Although Andy had left for greener pastures generations ago, everyone on Julius's team knows Andy. Actually, it's hard not to know him.

It's not that Andy's code is that bad. It's certainly buggy and rarely works properly, but that alone doesn't make it memorable. It's more... the Andy in the code. Take, for example, this snippet of code from RFIDAndyJulRequest3.pde:

if (Wewanttoread)
  {
    while(!readsucces)
    {
      Andyread();
      //now code is what we read
    }
    Wewanttoread=false;
  }
  lcd.clear();
  lcd.setCursor(0,0);
  lcd.print("Ball got by:");
  lcd.setCursor(0,1);
  lcd.print(Andymatch(code));
}

Not all of Andy's methods are prefixed with Andy, but they almost always have a little Andy in them.

private void button34_click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (serialPort1.IsOpen)
    {
	string andy = "R";
	serialPort1.Write("R"); 
    }
}

But at least not all of his code is undocumented and poorly commented. In his later years, he learned the magic of maintainability through combing self-commenting code with code comments.

void Andycolorbit(int xloc,int yloc )
{
  byte the_byte_we_will_alter;
    //activate help variable
    the_byte_we_will_alter =dataG[yloc];
    //actual change
    the_byte_we_will_alter =the_byte_we_will_alter+powers[xloc];
    //return
    dataG[yloc]=the_byte_we_will_alter;
}