It's that time again! Please take a moment to check out the companies that sponsor us. Without them, there'd be no Daily WTF.

 

TDWTF Sponsors

BuildMaster   BuildMaster - an easy way to automate your build, deploy, and configuration process all the way through production. Basically, it's application lifecycle management the way it should be: platform neutral, process neutral, and tool neutral.
Comic Reader Mobi   Comic Reader Mobi - a mobile comic book reader for iPhone/Windows/Blackberry with smarts; the app can automatically detect the size of the text bubble and magnify only that text without needing to zoom in and out.
SoftLayer   SoftLayer - serious hosting provider with datacenters in three cities (Dallas, Seattle, DC) that has plans designed to scale from a single, dedicated server to your own virtual data center (complete with racks and all)
Mindfusion   MindFusion - a great source for flow-charting and diagramming components for a variety of platforms including .NET, WPF, ActiveX and Swing
Peer 1   Peer 1 - provides award-winning Managed Hosting, Dedicated Hosting, Co-location, and Network services offered through 15 data center across North America. With over 10,000 businesses hosted on their legendary SuperNetwork™backbone, PEER 1 delivers one of the highest server performance and network outputs in the industry.
SlickEdit   SlickEdit - makers of that very-impressive code editor and some pretty neat Eclipse and VisualStudio.NET tools and add-ins, some of which (Gadgets) are free. Check out this short video highlighting just one of SlickEdit's Visual Studio integration features.
SPN_NAME   StrataScale - their world-class Data Center is engineered to provide 99.999% availability of power, cooling, and network connectivity, and has N+2 redundancy. That's some serious business.

And now, back to our regularly, completely off-topic scheduled program.

 

Joe spotted this "binary abacus" at a local playground-

 

David Robinson spotted this advert running othe back of a bus.

 

"This documentationis from an Australian-built product called CitectSCADA, which has been in existence for decades," writes Justin, "two standard functions, AssWin() and AssPopUp(), are called to pass tags to a named custom-built object and display it on the screen as a pop-up or window."

 

And while we're being immature, Steve noted that he wasn't going to be trying this flavor of soup.

 

"This is the from the front cover of a manual for some backup software," Jeff notes, "and yes, yes they are!"

 

"I was installing a new outdoor thermometer when I noticed the 'warning' label on the plastic bag," Jack writes, "looks like someone copied the wrong paragraph from their contract."

 

"I found this truck here in Chile," Jote Correa wrote, "the (incomplete on the picture) phrase 'concretando futuro' is a word play on "concreto" (concrete) and means something like 'fulfilling the future'."

 

"The best (or worst) part is that it didn't even work," writes Vassili.

 

"Waitasec," Larry Garfield wondered, "if I tear the seal to open the box, my quality assurance is void? Fortunately, it's quite easy to open and re-seal the label without tearing it."

 

"This note came with a robot that one of my coworkers bought," Tom wrote, "apparently there's a bug with the software on the CD which, under certain conditions, causes the robot to malfunction and destroy all humans."

 

"This seems a bit high for null," Jason Sukut wrote, "$500... maybe $700 is my limit."

 

"I noticed this on my ruler while doing statistics today," writes Alex Manfred, "at least this was "made in U.S.A."

 

Corey spotted this poor translation at Target.