Yo Ho, Yo Ho, A Pirate's Life for Lee

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  • Johnny Canuck 2008-10-16 11:07
    "The tech deleted whatever files he could that looked illegal and moved on."

    Ok, so sure Lee was potentially breaking the law, blah blah blah. But dude, if I ever accidentally got a co-workers laptop, and I deleted files without knowing EXACTLY what they were, I'd be in pretty deep doo-doo too.

    The details might be strange, but the WTF on this one is why it's a WTF. The tech deleted material from an employees working environment that he was not sure of without backing it up first. That does deserve a reprimand.
  • my name is missing 2008-10-16 11:10
    Please forward the real name of Lee and his company to us or get sued!

    Signed,

    The RIAA

    PS. Or just send money
  • Steve 2008-10-16 11:11
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.
  • Mike 2008-10-16 11:13
    This comment was posted from a pirated Firefox running on my corporate laptop.
  • Lesson learned: Lee 2008-10-16 11:15
    Steve:
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.


    Actually, when your laptop is collected by your company to have its contents reviewed, you can't assume they won't format the entire drive and reinstall only the necessary software.
  • anon 2008-10-16 11:19
    Couldn't remember where I'd heard 'Autobahn' before. Then 'Nagelbett' reminded me it was The Big Lebowski.
  • gabba 2008-10-16 11:23
    I confess I have no idea what Steve's problem is. He's "in disbelief" because his coworker was disciplined for deleting files wholesale? WTF? The "pirate" business is a complete red herring. You don't just delete files from someone's computer without knowing what you're doing -- whether you suspect Autobahn is not getting the full income from their songs is irrelevant.
  • BobB 2008-10-16 11:24
    Memorize these lyrics and everything will be okay.

    -You Are A Pirate, by Lazy Town-

    Do what you want 'cause a pirate is free, you are a pirate!

    Yar - har - fiddle-dee-dee, being a pirate is all right to be!
    Do what you want 'cause a pirate is free, you are a pirate!

    You are a pirate! (Yay!)

    We got us a map (a map!) to lead us to a hidden box,
    Thats all locked up with locks (with locks!) and buried deep away.
    We'll dig up the box (the box!), we know it's full of precious booty
    Burst open the locks, and then we'll say 'HOORAY!'

    Yar - har - fiddle-dee-dee,
    If you love to sail the sea, you are a pirate!

    WEIGH ANCHOR!

    Yah - har - fiddle-dee-dee, being a pirate is all right to be!
    Do what you want 'cause a pirate is free, you are a pirate!
    Arr - yarr - ahoy and avast, dig in the dirt and you dig in it fast!
    Hang the black flag at the end of the mast! You are a pirate!

    HA HA HA (Yay!)

    We're sailing away (set sail!), adventure waits on every shore!
    We set sail and explore (ya-har!) and run and jump all day (Yay!)
    We float on our boat (our boat!) until its time to drop the anchor,
    Then hang up our coats (aye-aye!) until we sail again!

    Yar - har - fiddle-dee-dee,
    If you love to sail the sea you are a pirate!

    LAND HO!

    Yar - har - fiddle-dee-dee, being a pirate is alright with me!
    Do what you want 'cause a pirate is free, you are a pirate!
    Yar har wind at your back lads, wherever you go!
    Blue sky above and blue ocean below, you are a pirate!

    HA HA HA!
    You are a pirate!
  • Red Green 2008-10-16 11:28
    Unbeknownst to Steve, a fellow technician had received Lee's laptop. During the analysis, he was shocked to find that the hard drive had less than 1GB of space available, and that the hard drive was full of pirated DVD rips, MP3s, and the like. The tech deleted whatever files he could that looked illegal and moved on.


    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?
  • zip 2008-10-16 11:32
    Red Green:
    Unbeknownst to Steve, a fellow technician had received Lee's laptop. During the analysis, he was shocked to find that the hard drive had less than 1GB of space available, and that the hard drive was full of pirated DVD rips, MP3s, and the like. The tech deleted whatever files he could that looked illegal and moved on.


    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?


    Uh, under a gig of free space is the problem.
  • AC 2008-10-16 11:32
    Ok, this is definitely from the sidebar (http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/t/9843.aspx), but it's rewritten to be more exciting and put up as a feature article. Shouldn't it be in the Best of the Sidebar section verbatim? I thought the rewriting was supposed to be for anonymization, which this didn't need.
  • Salami 2008-10-16 11:34
    Red Green:
    Unbeknownst to Steve, a fellow technician had received Lee's laptop. During the analysis, he was shocked to find that the hard drive had less than 1GB of space available, and that the hard drive was full of pirated DVD rips, MP3s, and the like. The tech deleted whatever files he could that looked illegal and moved on.


    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?


    Does the legal problem not count?
  • Milton Waddams 2008-10-16 11:36
    This article is trolling.
  • Anonymous Coward 2008-10-16 11:41
    BobB:
    Memorize these lyrics and everything will be okay.

    -You Are A Pirate, by Lazy Town-

    *SNIP*

    Those lyrics are copyrighted content. Please delete the referenced post and just in case, any posts surrounding it. After all, we only have 1 gig of free space.
  • MrTweek 2008-10-16 11:43
    So, why is it illegal to have MP3s on a laptop? I'd surely rather rip all my cd's to mp3 instead of carrying hundreds of cd's to my office (and probably back everyday, if I want to listen to them at home also).
  • SomeCoder 2008-10-16 11:43
    Does anyone else think Jake needs to retake English 101? This article was a bit hard to read and piece together. As such, I don't really know what TRWTF(tm) is.
  • LBD 2008-10-16 11:50
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b
  • Kushiague 2008-10-16 11:52
    Mike:
    This comment was posted from a pirated Firefox running on my corporate laptop.


    Really? Yours too? My little fox logo has an eye patch and a hook for a paw YAR!

    Portable firefox rocks.
  • bd 2008-10-16 11:52
    zip:
    Red Green:
    Unbeknownst to Steve, a fellow technician had received Lee's laptop. During the analysis, he was shocked to find that the hard drive had less than 1GB of space available, and that the hard drive was full of pirated DVD rips, MP3s, and the like. The tech deleted whatever files he could that looked illegal and moved on.


    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?


    Uh, under a gig of free space is the problem.
    Only if you need to download all videos made by the Autobahn.
  • RTFA 2008-10-16 11:58
    Red Green:
    Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?


    Besides scanning for viruses/spyware, what else could "had their contents reviewed" mean?
  • Andrew 2008-10-16 11:58
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b


    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?
  • Pesto 2008-10-16 11:59
    LBD:
    Mike:
    This comment was posted from a pirated Firefox running on my corporate laptop.

    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b

    The fail is strong with this one.
  • Erzengel 2008-10-16 12:01
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b


    That was the joke, "N00b". Get your humor center fixed.

    Edit: 3 posts in 5 minutes, in a row, about the same thing. Lovely.
  • Johnny Canuck 2008-10-16 12:04
    zip:
    Red Green:
    Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?

    Uh, under a gig of free space is the problem.


    Then the obvious solution is to back-up material to another medium (company folders, CD, DVD, etc.) and then remove it from the laptop.

    What's that, you say? It's easier to just arbitrarily delete files that I suspect might be illegal? Well, you'd better know for sure, because if you wipe out legitimate work, you'll be getting a (deserved) reprimand.

    This really is one of the least WTF I've ever seen posted here.

  • Nicolas Verhaeghe 2008-10-16 12:06
    I was asked to look at his laptop because it was running very slow.

    I found out that the laptop was full of enema porn (yes, there is such a thing and yes, it is gross).

    He had gigabytes of enema and scat movies of all sorts, tons of images downloaded and he was part of dozens of Yahoo groups related to the topic.

    This was a manager who was very bossy and borderline abusive with everybody and me in particular.

    I deleted all these files, gave it a good defrag and installed a RAM module (it had been ordered for him) and when I handed the laptop back to him I said:

    "It's ok, now, I gave the hard drive a good ENEMA".

    He never was bossy with me anymore and avoided looking at me.
  • JimM 2008-10-16 12:07
    MrTweek:
    So, why is it illegal to have MP3s on a laptop? I'd surely rather rip all my cd's to mp3 instead of carrying hundreds of cd's to my office (and probably back everyday, if I want to listen to them at home also).
    Well, Lee has already admitted to Steve that the Autobahn is leaked, pirated music. So that's illegal.
    gabba:
    The "pirate" business is a complete red herring. You don't just delete files from someone's computer without knowing what you're doing -- whether you suspect Autobahn is not getting the full income from their songs is irrelevant.
    No, the pirate business is not a complete red herring. If the files are stored on equipment that is legally owned by the company, and the company reviews the content of its equipment, then leaving the potentially pirated material on there would make the company complicit in the piracy.
    Johnny Canuck:
    But dude, if I ever accidentally got a co-workers laptop, and I deleted files without knowing EXACTLY what they were, I'd be in pretty deep doo-doo too.
    In case you didn't read it, the laptop was collected for review. This wasn't an accident, it was a deliberate review of laptop content. Presumably the whole point was to ensure that no unsuitable content was being kept on work laptops, and I'd call 40GB of potentially illegal copies unsuitable. Frankly, more than a few GB of personal data would be unsuitable - you can only listen to 8 hours of music on any given workday anyway.
    Johnny Canuck:
    The tech deleted material from an employees working environment that he was not sure of without backing it up first.
    This may be more to the point - that the files were deleted without backup and without reference to the owner to check what they were and what they were used for. So, that's the first WTF.
    Article:
    Steve explained it to the manager, who closed his eyes as if he was in intense thought, exhaling loudly through his nostrils. "Well, we mentioned the laptop in Lee's employment contract."
    This is the second: Lee's contract mentioned a laptop without specifying how it was to be used. Any contract stating the the company will provide a laptop should have clearly stated usage terms detailing whether / how much personal use is allowed. Over 90% of the hard drive taken up with personal files? IMNSHA, not acceptable usage...
  • [twisti] 2008-10-16 12:07
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b


    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?


    They removed gullible, too.
  • JimM 2008-10-16 12:13
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b


    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?
    You keep using this word. I do not think it means what you think.
  • memals 2008-10-16 12:13
    At my last company the dev server was running out of space.
    Everyone was to remove old projects. Most projects were ASP with a few images so less than 10mb.
    After the request was made three times in a month, the server did not seem to be gaining any significant space.
    A quick search filtered to files over 500mb, showed two results, one a legitimate 540mb PSD with loads of layers and a 44gb ZIP file called backup.zip that was in the Images folder of a copy of an old project that had been renamed to PROJECT_OLD.
    Took a while to decompress but the whole things was mp3s.
  • jspenguin 2008-10-16 12:18
    anon:
    Couldn't remember where I'd heard 'Autobahn' before. Then 'Nagelbett' reminded me it was The Big Lebowski.


    This article is relevant because I have a pirated version of The Big Lebowski.
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 12:22
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b

    Of course one can, it's just a matter of breaking the GPL or Mozilla License. Then the copyright laws come in to rip you off your freedoms. Just because you can do more stuff doesn't mean you can't pirate. For something to be unpiratable it has to be in the public domain.
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 12:24
    Mike:
    This comment was posted from a pirated Firefox running on my corporate laptop.

    You should switch to iceweasel, in order to avoid that issue :-).
  • Chris 2008-10-16 12:26
    It is messed up that the company would be ok with all the pirated data, however in my experience its not enough to be right you've got to be profitable. Just because something might be illegal doesn't mean management will over look loosing time and money over it.
  • Leauki 2008-10-16 12:26
    "Just like one cannot pirate Linux"

    Sure you can.

    SCO did. The rejected the licence that allowed them to distribute Linux (the GPL) and then distributed Linux without permission from Linux' owners.

    That's "piracy", surely.
  • BJ Upton 2008-10-16 12:27
    The real WTF is when this is posted on Reddit in 10 months as though it is a new story.
  • nerdierthanyou 2008-10-16 12:27
    Inconceivable!
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 12:29
    Nicolas Verhaeghe:
    I was asked to look at his laptop because it was running very slow.

    I found out that the laptop was full of enema porn (yes, there is such a thing and yes, it is gross).

    He had gigabytes of enema and scat movies of all sorts, tons of images downloaded and he was part of dozens of Yahoo groups related to the topic.

    This was a manager who was very bossy and borderline abusive with everybody and me in particular.

    I deleted all these files, gave it a good defrag and installed a RAM module (it had been ordered for him) and when I handed the laptop back to him I said:

    "It's ok, now, I gave the hard drive a good ENEMA".

    He never was bossy with me anymore and avoided looking at me.

    So you deleted the guys porn just for fun? Last I heard storing media on a HD doesn't account for computer slowness. The extra RAM was probably what fixed it. You're a big jerk :-(.
  • notme 2008-10-16 12:32
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.


    Not true. You can:
    1. Download the Firefox source code
    2. Optionally alter it in some way
    3. Compile it
    4. Redistribute it, while still calling it "Firefox" (and not something else, like "Iceweasel")
    5. ???
    6. Profit!

    The Firefox license says you cannot distribute any firefox binaries that are officially branded as Firefox and have not been compiled by the Mozilla Project. Distributing these binaries like that is technically a copyright violation, or "software piracy".
  • inigomontoya 2008-10-16 12:35
    Tell me, is Steve the six-fingered man? I have a little bone to pick with him.

    CAPTCHA: gravis - still made the best damn sound card of the early 90's
  • Not Wtf 2008-10-16 12:36
    The real WTF is you think MP3 and other digital media are automatically illegal.
  • mauhiz 2008-10-16 12:41
    What's wrong with klismaphilia? You hurt my feelings :(
  • IByte 2008-10-16 12:43
    Jake Vinson:
    Steve's boss half-yelled a cheerful "Lee! This is Steve, new in IT!" No response. "Lee!" Still nothing. The boss sighed, turned to Steve, and said "Sometimes Lee likes to listen to music loud on his headphones."
    That's why we use Google Talk at our IT department. It doesn't matter you're in the same room if your addressee can't hear you. Plus, I'd rather paste a URL instead of reading it out loud.
  • caffeinatedbacon 2008-10-16 12:45
    Sexy coder:
    Nicolas Verhaeghe:
    I was asked to look at his laptop because it was running very slow.


    So you deleted the guys porn just for fun? Last I heard storing media on a HD doesn't account for computer slowness. The extra RAM was probably what fixed it. You're a big jerk :-(.

    Fill your HD past about the 90% mark (in any flavour of Windows at least), and every % above 90 drops your performance by about a quarter of the performance you had at the % before it (e.g at 91 you get 75% performance, 92 you get 57%).

    Lots of reasons for this: the swap file has to be written in smaller chunks over a larger part of the HD, file saves are less efficient, and reads can go from very linear on the HD platter to something resembling the moves printed on the back of a 'Breakdance' LP.

    TMYK :)
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 12:47
    IByte:
    Jake Vinson:
    Steve's boss half-yelled a cheerful "Lee! This is Steve, new in IT!" No response. "Lee!" Still nothing. The boss sighed, turned to Steve, and said "Sometimes Lee likes to listen to music loud on his headphones."
    That's why we use Google Talk at our IT department. It doesn't matter you're in the same room if your addressee can't hear you. Plus, I'd rather paste a URL instead of reading it out loud.

    Weird, I can hear just fine people on the same room as me, but I have exceptional hearing.
  • Nicolas Verhaegeh 2008-10-16 12:50
    Uh no, his hard drive was running out of space and the entire hard drive, as well as the pagefile was badly fragmented.

    When you run out of space on your hard drive, it truly slows things down.

    And it was also against company policy and yes, he had pissed me off enough that I wanted him to shut his clapper.
  • Nicolas Verhaegeh 2008-10-16 12:51
    mauhiz:
    What's wrong with klismaphilia? You hurt my feelings :(


    I have seen it all and I don't care whatever fetish you have.

    In his case, he was a big jerk and I wanted him to shut up.

    Also it was against company policies, which he was also pretending to be promoting.
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 12:58
    caffeinatedbacon:
    Sexy coder:
    Nicolas Verhaeghe:
    I was asked to look at his laptop because it was running very slow.


    So you deleted the guys porn just for fun? Last I heard storing media on a HD doesn't account for computer slowness. The extra RAM was probably what fixed it. You're a big jerk :-(.

    Fill your HD past about the 90% mark (in any flavour of Windows at least), and every % above 90 drops your performance by about a quarter of the performance you had at the % before it (e.g at 91 you get 75% performance, 92 you get 57%).

    Lots of reasons for this: the swap file has to be written in smaller chunks over a larger part of the HD, file saves are less efficient, and reads can go from very linear on the HD platter to something resembling the moves printed on the back of a 'Breakdance' LP.

    TMYK :)

    That makes no sense at all. First, if you are intensively using swap, then your computer will be slow no matter what. Second, I know windows swaps to a file, but doesn't it have fixed size? I'm pretty sure you can at least set it like that and it would be very dumb if a swap file with fixed size would be scattered all over the HD (unless it's impossible to do otherwise), so I'm confident windows would work things out. Which leads to my next point, he can make the free space more contiguos by defraging the HD, after that, you create your fixed-size swap file.

    What is he indexing the web or something? Because usually having a fragmented hard disk doesn't account for that much slowness, unless it's very fragmented. But then again, using a lot of disk doesn't automatically mean heavy fragmentation. I've used for a long time a computer with the disk nearly full all the time, the file access time was nothing out of the ordinary. I wasn't using windows, but I hear ntfs is very good, so I don't think it was a system-specific feature I was experimenting.

    Finally, worst case scenario, he deletes a few files, not the whole thing.
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 13:03
    Nicolas Verhaegeh:
    Uh no, his hard drive was running out of space and the entire hard drive, as well as the pagefile was badly fragmented.

    When you run out of space on your hard drive, it truly slows things down.

    And it was also against company policy and yes, he had pissed me off enough that I wanted him to shut his clapper.

    If there's no space left and that's a problem you should just report him "hey, you gotta delete something", then he goes on and deletes whatever he pleases. Of course, you might as well have the legally right or even the obligation (if you value your job) of doing so. If you already don't like the guy, you won't be willing to take the risk at all, I agree. If that was the case I'd probably regreatfully delete the files, because I find that sort of policy ridiculous. As long as you're happy with the guy's work you should keep on paying him to do so, I see no reason not to.
  • Red Green 2008-10-16 13:09
    Uh, under a gig of free space is the problem.


    Didn't seem to be bothering the laptop's user... why would that bother the technician?
  • Technical Thug 2008-10-16 13:13
    You don't just delete files from someone's computer without knowing what you're doing

    Oh, he knew exactly what he was doing. Getting rid of nonsense.

    The "training CD's were deleted" was a complete pile of crap. Just like those weren't "backup copies" of his CD's.

    If Lee's laptop was that important to be written into a contract, then someone needed to tell the IT department. But then management would need to take responsibility for dropping the ball, so they dumped it all on Steve's coworker.
  • icelava 2008-10-16 13:45
    methinks the manager is one of the leeches of Lee's autobahn collection.
  • Short change 2008-10-16 14:17
    How is this a WTF? The tech overstepped his bounds. If he needed to delete files on the laptop he should have at least called Lee to confirm if it was okay.

    If the tech suspected there was content that was against corporate policy, then he should have immediately brought it to the attention of his supervisor.

    His supervisor would then notify Lee's supervisor and/or the HR department and they would determine if any action would be taken against Lee.

    If Lee was terminated over this, then the laptop would be locked up to become evidence in the very likely upcoming lawsuit. Deleting or otherwise tampering with the files would destroy this evidence.
  • deposition #66 2008-10-16 14:24
    > This article is relevant because I have a pirated version of The Big Lebowski.

    Hi, I'm from Big Media, and I'm here to help you....
  • ubersoldat 2008-10-16 14:49
    At least here... suckers!!!
  • caffeinatedbacon 2008-10-16 14:56
    Sexy coder:
    That makes no sense at all. First, if you are intensively using swap, then your computer will be slow no matter what.

    Intensively or not, swap writes to disk. The swap file in Windows grows and shrinks based on usage. Where it grows to is available space on disk. As HD's write from the outer tracks to the inner tracks, as the free space becomes restricted to the inner tracks, write operations slow down (fewer sectors can be accessed at the same RPM as the track circumference reduces). Add that to a drive where as it nears capacity is almost certainly fragmented, free space becomes peppered throughout the drive, all disk operations become slower.

    Sexy coder:
    Second, I know windows swaps to a file, but doesn't it have fixed size?

    It has a fixed *maximum* size (which in practice, usually becomes pretty fixed, but the size can and will vary)

    Sexy coder:
    he can make the free space more contiguos by defraging the HD

    True. But have you ever tried to defrag a HD that was near or at capacity? The process goes from slow to glacial. Much faster to delete enema pr0n ;)

    Sexy coder:
    Finally, worst case scenario, he deletes a few files, not the whole thing.

    Company PC = Delete anything that ain't needed by the company.
    When I was a PC tech, deleting porn and movies to free up space was always an easy choice. Take the low-hanging fruit that no one can argue about when you do. :D

    FYI, for your disk-space reading pleasure, see:
    http://www.microsoft.com/atwork/getstarted/speed.mspx
    http://www.pcnineoneone.com/howto/swpfile1.html
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/246317-32-platters-capacity-speed-drop

    Enjoy!
  • Just Some Guy 2008-10-16 14:56
    JimM:
    Well, Lee has already admitted to Steve that the Autobahn is leaked, pirated music. So that's illegal.


    No, it's not. Copying a file without the right to do so is illegal, but possession of the results isn't. Furthermore, you and I don't know that Lee's not president of the Autobahn fan club and listening to a copy that the band leaked to him.

    These are fine distinctions, but very important ones.
  • Jeff Rife 2008-10-16 14:58
    Lesson learned: Lee:

    Actually, when your laptop is collected by your company to have its contents reviewed, you can't assume they won't format the entire drive and reinstall only the necessary software.

    MP3 files and CD images aren't "software"...they are data.

    So, even if they drive is wiped and only the authorized system image is installed, any data should be backed up first. It doesn't need to be restored, but it needs to be available.
  • Just Some Guy 2008-10-16 15:03
    caffeinatedbacon:
    As HD's write from the outer tracks to the inner tracks, as the free space becomes restricted to the inner tracks, write operations slow down (fewer sectors can be accessed at the same RPM as the track circumference reduces).


    I'm unaware of any modern OS that starts at the outside edge and directly works its way in, especially since it's hard (and probably impossible) to tell exactly where a sector lies.
  • Jerf 2008-10-16 15:05
    The writing quality was subpar on this article. One of the reasons I read this is because usually the article is written like a true article, not a random post on a forum.
  • Technical Thug 2008-10-16 15:11
    If Lee was terminated over this, then the laptop would be locked up to become evidence in the very likely upcoming lawsuit.
    Because pirates are a protected class!

    Arrrh!
  • Chris 2008-10-16 15:12
    Just Some Guy:
    caffeinatedbacon:
    As HD's write from the outer tracks to the inner tracks, as the free space becomes restricted to the inner tracks, write operations slow down (fewer sectors can be accessed at the same RPM as the track circumference reduces).


    I'm unaware of any modern OS that starts at the outside edge and directly works its way in, especially since it's hard (and probably impossible) to tell exactly where a sector lies.
    Uh, pretty much all hard drives work like this. It's not "where the operating system starts", it's "where the partition starts". Partitions have a logical number of contiguous blocks starting at block 1. Block 1 is at the outside edge of the disk. It makes perfect sense, because the angular velocity of the disk at the outter edge is at it greatest, and therefore you get the greatest throughput for the data towards the beginning of the disk (which is where most data is going to be anyway). You're always going to have data at the beginning of the disk, but seldom at the end, so why not make throughput better at the beginning.

    There are many benchmarks to prove that this is correct, btw.
  • Fernando 2008-10-16 15:17
    LBD:
    Just like one cannot pirate Linux
    Actually, you can. Build an embedded system with Linux as its OS, sell it, and refuse requests for the source code. Have a lawyer on standby.
  • Orbstart 2008-10-16 15:26
    Is making me squint YAARRRR

    Not that I'm defending the act, but piracy is not in fact piracy, it is copyright violation. Piracy implies theft, theft suggests that you deprive the victim of the article being stolen. Ok, I'm nicking[1] these words from other people who have uttered them before but I think it's important to make the distinction, otherwise we all become victims of the RIAA et al. propaganda mechanisms.

    [1] violating their copyright.
  • strcmp 2008-10-16 15:43
    Chris:
    Just Some Guy:
    caffeinatedbacon:
    As HD's write from the outer tracks to the inner tracks, as the free space becomes restricted to the inner tracks, write operations slow down (fewer sectors can be accessed at the same RPM as the track circumference reduces).


    I'm unaware of any modern OS that starts at the outside edge and directly works its way in, especially since it's hard (and probably impossible) to tell exactly where a sector lies.
    Uh, pretty much all hard drives work like this. It's not "where the operating system starts", it's "where the partition starts". Partitions have a logical number of contiguous blocks starting at block 1. Block 1 is at the outside edge of the disk. It makes perfect sense, because the angular velocity of the disk at the outter edge is at it greatest, and therefore you get the greatest throughput for the data towards the beginning of the disk (which is where most data is going to be anyway). You're always going to have data at the beginning of the disk, but seldom at the end, so why not make throughput better at the beginning.

    There are many benchmarks to prove that this is correct, btw.


    Only it's uninteresting for swap because swap (especially swapping in) accesses the blocks randomly (whatever code/data the programs need) and the sequential read performance is secondary. The time for a sector to appear under the head is the same on any track. Swapout can be linear, until the swap space is fragmented due to 'random' page life times. The sad truth is that swap is not only slow, because hard disks are slower than RAM in general, but it is worst case for the HD.
  • Jeltz 2008-10-16 15:54
    caffeinatedbacon:
    Sexy coder:
    That makes no sense at all. First, if you are intensively using swap, then your computer will be slow no matter what.

    Intensively or not, swap writes to disk. The swap file in Windows grows and shrinks based on usage. Where it grows to is available space on disk. As HD's write from the outer tracks to the inner tracks, as the free space becomes restricted to the inner tracks, write operations slow down (fewer sectors can be accessed at the same RPM as the track circumference reduces). Add that to a drive where as it nears capacity is almost certainly fragmented, free space becomes peppered throughout the drive, all disk operations become slower.


    Madness, if this still is the truth in XP and Vista (I am pretty sure it was in 95/98). Having a swap file which cna become fragmented is horrible. I have seen no UNIX clone with a variable size swap file. Either fixed size swap files or more commonly swap partitions.
  • Marcel 2008-10-16 16:04
    ...the angular velocity of the disk at the outter edge is at it greatest...

    The *angular* velocity is the same everywhere on the disk. The *linear* velocity is higher at the outer edge.
  • Anon 2008-10-16 16:25
    caffeinatedbacon:
    It has a fixed *maximum* size (which in practice, usually becomes pretty fixed, but the size can and will vary)


    No, you can specify a minimum AND maximum size for the swap file in any windows version from the last decade. Set them to the same value and you have a fixed size swap file that won’t fragment. I think it will increase the maximum size if utterly necessary (ie: it’s run out of swap and ram for programs) but that is rare and generally is a sign you should increase the minimum (or get more ram rather).
  • Eli 2008-10-16 16:33
    Uh, I don't think you should delete any files off someone's laptop without asking first.

    If there's something on the laptop that really shouldn't be there, bring it to the boss or HR.
  • Technical Thug 2008-10-16 16:35
    Orbstart:
    Piracy implies theft, theft suggests that you deprive the victim of the article being stolen.


    No it doesn't. You idiot.

    Go read up about non-rivalrous goods.

  • anonymouse 2008-10-16 16:35
    Jeltz:
    I have seen no UNIX clone with a variable size swap file.
    Mac OS 10.5 will create and use additional swap files as needed.
  • vlad 2008-10-16 16:45
    The real WTF is that Lee didn't just stream the music from a machine at home.
  • squeem 2008-10-16 16:52
    Haven't we seen this article before?
  • Grig Larson 2008-10-16 16:58
    I once was doing QA for an image cataloging system. We had been doing some initial bug screening for the Windows version and we had been scouting for a free Mac, but the Mac desktops were in short supply, and each one had multiple uses.

    Finally, a fresh one appeared when an employee was let go during a layoff. It was an older model, but ran System 7.5.3 well, which was the current OS for Apple at the time (1997-ish). So we installed the cataloging software, ran it, and it froze. Hard. Huh. We rebooted, ran it again, and it completely choked. We turned on virtual memory to the maximum, and watched the wheel chug away. Finally, we figured that we had a showstopper bug to submit, so we went to go find someone, got sidetracked, and long story short, didn't get back to the mahine for about an hour.

    When we came back, we found out why it had choked: there was over 500mb of porn on it. This was back when a 1gb hard drive was still pretty big. And the porn that came up was combination of:

    - Young scantily clad boys (not underaged, though... we think)
    - Fishnet stockings
    - Young boys in fishnet stockings
    - Young boys in high heels
    - Various feet, bare and in stockings or shoes, crushing baked beans

    You heard it right, baked beans. As in Hormel's Brown sugar baked beans from a can.

    The imaging cataloging had picked up one of his "hidden" images folder and was choking on generating thousands of thumbnails.
  • Kasper 2008-10-16 17:09
    Fernando:
    LBD:
    Just like one cannot pirate Linux
    Actually, you can. Build an embedded system with Linux as its OS, sell it, and refuse requests for the source code. Have a lawyer on standby.
    I think a lot of router vendors have done it without having lawyers on standby. But when threatened with a lawsuit they all decided to comply.
  • SeaDrive 2008-10-16 17:10
    You can not have "Training CDs" on your hard drive. A CD is a plastic disk, and you can only store digital data on your hard drive. The WTF is that "Training CDs" were evidently ripped off somehow, and no one had the original media.

    I did read where an IT manager said that if you give a computer guy a tape and tell him to erase it, he will do so, but only after copying it.
  • OhDear 2008-10-16 17:40
    I generally have found in every IT organization there is usually only one, and only one, twat who is morally opposed to piracy. I doubt that most IT users' iPods are blessed with legitimacy. I have also found that that one oddball is usually the least efficient worker. Usually very good at inventing paperwork though.
  • havokk 2008-10-16 18:00
    Lesson learned: Lee:
    Actually, when your laptop is collected by your company to have its contents reviewed, you can't assume they won't format the entire drive and reinstall only the necessary software.


    To phrase this to more closely match what is going on in the original story:

    When the company's laptop is collected by the company's IT department to have its contents reviewed, you should assume the company's techs will delete anything non-company related.

    B
  • Liquid Egg Product 2008-10-16 18:09
    Grig Larson:
    - Various feet, bare and in stockings or shoes, crushing baked beans


    crushedbakedbeans.com is available for you entrepeneurs out there.
  • iToad 2008-10-16 18:32
    Well... let's see.

    1. Posession of a privately owned computer on the company premeses.
    2. Attachment of a privately owned computer to the company network.
    3. Downloading pirated music, video, or software using company computers (and/or the company IP address).
    4. Posession of pirated music, video, or software files on company computers.

    Around here, Lee would be so fired...
  • Steve (a different one than the first or subsequent ones, if any) 2008-10-16 18:57
    Wow, I'm sure glad I don't work in a corporate environment.
  • m0ffx 2008-10-16 19:13
    notme:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.


    Not true. You can:
    1. Download the Firefox source code
    2. Optionally alter it in some way
    3. Compile it
    4. Redistribute it, while still calling it "Firefox" (and not something else, like "Iceweasel")
    5. ???
    6. Profit!

    The Firefox license says you cannot distribute any firefox binaries that are officially branded as Firefox and have not been compiled by the Mozilla Project. Distributing these binaries like that is technically a copyright violation, or "software piracy".


    Are you sure? I've checked, and there a few relevant licenses:

    An EULA for the Mozilla binaries specifically, source is irrelevant.

    The MPL might say what you claim. However, the Mozilla project uses a 'disjunctive tri-license' so you can just modify the code under the GPL or LGPL instead, which have no such term.

    Rather, the restrictions on the use of the Firefox branding come from TRADEMARK law. Firefox is a registered trademark of the Mozilla Foundation, giving them the sole discretion to decide who may or may not use it.
  • angry 2008-10-16 19:25
    Actally the worst article in the site.
    Get lost, you Bigot.
  • Bob 2008-10-16 19:37
    Johnny Canuck:
    But dude, if I ever accidentally got a co-workers laptop, and I deleted files without knowing EXACTLY what they were, I'd be in pretty deep doo-doo too.

    But dude, if I ever had valuable files on my hard drive that wern't backed up then, well, er, it would be pretty much just another day, but I should be in a bit of doo-doo for being an idiot.

    And if I can't keep my personal files separate from my work files, then I'ld also be pretty dumb.
  • rfsmit 2008-10-16 19:56
    Steve:
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.

    You'd think so, wouldn't you? However, one day, when you actually work for a real company, you'll find that backups are your own responsibility, kid. That is, unless the company provides an automated backup scheme. Usually they'll have a filter of some kind applied, but it's still your responsibility to check that certain files requiring automated backups are not filtered out.

    Maybe it's different in kindergarten...
  • Duke of New York 2008-10-16 20:05
    A "real" company is going to have people working for a "real" manager ready to put the fear of god into anyone who messes with a system they're not supposed to...

    "kid."
  • undrline 2008-10-16 20:18
    RTFA:
    Red Green:
    Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?


    Besides scanning for viruses/spyware, what else could "had their contents reviewed" mean?


    There's all sorts of software floating out there in a company that could be incompatible with other software. Reviewing machines to inventory it their software, version, etc is a good start to building a centralized, managed environment. It also prevents a flood of stop-work issues at the time of integration. The fact that these were portable machines makes them more difficult to scan remotely.
  • Sexy coder 2008-10-16 20:29
    rfsmit:
    Steve:
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.

    You'd think so, wouldn't you? However, one day, when you actually work for a real company, you'll find that backups are your own responsibility, kid. That is, unless the company provides an automated backup scheme. Usually they'll have a filter of some kind applied, but it's still your responsibility to check that certain files requiring automated backups are not filtered out.

    Maybe it's different in kindergarten...

    My company is so real that not only you have to keep a backup, but you have to memorize the most sensible data as there are hired hackers that will try to hack into your data backup all day long. The hackers are infiltrated and disguised as common employees so they use their social connections within the company in order to hack into your stuff. If you get hacked your month's payment is dicounted, if you're hacked three times, you're fired. Only the very careful hardcore employees make it. That, my friend, is a REAL company. Maybe on your high school company you make things different...
  • Just Some Guy 2008-10-16 20:43
    Chris:
    Just Some Guy:
    I'm unaware of any modern OS that starts at the outside edge and directly works its way in, especially since it's hard (and probably impossible) to tell exactly where a sector lies.


    Uh, pretty much all hard drives work like this. It's not "where the operating system starts", it's "where the partition starts". Partitions have a logical number of contiguous blocks starting at block 1. Block 1 is at the outside edge of the disk. It makes perfect sense, because the angular velocity of the disk at the outter edge is at it greatest, and therefore you get the greatest throughput for the data towards the beginning of the disk (which is where most data is going to be anyway). You're always going to have data at the beginning of the disk, but seldom at the end, so why not make throughput better at the beginning.

    There are many benchmarks to prove that this is correct, btw.


    Again, modern OSes don't work like that. For instance, FreeBSD spreads data across cylinder groups within a partition to minimize fragmentation. See Wikipedia's "Unix File System" (UFS) entry.

    Also, modern drives are designed to lie about block layout, aka remapping. Whenever you request block N, there's no guarantee or reasonable expectation that it'll be physically adjacent to blocks N+-1.

    I know perfectly well how hard drives work, and quite a bit about filesystems. In summary, you're making assumptions about how files are physically laid out that aren't justified.
  • Alan 2008-10-16 20:48
    bah, I feel bad now. I can see the resemblance of Lee and me.

    As I type this I'm at work with headphones on listening to loud techno music... my boss does the same thing, has to tap me on the shoulder when he wants my attention. I've even done the entire 'mistakenly pulled out headphones from computer when spinning around', to have my music suddenly loudly go through the speakers... at which point my coworkers look at me and go "... you where listening... to that?"

    I'm a good 10 years younger then my coworkers, so they put it under the category of "damn kids these days".

    Well, I don't care, I like my music :P
  • HK47 2008-10-16 21:08
    Alan:
    bah, I feel bad now. I can see the resemblance of Lee and me.

    As I type this I'm at work with headphones on listening to loud techno music... my boss does the same thing, has to tap me on the shoulder when he wants my attention. I've even done the entire 'mistakenly pulled out headphones from computer when spinning around', to have my music suddenly loudly go through the speakers... at which point my coworkers look at me and go "... you where listening... to that?"

    I'm a good 10 years younger then my coworkers, so they put it under the category of "damn kids these days".

    Well, I don't care, I like my music :P

    Congratulations on going deaf.
  • acid 2008-10-16 22:25
    Nicolas Verhaeghe:
    I found out that the laptop was full of enema porn (yes, there is such a thing and yes, it is gross).


    Now maybe I've just lived a far more sheltered life than I thought but personally, I think that's the REAL WTF right there...
  • Nick 2008-10-17 01:19
    Technical Thug:
    Orbstart:
    Piracy implies theft, theft suggests that you deprive the victim of the article being stolen.


    No it doesn't. You idiot.

    Go read up about non-rivalrous goods.


    Theft is larceny, if someone is not deprived of the good after it is "stolen", then it is not larceny, it is something else, eg copyright infringement.
  • Nick 2008-10-17 01:21
    iToad:
    Well... let's see.

    1. Posession of a privately owned computer on the company premeses.

    [snip]

    Around here, Lee would be so fired...

    You aren't allowed personal cell phones or PDA's on company property?
  • Internet Roadkill on Information Superhighway 2008-10-17 02:29
    Just remember the teachings of the original Bastard Operator From Hell (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/09/19/bofh_2008_episode_31/):

    "Look," I sigh. "It's a Friday afternoon and I can see where this is going, so why don't we just cut to the chase? We get calls from concerned users like yourself upon occasion and I'll tell you what I tell them: When it comes to an administrator's interest in your affairs you're competing against the rich tapestry of the internet - and losing. The only thing that can possibly be done to engage our interest in you is for you to complain about your lack of privacy - because then we start wondering what the hell it is you have that you don't want us to see. And before you know it the administrator concerned has passed you on to someone such as myself whose sole purpose is to keep you talking long enough to fire off a backup of the contents of your hard drive."
  • fred 2008-10-17 03:30
    JimM:
    Over 90% of the hard drive taken up with personal files? IMNSHA, not acceptable usage...


    What "personal files"? It's music that he listens to at work.

    I have a bunch of music on my laptop (for, you guessed it, listening to while I work), if space becomes a problem, I can delete some to make room - I don't need some dipshit tech doing it for me.
  • Trevor D'Arcy-Evans 2008-10-17 04:12
    The sysadmin at my old job had to look at one of the sales guys laptops. Out of curiosity, he had at look at his IE cache. After that, we referred to him as 'Mr Bestial'.
  • dkf 2008-10-17 04:13
    strcmp:
    Only it's uninteresting for swap because swap (especially swapping in) accesses the blocks randomly (whatever code/data the programs need) and the sequential read performance is secondary. The time for a sector to appear under the head is the same on any track. Swapout can be linear, until the swap space is fragmented due to 'random' page life times. The sad truth is that swap is not only slow, because hard disks are slower than RAM in general, but it is worst case for the HD.
    Not just that, but the chances are reasonably high that the drive will have to move the read head between reading each block of swap. Which isn't fast and (probably) won't use the drive's built-in cache.

    With sequential reads, there's a fair chance that you'll get a whole track off the drive in one go, even with remapping. And the drive's firmware will probably predict it correctly too and so have the stuff in cache even if you break up the sequential read over many read() calls. Random access stuff (e.g. swap) doesn't benefit like that. As you said, a worst case.
  • You call this working? 2008-10-17 04:24
    fred:
    JimM:
    Over 90% of the hard drive taken up with personal files? IMNSHA, not acceptable usage...


    What "personal files"? It's music that he listens to at work.

    I have a bunch of music on my laptop (for, you guessed it, listening to while I work), if space becomes a problem, I can delete some to make room - I don't need some dipshit tech doing it for me.


    A company laptop is for company business, and work is not the place to indulge in entertainment, be that listening to music, reading newspapers, talking to friends on the phone etc. It's work, so you should be working.
  • ClaudeSuck.de 2008-10-17 04:27
    zip:
    Red Green:
    Unbeknownst to Steve, a fellow technician had received Lee's laptop. During the analysis, he was shocked to find that the hard drive had less than 1GB of space available, and that the hard drive was full of pirated DVD rips, MP3s, and the like. The tech deleted whatever files he could that looked illegal and moved on.


    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Can anyone tell me what problem this fellow technician is solving here?


    Uh, under a gig of free space is the problem.


    Hence Lee couldn't download anymore. Stupid enough that he didn't see that and backed up what was his.
  • RiF 2008-10-17 04:37
    Grig Larson:

    As in Hormel's Brown sugar baked beans from a can.


    WTF?

    Beanz.
    Meanz.
    Heinz.

    n00b.
  • JimmyVile 2008-10-17 04:38
    inigomontoya:
    Tell me, is Steve the six-fingered man?


    He's the guy!
    Here's what happened... Unless I'm wrong, which, you know, I'm not...
  • Submarine 2008-10-17 04:51
    LBD:
    Just like one cannot pirate Linux


    OMG you're so wrong - pirates do sell Linux for money



    N00b

    Glad to meet you, N00b!
  • ch. 2008-10-17 04:51
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable. Just like one cannot pirate Linux
    Oh yeah, you can. It satisfies all the "arguments" of anti-pirates:
    - You are using someone's work without paying for it.
    - By downloading firefox or linux the competitors are losing "potential profit".
    - If everybody did it, the competitors would go bankrupt.
    - It is immoral to steal. (In other words: you wouldn't shoplift a firefox or linux CD in a store.)
  • Casey 2008-10-17 05:10
    If you are a tech employed (not contractor) by a company, you have a fiduciary to notify your company's legal department of these issues. It is a potential legal liability.
  • JD 2008-10-17 06:01
    If the guy has contractual concessions that allow him to use his laptop for personal use then it is absolutely unacceptable for some overzealous tech to go in there and randomly delete anything he doesn't like the look of. Clearly this action warranted disciplinary measures and that was exactly what happened. I see absolutely no WTF here, except the tech who thought he could rampage unchecked through someone's personal laptop.

    As for the subject of pirated material, there is absolutely no indication that any of that material was downloaded via the corporate network. It was very probably downloaded on the guy's own time and internet connection. That doesn't make it legal but it does severely restrict any 'right' that the company has over any of those files. Remember of course that the company cannot realistically prove that any of the files are pirated - they can only harbour suspicions, nothing more. Well, if I suspect that someone's personal laptop has pirated material on it, I don't feel that gives me the right to delete files at my whim.

    I hope this tech learnt his lesson.
  • Tilman Baumann 2008-10-17 06:58
    Honestly, i would be really pissed too if someone deleted files on my company laptop.
    I would be fine if someone would ask me to please delete all the pirated stuff.
    This way, i can do it and i can do it right and responsively.

    Just looking at the files without asking me would feel offensive to me.

    And why should it be a problem anyway. Many companies allow private use of laptops. As long as it does not interfer with work...
  • Jim 2008-10-17 07:05
    I think Jake is trolling us with this post. He saw all the passionate responses to the Wii hacking post and thought he'd have some fun stirring the crowd up a bit.

    It's obviously no WTF to reprimand a tech for deleting a staff member's personal files that reside on his personal laptop (sure it may be the company's laptop, but if he had special contractual rights to use it as his personal machine then it's as good as his personal laptop).

    The whole 'pirated material' bit is totally irrelevant to the story. All that is relevant here is that a tech deleted someone's personal files without bothering to enquire with them or even the company / boss!

    Simple equation: personal laptop = personal laptop, not personal laptop = personal laptop as long as there is nothing that I suspect may be illegal in which case I'll just delete whatever I feel like.
  • Andre 2008-10-17 07:14
    Anon:
    No, you can specify a minimum AND maximum size for the swap file in any windows version from the last decade. Set them to the same value and you have a fixed size swap file that won’t fragment.

    Right.

    Anon:
    I think it will increase the maximum size if utterly necessary

    Wrong.
  • JimmyVile 2008-10-17 07:14
    Tilman Baumann:
    Honestly, i would be really pissed too if someone deleted files on my company laptop.
    I would be fine if someone would ask me to please delete all the pirated stuff.
    This way, i can do it and i can do it right and responsively.

    Just looking at the files without asking me would feel offensive to me.

    And why should it be a problem anyway. Many companies allow private use of laptops. As long as it does not interfer with work...


    I think it's because your employer is responsible if "they" find illegal software/media on your PC.
    ("They" being your local flavor of anti-piracy watchdog.)

    My company was actually raided by people from Autodesk who somehow got some legal docs that allowed them to search all our computers for illegal installments.
    The reasoning behind it was the fact that we only had one or two registered licenses, which are not nearly enough for a studio this size.
    Turns out we were just use Maya instead of 3DSM.
  • IByte 2008-10-17 07:23
    Sexy coder:
    IByte:
    Jake Vinson:
    Steve's boss half-yelled a cheerful "Lee! This is Steve, new in IT!" No response. "Lee!" Still nothing. The boss sighed, turned to Steve, and said "Sometimes Lee likes to listen to music loud on his headphones."
    That's why we use Google Talk at our IT department. It doesn't matter you're in the same room if your addressee can't hear you. Plus, I'd rather paste a URL instead of reading it out loud.

    Weird, I can hear just fine people on the same room as me, but I have exceptional hearing.
    You know, I quoted that bit about the headphones and loud music for a reason...
  • Justin 2008-10-17 07:34
    This is not a WTF. The tech should not delete stuff without checking with the management first. It is not his responsibility or ability set to decide what should and should not be on a user's disk.
  • Mr B 2008-10-17 07:49
    Justin:
    This is not a WTF. The tech should not delete stuff without checking with the management first. It is not his responsibility or ability set to decide what should and should not be on a user's disk.


    So it isn't a WTF, but it IS a WTF?

    Make your mind up!

    The local files, if they were important, should have been backed up. /END
  • vman 2008-10-17 07:52
    Jim:

    The whole 'pirated material' bit is totally irrelevant to the story. All that is relevant here is that a tech deleted someone's personal files without bothering to enquire with them or even the company / boss!

    Simple equation: personal laptop = personal laptop, not personal laptop = personal laptop as long as there is nothing that I suspect may be illegal in which case I'll just delete whatever I feel like.


    If the laptop is provided by the company, then it is a *company* laptop. If there is something in Lee's contract that says "lee can put x amount of personal stuff on the laptop" then that should be made clear to the tech before the inventory of that laptop. Otherwise, Lee's out of luck.

    Most places I've worked, an "inventory" of this sort means that you need to back up any important files, as they're going to wipe the disk and reinstall the OS. They're not even going to LOOK at it. Failure to back the disk up is YOUR fault, not the tech's and YOU get in trouble for it, not the tech.
  • yah 2008-10-17 08:26
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b


    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?

    They removed it at the same time as gullable.
  • JimM 2008-10-17 08:42
    yah:
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b
    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?
    They removed it at the same time as gullable.
    Dang it - I was about to post a screenshot of an OED search for "gullable" along with a comment like "gosh, look, you're right!" but it's in there as an early - mid 19th century alternative spelling... :(
  • Jim 2008-10-17 08:42
    vman:
    If the laptop is provided by the company, then it is a *company* laptop. If there is something in Lee's contract that says "lee can put x amount of personal stuff on the laptop" then that should be made clear to the tech before the inventory of that laptop. Otherwise, Lee's out of luck.

    Umm, but if you read the article you'll see that there WAS something in Lee's contract to say he could use it for personal stuff. We don't know the specifics, of course, but we do know that there was some clause that allowed this. It was not Lee's responsibility to tell this to the tech and even if it was, the story suggests that the tech did this without Lee's knowledge or blessing. So I don't see how Lee could have done anything different, unless he's expected to go around and inform every single tech in the entire company that his laptop contains legitimate personal files. I don't think this is reasonable.

    I stand by my assessment that the tech was at fault and was correctly admonished for it.
  • Stephen 2008-10-17 08:55
    The Real WTF was that he wasnt reported to the Police, sacked and then jailed for having that on his PC.

    Thats happened to people i've worked with and I wouldnt hesitate to shop them for that kind of carry on.

    S
  • Zap Brannigan 2008-10-17 09:00
    rfsmit:
    Steve:
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.

    You'd think so, wouldn't you? However, one day, when you actually work for a real company, you'll find that backups are your own responsibility, kid. That is, unless the company provides an automated backup scheme. Usually they'll have a filter of some kind applied, but it's still your responsibility to check that certain files requiring automated backups are not filtered out.

    Maybe it's different in kindergarten...
    You're right, it's that way here too. I am responsible to protect and back up important files to the network. However, if I gave my laptop to the net techs to be checked out and they deleted files without asking, I would be so pissed.
  • Reggie 2008-10-17 09:10
    Meh... nothing unusual about guys plugged into headphones, listening to mp3s at work, legal or not. While the IT tech getting reprimanded for deleting non work related files is awkward, it's nothing to write about....
  • vman 2008-10-17 09:12
    Jim:
    vman:
    If the laptop is provided by the company, then it is a *company* laptop. If there is something in Lee's contract that says "lee can put x amount of personal stuff on the laptop" then that should be made clear to the tech before the inventory of that laptop. Otherwise, Lee's out of luck.

    Umm, but if you read the article you'll see that there WAS something in Lee's contract to say he could use it for personal stuff. We don't know the specifics, of course, but we do know that there was some clause that allowed this. It was not Lee's responsibility to tell this to the tech and even if it was, the story suggests that the tech did this without Lee's knowledge or blessing. So I don't see how Lee could have done anything different, unless he's expected to go around and inform every single tech in the entire company that his laptop contains legitimate personal files. I don't think this is reasonable.

    I stand by my assessment that the tech was at fault and was correctly admonished for it.


    Nope, if the tech had no way of knowing that his job was different for Lee than for everyone else, then sorry, management is at fault.
  • RiF 2008-10-17 09:20
    [quote user="Jim"][quote user="vman"]
    Umm, but if you read the article you'll see that there WAS something in Lee's contract to say he could use it for personal stuff.[/quote]
    Personal illegal stuff?

    Could be that the tech was following company procedure(s) we'll never know the full story.

    Don't let that stop you though...
  • RiF 2008-10-17 09:22
    RiF:
    Jim:
    vman:

    Umm, but if you read the article you'll see that there WAS something in Lee's contract to say he could use it for personal stuff.

    Personal illegal stuff?

    Could be that the tech was following company procedure(s) we'll never know the full story.

    Don't let that stop you though...

    FFS.

    Note to self: use preview button
  • Jim 2008-10-17 09:58
    vman:
    Nope, if the tech had no way of knowing that his job was different for Lee than for everyone else, then sorry, management is at fault.

    No apology necessary because I think you have made a very fair assessment. If there were specific clauses in Lee's contract that meant his situation was different from that of the average staff member then yes, it should have been management's responsibility to inform the company's techs. My overarching point was that this WTF is nothing to do with "Lee the pirate" or his behaviour. It is the action of the other staff members at his company that provided the real WTF.
  • Jim 2008-10-17 10:01
    Quote:
    [quote user="Jim"][quote user="vman"]
    Umm, but if you read the article you'll see that there WAS something in Lee's contract to say he could use it for personal stuff.[/quote]
    Personal illegal stuff?

    Could be that the tech was following company procedure(s) we'll never know the full story.

    Don't let that stop you though...
    End Quote

    Learn how to post and maybe I'll grace you with a reply...
  • RiF 2008-10-17 10:32
    Jim:
    Quote:
    Jim:
    vman:

    Umm, but if you read the article you'll see that there WAS something in Lee's contract to say he could use it for personal stuff.

    Personal illegal stuff?

    Could be that the tech was following company procedure(s) we'll never know the full story.

    Don't let that stop you though...

    End Quote

    Learn how to post and maybe I'll grace you with a reply...

    Hey, I overlooked your ability to think, I think you could cut me a little slack!
  • lern2read 2008-10-17 10:45

    Intensively or not, swap writes to disk. The swap file in Windows grows and shrinks based on usage. Where it grows to is available space on disk. As HD's write from the outer tracks to the inner tracks, as the free space becomes restricted to the inner tracks, write operations slow down (fewer sectors can be accessed at the same RPM as the track circumference reduces). Add that to a drive where as it nears capacity is almost certainly fragmented, free space becomes peppered throughout the drive, all disk operations become slower.

    TRWTF is people like this giving advice. You can force windows to use a fixed size page file. Select custom size and make min=max. Allowing the page file to grow is how you get a fragmented page file.
  • Dave 2008-10-17 12:05
    Ok I'm gonna bite here.

    When a laptop of mine gets loaned out they sign a form indicating that the laptop should be returned in the condition it left the office and that they should expect any files left on there on return to be deleted on return.

    I'm not going to waste my technicians time making backups of shit that should have been stored securely on the huge file server we invested in. If you don't that's YOUR problem - not mine.
  • Technical Thug 2008-10-17 12:18
    Nick:
    Theft is larceny,

    No it isn't. Moron.

    Theft includes larceny, but it is not limited to larceny.

  • Technical Thug 2008-10-17 12:24
    You call this working?:
    A company laptop is for company business, and work is not the place to indulge in entertainment, be that listening to music, reading newspapers, talking to friends on the phone etc. It's work, so you should be working.
    I am working when I'm listening to music. I take my headphones off when I'm on the phone or talking to someone.

    If I have 40GB of music that prevent me from doing work, then we might have an issue. But I don't.

    My boss is free to tell me not to listen to music ever, of course. I'd probably start looking for another job at that point, or tell my boss to stop all the mindless chitter-chatter that I'm putting on the headphones to ignore.
  • Dirk Diggler 2008-10-17 12:41
    Dave:
    Ok I'm gonna bite here.

    When a laptop of mine gets loaned out they sign a form indicating that the laptop should be returned in the condition it left the office and that they should expect any files left on there on return to be deleted on return.

    I'm not going to waste my technicians time making backups of shit that should have been stored securely on the huge file server we invested in. If you don't that's YOUR problem - not mine.
    As long as that's everyone's understanding and you're not making up rules as you go. You're 100% correct. Having it spelled out on the sign out sheet as you wrote is the way to go. I'm not sure that's what happened in the article.
  • kirkjerk 2008-10-17 15:03
    TRWTF: "bmm-tss" is *much* better onomatopoeiatically spelled "OONTZ OONTZ"
  • My Name 2008-10-17 15:44
    anon:
    Couldn't remember where I'd heard 'Autobahn' before. Then 'Nagelbett' reminded me it was The Big Lebowski.


    Kraftwerk had a single called Autobahn in 1975. Very cool song by a legendary band. They were the de facto standard of electronical music at the time
  • obediah 2008-10-17 16:07
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux


    Maybe he slapped the firefox name and logo on his IE installation?

    N00b


    nuh-uh u r!
  • MM 2008-10-17 16:27
    JimM:
    Lee's contract mentioned a laptop without specifying how it was to be used. Any contract stating the the company will provide a laptop should have clearly stated usage terms detailing whether / how much personal use is allowed.
    What makes you think it didn't specify that? We know it stated that the rights he would have to the laptop included the right to store personal files there. Since it included that, I expect it likely did state how much.
  • MM 2008-10-17 16:27
    Andre:
    Anon:
    I think it will increase the maximum size if utterly necessary

    Wrong.
    I'm not sure about all varieties of Windows, but I know that Windows NT can increase its max swap file size when necessary. It will warn you that you've exceeded the available virtual memory and should close any unnecessary applications, but then it will increase the swap file (and with it the swap file max size) to whatever it needs.

    (When it starts doing that repeatedly, you know you're past due to upgrade your RAM.)
  • MM 2008-10-17 16:27
    Justin:
    This is not a WTF. The tech should not delete stuff without checking with the management first. It is not his responsibility or ability set to decide what should and should not be on a user's disk.
    It certainly was his responsibility to decide. That was his job. He had been specifically tasked with the job of reviewing the contents of that laptop to ensure it had just what it was supposed to.

    His error was that he decided wrong when he cleared out everything without being careful enough to distinguish the company training materials that should have been left on there.

    And if anything else should have been left on there due to whatever the contractual agreement with Lee had been, then it was management's error for not making those special contractual rules clear to the tech before that laptop was reviewed.
  • obediah 2008-10-17 16:33
    I used to manage a large network 24 hour scratch space at a University. Capacity-wise, it was mostly a pit or porn and piracy. We had absolutely no interest in or funding for policing content, so most of the stuff had it's 24 hour run and went away.

    The one time we violated the 24 hour window involved much secrecy, policy office higher ups, strict orders and all that. It ended up that some old lady had discovered home-made child pornography. Well - she actually discovered 21+ college students flashing their tits at a bar, but when you're as old as dirt whats the difference between 17 and 21?
  • Technical Thug 2008-10-17 16:50
    MM:
    His error was that he decided wrong when he cleared out everything without being careful enough to distinguish the company training materials that should have been left on there.
    Please. There were never any "training materials" on the drive.

    Lee got pissed that his shit was wiped out, but realized he couldn't complain about that. So instead he made up something else.
  • themanager 2008-10-17 20:47
    Please, stop talking about law, rights, business policies,... all that chat makes us look like a bunch of clueless nerds. Please, let's take a dose of common sense.

    Lee works in 'production', and probably is a valuable employee.
    The IT guy works in IT, so 'services', and his task is to serve the rest of the staff, specially the production guys.
    Period.

    If I were the manager, I for sure didn't like a service guy pissing off a good production guy, especially for that silly thing (and specially now, in the middle of the mess of a move). As a manager, the quarrels between my employees annoy me much more than the 0.0001 probability of having trouble because of some copyrighted media. In the rare event of this trouble never arises, I'm sure I can manage it and take null damage. Meanwhile, quarrels between employees damages production now; it's loosing money right now, and a sad way to spend life.

    So, TRWTF is the IT guy forgot what is his place, and behave like a little BOFH, and like a little BOFH now cries begging for the sympathy of his colleagues. Surely deep down he is a good guy, but lacks experience. So, if you want to teach him a valuable lesson don't tell he was right.
  • savar 2008-10-17 21:38
    Lesson learned: Lee:
    Steve:
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.


    Actually, when your laptop is collected by your company to have its contents reviewed, you can't assume they won't format the entire drive and reinstall only the necessary software.


    They certainly have the right to do that, but I doubt that it makes much business sense to erase data without asking first.

    When I left a large company (Fortune 50), they backed up the entire HD before re-imaging it. Better safe than sorry.
  • Ren 2008-10-18 07:29
    JimM:
    yah:
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b
    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?
    They removed it at the same time as gullable.
    Dang it - I was about to post a screenshot of an OED search for "gullable" along with a comment like "gosh, look, you're right!" but it's in there as an early - mid 19th century alternative spelling...
    :(


    WHAT!? I can't throw seagulls at people anymore!?
  • Jeff Grigg 2008-10-18 22:43
    It's OK; I'm reading a pirated version of WTF. ;->


    Arrrr!!!!!
  • zach 2008-10-19 22:32
    This sounds like the guy who went to my undergrad who got busted for child porn. He got caught because he asked the helpdesk to back up some stuff on his computer, including his kiddie porn folder (which was named, iirc, "kiddie porn").
  • jwenting 2008-10-20 02:40
    Sexy coder:
    Nicolas Verhaeghe:
    I was asked to look at his laptop because it was running very slow.

    I found out that the laptop was full of enema porn (yes, there is such a thing and yes, it is gross).

    He had gigabytes of enema and scat movies of all sorts, tons of images downloaded and he was part of dozens of Yahoo groups related to the topic.

    This was a manager who was very bossy and borderline abusive with everybody and me in particular.

    I deleted all these files, gave it a good defrag and installed a RAM module (it had been ordered for him) and when I handed the laptop back to him I said:

    "It's ok, now, I gave the hard drive a good ENEMA".

    He never was bossy with me anymore and avoided looking at me.

    So you deleted the guys porn just for fun? Last I heard storing media on a HD doesn't account for computer slowness. The extra RAM was probably what fixed it. You're a big jerk :-(.


    I've yet to see a company (outside the pron industry, obviously, but I've never seen those companies) where it's not against company policy to store porn on company systems (or to use company computers to browse porn sites).

    Same with pirates and other illegal material.

    So he did the right thing, followed company procedures.
    In fact I think he should have reported the manager to HR for violating that policy.
    Because he didn't that manager is now a meak lamb, knowing or fearing that further transgressions may have "unfavourable consequences" for his career.
  • jwenting 2008-10-20 02:43
    iToad:
    Well... let's see.

    1. Posession of a privately owned computer on the company premeses.
    2. Attachment of a privately owned computer to the company network.
    3. Downloading pirated music, video, or software using company computers (and/or the company IP address).
    4. Posession of pirated music, video, or software files on company computers.

    Around here, Lee would be so fired...


    1 and 2 are no problem here. There's even a special network segment to plug in non-company systems that has extra security on it.
    3 and 4 are definite problems. Probably not firing offenses for the first offender, but you'd certainly get a good talking to.
  • Georg 2008-10-20 03:50
    Hmm the band "Autobahn" does not exist, it's only mentioned in the big lebowski to reference the german band called "Kraftwerk", they actually brought out a record called "Autobahn".
  • ch. 2008-10-20 04:26
    JimmyVile:
    My company was actually raided by people from Autodesk who somehow got some legal docs that allowed them to search all our computers for illegal installments. The reasoning behind it was the fact that we only had one or two registered licenses, which are not nearly enough for a studio this size. Turns out we were just use Maya instead of 3DSM.
    Wow, indeed these are some troubled times we live in... What's next? Raiding my home because I don't buy enough milk, presuming I steal it from somewhere?
  • yah 2008-10-20 06:00
    Technical Thug:
    Orbstart:
    Piracy implies theft, theft suggests that you deprive the victim of the article being stolen.


    No it doesn't. You idiot.

    Go read up about non-rivalrous goods.



    Certainly an interesting addition to anyone's understanding of economics, but this (at least the Wikipedia version) does not cover whether or not depriving someone of a non-rivalrous good is theft. An example that seems to indicate the fact that you need to intend to deprive permanently is the phenomenon of joy-riding. If someone takes your car then you will probably report it stolen - however in the unlikely event that the offender is caught and charged then under English law they are charged with 'Taking Without Consent' (otherwise known as TWOC'ing). The same offence under Scots law is called somthing like 'Taking and Driving Away'. The offender is not charged with theft since despite the fact they took your car (a rivalrous good), they probably did not intend to keep it. On the other hand if they took it and shipped it offshore to re-sell, then that is definitely theft (or larceny as someone else has put it) of your rivalrous good.
  • yah 2008-10-20 06:21
    JimM:
    yah:
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b
    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?
    They removed it at the same time as gullable.
    Dang it - I was about to post a screenshot of an OED search for "gullable" along with a comment like "gosh, look, you're right!" but it's in there as an early - mid 19th century alternative spelling... :(


    yah - I is so old...
  • Tilman Baumann 2008-10-20 06:56
    I'm not so terribly sure if my employer would be responsible for my stash of illegally backuped music.
    He does not know.
    And as far as I understand the law where I live (Germany) he has no right to spy on me without me knowing it.

    Ok, I would be liable for misusing company resources. But this is besides the point.

    Honestly. I would quit the same moment I figure out that my company spied on me (without any previous suspicion) and especially when I come at work and find out that someone else deleted my files. No matter what files. This would be no place for me to work.
  • squeem 2008-10-20 12:15
    My Name:

    Kraftwerk had a single called Autobahn in 1975. Very cool song by a legendary band. They were the de facto standard of electronical music at the time


    I would start the tape while waiting at the stoplight near home; if I drove at the speed limit the song would end as I reached the stop sign near where I worked.
  • TIQ 2008-10-20 22:50
    Hey guys :)


    I'm the tech in question... thought i'd clear a few things up!



    The staff member whose files i deleted was actually standing right next to me, watching me as i did it.

    I asked him what files he needed to keep, and what could be deleted. I did what he asked :)


    As far as illegal or not is concerned... It states in our companies computer policy what is and is not allowed... and what was on this laptop was most definitely not allowed - ripped/downloaded DVDs, music, and pirated software.


    Any other questions about it, just add a comment, i'll reply to whatever you've got to ask :)

  • tld 2008-10-21 14:16
    I'll second that. Sure, the machine needed a good cleaning, but you don't just toss files without knowing what you're doing.
  • TIQ 2008-10-21 17:16
    I know/knew what i was doing.... And was doing so with his consent :)

    I wasn't new to the company either, been working for them for over a year when this happened - 14 months now.
  • Moving on... 2008-10-22 10:55
    Sorry TIQ, no one cares anymore, this article is a week old...
  • OBloodyHell 2008-10-28 10:34
    Lesson learned: Lee:
    Steve:
    He should have asked before deleting the files. You can never assume anything ,no matter how reasonable it may be. A lesson learned.


    Actually, when your laptop is collected by your company to have its contents reviewed, you can't assume they won't format the entire drive and reinstall only the necessary software.


    I believe this is far more dependent on what sort of bureaucratic hellhole you work for, and what sort of bureaucratic IT uberlord you have.

    And any company which formats a drive without asking you first if you left anything on it, that's not a company any competent developer wants to work for.

    And smart companies partition their drives so that you don't have to wipe everything just to update it.

    ... and yes, there are a lot of unsmart companies out there.
  • OBloodyHell 2008-10-28 10:49
    > In case you didn't read it, the laptop was collected for review. This wasn't an accident, it was a deliberate review of laptop content. Presumably the whole point was to ensure that no unsuitable content was being kept on work laptops, and I'd call 40GB of potentially illegal copies unsuitable. Frankly, more than a few GB of personal data would be unsuitable - you can only listen to 8 hours of music on any given workday anyway.

    Yes, and you alway -- always -- want to listen to the exact same 8 hours of music day in and day out

    > Steve explained it to the manager, who closed his eyes as if he was in intense thought, exhaling loudly through his nostrils. "Well, we mentioned the laptop in Lee's employment contract."
    This is the second: Lee's contract mentioned a laptop without specifying how it was to be used. Any contract stating the the company will provide a laptop should have clearly stated usage terms detailing whether / how much personal use is allowed. Over 90% of the hard drive taken up with personal files? IMNSHA, not acceptable usage...


    Rather blatantly presumptive of you. It's easily possible that the laptop was more of an employment perk than anything specifically related to heavy duty job usage. Not saying that IS the case here, but there are lots of cases where someone gets a laptop from the company just because everyone at a certain level gets a laptop from the company -- because enough people do need or use them for company work that it's worth it to just buy a bulk lot of them and image them all the same way.

    And it sounds as though the company was rather appreciative of Lee's abilities, so complaining about his own usage is questionable. If he wasn't having any problems with it (and the fact that the company clearly appreciated his work suggests that), then 1gb remaining is apparently adequate.

    Given that, the only legitimate complaint is possible liability if the RIAA, BSA, or MPAA gets wind of it. That's far from insubstantial but it's relatively low probability, so many companies will ignore something only distantly "their fault" until they get hit with some (possibily completely unrelated) legal nutcracker, after which time the attorneys will become a second set of beancounting jackasses running the company and interfering with the proper functioning and the happy employees.
  • sex 2008-10-29 06:49
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  • tiuk 2008-11-08 15:16
    IByte:
    Jake Vinson:
    Steve's boss half-yelled a cheerful "Lee! This is Steve, new in IT!" No response. "Lee!" Still nothing. The boss sighed, turned to Steve, and said "Sometimes Lee likes to listen to music loud on his headphones."
    That's why we use Google Talk at our IT department. It doesn't matter you're in the same room if your addressee can't hear you. Plus, I'd rather paste a URL instead of reading it out loud.

    I'd much rather wear headphones at work so I can listen to whatever I want (I keep a separate playlist for "work safe" music), but company policy is no headphones so we can hear announcements, in case of emergency, etc.
  • Capt. Obvious 2008-11-12 14:31
    caffintedbacon:
    It has a fixed *maximum* size (which in practice, usually becomes pretty fixed, but the size can and will vary)

    It also has a fixed minimum size. To fix the files location, make max = min
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  • GullAble 2009-03-01 10:59
    JimM:
    yah:
    Andrew:
    LBD:
    One cannot pirate firefox. It's free and therefore unpiratable.

    Just like one cannot pirate Linux

    N00b
    Did you know the word sarcasm isn't in the dictionary?
    They removed it at the same time as gullable.
    Dang it - I was about to post a screenshot of an OED search for "gullable" along with a comment like "gosh, look, you're right!" but it's in there as an early - mid 19th century alternative spelling... :(


    Bet if you take a look, gullAble isn't in the dictionary.
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  • legere 2013-08-05 08:49
    Actually, that's not how you pirate Linux. To be piracy, it would have to be without permission, and the GPL (at least) doesn't forbid you selling copies for money.

    On the other hand, if you send someone a copy of a GPL program and forget to include source code, you are in violation of the license agreement.