board.
  • JP 2008-11-10 09:54
    ...or "C Tic-Tac-Toe"?
  • wm 2009-07-06 05:27
  • 0ffh 2009-08-15 05:10
    Easy: C Doublecross ;-)
  • Scott 2009-08-24 20:08
    c waffle, c grid, c tic tac toe
  • Jeff K. 2010-03-02 10:40
    I always thought it was C tic-tac-toe.
  • Barry 2010-09-30 20:56
    C sharp, we had architects who used to call it C hash or C pound...
  • Smoke3723 2010-11-25 20:20
    None of the above: it's C Naughts & Crosses Grid. Or C Tic-Tac-Toe if you speak US.

    CAPTCHA test: haero. That's me!
  • Ben 2010-12-06 17:08
    It's actually C tic-tac-toe.
  • anonymous 2011-05-29 16:08
    It's C tic-tac-toe
  • TonyTwoTones 2011-08-29 11:12
    I'll have to go with C octothorp this time. C pound seems so yesterday.