Human Heat Sink

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  • Meep 2013-02-05 08:06
    First "f*** I don't want to go to work today" post.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2013-02-05 08:06
    So TRWTF was that he needed to re-spackle the heat sink on his CPU?
  • Crash 2013-02-05 08:09
    My guess is that the last part implys that the DNA sequence they were working on was the presidents daughters. Perhaps the sequence will cure her or something?
  • Gizz 2013-02-05 08:10
    "Andrew," Steinbrenner said, "remember what I said about the president’s sick daughter?"

    No, I don't get it...
  • mike5 2013-02-05 08:10
    What about the sick daughter??!!!! The suspense is killing me!!
  • Giles Roadnight 2013-02-05 08:13
    Presumably the meeting was called off as the president wasn't going to be able to make it because of his daughter??
  • Caffeinated Cake 2013-02-05 08:16
    That's probably the reason, yes.
  • Bad Human 2013-02-05 08:19
    Maybe she died.
  • Tim 2013-02-05 08:21

    maybe she had some nasty infectious fatal disease - that has the same symptoms as Andrew has!
  • Tim 2013-02-05 08:22
    Bad Human:
    Maybe she died.

    that was my best guess
  • Sockatume 2013-02-05 08:29
    Good times. In 2004 I moved into a place with south-facing windows. To my chagrin I couldn't use my laptop in the day time, because at a temperate 22 celcius, thermal safety throttling would kick in and knock the CPU back into the stone age.

    (I later tore the thing open and subjected it to a good canned air treatment.)

    Only Andrew is a bad enough dude to etc. etc.
  • ubersoldat 2013-02-05 08:30
    Bad Human:
    Maybe she died.


    And that's why all the work he had done during the day was useless since they couldn't present it.
  • MrBester 2013-02-05 08:32
    Doesn't matter. He's still got the rest of the week off.
  • Remy Porter 2013-02-05 08:32
    Obviously, the President's daughter has run away to LA with a doomsday device. Now Andrew must don his eyepatch and go stop her.
  • toot 2013-02-05 08:37
    Another vote for "best guess is she died".
  • Caffeine 2013-02-05 08:38
    Ok... I don't get the WTF I must admit.
    PC overheating? Meh.
    PC overheating but dependent on which kitten he was processing? Huh?

    Daughter sick reference... unclear.

    I like to think that there is a correlation between the presidents daughter being sick and him being sick... ;-)
  • Caffeine 2013-02-05 08:40
    Caffeine:
    Ok... I don't get the WTF I must admit.
    PC overheating? Meh.
    PC overheating but dependent on which kitten he was processing? Huh?

    Daughter sick reference... unclear.

    I like to think that there is a correlation between the presidents daughter being sick and him being sick... ;-)


    Hmmm.... auto-correct or predictive text weirdness, but processing kittens rather than processing items actually sounds more interesting!
  • Ho Miscreant! 2013-02-05 08:41
    Remy Porter:
    Obviously, the President's daughter has run away to LA with a doomsday device. Now Andrew must don his eyepatch and go stop her.


    Andrew? Snake Plissken, surely.
  • Rnd( 2013-02-05 08:42
    No remote connect possible?
    Has to place desktop next to radiator?

    WTF is the WTF or is it the lack of WTF?
  • Nim 2013-02-05 08:45
    So, did the computer with all the results fall out the window?
  • WC 2013-02-05 08:56
    The real WTF is that they know the guy's in bed, feeling like dying, and they've just given him the rest of the week of. So they call him to tell him that his work was pointless? Great idea. Couldn't just tell him that next week or anything. Very important info.
  • A developer 2013-02-05 08:58
    I'd have to say that this was an entertaining short fiction story.
    The author was feeling creative.
    I think the sick daughter thing was made up so that he would get the job done.
  • imgx64 2013-02-05 09:01
    I've done something similar. The heatsink fan on a server died, so it couldn't even boot up without overheating. There was some data on the server that wasn't backed up, and I couldn't just put the hard disks in another computer because they were configured with hardware RAID in the motherboard (funny how redundancy made it easier to lose data). So I ended up putting the server on a cabinet right under the air conditioner, and directing all the cool air towards it. It worked long enough to retrieve the data.
  • Andrew 2013-02-05 09:03
    Worst punchline ever.

    So let me get this straight: a computer doing science had an overheating problem from being next to a heat source, so it was moved to a cold windowsill. All the while, the user was being nagged to get said science done. For all we know, it got done on time.

    Not a WTF.
  • Ross Patterson 2013-02-05 09:03
    TRWTF is Andrew saying "It's almost done" at 5:00 when he knows it's failing horribly. Come on, people, cut the bullsh*t out.
  • dgvid 2013-02-05 09:05
    Dr. Steinbrenner has been tasked with finding a cure for the president's daughter's illness. Steinbrenner hopes that the antigens in Andrew's blood are the answer, since Andrew's body was eventually able to fight off the "overheating issues." He needs Andrew to come into the lab to provide a blood sample and to begin sequencing his own antigens. "The cure must be in there somewhere, Andrew. Don't you see? Somehow, you're the key to all this!"

    Andrew agrees to come in, but first he asks the crucial question that ends up saving the girls life. "Are they, by any chance, keeping her next to a radiator?"
  • Rnd( 2013-02-05 09:09
    Oh, TRWTF was that it took him 8 hours to solve simple overheating issue...
  • QJo 2013-02-05 09:14
    The real WTF is that he is making such a fuss over a mere cold. Clearly not British.
  • QJo 2013-02-05 09:21
    Am I the only one to have expected the story to end with:

    "While he was on the phone to Stickybugger, listening with half an ear to the sob story about the boss's daughter's chipped nail varnish, a gust of wind caught Andrew's laptop, spiralling it off the windowsill and down into the murky depths of the (whatever smelly puddle his apartment opened out above). The results of the research were gone forever."

    ?
  • Destman 2013-02-05 09:23
    He probably got the cold from the president's daughter cause the were getting friendly and her dad figured it out. They wanted him to get the work done ASAP so they can fire him afterwards...
  • OldCoder 2013-02-05 09:26
    Rnd(:
    No remote connect possible?
    Has to place desktop next to radiator?

    WTF is the WTF or is it the lack of WTF?

    TRWTF is temperatures in Fahrenheit, am I right?

    Captcha: laoreet. I'm sure I visited there when I last played Elite...
  • emaNrouY-Here 2013-02-05 09:48
    "So, like, I heard you were sick. And, like, I'm sick, too. Maybe call me?"

    (I hate myself for having thought that.)
  • Planar 2013-02-05 09:49
    Rnd(:
    Oh, TRWTF was that it took him 8 hours to solve simple overheating issue...


    TRWTF is any OS/hardware combination that doesn't warn you about the overheating CPU.
  • RonBeck62 2013-02-05 10:17
    TRWTF is trying to do science in Java. If he wanted code portability without overheating his processor, he should have used C.
  • RichP 2013-02-05 10:24
    Tim:
    Bad Human:
    Maybe she died.

    that was my best guess


    People, come on, have some decency here!

    This is the intertubes, the correct question is: "did she died?"
  • cleavland_steamer 2013-02-05 10:42
    I'm pretty sure that the "WTF" is legitimate and would expressed verbally in exasperation after realizing he spent twice the time he needed all because he didn't think clearly enough to realize that his PC next to the radiator would get too hot...

    The daughter thing... no idea, I'll go with the consensus, she died while attempting some evil plot in LA and wearing an eye patch and a peg leg.
  • Robin 2013-02-05 10:42
    What's a Fahrenheit?
  • Neil 2013-02-05 10:48
    OldCoder:
    TRWTF is temperatures in Fahrenheit, am I right?
    I was hoping you would have saved me the trouble of converting 230°F to 110°C.
  • Fake nagesh 2013-02-05 11:05
    TRWTF is Java. Don't use it.

    RonBeck62:
    TRWTF is trying to do science in Java. If he wanted code portability without overheating his processor, he should have used C.
  • GvS 2013-02-05 11:09
    Andrew is the president's daughter?
  • Jazz 2013-02-05 11:15
    Caffeine:
    Caffeine:
    PC overheating but dependent on which kitten he was processing?

    Hmmm.... auto-correct or predictive text weirdness, but processing kittens rather than processing items actually sounds more interesting!


    Agreed, I enjoy processing kittens... ;-)
  • Roby McAndrew 2013-02-05 11:19
    More interesting, which President? As Java is mentioned, it must be >= 1995. I'm guessing not Bush as he believes that science is the work of Satan.
  • airdrik 2013-02-05 11:21
    Fake nagesh:
    TRWTF is Java. Don't use it.

    RonBeck62:
    TRWTF is trying to do science in Java. If he wanted code portability without overheating his processor, he should have used C.

    But The Oracle fixed all of the security problems, so it's ok now.
  • AverageJon 2013-02-05 11:24
    ... and what's with the midnight deadline? Committees never meet until at least 9am.
  • C-Derb 2013-02-05 11:29
    TRWTF is that we're supposed to believe that Andrew only thought of the overheating problem after opening the window to throw his phone out the window.

    I'm fine with the idea of him opening the window and realizing he was overheating the place. I'm fine with him having the thought that he should chuck his phone out the window to avoid further phone calls. But that he would entertain that thought far enough to open the window??

    I call shenanigans on the author.
  • Mike 2013-02-05 11:39
    Or the boss was accusing the guy of getting sick because he was with the president's daughter? I got dibs on Chesela Clinton :)
  • Jano 2013-02-05 11:41
    Roby McAndrew:
    More interesting, which President? As Java is mentioned, it must be >= 1995. I'm guessing not Bush as he believes that science is the work of Satan.
    Misrepresent much? In truth, he merely thinks the taxpayers should not be forced to pay for supporting the work of Satan.
  • Carl 2013-02-05 11:42
    Yeah, the story was so buried in reminders that Andrew was sick, I kinda lost the flow of what was really going on.

    Plus, I too totally don't get how the daughter fits in.
  • Ironside 2013-02-05 11:54
    "Andrew," Steinbrenner said, "remember what I said about the president’s sick daughter?"

    "She's mutated Andrew. What the hell did you do to those DNA sequences?", Steinbrenner stammered.

    "They're coming for you Andrew" finished Steinbrenner before hanging up the phone.

    Andrew leaned back and laughed. For he had been secretly working for the reptilians all along.
  • chubertdev 2013-02-05 12:02
    Andrew is really Andrea, the (former) daughter of the president who is suffering from amnesia (and the common cold) after a botched gender reassignment surgery. (S)he has to find the cure for his/her own disease, although (s)he doesn't know it. Even worse, the disease is caused by a foreign object accidentally implanted in his/her body during his surgery, and (s)he only has until midnight to fix it. Also, this story was written by M. Night Shamahimallamalayan.
  • Christopher 2013-02-05 12:06
    Ironside:
    "She's mutated Andrew. What the hell did you do to those DNA sequences?", Steinbrenner stammered.

    How did she mutate Andrew?? Commas are your friend!
  • muphry 2013-02-05 12:17
    Christopher:
    Ironside:
    "She's mutated Andrew. What the hell did you do to those DNA sequences?", Steinbrenner stammered.

    How did she mutate Andrew?? Commas are your friend!

    It certainly are.
  • neminem 2013-02-05 12:30
    C-Derb:
    TRWTF is that we're supposed to believe that Andrew only thought of the overheating problem after opening the window to throw his phone out the window.

    I'm fine with the idea of him opening the window and realizing he was overheating the place. I'm fine with him having the thought that he should chuck his phone out the window to avoid further phone calls. But that he would entertain that thought far enough to open the window??

    I call shenanigans on the author.


    I'm more fine with that setup, given that we have a person who is clearly not in their right mind, after working all day and night while still somewhat sick with a cold. I've done some pretty dumb things while sleep-depped and sick (mostly involving saying "yes I am totally better now, now let me go to this party and be all active until I crash horribly", but still.)

    I'm just sad that I'm apparently the only one who, upon hearing the phrase "the president's daughter" repeated all thread, can't help but think that clearly the president's daughter was kidnapped by ninjas, and Andrew should really be asking himself whether he's a bad enough dude to rescue her.
  • jay 2013-02-05 12:34
    Roby McAndrew:
    More interesting, which President? As Java is mentioned, it must be >= 1995. I'm guessing not Bush as he believes that science is the work of Satan.


    Oh brother. Yes, Bush refused to accept the modern idea of "science", namely, anything said by someone who calls himself a scientist and which serves the political ends of powerful interest groups. He had this silly idea that he wanted to actually see some, you know, actual experimental evidence before taking drastic action.

    Funny how today anyone who asks to see the evidence rather than blindly accepting everything he is told by "the experts" is labeled "anti-science".

    Oh, and in his notorious stem cell decision, he said that when a scientist demands that the government fund his research, after all private sources of funding have dried up because he was unable to produce any results after years of work and billions spent, that the government might look at what he's actually doing before just signing a check. And that moral considerations might be taken into account when deciding what research to fund. Yes, crazy ideas. Obviously anyone who calls himself a scientist is above petty considerations like "morals". If a scientist says that it is more convenient for his research if he is allowed to kidnap people and torture them to death for his experiments, no one has the right to question that, because he's a scientist, right?

    I don't particularly like most of Mr Bush's policies, but this "anti-science" argument is just silly.

    And by the way, the "president" of the story is surely the president of the company and not of the nation.
  • Y_F 2013-02-05 12:35
    ♪ And the science gets done ♫
    ♬ And you make some neat notes ♩
    ♪ Only if you manage to... stay alive! ♫
  • jay 2013-02-05 12:38
    Neil:
    OldCoder:
    TRWTF is temperatures in Fahrenheit, am I right?
    I was hoping you would have saved me the trouble of converting 230°F to 110°C.


    It must be very confusing living in Europe. If you want to get a feel for even a simple thing like whether your car gets good fuel economy, you have to convert liters to gallons, then you have to convert kilometers to miles, and finally you have to convert Euros to real money. :-)
  • jay 2013-02-05 12:39
    RichP:
    Tim:
    Bad Human:
    Maybe she died.

    that was my best guess


    People, come on, have some decency here!

    This is the intertubes, the correct question is: "did she died?"


    I think you mean, "Am she bees done deaded?"
  • Rich 2013-02-05 12:40
    Little known to Andrew, the DNA sequencer was also a DNA replicator. The president had been secretly funding the research in order to get his daughter cloned, but modified slightly so that she didn't look so much like Chelsea Clinton.

    Unfortunately the first round of treatments on the daughter unleashed a wildly virulent horrible new disease of a class and category never before encountered by the human race. Also, those working in proximity to the sequencer/replicator were prone to infection from the odd bits that fell out and became airborne.

    Humanity's last hope was dashed when Andrew opened the window, allowing chaos to escape. But at least he got a breath of fresh air, clearing his head just long enough to appreciate the demons he had unleashed.

    See what happens when you let grad students putty their own CPU heat sinks?
  • Rick 2013-02-05 12:41
    So, the real WTF is that the president doesn't have a daughter, it was just something the prof made up to get his results faster?
  • ckrash 2013-02-05 12:45
    Imperial or US liquid gallons?

    Ever wonder why the same car sold in the US and Europe have different MPG ratings?
  • Cato 2013-02-05 12:57
    Peer-reviewed science has degenerated into pal-reviewed political correctness, unavoidably biased to scare the taxpayers into coughing up perpetual grant funding.

    That's how we got the whole "global warming" hysteria, which inconveniently had to be renamed "climate change" when the globe stubbornly refused to get warm enough to decimate everything.

    "Climate change" in itself is a blatantly absurd term, since it implies that nothing should ever be allowed to change at all, anywhere.

    Did you know that the tectonic plates are still moving? And the big island of Hawaii continues to grow with every eruption, entirely devoid of Congressional approval?
  • Destman 2013-02-05 13:12
    ckrash:
    Imperial or US liquid gallons?

    Ever wonder why the same car sold in the US and Europe have different MPG ratings?


    Slightly different gas, and different emissions restrictions (thus more/less restrictive catalyzer).
  • B00nbuster 2013-02-05 13:30
    TRWTF is that he didn't immediatelly recognize that the crash was due to overheating.

    If my PC keeps crashing (and it must have rebooted, because that's the symptom of overheating!) under CPU load this would be my first suspect! I have yet to see a JVM that causes a rebooting crash. Bluescreen at most. But a rebooting crash??!

    TRWTF is that the poor ill guy was just inexperienced.
  • pdwalker 2013-02-05 13:38
    Not really.

    The guy was sick, with a fever. He was cold. Why would he notice the room was overheated?

    When you're sick with flu, your brain also doesn't work as well.

    (The last line is a mystery though)
  • chubertdev 2013-02-05 13:39
    ckrash:
    Imperial or US liquid gallons?


    "I don't know that! Ahhhhhhhhh!"
  • Martin 2013-02-05 13:41
    This must have been one of the few times where Windows were useful during a virus infection.
  • Mort 2013-02-05 13:53
    Bad Human:
    Maybe she died.


    Well, the title is "Human Heat Sink." Apparently she's cold now and taking the heat off of Andrew at work.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2013-02-05 13:55
    +1s all around for all these "alternate" endings to the story!

    "So, about the president's daughter," Steinbrenner said, "the rabbit died."
  • gravis 2013-02-05 13:56
    The real WTF is management enforcing deadlines based on personal schedule, while making it sound that the company would otherwise collapse (or something). Usually, at the end, when the project doesn't get completed by the deadline, the employees working their ass of 60-80 hours per week (on short notice and without extra pay or time-off in future) discover that cruel truth: that some slime of a manager volunteered the whole group to work harder only for personal gain (bonus, points, recognition), while the top boss couldn't care less (whether January or Match, it's all the same to him).

    In this story, the employee working hard is, obviously, Andrew; the slime manager is, obviously, Dr. Steinbrenner; the president (with sick daughter) probably didn't even as little as suggest the original deadline, but simply accepted the meeting invite for the demo, sent by the ass-kisser Dr. Steinbrenner.
  • gravis 2013-02-05 14:00
    gravis:
    The real WTF is management enforcing deadlines based on personal schedule, while making it sound that the company would otherwise collapse (or something). Usually, at the end, when the project doesn't get completed by the deadline, the employees working their ass of 60-80 hours per week (on short notice and without extra pay or time-off in future) discover that cruel truth: that some slime of a manager volunteered the whole group to work harder only for personal gain (bonus, points, recognition), while the top boss couldn't care less (whether January or Match, it's all the same to him).

    In this story, the employee working hard is, obviously, Andrew; the slime manager is, obviously, Dr. Steinbrenner; the president (with sick daughter) probably didn't even as little as suggest the original deadline, but simply accepted the meeting invite for the demo, sent by the ass-kisser Dr. Steinbrenner.



    ... and, yeah - the president's daughter is still too sick for him to even show up on that demo-meeting, which proves the point that he really doesn't care about the "when" too much. The sad part is that he'll probably never know the true extent to which his direct ass-kissing management staff is whipping his bottom-layer employees, and usually for reasons that aren't for general company's benefit (like I said, it's mostly about bonus, promotion, or similar).

    I've seen that numerous times (and have been a bottom-layer victim of).
  • zelmak 2013-02-05 14:18
    Odd, I was under the impression that the setting was more along the lines of a university research lab. The president was the president of the university.

    "lab mentor"

    "research notes"

    "etc"

    I've seen Profs who were slave drivers for students to finish their research papers just so they could get them upchanneled and approved for some high-falutin' trade conference or scholastic research talk.

    And the Prof assigns his/her name to it as mark of prestige to the report as well as the prof gets a +1 to "published".
  • Ralph 2013-02-05 14:25
    Martin:
    This must have been one of the few times where Windows were useful during a virus infection.
    Windows is always very helpful with a virus infection.
  • Uni brat 2013-02-05 14:32
    zelmak:
    the Prof assigns his/her name to it as mark of prestige to the report as well as the prof gets a +1 to "published".
    At least in the branch of science where I hung out for a while, it was well known (across all Universities etc.) that the First Author was the big wig high profile name who would get all the credit, while those whose names were near the end of the list actually did all the work.

    As in: Einstein, et al, 1947

    This system was self correcting to some extent -- if you wanted to follow up on some interesting research you contact, and work with, one of the lesser names. Everyone knew where the real knowledge came from.
  • Rootbeer 2013-02-05 14:33
    Nim:
    So, did the computer with all the results fall out the window?


    Yes, and it hit the president's daughter.
  • Renault 2013-02-05 14:38
    Feeling colder than ever, from opening the window, Andrew sat on the radiator.

    "What's that strange smell?" he wondered a moment later.
  • operagost 2013-02-05 14:39
    First of all, you don't turn up the heat on a hot-water system by directly manipulating the radiator. Second, your system will crash way before it hits 230 degrees F. I don't know of any CPUs that will survive exceeding the boiling point of water.
  • operagost 2013-02-05 14:43
    Roby McAndrew:
    More interesting, which President? As Java is mentioned, it must be >= 1995. I'm guessing not Bush as he believes that science is the work of Satan.
    And that must be why he provided federal funding for stem cell research, which Clinton wouldn't do. And he increased funding for AIDS research. So basically, he just poked around the edges like every moderately socialist president.
  • Anonymous 2013-02-05 14:44
    operagost:
    First of all, you don't turn up the heat on a hot-water system by directly manipulating the radiator. Second, your system will crash way before it hits 230 degrees F. I don't know of any CPUs that will survive exceeding the boiling point of water.


    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=thermostatic+radiator+valve
  • Soviut 2013-02-05 14:53
    Crash:
    My guess is that the last part implys that the DNA sequence they were working on was the presidents daughters. Perhaps the sequence will cure her or something?


    No, the president's daughter was sick and got the president sick so the meeting was probably canceled as a result. Meaning the rush job was in vain.

    Also, I'm fairly certain they mean "president of the funding committee" not "president of the united states".
  • Paul 2013-02-05 14:59
    Soviut:
    Also, I'm fairly certain they mean "president of the funding committee" not "president of the united states".
    There's a difference?

    I thought if we could only get our heads together long enough to elect the right person, he/she would just hand out limitless gobs of cash to everybody and we would all be rich. It is only a few stupid but powerful angry people -- racists, too -- who stand in the way, spoiling it for all of us.
  • WhiskeyJack 2013-02-05 15:20
    I've had similar experiences at work, as have probably most people.

    One time I was working on a new feature just before Canada Day (think Fourth of July, you Americans). And just before I was going on vacation. I was told that my boss wanted to demo this the week after to a potential customer in Japan, and it had to be done. Period.

    OK, so I put in all kinds of overtime that week, including working the whole day on Canada Day. Delayed my vacation by a day too. Got it done. Sent off the code along with instructions on how to install and run it on the laptop they were taking with them to Japan. Then took off for a well-deserved rest.

    When I got back, I asked how the demo went, and if the customer was impressed with the new feature. "Oh, that? We didn't have time to show them."
  • chubertdev 2013-02-05 15:21
    Soviut:
    Also, I'm fairly certain they mean "president of the funding committee" not "president of the united states".


    I'm pretty sure it's President of Earth, Richard Nixon's head.
  • smxlong 2013-02-05 16:11
    TRWTF is placing so much importance on a deadline to the level of the exact minute that people are forced to work while deliriously sick, using computers which are overheating.

    If I found out that critical results had been computed on a computer that was repeatedly crashing, and the process had been monitored by somebody who was sick to the point of almost hallucinating, I think I'd chuck those results right out the aforementioned window. Getting the wrong results on time is no better than getting no result at all.

  • Lorne Kates 2013-02-05 16:15
    About the president's daughter...


    "After running the DNA tests, it turns out the president's daughter is also his mother. We're handing this one over the Quantum lab guys."
  • chubertdev 2013-02-05 16:29
    I got it. President's daughter. DNA sequencing. This is obviously for the Maury Povich show.
  • Herp 2013-02-05 16:32
    0/10. Would not bang.

    Captcha: I <i>saluto</i> you for trying!
  • ullamcorper 2013-02-05 16:34
    TFA:
    "Andrew," Steinbrenner said, "remember what I said about the president’s sick daughter?"

    Until this line is explained, I will maintain this as a work of fiction.

    Disgusting. This used to be a site with legitimate WTFs.
  • draco malfoy 2013-02-05 16:34
    Dr. Steinbrenner called once again: "Is it safe?"
  • Evan 2013-02-05 17:00
    Uni brat:
    At least in the branch of science where I hung out for a while, it was well known (across all Universities etc.) that the First Author was the big wig high profile name who would get all the credit, while those whose names were near the end of the list actually did all the work.

    It's interesting, because in CS it seems to usually be the opposite. (I say "usually", but this isn't a scientific measure; it just seems to be true a ton.) The first author is the grad student that did the actual work, and then the adviser tacks his or her name on the end.

    It's not universally true, but it's definitely a common case.
  • Evan 2013-02-05 17:02
    [quote user="Evan"]I should also say that I say "did the actual work" a bit tongue-in-cheek; adviser input is pretty invaluable, and at least for a while you probably wouldn't be able to do it without them.
  • F***-it Fred 2013-02-05 17:02
    And then the poor bastard discovered that his overheated CPU had calculated everything wrong and rendered all that work useless.
  • Coyne 2013-02-05 17:16
    Soviut:
    Crash:
    My guess is that the last part implys that the DNA sequence they were working on was the presidents daughters. Perhaps the sequence will cure her or something?


    No, the president's daughter was sick and got the president sick so the meeting was probably canceled as a result. Meaning the rush job was in vain.

    Also, I'm fairly certain they mean "president of the funding committee" not "president of the united states".


    That was my guess, too.

    When one thinks "dysfunctional organization" (which clearly is not like any organization any of the other readers works for) then one knows that artificial deadlines are a fact of life.

    The key word in "artificial deadline" is "artificial". As in manufactured; as opposed to something arising naturally.

    So the president's daughter was sick, and possibly the president, too. So he informed the committee that formed the funding committee, and the funding committee, that he would not be able to meet at the time designated...the self-same time that set the artificial deadline.

    Since neither committee can meet without the president, the meeting had to be deferred. So the artificial deadline is deferred.

    Which means that Andrew "died" for nothing...
  • Coyne 2013-02-05 17:25
    Coyne:
    Soviut:
    Crash:
    My guess is that the last part implys that the DNA sequence they were working on was the presidents daughters. Perhaps the sequence will cure her or something?


    No, the president's daughter was sick and got the president sick so the meeting was probably canceled as a result. Meaning the rush job was in vain.

    Also, I'm fairly certain they mean "president of the funding committee" not "president of the united states".


    That was my guess, too.

    When one thinks "dysfunctional organization" (which clearly is not like any organization any of the other readers works for) then one knows that artificial deadlines are a fact of life.

    The key word in "artificial deadline" is "artificial". As in manufactured; as opposed to something arising naturally.

    So the president's daughter was sick, and possibly the president, too. So he informed the committee that formed the funding committee, and the funding committee, that he would not be able to meet at the time designated...the self-same time that set the artificial deadline.

    Since neither committee can meet without the president, the meeting had to be deferred. So the artificial deadline is deferred.

    Which means that Andrew "died" for nothing...


    Oh, and then there's the rest of the story...

    Remember how Dr. Steinbrenner started out by mentioning the, "...explanation about the president's daughter..."?

    My guess is that he already knew the funding committee meeting was cancelled. He sounds like the type of boss who likes to, "See what his people [aka "slaves"] are made of."

    So my guess is that the phone rang at 7:18 AM the next morning: "Andrew, can you...?"
  • chubertdev 2013-02-05 17:28
    Coyne:
    So my guess is that the phone rang at 7:18 AM the next morning: "Andrew, can you...?"


    "...pick this phone up out of the snow bank that you threw it in?"
  • Matt Westwood 2013-02-05 18:03
    Cato:
    Did you know that ... the big island of Hawaii continues to grow with every eruption ...?


    Sheesh, that's seriously bad news. That means the US is actually growing in size. That's the very last thing the universe needs.

    Looks like a job for Chuck Norris: plug them damn volcanos!
  • Jasmine 2013-02-05 18:12
    My guess is it was the President's daughter who initially turned up the heat in the lab.
  • danixdefcon5 2013-02-05 18:18
    jay:
    Neil:
    OldCoder:
    TRWTF is temperatures in Fahrenheit, am I right?
    I was hoping you would have saved me the trouble of converting 230°F to 110°C.


    It must be very confusing living in Europe. If you want to get a feel for even a simple thing like whether your car gets good fuel economy, you have to convert liters to gallons, then you have to convert kilometers to miles, and finally you have to convert Euros to real money. :-)
    hehehe. Its actually easier to deal with ºC and kms, especially as you don't need to memorize uneven multipliers. Everything's metric!
  • Bill C. 2013-02-05 18:27
    Mike:
    Or the boss was accusing the guy of getting sick because he was with the president's daughter? I got dibs on Chesela Clinton :)
    Yes she's hot, isn't she? Thank you for posting that so people wouldn't call me a pervert for noticing that myself.
  • Evan 2013-02-05 18:39
    danixdefcon5:
    hehehe. Its actually easier to deal with ºC and kms, especially as you don't need to memorize uneven multipliers. Everything's metric!
    kms I will give you without any dispute at all. My mind has been warped with time and I now need to do mental conversions to make sense of metric, but it really does make better sense.

    But the best quote I've seen about Fahrenheit is that it is a "wonderfully human temperature scale: 0 degrees is too damn cold, and 100 degrees is too damn hot," and I will defend it. The 0/100 marks of Celsius are not much less arbitrary than Fahrenheit. How often do I -- or anyone, really -- need to know what temperature water boils at? If I want to know whether my water is boiling, I wait until I hear bubbling, not put a thermometer in it. Even 0 degrees is pretty useless -- the only day-to-day use I can think of is guessing how much I need to worry about ice on the roads (though the sun kind of kills that). And what kind of conversions do you need to do with temperature? I don't think I've ever heard someone talk about millidegrees or kilodegrees; and those measurements would work just as well with Fahrenheit as with Celsius.

    Maybe I'm biased by location, but Fahrenheit is way better for actual, day-to-day use. Why do I say location? Because where I am, Fahrenheit actually comes really close to capturing the temperatures that I experience over the course of a year! We have a few days each year with a low around -10 and a high around 0. We have a couple days each year with a high around 100. Boom. Practical.
  • Norman Diamond 2013-02-05 18:46
    operagost:
    First of all, you don't turn up the heat on a hot-water system by directly manipulating the radiator.
    I did. Though after the valve was fully open, I couldn't turn the heat up any further.
    operagost:
    Second, your system will crash way before it hits 230 degrees F. I don't know of any CPUs that will survive exceeding the boiling point of water.
    I don't know of any CPUs that depend on water. Some cooling systems put heat sinks in water instead of air but the CPU doesn't know that. Most cooling systems use air. The CPU works fine when hotter than the boiling points of nitrogen, oxygen, etc.
  • Ben 2013-02-05 18:48
    Wait, so your argument is that because you don't need to know precise numbers, that the Fahrenheit system is better for day to day use?

    Following that logic, wouldn't the best system for day to day use be "Hot, Cold" and some modifiers such as "Really" and "Extremely"?

    Do you know what else comes really close to capturing the temperatures we experience? Literally any scale that can be used to measure it.
  • chubertdev 2013-02-05 19:35
    Ben:
    Wait, so your argument is that because you don't need to know precise numbers, that the Fahrenheit system is better for day to day use?

    Following that logic, wouldn't the best system for day to day use be "Hot, Cold" and some modifiers such as "Really" and "Extremely"?

    Do you know what else comes really close to capturing the temperatures we experience? Literally any scale that can be used to measure it.


    "Today's high will be Don't Stick Your Hand In That Toaster."
  • Coyne 2013-02-05 20:21
    Ben:
    Wait, so your argument is that because you don't need to know precise numbers, that the Fahrenheit system is better for day to day use?

    Following that logic, wouldn't the best system for day to day use be "Hot, Cold" and some modifiers such as "Really" and "Extremely"?

    Do you know what else comes really close to capturing the temperatures we experience? Literally any scale that can be used to measure it.


    Neither system is really convenient, when you come right down to it (though I like the idea behind the quote above about 0 F being too cold and 100 F too hot)

    I vote for a system where 00 is freezing and 10 is boiling, and room temperature is around 00.0111. Don't we all agree that would be much more convenient?
  • Gigaplex 2013-02-05 20:36
    Coyne:
    Ben:
    Wait, so your argument is that because you don't need to know precise numbers, that the Fahrenheit system is better for day to day use?

    Following that logic, wouldn't the best system for day to day use be "Hot, Cold" and some modifiers such as "Really" and "Extremely"?

    Do you know what else comes really close to capturing the temperatures we experience? Literally any scale that can be used to measure it.


    Neither system is really convenient, when you come right down to it (though I like the idea behind the quote above about 0 F being too cold and 100 F too hot)

    I vote for a system where 00 is freezing and 10 is boiling, and room temperature is around 00.0111. Don't we all agree that would be much more convenient?

    Freezing? Boiling? Of hydrogen?
  • jt 2013-02-05 20:56
    Supposedly a design goal of the Fahrenheit was that temperatures below 0 would be unusual (avoiding those "tricky" negative numbers), and that for "usual" temperatures you wouldn't need to use decimals to get enough precision. Hence 0-100 represent roughly the range of temperatures you get in Europe. The precise values were chosen so that the resulting thermometers would be easy to make and calibrate; 0 and 32 are easy to get reference points for, and making 32 even divisions is easy to do.

    Celsius isn't really a sensible unit; for real scientific work you'd want degrees Kelvin, and for everyday use it requires you to use fractional degrees.
  • Evan 2013-02-05 21:08
    operagost:
    First of all, you don't turn up the heat on a hot-water system by directly manipulating the radiator.
    Um, in my first long-term apartment, you did.

    That was our control over our heat.

    Ben:
    Wait, so your argument is that because you don't need to know precise numbers, that the Fahrenheit system is better for day to day use?

    Following that logic, wouldn't the best system for day to day use be "Hot, Cold" and some modifiers such as "Really" and "Extremely"?
    Um, that wasn't my argument at all. My argument was that the specific numbers the Celsius scale is anchored at -- the melting and boiling point of water -- are not important. Using "very hot" is a problem because it would either not be an absolute scale ("very hot" to me is quite different from "very hot" to someone who lives in Florida) or it would overload the terms like "hot" (more and in more confusing ways than they already are).

    Do you know what else comes really close to capturing the temperatures we experience? Literally any scale that can be used to measure it.
    Coyne's response is best. 0-100 is more convenient than -15 to 40 for similar reasons to why "0.011 is room temperature" is less convenient.

    jt:
    Celsius isn't really a sensible unit; for real scientific work you'd want degrees Kelvin, and for everyday use it requires you to use fractional degrees.
    Eh, I disagree on that last one. 1 deg C is about 2 deg F.
  • Evan 2013-02-05 21:09
    Evan:
    jt:
    Celsius isn't really a sensible unit; for real scientific work you'd want degrees Kelvin, and for everyday use it requires you to use fractional degrees.
    Eh, I disagree on that last one. 1 deg C is about 2 deg F.

    Ooops, I forgot to finish my thought. How often in everyday use do you have to care about the difference between, say, 70 and 71 degrees? I'm not even sure I'd be able to feel the difference (though sometimes I think I would). I don't think "everyday use" for most people requires the resolution that Fahrenheit provides.
  • russ 2013-02-05 21:26
    Evan:
    Evan:
    jt:
    Celsius isn't really a sensible unit; for real scientific work you'd want degrees Kelvin, and for everyday use it requires you to use fractional degrees.
    Eh, I disagree on that last one. 1 deg C is about 2 deg F.

    Ooops, I forgot to finish my thought. How often in everyday use do you have to care about the difference between, say, 70 and 71 degrees? I'm not even sure I'd be able to feel the difference (though sometimes I think I would). I don't think "everyday use" for most people requires the resolution that Fahrenheit provides.



    I know I can tell the difference between 72 and 74 degrees. 72 being the sweet spot for office temperature and 74 being too damn hot.
  • Norman Diamond 2013-02-05 23:04
    Coyne:
    I vote for a system where 00 is freezing and 10 is boiling, and room temperature is around 00.0111. Don't we all agree that would be much more convenient?
    That would work in decigrade. Remember that Celsius used to be called centigrade. Freezing is still 0. Boiling is 10 instead of 100. Room temperature in our kitchen when Vista died is 0.0111 instead of 0.111. It works.

    (We kept Vista in a bowl on the kitchen table. Vista came from the tropics and failed to adjust to Japanese winters. Vista got her name because I was installing another betta in a PC when we got her.)
  • Scarlet Manuka 2013-02-05 23:31
    operagost:
    Second, your system will crash way before it hits 230 degrees F. I don't know of any CPUs that will survive exceeding the boiling point of water.

    My PC started having trouble booting up a month or two back. I went into the BIOS setup to check the CPU temperature (yes, TRWTF is that that's the only place I can see it) and found it was 104 degrees C. Vacuumed all the dust off the CPU fan and elsewhere, rebooted and watched the CPU temperature drop to 35 degrees C. No problems since.
    F***-it Fred:
    And then the poor bastard discovered that his overheated CPU had calculated everything wrong and rendered all that work useless.

    I thought something similar to this also. But really there are two options:
    (i) He realises that the previous results were likely to be affected by the CPU overheating and recalculates them later in the week. Noboy actually needed the data before then anyway and all is well.
    (ii) It doesn't occur to him that the calculations should be redone. Everyone accepts the results because they don't know what they were supposed to be (that's why they wanted to do the calculations). The resulting errors eventually show up as limitations of certain medical techniques, but nobody ever realises where the problem really lies.
  • IV 2013-02-06 00:14
    jt:
    Supposedly a design goal of the Fahrenheit was that temperatures below 0 would be unusual (avoiding those "tricky" negative numbers), and that for "usual" temperatures you wouldn't need to use decimals to get enough precision. Hence 0-100 represent roughly the range of temperatures you get in Europe. The precise values were chosen so that the resulting thermometers would be easy to make and calibrate; 0 and 32 are easy to get reference points for, and making 32 even divisions is easy to do.

    Celsius isn't really a sensible unit; for real scientific work you'd want degrees Kelvin, and for everyday use it requires you to use fractional degrees.


    That isn't what I always heard. 100 degrees was supposed to be human body temperature. Somehow that got screwed up. I don't know if that was bad measurement initially or with copying the work later. 0 degrees was supposed to be as cold as it ever got - determined by sending a ship as far north from England as it could get and returning with the resulting measurement. So 32 is an accident, as is the size of the steps.

    Let me go check Wikipedia to see which of us is correct. If it is you, I will change the article. Wither way, I will continue on my merry way knowing that people who check it out after I do will agree with me.
  • DaveK 2013-02-06 00:22
    jay:
    RichP:
    Tim:
    Bad Human:
    Maybe she died.

    that was my best guess

    People, come on, have some decency here!

    This is the intertubes, the correct question is: "did she died?"


    I think you mean, "Am she bees done deaded?"
    ITYM, "She an heroed".
  • hikari 2013-02-06 00:32
    operagost:
    First of all, you don't turn up the heat on a hot-water system by directly manipulating the radiator. Second, your system will crash way before it hits 230 degrees F. I don't know of any CPUs that will survive exceeding the boiling point of water.


    You sort of do; at least here (UK) radiators have a valve on them which lets you control the flow of hot water to them. The actual temperature of the water is controlled by the boiler, of course.
  • Soviut 2013-02-06 02:49
    Paul:
    Soviut:
    Also, I'm fairly certain they mean "president of the funding committee" not "president of the united states".
    There's a difference?

    I thought if we could only get our heads together long enough to elect the right person, he/she would just hand out limitless gobs of cash to everybody and we would all be rich. It is only a few stupid but powerful angry people -- racists, too -- who stand in the way, spoiling it for all of us.


    You're right, southern america needs to go!
  • Soviut 2013-02-06 02:51
    WhiskeyJack:
    I've had similar experiences at work, as have probably most people.

    One time I was working on a new feature just before Canada Day (think Fourth of July, you Americans). And just before I was going on vacation. I was told that my boss wanted to demo this the week after to a potential customer in Japan, and it had to be done. Period.

    OK, so I put in all kinds of overtime that week, including working the whole day on Canada Day. Delayed my vacation by a day too. Got it done. Sent off the code along with instructions on how to install and run it on the laptop they were taking with them to Japan. Then took off for a well-deserved rest.

    When I got back, I asked how the demo went, and if the customer was impressed with the new feature. "Oh, that? We didn't have time to show them."


    And you said, "I worked overtime, delayed my vacation and worked my ass off to get it done, why didn't you do your part, asshole?", right?
  • mugo 2013-02-06 03:36
    > restarted the VM

    Is he running java in virtual machine?
  • C10B 2013-02-06 04:04
    That has to be the most boring thing I've ever read on this increasingly boring website. Why do we have to have the stories embellished like a Mills and fuc|<ing Boon novel?
  • QJo 2013-02-06 04:05
    Soviut:
    WhiskeyJack:
    I've had similar experiences at work, as have probably most people.

    One time I was working on a new feature just before Canada Day (think Fourth of July, you Americans). And just before I was going on vacation. I was told that my boss wanted to demo this the week after to a potential customer in Japan, and it had to be done. Period.

    OK, so I put in all kinds of overtime that week, including working the whole day on Canada Day. Delayed my vacation by a day too. Got it done. Sent off the code along with instructions on how to install and run it on the laptop they were taking with them to Japan. Then took off for a well-deserved rest.

    When I got back, I asked how the demo went, and if the customer was impressed with the new feature. "Oh, that? We didn't have time to show them."


    And you said, "I worked overtime, delayed my vacation and worked my ass off to get it done, why didn't you do your part, asshole?", right?


    Can be frustrating, but I've been in similar situations, and it is often the case that the (potential) customer (who drives the agenda of this stuff) has completely forgotten the suggestion he made at last meeting ("Those buttons look boring, can you make them into little animated can-can dancers? Oh, and we want it to play the intro to the movie Die Hard 2, but you'll have to fix it so that you don't violate any copyrights ...") and instead says, "Hey, I've got a great idea, how about if you ..." and expresses no interest in what's been done from last meeting.

    This is exceptionally a problem when there are multiple stakeholders, none of whom turn up to all of these pre-sales meetings, and so none of them know the whole story. Not only that, but all of them have a different list of priorities - so it's frequently the case that the work you did to satisfy Stakeholder 1 (who happens to be louder than wise) is irrelevant to Stakeholder 2 (who actually has a better idea of what is really needed).

    Add to the mix the fact that in many of the larger organisations have a metaphorical revolving door at the top, and so the stakeholder who required all these changes is no longer employed by the time the next pre-sales demo takes place.

    Sympathies, though - more than one colleague of mine has resigned his position as a result of too much of this sort of thing happening. Saying "(*shrug*) it happens" doesn't actually help in such circumstances.
  • DD 2013-02-06 04:35
    Not so easy. First you must convert litres to liters.
  • ohansen 2013-02-06 05:23
    Aah, sunlight... Once upon a time I worked for an IT Company in Norway, delivering a lot of computers to the county. And a few days later, we start getting calls. In the morning, all computers on one side of the building started to behave funny, in the afternoon it was the other side of the building. The error was described as windows (3.11) going bananas, mouse pointer going all over the screen.

    After many long days, a lot of screaming from our bosses and the customer, we found the error. The computers mouse has a production error, causing a gap in the chassis of the mouse. Sunlight shining into the mouse causing the optical sensors to go bananas...
  • TimB 2013-02-06 06:56
    TRWTF is his response in the first place.

    First, when given a midnight deadline, you NEVER say "Midnight? You'll have it by 5pm my good sir!" Deliver 7 hours early and you're a hero. Promise you'll deliver 7 hours early and you're just stressing yourself for no good reason.

    Second, the correct response is "The research notes are due tonight? Wow, that sucks for you. You'll have to tell me how it went when I feel better."
  • F 2013-02-06 07:21
    DD:
    Not so easy. First you must convert litres to liters.


    To what?
  • nagesh 2013-02-06 07:52
    I was reading at first, Andrew choke his chicken.
  • Steve The Cynic 2013-02-06 07:59
    F:
    DD:
    Not so easy. First you must convert litres to liters.


    To what?

    Lighters, duh. Can't you read? Think: light is sometimes written as lite (see e.g. non-British European cans of Diet Coke, called Coca-Cola Lite), so lighter should be writeable as liter.

    Alternatively, a liter is an American litre. The American cubic centimeter is about 5% larger than the European cubic centimetre, but they have 20% less of them in a liter than we do of ours in a litre, so the litre is 21% bigger than the liter.

    I should probably stop now...
  • Steve The Cynic 2013-02-06 08:12
    IV:
    That isn't what I always heard. 100 degrees was supposed to be human body temperature. Somehow that got screwed up. I don't know if that was bad measurement initially or with copying the work later. 0 degrees was supposed to be as cold as it ever got - determined by sending a ship as far north from England as it could get and returning with the resulting measurement. So 32 is an accident, as is the size of the steps.

    Let me go check Wikipedia to see which of us is correct. If it is you, I will change the article. Wither way, I will continue on my merry way knowing that people who check it out after I do will agree with me.

    I *did* check Wikip. The truthy is that neither of you is right.

    The Fahrenheit scale is the product of the possibly-fevered imagination of Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit, with some refinements later on to make it easier to use. DGF based the scale on a particular sort of "brine" (actually based on ammonium chloride, not sodium chloride) that melts at about what is now called 0 °F; normal water, which melts at what he pinned as 32 °F; and "blood heat" (body temperature) at 96 °F. The scale was later tweaked so that water boils (at pressures of 100 kilopascals) at 212 °F, which is why normal body temperature is just over 98 °F on the modern scale.
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL 2013-02-06 09:24
    Steve The Cynic:
    Alternatively, a liter is an American litre. The American cubic centimeter is about 5% larger than the European cubic centimetre, but they have 20% less of them in a liter than we do of ours in a litre, so the litre is 21% bigger than the liter..
    In other words, the litre is an Imperial liter.
  • urza9814 2013-02-06 09:50
    B00nbuster:
    TRWTF is that he didn't immediatelly recognize that the crash was due to overheating.

    If my PC keeps crashing (and it must have rebooted, because that's the symptom of overheating!) under CPU load this would be my first suspect! I have yet to see a JVM that causes a rebooting crash. Bluescreen at most. But a rebooting crash??!

    TRWTF is that the poor ill guy was just inexperienced.


    Pretty sure that modern versions of Windows do not, by default, ever give a BSOD -- they just reboot (I know this is true of XP, though they may have gone back since.) So unless he'd gone digging through the system settings to change that, it's likely the two would have been indistinguishable.
  • Edmund 2013-02-06 10:14
    I've got it, the President was actually a woman! Right?
  • operagost 2013-02-06 11:13
    Norman Diamond:
    operagost:
    Second, your system will crash way before it hits 230 degrees F. I don't know of any CPUs that will survive exceeding the boiling point of water.
    I don't know of any CPUs that depend on water. Some cooling systems put heat sinks in water instead of air but the CPU doesn't know that. Most cooling systems use air. The CPU works fine when hotter than the boiling points of nitrogen, oxygen, etc.

    It's not that there was water to be boiled, but every PC I've used either malfunctioned or, if equipped, automatically shut down at temps between 70 and 80 degrees C, which is about 176 F. The "boiling water" reference is mostly for impact. What I HAVE found is improperly calibrated motherboard sensors that read as much as 30 degrees off (Celsius), which could have been the problem.
  • shepd 2013-02-06 11:53
    "Andrew," Steinbrenner said, "remember what I said about the president’s sick daughter?"

    "Of course I do. I'm the one that gave her it. If she shaves it they'll leave."

    Ba-dum-tss.
  • jay 2013-02-06 14:27
    danixdefcon5:
    jay:

    It must be very confusing living in Europe. If you want to get a feel for even a simple thing like whether your car gets good fuel economy, you have to convert liters to gallons, then you have to convert kilometers to miles, and finally you have to convert Euros to real money. :-)
    hehehe. Its actually easier to deal with ºC and kms, especially as you don't need to memorize uneven multipliers. Everything's metric!


    On the serious side: When I was in high school and college and was studying physics and chemistry, the advantages of metric were obvious, and I couldn't comprehend why the U.S. didn't make the switch. But when I graduated and became an IT geek, I didn't have much need to do a lot of arithmetic with units of measurement, and it just didn't matter to me any more. When I look up how far it is to my friend's house, whether I get that number in miles or kilometers doesn't matter much. Given that, I can see how switching from units that you are familiar with for no clear advantage just seems like too much trouble for most people.

    The biggest hassle I run into with English measurements these days is when I'm trying to follow the instructions on the back of a box of food. How many tablespoons in a cup again? Etc.
  • B00nbuster 2013-02-06 16:14
    OH, I have had systems that went well above 80° Celsius. Maybe they even reached 100°, I don't know, they were stable anyway. I looked quite infrequently on the temperature reading.
  • Arancaytar 2013-02-06 20:03
    Andrew:
    Worst punchline ever.

    So let me get this straight: a computer doing science had an overheating problem from being next to a heat source, so it was moved to a cold windowsill. All the while, the user was being nagged to get said science done. For all we know, it got done on time.

    Not a WTF.


    At least he's still alive, and I'm betting his data points made a beautiful line.
  • russ0519 2013-02-06 21:58
    ohansen:
    Aah, sunlight... Once upon a time I worked for an IT Company in Norway, delivering a lot of computers to the county. And a few days later, we start getting calls. In the morning, all computers on one side of the building started to behave funny, in the afternoon it was the other side of the building. The error was described as windows (3.11) going bananas, mouse pointer going all over the screen.

    After many long days, a lot of screaming from our bosses and the customer, we found the error. The computers mouse has a production error, causing a gap in the chassis of the mouse. Sunlight shining into the mouse causing the optical sensors to go bananas...


    I don't buy it. Optical mice in time of windows 3.1?
  • Coyne 2013-02-06 23:18
    ohansen:
    Aah, sunlight... Once upon a time I worked for an IT Company in Norway, delivering a lot of computers to the county. And a few days later, we start getting calls. In the morning, all computers on one side of the building started to behave funny, in the afternoon it was the other side of the building. The error was described as windows (3.11) going bananas, mouse pointer going all over the screen.

    After many long days, a lot of screaming from our bosses and the customer, we found the error. The computers mouse has a production error, causing a gap in the chassis of the mouse. Sunlight shining into the mouse causing the optical sensors to go bananas...


    About 5 years ago, there were some elevators at a local parking garage that would go offline at certain times of day. Who knew elevators used optical systems that could be affected by sunlight?
  • TimB 2013-02-07 04:45
    russ0519:

    I don't buy it. Optical mice in time of windows 3.1?


    The client was the county. This was last year.
  • Craig 2013-02-07 06:19
    It was probably Friday when they gave him the rest of the week off anyway...
  • someone 2013-02-07 09:24
    operagost:

    It's not that there was water to be boiled, but every PC I've used either malfunctioned or, if equipped, automatically shut down at temps between 70 and 80 degrees C, which is about 176 F.


    That's what made me wonder when exactly this alleged story could have happened. Andrew runs the software on his "desktop PC" at home.

    The last "desktop PC" processor that didn't have thermal protection of any sort was the Athlon K7 (the XP already had a sensor, but could still be fried if the board didn't properly support it). All later ones indeed shut down when overheating, most even throttle themselves to run cooler and avoid the hard shut down if possible. The actual temperature is CPU and sometimes BIOS dependent, but yes - 110C is beyond the usual.

    And most of the time the system works fine until it has to shutdown (a bit slower perhaps). But if there's misbehaviour, it's usually totally obvious - random processes terminating with privilege violations. The real WTF would indeed be not noticing that.
  • Svensson 2013-02-07 13:02
    russ0519:
    ohansen:
    Sunlight shining into the mouse causing the optical sensors to go bananas...


    I don't buy it. Optical mice in time of windows 3.1?


    He didn't say "optical mice". He said "optical sensor". If you're too young to remember how a mechanical mouse works, look at the subheading "Mechanical mice" on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_%28computing%29

  • zelmak 2013-02-08 16:48
    Svensson:
    russ0519:
    ohansen:
    Sunlight shining into the mouse causing the optical sensors to go bananas...


    I don't buy it. Optical mice in time of windows 3.1?


    He didn't say "optical mice". He said "optical sensor". If you're too young to remember how a mechanical mouse works, look at the subheading "Mechanical mice" on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_%28computing%29



    Or, even, look into Sun Microsystems/Mouse Systems optical mice (with required metal grid pad) in the early 1990s. (Goodness, these things were awful.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_Systems
  • Mike 2013-02-13 13:33
    Way back when I had a 486 computer that I was learning 3d CAD on. My dad bought a match coprocessor for it but all they had was a 386 one that badly overheated any time it was used heavily. The solution was drop a racing lug nut on top of the mat coprocessor...
  • WTFFFFCUNT 2013-02-15 14:28
    He was not questioning if she died, but was telling that he thought she died. the real question is, what is WTF mean?
  • The Big Picture Thinker 2013-03-04 16:46
    TRWTF is this story itself. If the problem was overheating, wouldn't it ALSO crash on the 1st two calculations? Not just the 3rd. Did the PC fall out the window? What about the daughter?
  • someone 2013-04-24 18:21
    3 DNA sequences: President, president's wife, and sick daughter.

    Apparently, the sick daughter is not the president's.
  • stan 2013-09-11 02:53
    there are nvidia gtx480 versions running stable at 107°C
  • Felix 2013-12-12 07:57
    Steve The Cynic:

    The Fahrenheit scale is the product of the possibly-fevered imagination of Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit, with some refinements later on to make it easier to use. DGF based the scale on a particular sort of "brine" (actually based on ammonium chloride, not sodium chloride) that melts at about what is now called 0 °F; normal water, which melts at what he pinned as 32 °F; and "blood heat" (body temperature) at 96 °F. The scale was later tweaked so that water boils (at pressures of 100 kilopascals) at 212 °F, which is why normal body temperature is just over 98 °F on the modern scale.


    Boom! Practical.