Comment On Unregistering a COM DLL

Yesterday, we learned that there is an entire Hall of Shame dedicated to bad UIs. But, I must say, I didn't see anything in there that would last half a round with The FileMatrix. I am still completely mystified by that UI ... and I haven't even braved installation (unlike Roy O)! [expand full text]
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re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-06-03 12:03 • by Jason Mauss
And that guy is a "Senior" Windows Developer? At least he didn't just flat out lie to you about what he did, like the people I have to give support to do.

"No, it's case sensitive...it needs to be in all caps."

I did put it in all caps.

"Let me look then."

...

"Yeah, you've got lower case letters there. Capitalize them."

re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-06-03 12:11 • by winwar
Someone at my work gets messed up about slash/forward slash and back slash too.

re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-06-03 23:20 • by Psychotic Rambler
The 'forward slash vs. backslash' part is *almost* excusable. The first time.

I sincerely hope the 'Hooray!' was out loud.

re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-06-03 23:21 • by Psychotic Rambler
The 'forward slash vs. backslash' part is *almost* excusable. The first time.

I sincerely hope the 'Hooray!' was out loud.

re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-06-03 23:22 • by Psychrotic Rambler
Yeah, double-post. Gotta love it.

re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-06-08 16:51 • by David Cumps
Call everything a 'slash', the user has to figure out which one it is ;) if it doesn't work, try the other one

re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-08-04 14:31 • by cablito
<quote>Call everything a 'slash', the user has to figure out which one it is ;) if it doesn't work, try the other one </quote>

Users who can´t figure out when to use the right 'slash' should just be shot in public; or have their licenses to operate computers revogued.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2004-12-21 15:45 • by

At a company I worked at we had this issue of slashes


 


and began calling the backslash  wack


 


so a server location would be stated as


 


wack wack test zero one wack output


\\test01\output


 

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-04 21:40 • by
I've found that all to often ther is little difference between "senior" and "noob" ;)

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-09 08:59 • by
27522 in reply to 26934
I picked up a habit from an old boss of calling backslash "slosh" - so
/ is slash and \ is slosh.  Makes sense.  I extended it so
that underscore is "dosh" - so - is dash and _ is dosh.  Also
makes sense.  But why not go further?  ~ is twiddle, so ` is
twoddle; ! is bang, so ? is bong (even kind of looks like one...); and
so on, ad infinitum.



And incidentally, quite unrelated to the above: "square bracket" and
"angle bracket" take too long to say, so [ and ] are squackets, and
< and > (in languages like C++ that use them that way) are ackets.



But & is always ampersand; read about Intercal to learn why!

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 13:12 • by JamesCurran
27547 in reply to 27522

:
And incidentally, quite unrelated to the above: "square bracket" and "angle bracket" take too long to say, so [ and ] are squackets, and < and > (in languages like C++ that use them that way) are ackets.


Now, listen carefully, I'm onlyu gonna explain this once:


[ and ] are "Brackets" because the hard angles are represented by the hard K.


{ and } are "Braces" because the soft curves are represented by the soft C & S.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 13:40 • by Stan Rogers
27551 in reply to 27547
Actually, braces look more like a "Y" and are used to support one's
trousers (as an alternative to a belt). Brackets, on the other hand,
are generally used to support shelving rather than trousers.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 16:30 • by Blue
27576 in reply to 27551
Stan Rogers:
Actually, braces look more like a "Y" and are used to support one's
trousers (as an alternative to a belt). Brackets, on the other hand,
are generally used to support shelving rather than trousers.





When you say "bracing one's trousers", are you referring to what we call "Suspenders" in america?





Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 16:50 • by Stan Rogers
27580 in reply to 27576
P'raps, but most of the English-speaking world uses "suspenders" to
refer to what y'all call "garters" -- something to keep one's stockings
from becoming embarrassing anklets. (That applies to both the
just-below-the-knee dealies men use to keep their socks up and the belt
& hook contraption worn by ladies to keep their unmentionables from
being mentioned.)

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:06 • by Blue
27582 in reply to 27580
Stan Rogers:
P'raps, but most of the English-speaking world uses "suspenders" to
refer to what y'all call "garters" -- something to keep one's stockings
from becoming embarrassing anklets. (That applies to both the
just-below-the-knee dealies men use to keep their socks up and the belt
& hook contraption worn by ladies to keep their unmentionables from
being mentioned.)





Most interesting!



What can I say, we americans like to twist everything just a little
bit.  Sometimes it's a real stretch (like the word "Faggot").



So, the device that you hold your pants up with is called a "Brace",
are they referred to as "Braces", or is that just how you were
describing what action it performs?



If so, how do you distinguish between that device and the device one uses to straighten one's teeth?





Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:14 • by Stan Rogers
27583 in reply to 27582
One holds trousers up with "braces" -- always plural. (Unless one of
the buttons/clips has become unfastened, in which case it might be fair
to say that the trousers are being held up by a single brace -- but
that would definitely be non-standard usage, both of English and of
braces.)



A singular "brace" is (of course) a pair of something (usually, the
unfortunate victims of a hunting expedition), as one would expect in a
language like English, a device used to turn a bit (as for drilling
holes), or a prop of some sort. Othodonture appliances are also
"braces" (plural). It may be singular, but I think the device would
have to be installed 'pon a single tooth -- and I just don't see how
that would work at all. (See "non-standard usage", above.)

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:16 • by Stan Rogers
27585 in reply to 27583
Oh -- in order to distinguish between the braces your grandfather wears
and the braces your teenaged daughter wears: one is worn attached to
the waistband of a pair of trousers and arranged in a criss-cross
fashion over the shoulders, and the other is worn almost completely
inside the mouth.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:20 • by Blue
27587 in reply to 27583
Quite interesting indeed.  I looked up "suspenders" and "braces"
at mirriam-webster (www.m-w.com), which DID mention the "British"
version of suspenders and defined it as you had, but did not do the
same for "braces" (ie, no "British" definition referring to the
American "suspenders"). 



There are probably many online dictionaries (or at least word lists)
that translate between American English and Everyone Else's English,
but I tend to stick with authoritative sources and am too lazy to find
an authoritative one for this. :)





Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:31 • by Stan Rogers
27590 in reply to 27587
When in doubt, ask a Canadian. We didn't get mad at the Muvver Country
and stop listening to them back in the late eighteenth century, and we
watch your television all day every day. Oh -- both of you seem to
think there's something wrong with the way we do English, so we
probably have it just about right....

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:44 • by Blue
27592 in reply to 27590
Stan Rogers:
When in doubt, ask a Canadian. We didn't get mad at the Muvver Country
and stop listening to them back in the late eighteenth century, and we
watch your television all day every day. Oh -- both of you seem to
think there's something wrong with the way we do English, so we
probably have it just about right....





It seems as though English (and its variants) inspire as many WTFs as VB does?



Sounds like we might need a new forum (other than side-bar) for language-related WTFs...



(VB Programmers: Just kidding!  You should know me by now.)



Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-10 17:48 • by
In England we have the Oxford Dictionary - this is where real English is defined.



I searched braces and here's the resultant page:

http://www.askoxford.com/results/?view=searchresults&freesearch=braces&branch=&textsearchtype=exact



notice that suspenders are on the list.



Jolly good show and all that!

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-27 22:07 • by HeapMalloc
28593 in reply to 26934
:

At a company I worked at we had this issue of slashes



 and began calling the backslash  wack



 so a server location would be stated as



 wack wack test zero one wack output



\\test01\output





Hrm... I've seen that practive here... maybe here is your there? 



All too often I see lots and lots of people get confused with their
slashes.  I sometime have to end up pointing the key out to
them. [:|]

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-28 11:36 • by CannonFodda

I think a much easier term is left-slash/right-slash. As in the left hand side of the keyboard, and the right hand side of the keyboard.


This came about when trying to teach my father to change a directory in an address bar. His reply to my statement of ''back-slash, Back-slash, BACK-SLASH!!! That one there, THAT ONE!'' was quite simply...


 


''Why the F@#! is that one a back-slash and that one isn't!''


 


Which I thought was a very valid point. Which leads me to this...


...Why are they called forward-slash and back-slash???

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-28 16:18 • by JamesCurran
28637 in reply to 28612

CannonFodda:
...Why are they called forward-slash and back-slash???


They aren't.


They're "slash" and "back-slash".


The slash is used in normal English writing and has been around for hundreds of years.  The backslash was probably invented in the last 50 years, is used only computer geeks, and named because it's the slash backwards.


On my keyboard, they are both on the right.

Re: re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2005-01-30 19:23 • by Foon
28680 in reply to 22283

:
And that guy is a "Senior" Windows Developer? At least he didn't just flat out lie to you about what he did, like the people I have to give support to do.

"No, it's case sensitive...it needs to be in all caps."

I did put it in all caps.

"Let me look then."

...

"Yeah, you've got lower case letters there. Capitalize them."


Sigh. People who think you can negotiate with or deceive things. The physical universe. Comes from all that religion of course - the idea that if you kiss God's ass hard enough then he will suspend the laws of nature on your behalf.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2006-02-10 16:40 • by merreborn
59819 in reply to 28612
CannonFodda:

...Why are they called forward-slash and back-slash???




I always figured the "normal" slash was the one used for typing/writing fractions.

1/2, 3/4, and so on.  This is the only slash we use in standard non-computer-based writing.

Since / is then the normal slash, \ is naturally the back slash.

Of course, if you grew up typing rather than writing, it seems a little less obvious.

Re: re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2006-02-10 16:57 • by GoatCheez
59826 in reply to 22289
Anonymous:
Call everything a 'slash', the user has to figure out which one it is ;) if it doesn't work, try the other one



Users who can´t figure out when to use the right 'slash' should just be shot in public; or have their licenses to operate computers revogued.


Yup. It's all just slash... H T T P colon slash slash. C colon slash. regsvr32 slash you.

If a "senior" programmer needs to be told that / is used for switches in dos, then they aren't "senior", and need to be demoted to "script kiddie". And even then, it's a generous demotion... Something more along the lines of "data input drone" is probably better suited for him.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2006-02-11 01:34 • by John Hensley
Sorry about the old thread bump but...



There was an incredibly annoying grad student in the CS department
where I did undergrad. Her only response any time a student was having
trouble, was to cheerfully screech "THINK ABOUT IT!!" until the student
got a clue or got fed up.



She always referred to / as

(I swear this is true)

"forward backslash"



This is a good example of why I chose to major in EE instead.



Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2006-02-11 07:38 • by Alistair Wall
59867 in reply to 59859
Anonymous:
Sorry about the old thread bump but...



There was an incredibly annoying grad student in the CS department
where I did undergrad. Her only response any time a student was having
trouble, was to cheerfully screech "THINK ABOUT IT!!" until the student
got a clue or got fed up.



It might have been annoying at the time, but it's the best way to prevent WTFs.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2006-02-11 16:30 • by John Hensley
59879 in reply to 59867
Alistair Wall:

It might have been annoying at the time, but it's the best way to prevent WTFs.


I tend to think that identifying what the student has overlooked and
explaining it works better, and someone who can't do that should be in
a teaching role.

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2006-02-11 16:31 • by John Hensley
59880 in reply to 59879
shouldn't

Re: Unregistering a COM DLL

2009-11-07 08:57 • by Simon (unregistered)
I did something incredibly daft when just starting in support... I needed to unresister about 20 or 30 DLLs (cannot remember why, now, only that it was necessary).

Not being one to sit through and repeat the command 20 times, I thought I would be clever and do a bulk unregister....

for %a in (*.dll) do regserv32 /u %a

(think that is the right syntax)

Lo and behold, the screen filled up with dialog boxes notifying me that it had unregistered a DLL - lots, and lots, of dialog boxes. I never knew that the unresister DLL was not based on the file in the current directory.

Fortunatly it was a server that we were umm-ing and ahh-ing over scrapping. I helped them make the choice!
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