Long time readers may remember a post from a few decades ago (in Internet time) entitled The FOR-CASE Paradigm. Since originally posting that, I've received quite a number of similar submissions but have avoided using them simply because it would feel like a duplicate post. There's really only so much you can say about a for-switch loop.

Wait, let me repeat the key part of that last paragraph: I've received quite a number of practically identical submissions. That's right. This is just not an isolated incident of WTF but is actually a standard coding practice for quite a few. Following are two of the most recent submissions (both from the past few weeks).

Exhibit A, discovered by Gary Henson, from production code written by a major international company for a government department:

String[] days = new String[7];
for( int i = 0; i < 7; i++ ) {
  switch(i) {
    default:
    case 0:
      days[i] = "Monday";
      break;
    case 1:
      days[i] = "Tuesday";
      break;
    case 2:
      days[i] = "Wednesday";
      break;
    case 3:
      days[i] = "Thursday";
      break;
    case 4:
      days[i] = "Friday";
      break;
    case 5:
      days[i] = "Saturday";
      break;
    case 6:
      days[i] = "Sunday";
      break;
  }
}

Exhibit B, discovered by John, a several-hundred line for-switch loop:

const int nLimits = 256;
for( int i = 0; i < nLimits; ++i )
{
    switch( i )
    {
    case 0:
        ProcessInternalFindings();
        break;

    case 1:
        break;

    case 2:
        BuildReferences(8,nRef);
        break;

    //ED: Snip 2-254

    case 255:
        CleanAllocations();
        break;
    }
}