• RaceProUK (disco)

    This meant customers who bought a system to manage their ice cream inventory also had tools to herd cats.

    Could work for Peugeot, I guess; in their history, they've gone from making coffee, pepper, and salt grinders, to dresses, umbrella frames, sawblades, munitions, bicycles, and finally cars.

    <!-- Emoji'd by MobileEmoji 0.2.0-->
  • tdwtf (disco)

    Their pepper grinders are still the worlds best

  • tdwtf (disco) in reply to RaceProUK

    As far as I can remeber Sperry was also a "Jack of all trades". Railway wagons and Computers in their manufacturing line

  • RFoxmich (disco)

    “Boris knows everything there is to know about software engineering techniques, he just doesn't bother to use them.”

    Didn't really need to read any further than this.

  • Steve_The_Cynic (disco)

    Don't overlook the history of Nintendo. Since they started up, back in the late 19th Century, they've had a hand in playing cards (still a Nintendo product in Japan), taxis, a TV network, instant rice, love hotels, various gameish toys, and, as we now know, video game consoles.

  • Steve_The_Cynic (disco) in reply to RFoxmich
    RFoxmich:
    “Boris knows everything there is to know about software engineering techniques, he just doesn't bother to use them.”

    Didn't really need to read any further than this.

    Yeah, that's pretty much a guarantee of disaster. If someone said that to me, I'd ask, "and you think this is a good thing?". And of course, it isn't true, because evidently Boris doesn't know that it is better to use at least **some** software engineering techniques rather than none at all. Mashing the keyboard and hoping something worthwhile comes out of it isn't software engineering, and leaving the result for the juniors to fix is just evil.
  • Antarctica (disco)

    Please compare the line that stuck out to Terrence to the line that stucks out to Ben in this article: http://www.thedailywtf.com/articles/Ancestors and tell me what the major differences are...

  • RFoxmich (disco) in reply to RFoxmich

    "and leaving the result for the juniors to fix is just evil typical."

  • John_Imrie (disco) in reply to RaceProUK

    Yer I saw that eddition of Top Gear as well :smile:

  • CoyneTheDup (disco)

    thechkbox = currRating[0].parentElement.parentElement.parentElement.parentElement.parentElement.parentElement.children(2).children(0).children(0)

    Nothing so bad it can't be improved to something worse. Imagine a wrapper method to shorten this monstrosity, accepts an arbitrary list of numbers, -1 means first parent, -2 second parent,, > 0 means child(#):

    thechkbox = OurMagic.getElement(currRating[0],-6,2,0,0);
    

    There. Much better.

  • Tsaukpaetra (disco)
    some screens required users to manually enter their own SQL into a text box.
    What?!? He mandated an SQL Injection vulnerability in _several_ places? :wtf:

    Filed under: how is this even a thing?

  • Yamikuronue (disco) in reply to Tsaukpaetra

    It's totally crazy to require users of a software to write their own SQL queries. Why, they might make the whole page go white on accident!


    Filed under: Badger Badger Badger Badger Badger Badger Badger Badger

  • Tsaukpaetra (disco) in reply to Yamikuronue

    Who is to say it was an accident?

    Rather, who's to say they'd stop at a single page?

  • JBert (disco) in reply to Antarctica
    Antarctica:
    Please compare the line that stuck out to Terrence to the line that stucks out to Ben in this article: http://www.thedailywtf.com/articles/Ancestorsand tell me what the major differences are...
    Well spotted.

    Now one has to wonder how the codebases are related.

    Are they the same and reported by two different newbies? Have they copied the same code from SO, or even from that other expert site "thedailywtf"? Or could it just be that this item has been editor'd twice thanks to a bug in the article queue? The truth is out there.

  • HardwareGeek (disco) in reply to JBert

    My first guess was the latter, but who knows.

  • mott555 (disco) in reply to JBert
    JBert:
    Or could it just be that this item has been editor'd twice thanks to a bug in the article queue? The truth is out there.

    I don't think so but I'm not privy to most of the editorial process. On today's, all I did was shorten up and reword parts of the submission, so I doubt it's the same source as the other article. Not much "front-pagification" this time.

  • HardwareGeek (disco) in reply to mott555
    mott555:
    Not much "front-pagification"

    :+1:

  • dkf (disco) in reply to JBert
    JBert:
    Are they the same and reported by two different newbies?

    That would be terrifying really, something so utterly bad that two people independently sent it in. Neat though; there's quite a few readers of this place about…

  • cheong (disco) in reply to CoyneTheDup

    Actually the code would have been acceptable if it were 10+ years ago, and he was using rogue javascript component library that don't name much element that can be used to pinpoint target element you wish to read. (Been there, done that)

    Good news we now have jQuery.

  • CoyneTheDup (disco)
    cheong:
    Good news we now have jQuery.

    ...and designs that use jQuery to find the first child of the first child of the third child of the sixth parent. Wonderful.

  • martin (disco)
    along the way, he met several other people who used to work at Initech

    Every bad thing has some good in it.

    Terrence has ex-collegues in every other company now and he can get any job very easily. Just post a question on LinkedIn.

  • Eldelshell (disco) in reply to RaceProUK

    The champions here are Samsung. I mean, they build from chips and LED panels to freaking ships and the shipyards to build those ships. I wouldn't be surprised to get some Samsung cereals or break some Samsung condoms.

  • NTW (disco)

    TRWTF is that people still think that an Architect can be someone who doesn't design physical structures.

  • RaceProUK (disco) in reply to NTW
    NTW:
    TRWTF is that people still think that an Architect can be someone who doesn't design physical structures.
    So… software doesn't have architecture? :wtf: <!-- Emoji'd by MobileEmoji 0.2.0-->
  • IngenieurLogiciel (disco) in reply to NTW

    Architect def. noun •a person who is responsible for inventing or realizing a particular idea or project:

  • Eldelshell (disco) in reply to IngenieurLogiciel

    Is this a woosh or a bitch slap?

  • kupfernigk (disco) in reply to RaceProUK
    RaceProUK:
    So… software doesn't have architecture?

    Yes, I have seen software that doesn't have architecture. I have also seen kids' tree houses.

  • dkf (disco) in reply to kupfernigk
    kupfernigk:
    I have also seen kids' tree houses.

    I'd have gone with “pictures of third-world shantytowns” in remembrance of this classic.

  • kupfernigk (disco) in reply to dkf
    dkf:
    'd have gone with “pictures of third-world shantytowns”

    You mean "distributed loosely-coupled architectures"? Javascript was invented to act as the foundation of today's web shanty towns. But somehow they work.

  • dkf (disco) in reply to kupfernigk
    kupfernigk:
    You mean "distributed loosely-coupled architectures"?

    No, I mean a Big Ball Of Mud that totally lacks any kind of planning at all. Distributed loosely-coupled architectures really don't need to be anywhere close to as bad as that.

  • kupfernigk (disco) in reply to dkf
    dkf:
    No, I mean a Big Ball Of Mud that totally lacks any kind of planning at all.

    I know what you meant, but I was quibbling with the "big ball of mud" article's view of shanty towns. They are in fact more like loosely coupled distributed architectures. If you didn't know, you might be surprised how much informal structure there is in shanty towns, which employ both short range and longer range transactions in their ad hoc designs. There are a lot of web pages that are basically "designed" like this. To the outsider the shanty town looks like a ball of mud, to the residents it has a fairly clear structure. Mind you, the same goes for some large corporations.

  • kupfernigk (disco) in reply to IngenieurLogiciel
    IngenieurLogiciel:
    Architect def. noun •a person who is responsible for inventing or realizing a particular idea or project:

    Specifically, the OED gives both meanings (i.e. chief builder or the one you give). The Greek word τέκτων in its earliest meaning perhaps meant "carpenter" but was later extended to almost any craftsman - including poets. So "architect" = chief maker, designer or builder whether it is a house, a ship or a Greek tragedy. The extension to computer programs is obvious.

  • dkf (disco) in reply to kupfernigk
    kupfernigk:
    There are a lot of web pages that are basically "designed" like this.

    I'm not saying that there's no design involved. There's a lot. It's just all short-range stuff, to fix an immediate problem; a huge bag of special cases, every last one of them slightly different from all the others and with no overall theme. Programs written like that are a Big Ball Of Mud, usually tied together with spaghetti code.

    Stepping back and applying a bigger overall plan — easier done with programs than with shanty towns! — can enormously reduce the amount of complexity involved in making everything actually work together. That's what program architecture is all about. (It can also be totally overdone. I've been on projects where the architecture killed all chance of the result being a success…)

  • HardwareGeek (disco) in reply to kupfernigk
    kupfernigk:
    The Greek word τέκτων in its earliest meaning

    I have to like (and flag) any post quibbling about the meaning of Ancient Greek words. :)

  • HardwareGeek (disco)

    It's still excellent pedantry, and I heartily approve. :)

  • tar (disco)

    The user interface was so hacked together and hostile, some screens required users to manually enter their own SQL into a text box.

    <img src=http://what.thedailywtf.com/uploads/default/_optimized/db2/e9c/4ba021fa97_208x500.png">

  • tar (disco) in reply to RaceProUK
    RaceProUK:
    Peugeot
    tdwtf:
    Sperry
    Steve_The_Cynic:
    Nintendo

    Yahama ought to count as well—pianos, motorcycles, electronics, musical instruments, CD players, sports equipment...

  • HardwareGeek (disco) in reply to tar
    tar:
    tdwtf:
    Sperry
    Steve_The_Cynic:
    Nintendo

    Yahama ought to count as well—pianos, motorcycles, electronics, musical instruments, CD players, sports equipment...

    One of these is a lot like the other.

    Trivia: The Yamaha logo on your motorcycle or whatever is, in fact, three tuning forks, a legacy of Yamaha's origin as a musical instrument (organ) company. The use of a tuning fork in their trademark dates from 1898, and the three tuning forks from 1927. The motorcycles are made by Yamaha Motor Co. (which grew out of Nippon Gakki, later renamed Yamaha Corp. on their 100th anniversary), and use the same trademark, but are an entirely separate business entity.

  • tar (disco) in reply to HardwareGeek

    Are you attempting to imply that pianos are musical instruments?

    (Historically (if wikipedia is to be believed) they started out making pianos and organ reeds, and then diversified into other musical instruments later on...)

  • I_am_the_guest (unregistered)

    Guest Posting allowed again?

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