Comment On All Talk and No Code

You know that you're really in for a treat when, after joining a large, on-going project, your technical overview consists of an email from the lead architect that reads "I have commented just about everything; you should be able to figure it out without a problem." Our anonymous poor soul who submitted this didn't quite realize how fun it would be ... [expand full text]
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Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:27 • by stewie
Gaiden outta here!



Aleph you all!

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:28 • by WTFer
The funny thing is that the second comment is in fact in English. :)
But well, I think it was a Quebecois boss just being an assclown.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:30 • by wakeskate
Sure Blame Canada...   well I'm a Canadian and I don't think
that multi-language code be acceptable at any company I've ever worked
for.  Even working in Europe (the Netherlands) we had to stick
with one language for an entire project (English or Dutch). 
There's nothing that I dislike more than multi-language variable
names...  impossible to read.



Besides, all of the code that I write reads like a book, so comments
aren't necessary.  I use "AlephComments", which are silent *and*
invisible :)

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:35 • by Darax The Good
Are you sure the second submission isn't a very creative ploy by systransoft to get a little free advertising to the geek demographic? :)

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:36 • by IngisKahn
52716 in reply to 52714

wakeskate:
comments aren't necessary


I hope that's a joke. lol

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:37 • by WTFer
52717 in reply to 52714
wakeskate:
Sure Blame Canada...   well I'm a Canadian and I don't think
that multi-language code be acceptable at any company I've ever worked
for.  Even working in Europe (the Netherlands) we had to stick
with one language for an entire project (English or Dutch). 
There's nothing that I dislike more than multi-language variable
names...  impossible to read.



Besides, all of the code that I write reads like a book, so comments
aren't necessary.  I use "AlephComments", which are silent *and*
invisible :)


I am Mexican and I keep my variables in English and my comments in
Spanish. The languages (C#, Java, etc)  and base classes and
libraries are always in English so I keep the code in English make it
cleaner and make it easier to post and make sense if you need help. But
that's just me.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:49 • by HAK
Alex Papadimoulis:

Since I'm on the subject of
comments, I may as well share this comment that another anonymous coder
sent in. I suppose you Canadians may be used to this, it was just a bit
of place in Atlanta, Georgia ...


/*\
* This source-code is to only be used by Initech developers. So that someone
* may navigate through this source code, here is the convention used:
* - All variable and function names are in English (for the most part), so that
* it will be clear for programmers; the names speak for themselves.
* - Comments throughout the code are usually written in French. If you don't
* speak French, and cannot find us to ask what a comment means, you can use
* a grammatical translator online, like http://www.systransoft.com
\*/




At least they specified the other language and provided a site for
translation.  They could have just left the coders guessing, and
therefore making a bigger WTF.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:55 • by damne33
I code in C, but I write my comments in Java.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 14:57 • by pjabbott
That first comment sounds like it was generated using The Commentator with verbosity=10, self-importance=10.

http://www.cenqua.com/commentator/ (I'm sure it's been linked from here before).

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:05 • by Xargon
52722 in reply to 52721
So, during my childhood the Nintendo game I was playing was really
called "Ninja side story"?  I'm glad I woke up this morning just
to learn that.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:07 • by Brendan Kidwell
Alex Papadimoulis:
/// The GaidenCommand is a specialized Command for use by the

/// CommandManager.


That's what happens when a programmer is told to "document your code now that you're done" and given no other interesting things to do.

If I can't figure out that a GaidenCommand is some kind of metacommand, from context, then I really don't want to be reading this code.


Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:11 • by VGR
Clearly, there are people who don't understand that comments are not
for the author, they're for the people who come along later.  If
there isn't a 100% likelihood that future maintainers will know French,
then you have no business commenting in French!



Of course, as soon as I saw "the names speak for themselves" I'd run
away.  Yes, self-documenting code is a good idea.  No, it is
not enough.



Same goes for "find us to ask what a comment means."  I've worked
in those conditions, and it's a farce.  Expecting a maintainer to
stop every five minutes and hunt down the original author for questions
is unacceptable.  The manager might as well make a bonfire out of
money.



I wonder if it's possible to give the original author a taste of his
own medicine by sending him encrypted e-mail without any keys, prefaced
with the unencrypted statement "See me if you want to know what this
says."



It's WTFs like this that have led me to insist on seeing a sample of the project's javadoc before I accept a job.



Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:15 • by Anonymoose
52725 in reply to 52720
To ensure proper internationalization and localization of comments, always be sure to store your comments in a string table.



(Kidding! Ha ha!   Oh never mind.)

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:19 • by rbriem
52726 in reply to 52724

VGR:
Clearly, there are people who don't understand that comments are not for the author, they're for the people who come along later.  If there isn't a 100% likelihood that future maintainers will know French, then you have no business commenting in French!


Hear, hear!


And if there isn't a 100% likelihood that future maintainers will know English, then you have no business commenting in English! (Feel free to substitute your language of choice).


But what the hell is "100% likelihood", anyway? "Absolutely probably"?

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:34 • by java.lang.NullReferenceException
52727 in reply to 52714
wakeskate:
Sure Blame Canada...   well I'm a Canadian and I don't think
that multi-language code be acceptable at any company I've ever worked
for.  Even working in Europe (the Netherlands) we had to stick
with one language for an entire project (English or Dutch). 
There's nothing that I dislike more than multi-language variable
names...  impossible to read.



Besides, all of the code that I write reads like a book, so comments
aren't necessary.  I use "AlephComments", which are silent *and*
invisible :)

I like comments, but they are not really part of the code, more written as an aside, so I generally prefer GaidenComments. Taste is personal.

On a more serious note -- while I realize that you are being sarcastic, there is some truth hidden in your statement. If you find yourself drawn to writing a huge and complicated comment to explain a point about your code (say, your weird idea of naming a class using an obscure language), then you're probably on the wrong track. Go fix the code instead.

What really gets me about the anglo-saxon code comment is the fact that it tells me nothing whatsoever. By reading the code, I would be able to spot pretty quickly that that most of the variables are named in English and that all comments (except the one shown here) are in French. WTF...

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:36 • by MikeB
///  The Nessie Variable is the ultimate storage container

/// for truth....

/// Last week Japanese scientists ex-placed...
/// placed explosive detonators at the bottom of Lake Lochness
/// to blow Nessie out of the water. Sir Cord Godfried of the
/// Nessie Alliance summoned the help of Scotland's local wizards
/// to cast a protective spell over the lake and its local residents.
/// And all those who seek for the peaceful existence of our underwater ally.

If Nessie IsTrue() Then..... [<:o)]

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 15:42 • by DisturbedSaint
52731 in reply to 52729
MikeB:
///  The Nessie Variable is the ultimate storage container

/// for truth....

/// Last week Japanese scientists ex-placed...
/// placed explosive detonators at the bottom of Lake Lochness
/// to blow Nessie out of the water. Sir Cord Godfried of the
/// Nessie Alliance summoned the help of Scotland's local wizards
/// to cast a protective spell over the lake and its local residents.
/// And all those who seek for the peaceful existence of our underwater ally.

If Nessie IsTrue() Then..... [<:o)]


dude, you like that movie *way* too much...

-ds

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:02 • by JohnSmallberries
52734 in reply to 52724
VGR:
The manager might as well make a bonfire out of
money.

I'm sure that each of us would run out of fingers (and toes) if we tried to count the number of times we've seen where this is the case.  I know I would.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:10 • by parasyte
52736 in reply to 52722
Xargon:
So, during my childhood the Nintendo game I was playing was really
called "Ninja side story"?  I'm glad I woke up this morning just
to learn that.


What's really amusing is that the Japanese version was called ?????, or Ninja Ryukenden - "Legend of the Dragon Sword Ninja."
Why they changed the name is beyond me, they exchanged one Japanese phrase for another and both are meaningless to most foreigners.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:19 • by GoatCheez
52739 in reply to 52734
<rant>man.... wtf... d00d spends more time in his comments on the origin of the work Gaiden and Aleph than he does saying anything else... like anyone cares where he got the word from. Sure, it might help cuz variables should get named what they are... but that only works if people know what the words are. if you have to tell people what the word means, then you shouldn't name any variables by it. i mean cmon people... as for the language... being developer support, i get very many questions, in very many different languages... most of the time, the code is in english, and the comments are in their native language. This is fine. the comments i could really care less about, as long as the code is in english. If the syntax of a language uses english words, then use english ppl... it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure that out. Oh yeah, if you don't know english, then don't use single letter vars... use your native language... cuz even though I hate seeing variables named words that I could never even take a guess to the meaning of, it's better than a variable named "v".(at least if i need to i could probably run the variable name through a translator)</rant>

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:21 • by OneFactor
52740 in reply to 52736

parasyte:
Xargon:
So, during my childhood the Nintendo game I was playing was really called "Ninja side story"?  I'm glad I woke up this morning just to learn that.
What's really amusing is that the Japanese version was called ?????, or Ninja Ryukenden - "Legend of the Dragon Sword Ninja." Why they changed the name is beyond me, they exchanged one Japanese phrase for another and both are meaningless to most foreigners.


The machines I played on called it Ninja USA. Never could figure out why the end boss was so much easier to beat than his three poison-claw henchmen before him though. Maybe he had spent the last 20 years building up an immunity to Iocaine poison...


That game required such precise timing though. I remember practicing until I could get to the end with one quarter but if I stopped playing for a few months I could not even get past level one.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:21 • by paranoidgeek
52741 in reply to 52721
pjabbott:
That first comment sounds like it was generated using The Commentator with verbosity=10, self-importance=10.

http://www.cenqua.com/commentator/ (I'm sure it's been linked from here before).
Pity it is just a joke :( . I was looking forward to running that on some of my code. Or maybe run it on /usr/src/linux and send the patch through to Linus ...

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:22 • by Manni
52742 in reply to 52736

Ha ha brillant! IsTrue() shoulda done that in JavaScript they were paid per line of code Hungarian notation MS Paint expertise C-pound


Now that I just used them all, this post will never make it past 40 replies! Eat it suckers! Muahahaha!!

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:25 • by Maz
52743 in reply to 52726
rbriem:

But what the hell is "100% likelihood", anyway? "Absolutely probably"?



Something along the lines of 100% probability.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:35 • by mrsticks1982
bi-lingual code ... I love it

Keep the diversity strong



Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:41 • by Xepol
Alex Papadimoulis:

 Also "CommandManagerCommand" is far too long to write.


And we have all noticed how much he hates to type!

As for the second comment, without a cultural background watching Quebec's language laws with their, HONEST TO GODS, I KID  YOU NOT - LANGUAGE POLICE (actual division of the quebec legal system punishing those who do not follow quebec's anti-english language laws) you might not appreciate the need for a disclaimer like this.  Frankly, I am surprised that some in the governemt has not yet drafted an addendum that requires that all languages be translated into french, require the all identifiers be in french and that all english comments may only be 40% as significant as the french comments.

Think I'm nutz?  Google "quebec language laws".  And here you thought your neighbours to the north were just wussier toned down versions of americans.  Not if you live south of Quebec. 

So ya, if it was written in Quebec, I am amazed that there was even THAT much english in the code.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:43 • by Paul Abraham
As a native English speaker myself (from the place that has given its
name to the language, no less), I always feel sorry for non-English
speakers who are forced to program in English.  Perhaps it's time
to redress the balance.



French example:



si(condition)

    // quelquechose

ousi(condition2)

    // encore quelquechose

fin



German example:



wenn(condition)

    // etwas

oderwenn(condition2)

    // noch etwas

Ende



I'm sure our French and German friends could do better.



Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:45 • by VGR
52753 in reply to 52726
rbriem:

VGR:
Clearly, there are people who
don't understand that comments are not for the author, they're for the
people who come along later.  If there isn't a 100% likelihood
that future maintainers will know French, then you have no business
commenting in French!



Hear, hear!



And if there isn't a 100% likelihood that future maintainers will
know English, then you have no business commenting in English! (Feel
free to substitute your language of choice).



But what the hell is "100% likelihood", anyway? "Absolutely probably"?







You're absolutely right.





If I'm writing software that's going to a company in Europe (but not
the UK), then it is my responsibility to make sure the comments are in
a language their maintainers can understand.





I suppose "reasonable expectation" should be substituted for "100%
likelihood."  And I think it's reasonable to expect that not every
Georgian will understand French comments.





At the very least, I would have sent the code back with a message
like:  "Since you chose to write in French, I hereby place on you
the burden of translating the comments for us.  It's your doing,
so it should eat into your time, not ours."





Comments are meant to save development time, not increase it.





Of course, if the whole codebase was inherited as the result of buying
up a French company, then this seems like an inevitable risk.  But
it sure appears the author knew non-French-speakers would be looking at
it.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:47 • by Xepol
52754 in reply to 52749

In fact, if the quebec language police ever find out that some languages have a pre-processor, they will likely require that all french companies use government mandated include files and program ENTIRELY in french.  Could you imagine entire system libraries translated through <#define>s?


Frankly, I could almost find the concept amusing enough to send an anonymous email to the quebec governement complaining about how english identifiers in programming languages undermine the french distinticiveness and how said pre-processors could fix the problem.


The economic damage would be amazing, and would not cause the quebec government to hesitate for a second before passing new laws to cover it.


Let's make that evil plot #31.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:54 • by Gene Wirchenko
52755 in reply to 52721
pjabbott:
That first comment sounds like it was generated using The Commentator with verbosity=10, self-importance=10.

http://www.cenqua.com/commentator/ (I'm sure it's been linked from here before).


How inconsiderate of you to not post the page.  Look, I am B-U-S-Y.  I do not have time to surf to that page!

(Actually, I did go, and it is a hoot.  Thank you.)

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 16:58 • by kipthegreat
Alex Papadimoulis:
 *  - Comments throughout the code are usually written in French. If you don't 

* speak French, and cannot find us to ask what a comment means, you can use
* a grammatical translator online, like http://www.systransoft.com


I can identify with this.  I work for a French-owned company, and much of our code was originally developed in France and has lots of French comments.  Which makes it really annoying to maintain here in the US.

On the other hand, I am actually picking up a little French (very slowly) just from maintaining the code.  But don't tell the French people that.  They'll think they're justified.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 17:06 • by masklinn
52758 in reply to 52750
Paul Abraham:
As a native English speaker myself (from the place that has given its
name to the language, no less), I always feel sorry for non-English
speakers who are forced to program in English. 

I'm not, fuck'em all.


And I say that being french and living in france...


Code localization should die, plain and simple. Standard libs are in english anyway, and it's a frigging pain switching to an english mindset (because you're coding and reading the docs and using the standard api) to a french mindset just because your stupid coworker doesn't want to use english in his code.


Now if you *really* want code localization, there is an (ugly) french (heap of dung) L5G/IDE called Windev (do not use it, seriously... wouldn't come to your mind anyway since you're not french but I still warn you) that allows you to code either in french or in english (and that can switch between both).

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 17:07 • by masklinn
52759 in reply to 52758
masklinn:
Paul Abraham:
As a native English speaker myself (from the place that has given its
name to the language, no less), I always feel sorry for non-English
speakers who are forced to program in English. 

I'm not, fuck'em all.


And I say that being french and living in france...


Code localization should die, plain and simple. Standard libs are in english anyway, and it's a frigging pain switching to an english mindset (because you're coding and reading the docs and using the standard api) to a french mindset just because your stupid coworker doesn't want to use english in his code.


Now if you *really* want code localization, there is an (ugly) french (heap of dung) L5G/IDE called Windev (do not use it, seriously... wouldn't come to your mind anyway since you're not french but I still warn you) that allows you to code either in french or in english (and that can switch between both).


s/to an english/from an english/

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 17:33 • by Cirdan
52763 in reply to 52754
Xepol:
Frankly, I could almost find the concept amusing
enough to send an anonymous email to the quebec governement complaining
about how english identifiers in programming languages undermine the
french distinticiveness and how said pre-processors could fix the
problem.

The economic damage would be amazing, and would not cause the quebec
government to hesitate for a second before passing new laws to cover it.



With the email headers translated into French I don't think there's much risk of your mail getting to its intended destination.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 17:41 • by triso
52764 in reply to 52714
wakeskate:
...Besides, all of the code that I write reads like a book, so comments
aren't necessary.  I use "AlephComments", which are silent *and*
invisible :)
But the most important question is:  Do they smell??

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 18:15 • by triso
52765 in reply to 52758
masklinn:
...Now if you *really* want code localization,
there is an (ugly) french (heap of dung) L5G/IDE called Windev (do not
use it, seriously... wouldn't come to your mind anyway since you're not
french but I still warn you) that allows you to code either in french
or in english (and that can switch between both).


Goodness me!  That sounds like something the Quebec government
would love to invest billions into...and then billions more changing it
so it is French only.   English is for those heathens in the
rest of Canada, anyway.



Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 18:25 • by ammoQ
52766 in reply to 52750
Paul Abraham:




German example:



wenn(condition)

    // etwas

oderwenn(condition2)

    // noch etwas

Ende



I'm sure our French and German friends could do better.




Well done, but honestly, I'm quite happy that all keywords are English;
that makes it easier to keep domain specific words and programming
keywords apart.

For example, "client" can mean two totally different things: In the
domain of the application, "client" is the one who places an order. In
the computer domain, client is a program or device that connects to a
server. To distinguish this two meanings, I use German words ("Kunde")
for domain specific meanings and English words ("Client") for computer
related meanings.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 18:49 • by HAK
It could just be job security .....



Dev: "You can't fire me! I'm the only one who understands [some essential-yet-badly-written/commented project]!"

Boss: "F***, you're right.  And you can have a raise after we fire Johnson."

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 19:00 • by AlfAlf
52769 in reply to 52714

Sure Blame Canada...   well I'm a Canadian and I don't think
that multi-language code be acceptable at any company I've ever worked
for.  Even working in Europe (the Netherlands) we had to stick
with one language for an entire project (English or Dutch). 
There's nothing that I dislike more than multi-language variable
names...  impossible to read.



Besides, all of the code that I write reads like a book, so comments
aren't necessary.  I use "AlephComments", which are silent *and*
invisible :)



Well, it may come as a surprise to you that not all french canadians are able to write properly sentenced comments in english. Where i work, comments used to be made in english (as is everything in the code) but after having comments that we're so badly written that they were more confusing than anything else, we opted to have all comments written in french.

I agree that in a perfect world, i should be all written in the same language, but in the real world, that is not always possible.

I see no WTF in this, i live it everyday. Sadly, i live in the real world.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 19:11 • by emptyset
i think this is the funniest daily wtf i've ever seen.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 19:26 • by foxyshadis
52772 in reply to 52763
Cirdan:
Xepol:
Frankly, I could almost find the concept amusing
enough to send an anonymous email to the quebec governement complaining
about how english identifiers in programming languages undermine the
french distinticiveness and how said pre-processors could fix the
problem.

The economic damage would be amazing, and would not cause the quebec
government to hesitate for a second before passing new laws to cover it.



With the email headers translated into French I don't think there's much risk of your mail getting to its intended destination.


Fortunately email and FTP would be largely unaffected, given the decidedly non-english nature of most of their 4-letter command words and how few mail relays actually care about anything else.

HTTP, on the other hand, may be in for a bit of a shock.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-06 21:41 • by Xepol
52773 in reply to 52772
foxyshadis:
Cirdan:
Xepol:
Frankly, I could almost find the concept amusing enough to send an anonymous email to the quebec governement complaining about how english identifiers in programming languages undermine the french distinticiveness and how said pre-processors could fix the problem.

The economic damage would be amazing, and would not cause the quebec government to hesitate for a second before passing new laws to cover it.


With the email headers translated into French I don't think there's much risk of your mail getting to its intended destination.



Fortunately email and FTP would be largely unaffected, given the decidedly non-english nature of most of their 4-letter command words and how few mail relays actually care about anything else.

HTTP, on the other hand, may be in for a bit of a shock.


You all think I am joking about Quebec's language laws and wanna run with it.  Sadly, the truth is stranger than fiction ever could be: "


MONTREAL - A couple selling maple syrup over the Internet has been fined for operating an English-only Web site in Quebec.

Muriel and Stanley Reid were cited for violating Quebec's language law, Bill 101."

http://cbc.ca/cgi-bin/templates/view.cgi?/news/2001/05/21/internet010521

If the Quebec government ever took it seriously into mind, yes, the could very well pass laws that would be disruptive enough to require french based protocols only.


Even the WTFs we see daily pale beside the delibertate dementia of the Quebec's crusade for "purity".  I only bring them up because they could be combine with programming to create some of the greatest programming WTFs of all times, HONESTLY.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 03:15 • by SysRq2000

Heres some danish C-pound code:


hvis(ErSand(sand))
{
  retuner sand;
}
ellers
{
  retuner falsk;
}


Brillant!

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 03:46 • by java.lang.NullReferenceException
52776 in reply to 52774
SysRq2000:

Heres some danish C-pound code:


hvis(ErSand(sand))
{
  retuner sand;
}
ellers
{
  retuner falsk;
}


Brillant!


C:\Kode>kompiler kode.cs

  retuner sand;


  ^^^^^^^ F01123: Syntaksfejl. Ukendt identifikator.


  retuner falsk;
  ^^^^^^^ F01123: Syntaksfejl. Ukendt identifikator.



C:\Kode>_

Does D-flat have macros like good old C/C++?

// got_danish.hpp
#define afbryd break
#define tilfaelde case
#define fang catch
#define karakter char
#define klasse class
#define konstant const
#define fortsaet continue
#define standard default
#define slet delete
#define goer do
#define dobbelt double
#define ellers else
#define oplist enum
#define ekstern extern
#define flydende float
#define ven friend
#define gaatil goto
#define hvis if
#define ilinie inline
#define heltal int
#define lang long
#define ny new
#define privat private
#define beskyttet protected
#define offentlig public
#define returner return
#define kort short
#define medfortegn signed
#define stoerrelse sizeof
#define statisk static
#define struktur struct
#define skift switch
#define skabelon template
#define denne this
#define kast throw
#define proev try
#define forening union
#define positiv unsigned
#define virtuel virtual
#define ingenting void
#define volatibel volatile
#define saalaenge while

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 03:54 • by bullestock
52777 in reply to 52774
SysRq2000:

Heres some danish C-pound code:


hvis(ErSand(sand))
{
  retuner sand;
}
ellers
{
  retuner falsk;
}


Brillant!





You misspelled "returner".

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 04:22 • by Jens
52779 in reply to 52776
Hillarious! To bad it's not possible to use ø æ and å



A question regarding comments.



At my current place of employment we are discuraged from putting
comments in our code in general. The two exceptions to this exist rule,
is API programming and code which cannot be made self-explanatory and
therefore deserved commenting. The reason for this being that comment
are often not updated as the code evolves, thus ending up being
misleading to the maintenance programming in the end. Obviously this
approach this approach assumes that an effort is being made to keep the
implementation as clean. What are our thought on this approach to
commenting?



Personally i'm very fond of stuff like javadoc commenting. I generally
like make a javadoc comment block for each and every
function/class/global/constant in my code, regardless of whether it's
use is self-explanatory or not.

















Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 04:31 • by ishmaeel

About programming language localization:


I don't think it could be done "pure enough" with simple #def's and keyword translation/substitution. How can we claim that the language we use is in our mother language ([^o)]), if sentence structure is not taken into account? Below is my proposal for the Turkish BASIC. (I did not translate the keywords themselves, only the structure, in order to minimize the obfuscation factor.)

10  SCREEN CLEAR

20 i = 0 FROM 10 UNTIL 2 STEP 2 STEP INCREMENT
30 i PRINT
40 IF i, 10< THEN
50 "," PRINT
60 IF END
70 NEXT i
80 "Tekrar? (E/H)"; PRINT
90 a* INPUT
100 IF (a*)WITH_LOWERCASE, "e"= THEN 10 TO_GO

Please note that a* is a string variable. I could not use a$ now, using the dollar sign would be against the whole principle. (Come to think of it, I could use aTL -- for Turkish Lira.)

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 04:43 • by trollable
52781 in reply to 52779
Jens:
Hillarious! To bad it's not possible to use ø æ and å






In Java, you can. But there is no preprocessor to change the keywords.


The perfect programming language is still to be invented.

(in my own little one, there is no keyword, just symbols so it is I18N ready)

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 05:11 • by ammoQ
52785 in reply to 52779
Jens:
Hillarious! To bad it's not possible to use ø æ and å


In Oracle's PL/SQL the can be used for identifiers, but that's a bad idea.



A question regarding comments.



At my current place of employment we are discuraged from putting
comments in our code in general. The two exceptions to this exist rule,
is API programming and code which cannot be made self-explanatory and
therefore deserved commenting. The reason for this being that comment
are often not updated as the code evolves, thus ending up being
misleading to the maintenance programming in the end. Obviously this
approach this approach assumes that an effort is being made to keep the
implementation as clean. What are our thought on this approach to
commenting?



Personally i'm very fond of stuff like javadoc commenting. I generally
like make a javadoc comment block for each and every
function/class/global/constant in my code, regardless of whether it's
use is self-explanatory or not.




Good comments do not repeat what the code already says, but why something is done. This "why" doesn't need to be updated that often.

Re: All Talk and No Code

2005-12-07 05:21 • by brazzy
52786 in reply to 52736
parasyte:
What's really amusing is that the Japanese
version was called ?????, or Ninja Ryukenden - "Legend of the Dragon
Sword Ninja."
Why they changed the name is beyond me, they exchanged one Japanese
phrase for another and both are meaningless to most foreigners.




Probably in order to make it more pronouncable.



Marketing people just go crazy when it comes to foreign languages. The
movie name "Couching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" is a literal translation of
the original Chinese name. In Japan, where people would actually understand the Chinese characters, it was titled in English, "Green Destiny".



And in Germany, where rampant anglicisms are the norm, Hollywood movie
titles are usually kept unchanged - English is just "cooler". At least
that has its advantages as you don't have problems identifying the
movie when talking to Americans or Englishmen. But once in a while,
they'll "translate" an English title into a DIFFERENT English title!
For example "Bend it like Beckham" was called "Kick it like Beckham".
Because while English is automatically "cool" to many, those are
usually the same people who don't speak it all that well and would be
confused by non-trivial words and idioms.



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