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"That's right kids," Richard Welty writes, "you *will* play. Don't make me use this radar on you."

 

 

"I found this on a table at a Wendy's restaurant," Dave Conger writes, "I appreciate that they their shakes are 'made from real ingredients.' I guess they want to stand out by not using imaginary ingredients, like their competitors."

 

 

Mark writes, "I think my Arbys has been contacted by aliens."

 

 

"I got this blank CD envelope in a Microsoft course," Aleksander Razumny Rødner writes, "interestingly, they meant to leave it blank."

 

 

Ari S was somewhat confused by this door at is local target...

 

 

And on a related note, Chris Kenworthy writes "it seems the Road Chef in Durham could do with a lesson in binary operations."

 

 

"Maybe I'm missing something," notes Allan, "but these are two words I wouldn't have imagined fitting together."

 

 

"This message in Boots Pharmacy in Kelso, Scotland says it all," writes Mike Forsyth.

 

 

"I found this ad while searching for some C# question," Nate Taylor wrote, "I wonder what kind of 'assistance' I'd be provided if I called the number for consulting."

 

 

G.S. this in response to last month's toilet sign from Monash U. "As a large manufacturer in Adelaide, Australia with a lot of Asian workers," he adds, "we've had a similar sign in our 'cubicles' for some time. However it doesn't seem to help; they still get rather disgusting."