Comment On It Depends & Too Good To Be True

It Depends (from David) [expand full text]
« PrevPage 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5 | Page 6Next »

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 18:08 • by Bappi
214255 in reply to 214238
pyro789x:
In order for this to be a valid argument, they would have to assume that anybody using Hungarian notation does not have access to an IDE that will tell you the variable's type upon mouse over, but which tracks each instance of the variable nonetheless, so that it can easily be changed to a different name should it be required.

This brings your number of possible uses of Hungarian notation down to an extreme niche market, in only those who are using IDEs that are of a very exact specification, one which is extremely unlikely to exist.

ABAP.

It's serious business.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 18:09 • by real_aardvark
214256 in reply to 214245
A Wizard a True Star:
nikki9696:
El Duderino:
A Wizard a True Star:
So, in which languages do you think Hungarian Notation would actually be useful?
pI advActually vLove adjHungarian nNotation advSo adjMuch, pI vUse pIt advAll artThe nTime! pIt advSure vMakes nEnglish adjEasier prepTo vUnderstand. vImagine cIf pYou vHad prepTo vRead pThis prepWithout pIt. pYou vWould vHave adjNo nClue advWhat pThese nWords vMeant prepWithout pTheir nParts prepOf nSpeech!


nThat vIs advAwesome.


Sorry, but just because you can abuse a programming practice doesn't make it useless.

Sigh.

Hungarian Notation (as used outside Systems Programming, and I'm not remotely convinced of its worth even there) is somewhere between Cargo Cult and CYA.

Yup.

It is, truly, useless.

Dangerous, also.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 18:23 • by emddudley
214258 in reply to 214111
WhiskeyJack:
My company advocates the practice of indicating the variable type in its name.

cFoo = class variable
pFoo = parameter variable
gFoo = global variable

foo = local variable

Why is this so bad? Sure, I could rely on the IDE to trace back and give me an icon or tooltip or some reminder of where the variable was defined, but if it's right there in the name...

Edit: oh, I see, we're talking about two different things.



I use a similar naming scheme myself and I think it works very well. To be a bit pedantic, however, I prefer the following:

mFoo = Member variable
aFoo = Argument variable
gFoo = Global variable

foo = Local variable

A class variable is a type of member variable. You use the term class variable to distinguish from instance variables.

Secondly, a parameter is what you define when you declare a function, and an argument is the value that is passed in to that function when it is called. Since the variable inside the function represents whatever is passed in, I prefer the "a" prefix.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 18:26 • by Havokk (unregistered)
214259 in reply to 214200
Franz Kafka:
The whole point of HN is a fairly consistent of naming variables semantically.

If I understand Hungarian Notation correctly, this is wrong. The whole point of a type identifier is to indicate syntax, not semantics.

My answer to the question is in two parts.
Stack allocated variables - use a notation to indicate general type (integer, float, string, datetime) not specific type (int32, int64, etc).
Object types - the whole point of polymorphism is that object type is not important (as long as inheritance chains match) so using a type identifier in the name is not required and might be counterproductive.

THe comments about renaming in the programming tool doens't work if the item you are renaming is an external property and is referenced in other code that calls yours.

B

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 18:32 • by Havokk (unregistered)
214260 in reply to 214259
Havokk:
My answer to the question is in two parts.

Oops, missed one.
I use a type prefix to indicate user interface objects (for example controls on an HTML form).

I also missed a few speeling mistaks... oh well, I'll try harrder next tyme.

B

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 18:50 • by awefawef (unregistered)
214263 in reply to 214078
wtf:
Surely you're joking...

But seriously, what 3 disadvantages to MVC do you have in mind?
Monolithic controllers. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation doesn't support multiple controllers.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 19:03 • by real_aardvark
214264 in reply to 214263
awefawef:
wtf:
Surely you're joking...

But seriously, what 3 disadvantages to MVC do you have in mind?
Monolithic controllers. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation doesn't support multiple controllers.

Splendid: now we're on to JMK's beauty contests.

In the mean time, check out Terrence Parr on the basics of doing MVC right.

It's just fucking organisation, for God's sake.

Oh, and for the total lunatic who suggested that it leads to "overhead" because of "too many files" and "wasting memory by passing messages between those files," well ...

... Try parsing Sanskrit. You can't possibly be more useless in the real world, and, you never know, it could be fun.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 19:10 • by JD (unregistered)
The RWTF is that you are such a vain person

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 19:12 • by awefawef (unregistered)
214267 in reply to 214264
real_aardvark:
awefawef:
wtf:
Surely you're joking...

But seriously, what 3 disadvantages to MVC do you have in mind?
Monolithic controllers. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation doesn't support multiple controllers.

Splendid: now we're on to JMK's beauty contests.

In the mean time, check out Terrence Parr on the basics of doing MVC right.

It's just fucking organisation, for God's sake.

Oh, and for the total lunatic who suggested that it leads to "overhead" because of "too many files" and "wasting memory by passing messages between those files," well ...

... Try parsing Sanskrit. You can't possibly be more useless in the real world, and, you never know, it could be fun.
WTF? You know, not all MVC implementations support multiple controllers. Nothing says fun like rummaging through a 4000 line controller file.

Jesus Christ in a can, if "organisation" was all that it took to program properly, Martha Steward would own your ass.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 19:13 • by John Hardin (unregistered)
140 tries? Geeze, what a lamer.

A multiple choice quiz with maximum (for example) five options per question, minimal feedback on the results (e.g. you got it right/wrong vs. telling you what the right answer is and why), and the same questions every time can be aced in at most five tries, even if you have zero knowledge of the subject matter...

I'm reminded of War Games where WOPR is trying to guess the launch code. It could guess the characters of the code individually (vs. having to guess the whole code at once, no doubt as a poorly-thought-out dramatic tension enhancement ploy) - which means the launch code would have taken at most 36 tries to guess.

"WOPR's trying to guess the... oh. Crap."

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 19:45 • by Appomattox (unregistered)
TRWTF in the second story is that the applicant didn't log the answers that got him the high score and submit them from a different IP address.

TSRWTF is that the test was designed to report the score directly to the user -- and then let the user take the test again.

TTRWTF is that the person who designed the test didn't at least have the kid in to interview for some low-level testing position, since he's obviously pretty good at breaking your code.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 20:24 • by cfreak (unregistered)
214272 in reply to 214071
Top Cod3r:
and the importance of naming your variables with a prefix that tells you what type it is.


What is it with Windows developers that feel the need for this? What if you change the code and your variable needs to change type? Do you find and replace every file to make sure you change the variable (annoying, tedious and error prone) or do you change the type and don't bother to go change the variable name? (making the practice useless).

What do you do if the program itself needs to change the variable's type?

I won't go so far as to call it a WTF but it just seems it creates more problems that it solves; especially with modern IDEs that can easily show you the variable's definition.

Of course I develop on Linux so what do I know? :)

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 20:38 • by lokey (unregistered)
214273 in reply to 214109
A Wizard a True Star:
Oh boy... just when I thought the Hungarian Notation holy war was over.

Sam B:
In this day and age, with IDEs (especially with the VB IDE) helping the programmer find out what type a variable is, there is absolutely no reason why anyone should advocate Hungarian Notation, save for the continued maintenance of legacy code.


Well, I can see a couple of important reasons to use Hungarian Notation, or least some variation of it.

In the VB.NET IDE you have to hover your mouse over a variable to figure out what type it is. Sometimes you can only see the type during run-time. Whereas, with some kind of variable naming convention, you can just read the code and know what the variable is supposed to be. I know it seems like a minor thing, but it really does make life a lot easier.

And god forbid you're stuck debugging code without an IDE, which happens more often than you'd think.


Sam B:
I think "The Real WTF" is that you advocate Hungarian Notation... in Visual Basic.


So, in which languages do you think Hungarian Notation would actually be useful?


Sam B:
Even Microsoft does not recommend it any longer ("Do not use Hungarian Notation").


Microsoft recommends a lot of things which are not exactly a) smart or b) the best way to increase productivity.



Yes, like using any Microsoft product - definitely not: a) smart or b) the best way to increase productivity - but a definite win for marketing...

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 21:04 • by lokey (unregistered)
214274 in reply to 214243
Sann B:
Sam B:
Eam:

What about the point where one fails to detect satire or sarcasm, consistently?


Well, this being the Internet, where it's already difficult to detect satire or sarcasm, one must make an "extra effort", as it were, to ensure that people get your point.


Would I be right in saying that you, and anyone else, who failed to notice the sarcasm are American? Or some other breed of dumbass? The ideas that he's espousing are so obviously ridiculous that I am embarassed for you. Please try harder next time. The internet is not such serious business.


Don't slam Americans! Asshats exist in all countries - just look in the mirror...

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 21:14 • by Ggreg (unregistered)
Where are the grammar nazis: nThat vIs adjAwesome

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 22:03 • by Me (unregistered)
214281 in reply to 214109
A Wizard a True Star:
Oh boy... just when I thought the Hungarian Notation holy war was over.

Sam B:
Even Microsoft does not recommend it any longer ("Do not use Hungarian Notation").


Microsoft recommends a lot of things which are not exactly a) smart or b) the best way to increase productivity.



Damn. M$FT can't catch a break. People dump on them for using HN, and when they finally own up to their mistake, someone comes along and dumps on for that.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 22:04 • by montgomery (unregistered)
Both contributors are douchebags.

I cower in the awesome intellect of Mr Prime. His knowledge that 1 is not a prime (anymore) is dizzying nee sublime. All hail Ultimate Prime, you sir are my hero. Next time you have our permission to dispatch such heretics that stick to the old ways of one-as-prime.

Or maybe the CEO douchebag just wanted you to prove you knew C# and write a simple 5 line program, and instead you stalled, got in a huff, and left.

Next time, it's going to be the awesome tale of how Sir Prime was forced to write a string reversal algorithm. I crap my pants in suspense.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 23:07 • by Mr.'; Drop Database -- (unregistered)
214286 in reply to 214263
awefawef:
wtf:
Surely you're joking...

But seriously, what 3 disadvantages to MVC do you have in mind?
Monolithic controllers. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation doesn't support multiple controllers.
Don't forget:

* Poor documentation. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation isn't documented well.
* Random crashes/data loss. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation contains lots of bugs.
* Getting raided by the FBI. That's a big disadvantage, if your MVC implementation automatically attacks government websites.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 23:20 • by Chris (unregistered)
214287 in reply to 214076
John:
"Lots of WTFs here, but not in the ways the authors intended. "

Got to agree with you. The Prime Number [WTF] doesn't mention what type of company the startup was. Quite possibly the CEO was the kind of person that knows Primes inside-out.

For those that think their knowledge of maths is excellent (myself included), have a look at this: http://xkcd.com/179/
My reaction was the exact same, and had to go to quickmath.com the verify it.

btw. What's with people saying what the captchas were?
e^(i*pi) is a well known in engineering mathematics. I wouldn't exactly call a knowledge of math without differential equations "excellent".

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-26 23:39 • by Zoinks (unregistered)
214289 in reply to 214276
"That", in the given context, is not a noun but a pronoun.
If you're going to "fix" something, why not actually fix it?

Also, to all the biters of TopCod3r (especially Sam B): please stop ruining this site with your pathetic attempts to argue with satire/trolling -- whichever it is, it's way more advanced than anything you've posted.
Go back to slashdot, where you stand a chance of appearing (relatively) intelligent. You're strictly 1st percentile here, you miserable oxygen thieves.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:09 • by Kuba (unregistered)
214291 in reply to 214081
panzi:
Top Cod3r:
Name 3 disadvantages of the MVC design pattern.


I'm curious, what are disadvantages of the MVC design pattern? I can't think of any. It's not overly complex, it does not add a lot of overhead... what are the disadvantages?


In some cases -- BTDT -- it produces code that's harder to maintain, understand and extend than non-MVC design.

For example, I've had one project where I, quite artificially, decoupled the forms from the "controller" which populated them, switched them, validated inputs, extracted data, etc. This was using the Qt famework. So, instead of using all that Qt provides and having a nice, self-contained and understandable form that could handle its own problems (such as wrong data, parsing/formatting from/to model, etc), the form was dumb, and the code to handle it (the controller) was elsewhere.

While MVC-kosher, in retrospect it was a small-scale snafu. MVC led the form to be stripped of any encapsulation that OOP would normally provide, in fact there were multiple levels of encapsulation: some things, which didn't break MVC separation, were abstracted out in the form, while others couldn't due to controller's involvement. During maintenance it wasn't exactly trivial to determine which way it would be without looking at the code. I wrote it and I had to constantly look things up, which meant someone else would just call it a clusterfuck and refuse to touch it.

I have later rewritten it to bundle the view and the controller, and the code shrank by 50% and became a breeze to work with. It was, just by the feel of it, the simplest, least astonishing way of doing it, and pretty natural when dealing with code targeting Qt.

Qt provides reasonably good M-VC separation in its model-oriented controls, but they too don't force you to separate the controller out; in fact they make the controller functionality subclasseable/extendable on as-needed basis. It just feels "sane" when using, and seems natural - at least to me.

Of course there are situations, like in web programming, where not only the model and view are physically separated, but the controller can have multiple personalities too, and be spliced between the ajax client and the application server. But there it actually makes sense, and still it doesn't come with its own pains (thus emergence of all those nifty web application frameworks).

Cheers, Kuba

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:23 • by Zemm
214292 in reply to 214081
panzi:
Top Cod3r:
On Error Resume Next


One of the "greatest" features of Visual Basic. "Just ignore all errors." *shudder*


It started in QuickBasic. I remember finding it quite handy, but since learning more elegant ways to handle errors, I haven't used it since about 1997. QB also used the old BASIC type suffix: like S$ for a string or N! for float or I% for integer. Does VB still support those? I have never used VB so I wouldn't know. :)

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:25 • by more randomer than you (unregistered)
214293 in reply to 214087
Vroomfundel:
Muahaha, I'm beginning to like the way Top Cod3r is becoming the laughing stock of the day.

Frist, in this sense!


Actually, it is all the idiots who can't recognize a troll when they see one (i.e. people like you) who we laugh at.

Topcod3r aka 'Brian' is a clever troll and chooses sides of contraversial topics to claim as fact.

You were the bait. Fact.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:29 • by 6pac (unregistered)
214294 in reply to 214113
Gotta say, it was 100% obvious to me he was a troll as soon as I read the post. I just couldn't believe that so many people took the bait.
And I've never seen him post before.

But I suppose I am a former VB/C++/C#/QuickBASIC/Forth/Pascal/Transact-SQL/6502 Assembler programmer so that probably helps.
Seriously, if ANYONE starts extolling the virtues of Hungarian notation (shudder) and ON ERROR RESUME NEXT, your troll ears have got to start twitching !
Not that ON ERROR RESUME NEXT isn't very useful in the right hands, but it's a real favourite twig to bash VB coders with !

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:34 • by Jim (unregistered)
214296 in reply to 214100
Sam B:

There's a point where if your satire or sarcasm is so veiled as to be undetectable, consistently, then it's just plain trolling.


It was plainly obvious that he was joking to us true top coders :) It was a materful troll and I'm glad it made people like you so grumpy.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:46 • by montgomery (unregistered)
214298 in reply to 214294
6pac:
Gotta say, it was 100% obvious to me he was a troll as soon as I read the post. I just couldn't believe that so many people took the bait.
And I've never seen him post before.

But I suppose I am a former VB/C++/C#/QuickBASIC/Forth/Pascal/Transact-SQL/6502 Assembler programmer so that probably helps.
Seriously, if ANYONE starts extolling the virtues of Hungarian notation (shudder) and ON ERROR RESUME NEXT, your troll ears have got to start twitching !
Not that ON ERROR RESUME NEXT isn't very useful in the right hands, but it's a real favourite twig to bash VB coders with !


It was a necessity when years ago, some of us were writing some VBScript, IIS4 or 5 running Classic ASP calling COM objects. The reason to do On Error Resume Next was because an error HResult from a COM object would kill the Classic ASP script dead in its tracks. Not exactly desired behavior for your website. So if you set errors off, you can then query the Err object and handle the situation properly.

It's not exactly rocket science, and it's nowhere as clean as try/catch/finally, but it has it's place.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:49 • by more randomer than you (unregistered)
214299 in reply to 214121
SarcasmFTW:
You kinda have to assume that the first interview is for a position requiring a fair amount of mathematical knowledge. Because unless I have really fallen out of touch, knowing off the top of your head how to calculate the nth prime is not something everyone is expected to know how to do.
Unless of course, they were expected the exhaustive search method, but if they were only expecting that, why even bother ask the question.




I think it is a good beginner question. Wondering what the nth prime is shows a lack of understanding the question. You only want to know what the n'th prime is after you already know the (n-1)th prime, recursively until the first prime. Knowing not to bother testing division by non-prime numbers is also something else they would have been looking for. You don't have to have a mathematical PHD to realise that there is no point testing for division by 6 if you have already tested for division by 2. Finally, there would probably be bonus 'marks' for people who put in optimisations such as only testing odd numbers higher than 2. In short, it is a simple problem which an intelligent applicant should be able to solve in short time regardless of their mathematical knowledge - provided they know what a prime is.

I didn't test or double check this code, but it should be pretty clear how it is working.


double possiblePrime = 1;
for(numFoundPrimes=0;numFoundPrimes<n;possiblePrime++) {
isPrime = false;

for(int prime : foundPrimes) {
if(possiblePrime/prime % 1 == 0) {
isPrime = false;
break;
}
}

if(isPrime) {
numFoundPrimes++;
foundPrimes.add(possiblePrime);
}

}

print(foundPrimes);

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 00:55 • by Hungarian (unregistered)
214300 in reply to 214292
Zemm:
panzi:
Top Cod3r:
On Error Resume Next


One of the "greatest" features of Visual Basic. "Just ignore all errors." *shudder*


It started in QuickBasic. I remember finding it quite handy, but since learning more elegant ways to handle errors, I haven't used it since about 1997. QB also used the old BASIC type suffix: like S$ for a string or N! for float or I% for integer. Does VB still support those? I have never used VB so I wouldn't know. :)


QB was a bit of a hybrid. It also supported dim s as string, IIRC.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 03:16 • by Sam B (unregistered)
214307 in reply to 214296
Jim:
Sam B:

There's a point where if your satire or sarcasm is so veiled as to be undetectable, consistently, then it's just plain trolling.


It was plainly obvious that he was joking to us true top coders :) It was a materful troll and I'm glad it made people like you so grumpy.


Not grumpy :) I don't particularly care; after all, this is the internets, right? I enjoy debate, or putting an idiot in his place. If it turns out the idiot was a troll and I fell for it... *shrug* I'm over it.

The only reason it seemed plausible to me is because I've actually heard from serious people the same crap that "Top Cod3r" was spewing. And they were being serious. And it happened many times throughout my tenure as a programmer. So, Top Cod3r's stance wasn't beyond-a-shadow-of-a-doubt illegit.

Oh well. It's all fun and games, etc.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 03:57 • by Mr.'; Drop Database -- (unregistered)
214308 in reply to 214299
more randomer than you:

double possiblePrime = 1;
for(numFoundPrimes=0;numFoundPrimes<n;possiblePrime++) {
isPrime = false;
for(int prime : foundPrimes) {
if(possiblePrime/prime % 1 == 0) {
isPrime = false;
break;
}
}
if(isPrime) {
numFoundPrimes++;
foundPrimes.add(possiblePrime);
}
}
print(foundPrimes);
I sense a golf challenge coming on ...
primeFilter (p:ns) = p : primeFilter [n | n <- ns, n `mod` p /= 0]

allPrimes = primeFilter [2..]
main = do numPrimes <- readLn
print $ take numPrimes allPrimes

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 04:24 • by Tourist
214309 in reply to 214130
Chris:
int iValue;

... 20,000 lines later...

Oops, we need to handle more widgets than we expected. Make iValue a 'long'.

Now what do you do? Do you change every instance of 'iValue' to 'lValue'? How long will that take? Remember to include time for testing, documentation, etc. This may not even be possible, e.g., if this is in a published libraries used by others.


You call the variable nItem

Chris:

Then there's the whole 'far pointer to an array of pointers to functions expecting a string and an integer and returning nulls' prefix thang. (Oops, not the function takes a long!). Any meaningful prefix for that will be a nightmare to read -- "fpApfvSia[i++] = fpApfvSib[j++];" anyone?


ever heard of typedef's ?


Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 04:55 • by None given (unregistered)
214311 in reply to 214076
[quote user="John]
...
For those that think their knowledge of maths is excellent (myself included), have a look at this: http://xkcd.com/179/
My reaction was the exact same, and had to go to quickmath.com the verify it.
[/quote]

That's actually an inferior rewrite of what some consider to be the most beautiful equation in mathematics, involving only the constants pi, e, 0, i and 1.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 04:59 • by Robert Synnott (unregistered)
214312 in reply to 214071
"I like to start off with simple questions like the proper use of On Error Resume Next," - Answer: Don't use it, or a language which contains it. (I assume it died with classic VB[script], right?)

"and the importance of naming your variables with a prefix that tells you what type it is." - No value. Silly. Your IDE will tell you. Looks mad. Even Microsoft no longer seems to bother.

So, do I get the job? :)

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 05:14 • by Hatshepsut
... a pretty difficult, broad-scoped multiple choice quiz ... designed to gauge experience, not book smarts.


This sounds to me like a pretty ambitious goal. Can you provide some realistic example questions?

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 05:21 • by Robert Synnott (unregistered)
214314 in reply to 214294
6pac:

Not that ON ERROR RESUME NEXT isn't very useful in the right hands...


No it bloody isn't. Stop justifying absurd design decisions on their path. It's just bad and silly and wrong.

(I once did maintenance on some ASP classic code for a while. It wasn't very nice.)

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 05:30 • by Tepsifüles (unregistered)
214315 in reply to 214268
John Hardin:
140 tries? Geeze, what a lamer.

A multiple choice quiz with maximum (for example) five options per question, minimal feedback on the results (e.g. you got it right/wrong vs. telling you what the right answer is and why), and the same questions every time can be aced in at most five tries, even if you have zero knowledge of the subject matter...

If the minimal feedback consists only of the number of questions you got right/wrong and not which ones they were, then you would be very hard pressed to get all the questions right after 5 dummy runs. Granted, 140 tries is still excessive for any reasonably sized quiz (and getting only to 92% out of that), but it definitely requires some thinking to get the right answers in a small number of tries.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 05:39 • by Ville (unregistered)
214317 in reply to 214314
Robert Synnott:
6pac:

Not that ON ERROR RESUME NEXT isn't very useful in the right hands...


No it bloody isn't. Stop justifying absurd design decisions on their path. It's just bad and silly and wrong.

(I once did maintenance on some ASP classic code for a while. It wasn't very nice.)

Ok, so just out of curiosity, what is the big difference:

Try

SomeFileFiddlingFunction()
Catch ex As System.IO.FileNotFoundException
DoProperThingsForFileNotFound()
Catch ex As System.IO.InvalidDataException
DoProperThingsForInvalidData()
End Try


'vs

On Error Resume Next
SomeFileFiddlingFunction
Select Case Err.Number
Case 53 'File Not Found
DoProperThingsForFileNotFound
Case INVALID_DATA
DoProperThingsForInvalidData
End Select
On Error GoTo 0
[/code]

Obviously the above one looks nicer, but consider it isn't an option.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 06:25 • by fbjon
214320 in reply to 214168
Franz Kafka:

loosely typed languages need real HN even more - how are you supposed to know what variable x is supposed to be unless you tag it with something like name or amount?

Then why are you using a loosely typed language in the first place?

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 06:28 • by hikari
Well it does depend...on whether you're a pre-C19th mathematician or not.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 06:59 • by dkf
214326 in reply to 214320
fbjon:
Franz Kafka:
loosely typed languages need real HN even more - how are you supposed to know what variable x is supposed to be unless you tag it with something like name or amount?
Then why are you using a loosely typed language in the first place?
Unless you go completely overboard with the types in the first place (yes, I've seen this in Ada derivatives and I never want to again) then the type will only capture the operations that are legal on the value and not the purpose of the value. IDEs are great at showing types and terrible at conveying purposes, and yet it is the purpose of the value that is important. For example, if you have x and y coordinates, it's usually not a good idea to add them — unless you're applying a transformation matrix, of course — and yet they're naturally the same numeric type, and so addition is quite legal; spotting that sort of thing is a good use of purpose annotations. You can have similar things with strings. If you put the purpose of the variable in the name, it's much easier to use. And remember, you're allowed to use multiple letters for a purpose; cryptic single letter stuff makes Baby Jesus cry.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 07:12 • by Hans (unregistered)
214327 in reply to 214074
Moitah:
gabba:

Lots of WTFs here, but not in the ways the authors intended.


I agree with you. Today's WTFs aren't that great.


I agree as well. Today's comments aren't that great.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 07:27 • by Sellnosoup (unregistered)
lets see-

we had:
table
wood
printed on a sheet of paper

...Almost!!

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:02 • by Flagger (unregistered)
Lots of people don't know that 1 is prime. That's not a wtf at all, really. Prime numbers are just some definition. Most people can live just great without knowing it. Even programers.

The later wtf is really sad. For a good part of the text I thought the wtf would be that the test was quite lame. As it turns out someone showed how flawed it is for using a test to qualify someone and instead of thanking him, he only got ignored.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:03 • by KenW
214357 in reply to 214123
D. T. North:

And isn't that the root of everything coded by Microsoft?


Ahhh... The clearest possible sign that someone has no programming skills and no intelligence: the need to mindlessly and needlessly engage in Microsoft bashing.

Congratulations.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:06 • by KenW
214358 in reply to 214126
schaefer:
If the company's purpose was to find prime numbers I would be worried that the CEO didn't know that 1 was not prime.


However, if the CEO thought that the ability to calculate prime was important enough to use that as an interview question, you'd think he'd trouble himself to know the right answer, wouldn't you?

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:14 • by VP (unregistered)
214361 in reply to 214358
How I aced a online consultant test a couple years ago? Fired up ollydbg and paused the thread the app was running inn... Gave me more than the 2-5 mins per question. Hey if I can freeze a thread and use google to find it I sure as hell can find it via google at a job :P

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:22 • by KenW
214363 in reply to 214152
J B:
Seriously, you have an out of the box thinker.
Someone with potential, they hack away a bit - and you pass him up. You're an id10t.

Seriously wtf.


Seriously, you have an idiot who doesn't realize that cheating your way through a test doesn't make you an "out of the box thinker"; it makes you a liar and cheater.

I'd pass you up. You think that lying and cheating makes you a "hacker". You're a moron. (And on top of that, you can't spell, either - real intellect knows that there are no numbers in idiot, no matter how kewl you think it makes you look. We all still know you're a loser script kiddie.)

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:40 • by rick (unregistered)
214368 in reply to 214077
isn't that how the attorney general's office works?

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:41 • by rick (unregistered)
214369 in reply to 214077
Top Cod3r:
Vroomfundel:
Top Cod3r:
the importance of naming your variables with a prefix that tells you what type it is


WTF? Why don't you ask why Jesus is so much cooler than Buddha?


Because we aren't allowed to ask questions like that when hiring people. Someday if you interview candidates, your HR person will tell you what kinds of questions are not allowed to ask.


Isn't that how the attorney general's office hires people.

-sorry about the duplicate.

Re: It Depends & Too Good To Be True

2008-08-27 09:58 • by KenW
214376 in reply to 214218
Kev:
Kev:
... He used some 3rd party site that let him make the exam and send give him the results...


I should have mentioned that it was an english class. Not one of my strong subjects.


You might be doing better with it now if you hadn't cheated your way through it then. ;-)
« PrevPage 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5 | Page 6Next »

Add Comment