"It's that time of year again," Robert Rossegger wrote, "you know, when the underpowered air conditioner just can't cope with the non-winter weather? Fortunately, we have a solution for that... and all we need to do is just keep an extra eye on people walking near the (completely ajar) server room door."

 

"For as long as anyone can remember," Mike E wrote, "the fax machine in one particular office was a bit spotty whenever it was wet out. After having the telco test the lines from the DMARC to the office, I replaced the hardware, looked for water leaks all along the run, and found precisely nothing. The telco disavowed all responsibility, so the best solution I could offer was to tell the users affected by this to look out the window and, if raining, go to another fax machine."

"One day, we had the telco out adding a T1 and they had the cap off of the vault where our cables come in to the building. Being curious by nature, I wandered over when nobody was around and wound up taking this picture. After emailing same to the district manager of the telco, suddenly we had the truck out for an extra day (accompanied by one very sullen technician) and the fax machine worked perfectly from then on."

 

"I found this when I came back in to work after some time off," writes Sam Nicholson, "that drive is actually earmarked for 'off-site backup'. Also, this is what passes for a server rack at this particular software company. Yes, it's made of wood."

 

"Some people use 'proper electrical wiring'," writes Mike, "others use 'extension cords'. We, on the other hand, apparently do this."

 

"I was staying at a hotel in Manhattan and somehow took a wrong turn and wound up in the stairwell," wrote Dan, "not only is all their equipment in a public place (without even a door), it's mostly hanging from cables in several places."

 

"I spotted this in China," writes Matt, "This poor switch was bolted to a column in the middle of some metal shop about 4m above ground. There were many more curious things, but I decided to keep a low profile and stop taking pictures."