No More Paper!

  • Bellinghman 2009-01-08 08:13
    "the taxes around here charge a bit of a premium during the holidays."
    I thought the US was supposed to have been founded as a protest against high taxes?

    Oh, Taxis!
  • mara 2009-01-08 08:13
    Clearly, Dale King photos were so ugly they desperately needed to be photoshopped.
  • Code Dependent 2009-01-08 08:14
    Somebody else do the "badger badger badger" thing with the photoshop pic this time. I did it last time.
  • Mitch 2009-01-08 08:19
    That last screenshot is so photoshopped, I cant believe you didn't notice that Alex
  • Someone You Know 2009-01-08 08:25
    Bellinghman:

    Oh, Taxis!


    Don't Ever Antagonize The Horn.
  • Someone You Know 2009-01-08 08:25
    I think Ken Cooney may some issues telling left from right.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 08:28
    Guess that explains how Dry Ridge got so dry.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 08:30
    I see you blurred out the addresses on the first one, but doesn't the (clearly visible) bar code at the bottom of the envelope basically encode the same information?
  • CodeReview 2009-01-08 08:31
    Someone You Know:
    I think Ken Cooney may some issues telling left from right.


    It's always embarassing to be called out by Someone You Know
  • reader 2009-01-08 08:34
    What is with the temperature measure for Cedar Creek?
  • reader 2009-01-08 08:37
    reader:
    What is with the temperature measure for Cedar Creek?


    uhm, Grove, Cedar Grove?

    captcha: genitus, instant-roflmao
  • AnonCoward23 2009-01-08 08:39
    Someone You Know:
    I think Ken Cooney may some issues telling left from right.

    He clearly meant the other left.
  • cthulhu 2009-01-08 08:48
    The realwtf is you have given me his address.

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.

    Oops!
  • jimlangrunner 2009-01-08 08:50
    Someone You Know:
    I think Ken Cooney may some issues telling left from right.


    Naw, he's a stage actor, and was talking about stage left.
  • Addison 2009-01-08 08:50
    Mitch:
    That last screenshot is so photoshopped, I cant believe you didn't notice that Alex


    Uh, no it really isn't. I've gotten that weirdness myself.
  • Anonymous coward 2009-01-08 08:52
    <quote>I thought the US was supposed to have been founded as a protest against high taxes?</quote>

    The Real WTF is in the comments, as usual.
  • jimlangrunner 2009-01-08 08:52
    Anon:
    I see you blurred out the addresses on the first one, but doesn't the (clearly visible) bar code at the bottom of the envelope basically encode the same information?


    Not really. The postal bar code is an encode of the zip+4, along with a couple of check-digits.

    Too bad they don't do a 2-d barcode like UPS does. Now THAT'S fun stuff.
  • Voodoo Coder 2009-01-08 08:53
    Addison:
    Mitch:
    That last screenshot is so photoshopped, I cant believe you didn't notice that Alex


    Uh, no it really isn't. I've gotten that weirdness myself.


    Error parsing style: "humor". Please try again.
  • Tim 2009-01-08 08:58
    cthulhu:
    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.


    This is utter nonsense.
  • Nobody You Know 2009-01-08 09:06
    Zip+4 will narrow it down to which block and which side of the street. Once you have that, you just go there and find the only house with a properly-configured wireless router and you've found your Daily WTF reader.
  • JPhi 2009-01-08 09:16
    cthulhu:

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.


    Whatever... Just because you saw that article on Slashdot or where ever it was doesn't mean you can do it. Also, they used a type of Gaussian blur which preserves shapes whereas the blur on the envelopes is more of a smear/wipe and no shapes are preserved whatsoever.

    As for the real snail-mail WTF -- Citibank sending me two letters a month telling my my online statement is available. (they've stopped)
  • Anon 2009-01-08 09:19
    Nobody You Know:
    Zip+4 will narrow it down to which block and which side of the street. Once you have that, you just go there and find the only house with a properly-configured wireless router and you've found your Daily WTF reader.


    Or just knock on a random door and ask for Martin. Even if it's the wrong door, I'm sure his helpful neighbors will happily tell you that he lives at number 42.
  • Steven 2009-01-08 09:26
    The real WTF here is that I posted the Niagara Falls picture (not "Dale King"), and even gave the description that was used. However, the "FinePix" message did not happen to me, and I did not send that with my post.
  • shepd 2009-01-08 09:27
    I work with busted computers too much.

    CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR - DEFAULTS LOADED
    Press F2 for setup
    Press F1 to continue

    Also, D/M/Y on the receipt. WTF!
  • Voodoo Coder 2009-01-08 09:29
    Anon:
    Nobody You Know:
    Zip+4 will narrow it down to which block and which side of the street. Once you have that, you just go there and find the only house with a properly-configured wireless router and you've found your Daily WTF reader.


    Or just knock on a random door and ask for Martin. Even if it's the wrong door, I'm sure his helpful neighbors will happily tell you that he lives at number 42.


    Ya know, since you guys all seem to have such a big ol man-crush on this Martin guy, maybe you should just ask him his address...he'd probably be much less freaked out when you showed up and gushed about how funny you thought his pictures on the interwebs were.

    (Seriously though, I'm sure this guy would be better off if the address was left untouched...then, at least, no one would try to hack it, and it'd lose its appeal...)
  • mauhiz 2009-01-08 09:37
    let's save bandwidth, no more comment!
    let's save bandwidth, no more comment!
    let's save bandwidth, no more comment!
  • Techzoid 2009-01-08 09:37
    Really? 89 degrees in Cincinnati a few weeks ago?
  • IByte 2009-01-08 09:53
    Perhaps they meant "there's no more paper in our office because we've mailed it all out".
  • Certified Coward 2009-01-08 10:16
    jimlangrunner:

    Too bad they don't do a 2-d barcode like UPS does. Now THAT'S fun stuff.


    Then what's that bunch of pixels in top right corner?
  • xxx 2009-01-08 10:18
    No. It's called "image processing". You know, stuff invented by smart people who think about problems instead of trolling on Internet forums.

    To address another commenter's claim that you can't undo directional smearing, that you can only degauss: on the contrary, this kind of filter is actually *easier* to revert. Learn how blurring is done. The operation is reversible *without loss* if it is a localized filter (which it always is in these kinds of blurrings) and you know its kind and *exact* parameters. Typically, you only know the kind (e.g. here: directional distortion) and you have to guess the parameters (here: speed). That's easy: the values space is small, use binary search.

    Recommendation: if you are trying to hide some part of an image, DO NOT blur it. Instead, draw an opaque black (or whatever, e.g. random patter; just don't apply any operation that uses original pixel values as inputs) box over the sensitive part. *That* is guaranteed to be unreversible. And if you absolutely want to use a fancy filter, you better understand the math first.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 10:18
    Techzoid:
    Really? 89 degrees in Cincinnati a few weeks ago?


    Now that you mention it, on the Channel 9 one you can see something about strong storms hitting the tri-state. I wonder if this was around the time that hurricane Ike hit Cincinnati and knocked everybody's power out. That might explain some strange sensor readings due to power being all screwed up.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 10:21
    xxx:

    Recommendation: if you are trying to hide some part of an image, DO NOT blur it. Instead, draw an opaque black box over the sensitive part.


    And TRWTF is that people continue to mess about with blurs when a black box over the sensitive pixels is both easier and more secure.
  • Andy 2009-01-08 10:22
    cthulhu:
    The realwtf is you have given me his address.

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.

    Oops!


    Big talk. Let's see you do it.

    Whether or not the data is retrievable depends a lot on the type of blur, the resolution and contrast of the image, and whether or not the images are unadulterated before they're blurred. (It's easy to mangle it before blurring.)

    Another important question is whether you can make assumptions about the content. (ie: Getting an account number off of a check printed in OCR font is a lot easier than getting a random address printed in a normal human font.)

    Really, if you have to develop custom software to find someone's address, I'm going to go out on a limb and say that he's going to consider it "good enough".
  • clickey McClicker 2009-01-08 10:23
    Why bother blurring? it takes less CPU time to just draw a few black boxes. Does the blur make it more authentic or something.

    I only care because more CPU time means more trees that were burned to make electricity.
  • squeem 2009-01-08 10:25
    JPhi:
    cthulhu:

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.


    Whatever... Just because you saw that article on Slashdot or where ever it was doesn't mean you can do it.



    No, it was one of those evening detective shows. There are 3 steps:
    1. Spray window cleaner on a Q-Tip
    2. End of Q-tip turns red
    3. Murderer's picture appears on computer monitor

    This process is called "Forensic Science".
  • Anon 2009-01-08 10:42
    squeem:
    JPhi:
    cthulhu:

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.


    Whatever... Just because you saw that article on Slashdot or where ever it was doesn't mean you can do it.



    No, it was one of those evening detective shows. There are 3 steps:
    1. Spray window cleaner on a Q-Tip
    2. End of Q-tip turns red
    3. Murderer's picture appears on computer monitor

    This process is called "Forensic Science".


    No, you missed the step where lots of different criminal pictures appear on the screen while the computer searches the database. Because everybody knows, it's important to show the data on the screen as you search it.
  • Bob Dole 2009-01-08 10:48
    I hear it speeds up the search considerably to show all the pictures and redraw the interface.
  • Dennis 2009-01-08 10:49
    You're confusing Zip+4 with Postnet. The Postnet barcode shown encodes Zip+4 plus the delivery point which is often the last two digits of the numeric part of the street address. DPBC (Delivery Point Bar Code - 11 digit Postnet) is supposed to be unique for every deliverable address.

    BTW, Pekin, IL, but I won't get any more specific than that.
  • gravis 2009-01-08 10:58
    I've seen that multiple Photoshop import error pop up quite a bit actually... on client computers with pirated installs of Photoshop. Way to go.
  • Squidfood 2009-01-08 10:59
    I work in [unnamed government department]. We like everyone do most things by email, including all departmental memos etc. Imagine my surprise, a few months ago, to find an actual paper memo in my mailbox. Then I noticed there was one in every one of the 250+ mailboxes in the mail room. A colleague later reported the same thing in his building, bringing the total to 1000 (at least).

    It was a memo on the Paperwork Reduction Act.
  • evanm 2009-01-08 11:05
    I saw the Niagra Falls one myself, and took a few shots myself. Never got around to submitting it though. Glad someone else did.
  • DeLos 2009-01-08 11:07
    squeem:
    JPhi:
    cthulhu:

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.


    Whatever... Just because you saw that article on Slashdot or where ever it was doesn't mean you can do it.



    No, it was one of those evening detective shows. There are 3 steps:
    1. Spray window cleaner on a Q-Tip
    2. End of Q-tip turns red
    3. Murderer's picture appears on computer monitor

    This process is called "Forensic Science".


    I'll create a gui interface using visual basic and see if I can track an ip address.
  • DeLos 2009-01-08 11:08
    Anon:
    I see you blurred out the addresses on the first one, but doesn't the (clearly visible) bar code at the bottom of the envelope basically encode the same information?


    I decoded the barcode. It turns out that the mails are coming from INSIDE YOUR HOUSE!!
  • Spectre 2009-01-08 11:20
    The battle for which comment can display the hottest temperature has begun!

    1000°.
  • Anon Ymous 2009-01-08 11:21
    Dennis:
    You're confusing Zip+4 with Postnet. The Postnet barcode shown encodes Zip+4 plus the delivery point which is often the last two digits of the numeric part of the street address. DPBC (Delivery Point Bar Code - 11 digit Postnet) is supposed to be unique for every deliverable address.

    BTW, Pekin, IL, but I won't get any more specific than that.


    (1300 block) Willow St.
    Pekin, IL 61554-2908 delivery point 04.
  • Anon Ymous 2009-01-08 11:26
    http://www.fsbolocal.com/propertyPics/11488_0_1190679876441.jpg

    O_O
  • Dennis 2009-01-08 11:29
    Anon Ymous:


    (1300 block) Willow St.
    Pekin, IL 61554-2908 delivery point 04.


    I can tell you Martin's last name and show you pictures of his house. It's all out there for anyone to see. Privacy is an illusion.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 11:29
    Anon Ymous:
    Dennis:
    You're confusing Zip+4 with Postnet. The Postnet barcode shown encodes Zip+4 plus the delivery point which is often the last two digits of the numeric part of the street address. DPBC (Delivery Point Bar Code - 11 digit Postnet) is supposed to be unique for every deliverable address.

    BTW, Pekin, IL, but I won't get any more specific than that.


    (1300 block) Willow St.
    Pekin, IL 61554-2908 delivery point 04.


    Well, aren't you clever. I'm sure the person who originally submitted the picture really appreciates it.

    In a related WTF, why blur the banks address. I'm pretty sure that's not a secret.
  • Dennis 2009-01-08 11:31
    Anon Ymous:
    http://www.fsbolocal.com/propertyPics/11488_0_1190679876441.jpg

    O_O


    Oh, I see you've been busy, too.
  • Someone You Know 2009-01-08 11:45
    Anon:

    In a related WTF, why blur the banks address. I'm pretty sure that's not a secret.


    Because the letter may have been sent from a local branch. If so, it'd probably be the one where Martin set up his account, which might give you a clue as to where he lived. Of course, that means little since other, more specific information about where he lives is available elsewhere on the envelope.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 11:54
    The biggest WTF is that PNC bank took TARP money and used it to buy National City. Way to go PNC!
  • Walleye 2009-01-08 11:58
    Bellinghman:
    I thought the US was supposed to have been founded as a protest against high taxes?


    To paraphrase Dave Barry "They dressed up as Indians and threw tea into the harbor, but surprisingly this did little to reduce taxes. They then dressed up as a harbor and threw tea into Indians, but this had no effect on taxes either..."
  • Da' Man 2009-01-08 11:59
    I have a mail account at German freemailer Web.de, which is pretty good service for money (it's free!) but has a limit of 500 mails or 5 GB - whichever comes first.

    Unfortunately, once you are approaching either of these limits, they start sending you "reminders" - by email, that is. And since they keep sending these reminders *every*few*minutes* they make sure the mailbox is over the limit in no time at all.
  • CynicalTyler 2009-01-08 13:04
    xxx:
    Recommendation: if you are trying to hide some part of an image, DO NOT blur it. Instead, draw an opaque black ... box over the sensitive part.

    That's why I draw an opaque text box over the sensitive part and type in "101 N. Screw You Dr." and blur *that*.
  • Code Dependent 2009-01-08 13:20
    Anon:
    No, you missed the step where lots of different criminal pictures appear on the screen while the computer searches the database. Because everybody knows, it's important to show the data on the screen as you search it.
    Don't forget the beep as each character of text appears on the screen.
  • Thief^ 2009-01-08 13:31
    Walleye:
    To paraphrase Dave Barry "They dressed up as Indians and threw tea into the harbor, but surprisingly this did little to reduce taxes. They then dressed up as a harbor and threw tea into Indians, but this had no effect on taxes either..."

    What about dressing up as tea and throwing Indians into the harbour?
  • acon1modm 2009-01-08 13:43
    "Whaddya expect, something intuitive here?"

    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
  • Blue Rose 2009-01-08 13:48
    I cringe every time I see this happen in movies. They might have gotten other critical details spot-on, but when it comes to mugshot searches, FAIL every time.

    The "rapid-fire flash every image on the screen" search flub-up reminds me of the just-as-aggregious "infinite zoom capabilities on grainy, black-and-white camera feed or photos" gimmick directors just love to abuse.

    Or the "flying through space with cool icons to show where you are in the computer system or network" representation that featured in Hackers and too many other movies/shows since.
  • plaidfluff 2009-01-08 13:50
    Man, National City. I used to have a second mortgage with them, and their website was HORRIBLE. They completely embodied the "doesn't get modern technology" side of things; completely different sets of login credentials for each kind of account (and it wasn't clear where the hell to go for a "home equity line of credit"), the login form kept on moving around and breaking in all sorts of curious ways, and their online payment options didn't fill me with any sense of confidence. Plus, even getting basic account information from the website was difficult, if not impossible - "for your security" they completely censor all account numbers from the online statements, and you have to consult the paper statements in order to get them (of course, I always ended up needing these numbers when I was nowhere near my filing cabinet).

    Somehow I guess they decided that a PDF stored on a password-protected SSL server was less secure than a piece of paper sent through postal mail.

    I ended up just setting them up as a recurring bill from my bank's bill payment instead.
  • Anon 2009-01-08 13:53
    Code Dependent:
    Anon:
    No, you missed the step where lots of different criminal pictures appear on the screen while the computer searches the database. Because everybody knows, it's important to show the data on the screen as you search it.
    Don't forget the beep as each character of text appears on the screen.


    Yes, this is especially import with password systems so you know which characters you got right.
  • ck 2009-01-08 14:13
    I was hoping it might be a "No Keyboard Present - Press F1 to Continue" error.

    And in the UK, d/m/y is the norm - makes far more sense as when you want to sort it completely you just reverse it. Also incrementing isn't done in the middle. Thats a WTF!
  • squeem 2009-01-08 14:30
    plaidfluff:
    Man, National City. I used to have a second mortgage with them, and their website was HORRIBLE. They completely embodied the "doesn't get modern technology" side of things; completely different sets of login credentials for each kind of account (and it wasn't clear where the hell to go for a "home equity line of credit"), the login form kept on moving around and breaking in all sorts of curious ways, and their online payment options didn't fill me with any sense of confidence. Plus, even getting basic account information from the website was difficult, if not impossible - "for your security" they completely censor all account numbers from the online statements, and you have to consult the paper statements in order to get them (of course, I always ended up needing these numbers when I was nowhere near my filing cabinet).



    National City's web site is better now, and features a very happy and politically correct vaguely ethnic lady on the front page.

    Wells Fargo has a horrendous web site, with separate logins
    for account lookup and account payment. The first part displays account numbers as "xxx-xxx1234-9001", the second as "xxxxxxx2349001". Since all my accounts end with the same last 4 digits, it's really easy to make a payment to the wrong account.
  • Trinian 2009-01-08 14:34
    No, you got the wrong number... this is 912.
  • TakeASeatOverThere 2009-01-08 15:13
    National City's web site is better now, and features a very happy and politically correct vaguely ethnic lady on the front page.

    I can only see a white douchebag holding binoculars. WTF, where's my vaguely ethnic women?
  • Corion 2009-01-08 15:54
    In my book, the real WTF here is that Adobe Photoshop is likely the culprit for the last one.

    And after all that trouble Adobe went through telling people to not use Photoshop as a verb.

    From http://www.adobe.com/misc/trade.html :
    Trademarks are not verbs.

    CORRECT: The image was enhanced using Adobe® Photoshop® software.
    INCORRECT: The image was photoshopped.
    Also INCORRECT: Photoshop using Photoshop.
  • Lihtox 2009-01-08 16:23
    ck:
    And in the UK, d/m/y is the norm - makes far more sense as when you want to sort it completely you just reverse it. Also incrementing isn't done in the middle. Thats a WTF!


    The best date format is of course y/m/d-- no reversing needed. Therefore, the problem with the US system isn't that we've got month and day reversed, it's that we've got the year on the wrong end.
  • Dennis 2009-01-08 16:35
    Dennis:
    Anon Ymous:


    (1300 block) Willow St.
    Pekin, IL 61554-2908 delivery point 04.


    I can tell you Martin's last name and show you pictures of his house. It's all out there for anyone to see. Privacy is an illusion.


    The funniest part and the real WTF is that the privacy page at http://thedailywtf.com/Info/Policy.aspx says "Coming soon..."

    Captcha: ratis ... in ur trashbinz stealin ur privaceez
  • Bob 2009-01-08 18:20
    Corion:
    In my book, the real WTF here is that Adobe Photoshop is likely the culprit for the last one.

    And after all that trouble Adobe went through telling people to not use Photoshop as a verb.

    From http://www.adobe.com/misc/trade.html :
    Trademarks are not verbs.

    CORRECT: The image was enhanced using Adobe® Photoshop® software.
    INCORRECT: The image was photoshopped.
    Also INCORRECT: Photoshop using Photoshop.


    "enhanced"?
  • '; drop table comments; 2009-01-08 18:31
    Blue Rose:
    Or the "flying through space with cool icons to show where you are in the computer system or network" representation that featured in Hackers and too many other movies/shows since.


    Has this ever actually been implemented? I want it so bad now.
  • Voytech 2009-01-08 19:08
    Quick question: What's a 733EB MHz CPU?

    Hex for CPU running at approx 472GHz?
  • Craig 2009-01-08 19:17

    Also, D/M/Y on the receipt. WTF!


    km on the receipt implies this is not American. Nearly everywhere else lists dates as d/m/y.
  • moz 2009-01-08 20:16
    ck:
    And in the UK, d/m/y is the norm - makes far more sense as when you want to sort it completely you just reverse it.
    No you don't - that would get you 8002/50/03. A date in ISO 8601 format wouldn't help you put your receipts in order in any case.
  • lolwtf 2009-01-08 22:11
    Voytech:
    Quick question: What's a 733EB MHz CPU?

    Hex for CPU running at approx 472GHz?
    Judging by the gibberish hard drive name and random characters on the screen, I'd say it's a sign of defective RAM and/or CPU.

    Also, these images have clearly been Photoshopped 8 times.
  • BentFranklin 2009-01-09 01:18
    FinePix software is terrible. All I want to do is move my files from the camera to the disk. Nope, I have to click each one and say what I want. A great reason to avoid Fuji cameras.

  • Dave 2009-01-09 02:56
    squeem:
    No, it was one of those evening detective shows. There are 3 steps:
    1. Spray window cleaner on a Q-Tip
    2. End of Q-tip turns red
    3. ...


    Note that if the Q-tip is currently pregnant it will turn blue instead of red. This has caught a number of people in the past.
  • bjolling 2009-01-09 03:18
    Thief^:
    Walleye:
    To paraphrase Dave Barry "They dressed up as Indians and threw tea into the harbor, but surprisingly this did little to reduce taxes. They then dressed up as a harbor and threw tea into Indians, but this had no effect on taxes either..."

    What about dressing up as tea and throwing Indians into the harbour?
    That's racist!
  • bjolling 2009-01-09 03:24
    Anon:
    squeem:

    <snip>

    No, it was one of those evening detective shows. There are 3 steps:
    1. Spray window cleaner on a Q-Tip
    2. End of Q-tip turns red
    3. Murderer's picture appears on computer monitor

    This process is called "Forensic Science".


    No, you missed the step where lots of different criminal pictures appear on the screen while the computer searches the database. Because everybody knows, it's important to show the data on the screen as you search it.
    In one CSI episode, someone is trying to search for fingerprints in the DB. They show about 10 fingerprints flashing by on the screen and on the eleventh they show the reference points, a pop-up saying "NO MATCH" appears and the search stops.

    So what about the first 10? Where they a "NO MATCH" as well? They probably were less of a "NO MATCH" than the last one. And what about those other millions of fingerprints... why don't they also show "NO MATCH"?
  • martin (from the wtf) 2009-01-09 03:59
    Wow, you guys are good. I don't suppose any of you that discovered the address, would want to e-mail me and walk me through step-by-step exactly how you did it, would you? phpworm AT yahoo com
  • John 2009-01-09 05:21
    squeem:
    JPhi:
    cthulhu:

    Blurring it only works so far. Giving me 3 instances of the same blurred text provides enough info to retrieve the underlying address.


    Whatever... Just because you saw that article on Slashdot or where ever it was doesn't mean you can do it.



    No, it was one of those evening detective shows. There are 3 steps:
    1. Spray window cleaner on a Q-Tip
    2. End of Q-tip turns red
    3. Murderer's picture appears on computer monitor

    This process is called "Forensic Science".


    Don't get me started on those 'forensic science' shows!

    I remember one where a picture of a killer was obtained by enlarging a security camera shot of a victim, so the killer's reflection could be seen in the victim's eyes.

    They're responsible for giving technically-challenged bosses the idea that any information whatsoever can be obtained from a computer once a nerd steps up and presses a few keys.
  • weirded verber 2009-01-09 08:46
    i have 'paper-free' banking and it works like this:

    )sign up for paper-free banking
    )they stop sending monthy statements
    )at end of year, the bank sends 12 months worth of statements instead...

    ...err...wtf?
  • iogy 2009-01-09 09:24
    gravis:
    I've seen that multiple Photoshop import error pop up quite a bit actually... on client computers with pirated installs of Photoshop. Way to go.


    I've had it pop up on my laptop, and I'm running a completely legit version of CS3 Web Premium here.

    I've also submitted the animated gif version of this (the row of Photoshop Photoshop Photoshop goes on and on) before either screenshot of this WTF (this is the second time this dialog appears in Error'd) turned up.
  • |-| 2009-01-09 09:42
    its taxies or taxis, not taxes.
  • Steven 2009-01-09 11:48
    lolwtf:
    Voytech:
    Quick question: What's a 733EB MHz CPU?

    Hex for CPU running at approx 472GHz?
    Judging by the gibberish hard drive name and random characters on the screen, I'd say it's a sign of defective RAM and/or CPU.

    Also, these images have clearly been Photoshopped 8 times.


    This picture was not "Photoshopped". I don't even have photoshop. That Niagra Falls picture is real.
  • rfsmit 2009-01-09 13:14
    DeLos:
    I decoded the barcode. It turns out that the mails are coming from INSIDE YOUR HOUSE!!


    If you're interested...
  • clickey McClicker 2009-01-09 13:19
    [quote user="Steven"][quote user="lolwtf"][quote user="Voytech"]

    Also, these images have clearly been Photoshopped 8 times.[/quote]

    This picture was not "Photoshopped". I don't even have photoshop. That Niagra Falls picture is real.[/quote]

    You took a picture of a photoshopped object that was photoshopped 8 detectable times.

    refer to:detecting photoshop
  • rfsmit 2009-01-09 13:24
    |-|:
    its taxies or taxis, not taxes.

    It's "it's", not "its"; "taxies" is not a plural noun, but a third person singular verb; and you're replying to the wrong comment. Please do try harder.
  • Pax 2009-01-09 17:31
    Has anyone else noticed that the holiday line for the receipt is $13107.20 and that 131,072 is 2^17?

    Or have I just been in the industry too long?
  • Pax 2009-01-09 17:33
    Crikey, no wonder it's called "Dry" Ridge.
  • tin 2009-01-10 02:50
    shepd:
    I work with busted computers too much.

    CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR - DEFAULTS LOADED
    Press F2 for setup
    Press F1 to continue


    Unless it's reversed or using DEL or another key.


    shepd:
    Also, D/M/Y on the receipt. WTF!


    You do know that there are other countries out there, right? And some of them call their currency "dollar" too... Oh, and quite a number speak English.
    Australia and New Zealand spring to mind just to get the examples started. Actually, the crazy "holiday" charge might not be a WTF if we're talking NZ dollars though (joke at New Zealand's expense there)



    Voytech:
    Quick question: What's a 733EB MHz CPU?
    Hex for CPU running at approx 472GHz?


    EB model Pentium 3. Most BIOSes showed it as a part of the speed for some reason.
    http://www.cpuscorecard.com/cpufaqs/dec99e.htm
  • fmobus 2009-01-12 08:37
    the real wtf is having a "peak hour" surcharge in a holidays.
  • Tim 2009-01-12 10:06
    Pax:
    Has anyone else noticed that the holiday line for the receipt is $13107.20 and that 131,072 is 2^17?

    Or have I just been in the industry too long?

    yup i noticed that too - which led me to the conclusion that the erroneous software probably works in $0.10 units rather than in $ or cents
  • BKatt 2009-01-12 12:33
    @cthulhu:

    I can't find the 3 images?!? ... :)
    Moreover to use super-resolution algorithms you will need the blurring function to be different or to have shifted snapshots by a non-integer number of pixels.
    so please cut them some slack, will ya?
  • Krem 2009-01-13 18:08
    shepd:
    I work with busted computers too much.

    CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR - DEFAULTS LOADED
    Press F2 for setup
    Press F1 to continue

    Also, D/M/Y on the receipt. WTF!


    D/M/Y format is not uncommon as the day increments the quickest.. US Military uses this format to match the rest of the world.. US Citizens just have to be "special".. but gj on cmos checksum... was going to point out the battery prob died, but n/m now..
  • Mike 2009-02-01 14:21
    Holy shit I was in Niagara Falls the same 3 days and got the same picture :O

    That was weird One day it was working and then the next day it stopped... and just showed a bios screen. lol.