Chris never really questioned his choice of university. Sure, the school wasn't at the top of the Best Universities list, but really, how many are? Well, technically, it wasn't even on the Best Universities list, but then again, it wasn't on the Worst Universities list, either. And not just because that list doesn't exist. The school was accredited after all; how bad could it be?

Chris didn't have any problems with the introductory courses. How could he? They had Princeton-quality lecture notes! Really, they did: googling the text in the PowerPoint lecture notes yielded an identical presentation (name and course number changed) from a Princeton professor. Sure, the book would sometimes conflict with the lecture notes (especially when they referred to non-existent page numbers), but really, who reads the book?

It wasn't until Chris took the Data Structures course that he started to question the quality of his university. The choice of Visual Basic 6 as the course language seemed awfully strange, especially considering that Data Structure courses generally introduce the concept of pointers and pointer-usage in creating stacks, lists, queues, etc. No matter, the professor still was able to teach all the standard structures, including the Sorted List:

Not too bad. Not quite Princeton-quality, but still appropriate. And how might we implement such a list in Visual Basic 6? With the ListBox UI Control, that's how ...

Maybe Chris should have looked at that Best Universities list after all ...