Y2K Pedaling

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  • Gerkins 2008-11-20 08:04
    The pickles are exactly why even when you "know" the customer will never see the code, you still watch what you type.
  • illtiz 2008-11-20 08:09
    "TimeLink license" expired...? Sounds as if the birth of Jesus had messed up some quite universal things...
  • rast 2008-11-20 08:14
    This post is Y2K ready
  • Keloran 2008-11-20 08:15
    Number 5 is obviouslly, NaN
  • Carl 2008-11-20 08:20
    The real expense with the bicycle was the testing. Since it doesn't have an onboard system clock to set forward, the team had to build a functional time machine and transport the bike (complete with brave rider) forward to the actual Y2K experience.

    He didn't survive the trip back, to tell everyone that Y2K turned out to be a non event. But fortunately his test checklist -- nicely filled out -- was clipped to the bike making a second test unnecessary.

    Ahh the sacrifices...
  • Cap This 2008-11-20 08:23
    The solution to the CAPTCHA should be obvious to any human. Simply count the number of boxes.

    But then again, maybe you should add up the length of all the lines.

    Or maybe it wants you to total the area of the boxes. Hint: there's a possible optimization here...
  • Indiana Jones 2008-11-20 08:27
    Yeah, I heard that movie was a steaming pile of cra
  • ParkinT 2008-11-20 08:30
    In 1997 I purchased a set of 'custom printed' pencils.
    They were standard #2 pencils, with an eraser, unsharpened.
    The text I had printed on them was:
    Y2K tested - Passed


    I still have a few lying around. Perhaps I should send one to Alex and get a sticker!
  • Nick 2008-11-20 08:38
    Carl:
    The real expense with the bicycle was the testing. Since it doesn't have an onboard system clock to set forward, the team had to build a functional time machine and transport the bike


    But the Time Machine would also need to be tested for Y2K compliance, as well as Y10K, Y100K, etc etc...
  • kennytm 2008-11-20 08:46
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Except it's ASP.NET.
  • cthulhu 2008-11-20 08:46
    In the late 90s the developers of this kind of beSpoke hardware realized that on January 1st 2000 the wheels would finally roll back round where they started. It was found as a result at least one Handle would become invalid.

    The cause of the error was traced using a carefully placed Brake-point and after a number of test Cycles it was determined the system could be labelled y2k compliant.

    Something about method-Chaining as well but im too Tyred to continue and I think I've puNished you all enough anyway.

  • jamface 2008-11-20 08:48
    Pickling is a way of serializing data in python... so maybe that's what the guy was doing.
  • halcyon1234 2008-11-20 08:48
    The 500 error is very easy to explain:

    1) The designers wanted to have an additional object for saving state-based data
    2) The lead programmer was a pregnant woman
    3) Thus, she used both cookies and pickles

    Depending on how far along she is, I do not want to be the one to tell her they're out of pickles.
  • Kozz 2008-11-20 08:51
    To be fair, some browsers don't honor the W3C box model specifications (amongst numerous other violations). We don't know what browser this fellow was using to view Google's CSS reference pages.
  • cthulhu 2008-11-20 08:54
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.
  • Carl 2008-11-20 08:55
    Kozz:
    To be fair, some browsers don't honor the W3C box model specifications (amongst numerous other violations). We don't know what browser this fellow was using to view Google's CSS reference pages.

    Google Chrome, naturally.
  • Bob 2008-11-20 08:57
    Kozz:
    To be fair, some browsers don't honor the W3C box model specifications (amongst numerous other violations). We don't know what browser this fellow was using to view Google's CSS reference pages.


    So either Google did not add a doctype, causing IE to display in "quirks mode", or the person is still using IE5.5?

    Or Google wanted the ie 5.5 box model and thus left out a doctype on purpose and the person is using Firefox?
  • David 2008-11-20 08:58
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.
    Good one.
  • Imroy 2008-11-20 08:58
    Doing a simple google search turned up that page on CSS and style. It shows up fine on Firefox 3. Who wants to bet that screenshot is made with IE, well-known for its poor CSS handling?
  • K&T 2008-11-20 09:01
    Imroy:
    Who wants to bet that screenshot is made with IE, well-known for its poor CSS handling?


    It works fine in IE 6.0
  • Rick 2008-11-20 09:02
    In 1999 I was working for a company that made thermal management products, in other words, heatsinks. Big finned blocks of aluminum. For each of the heatsink products they used GE made us fill out forms verifying that our big inert chunks of metal were ready for Y2K. They were very serious about it too, there were penalties for not filing the paperwork.
  • DaveAronson 2008-11-20 09:09
    ParkinT:
    They were standard #2 pencils, with an eraser, unsharpened.
    The text I had printed on them was:
    Y2K tested - Passed
    Wouldn't surprise me if that humor was exactly the point. (And before you say it, yes, I saw that they were unsharpened and thus didn't have a point. You know what I mean.)

    Also, I have a "Mencil" (a Mensa pencil)... with erasers on both ends.
  • DaveAronson 2008-11-20 09:12
    cthulhu:
    In the late 90s the developers of this kind of beSpoke hardware realized that on January 1st 2000 the wheels would finally roll back round where they started. It was found as a result at least one Handle would become invalid.

    The cause of the error was traced using a carefully placed Brake-point and after a number of test Cycles it was determined the system could be labelled y2k compliant.

    Something about method-Chaining as well but im too Tyred to continue and I think I've puNished you all enough anyway.

    Cut it the fork out and pedal your hub-bub elsewhere, you crank, or we'll derailleur train of thought and you'll be in deep shift. Cantilever well enough alone?
  • John 2008-11-20 09:13
    TRWTF is that a production website was compile with debug="true" and customErrors mode="Off"

    As an aside, I remember going to HSBC's site and getting a server error which indicated the location of the access db it was trying to open.

    Even worse was that the fact that the mdb was store inside htdocs, and therefore available to download.

    Even worse that that, it wasn't password protected (if it were it would have taken less than a second to crack it anyway).

    It turned out to be a list of all their branches, sort codes, addresses, phone numbers & direct branch phone number & fax, so nothing too juicy.
    Still very handy to be able to call somebody in the branch rather than a call centre
  • dave 2008-11-20 09:18
    Could be worse -
  • Vincent Curry 2008-11-20 09:26
    If you count those three up, they're all the same...
  • Synchronos 2008-11-20 09:28
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    If you are trying to pose as TopCod3r, you should at least check you spell their* name right.

    *) Has TopCod3r ever said which sex they** are?

    **) Actually I really hate the epicene way to say he/she with the word 'they'.
  • Vollhorst 2008-11-20 09:31
    Wow, the browser (whichever, doesn't matter) didn't manage to fetch the stylesheet-file. How great! I am so totally impressed!!!

    This page goes downhill. Fast.
  • Vincent Curry 2008-11-20 09:32
    Cap This:
    The solution to the CAPTCHA should be obvious to any human. Simply count the number of boxes.

    But then again, maybe you should add up the length of all the lines.

    Or maybe it wants you to total the area of the boxes. Hint: there's a possible optimization here...


    The answer to all three is in fact the same...
  • Ken 2008-11-20 09:35
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.


    You're either retarded or trolling. I'm not too sure which.
  • Raf 2008-11-20 09:39
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.


    TODO: please calibrate your sarcasm parser.
  • 01001101010101011 2008-11-20 09:56
    cthulhu:
    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them.
    Why would you want to compile the file when it already *is* machine code?
  • Precious Metal Soldier 2008-11-20 09:58
    Indiana Jones:
    Yeah, I heard that movie was a steaming pile of cra
    Oh cra, a WTF involving a movie...
  • nocturnal 2008-11-20 09:58
    TRWTF is as always: VB
  • Patrys 2008-11-20 09:59
    Ken:
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.


    You're either retarded or trolling. I'm not too sure which.


    And the REAL WTF is using drag&drop WYSIWYG editors :)
  • amischiefr 2008-11-20 10:12
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.

    You must be new here...
  • Mickey Blue Eyes 2008-11-20 10:35
    Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doo? That is either the second movie (what a load of excrement that was!) or the fourth movie (according to South Park).
  • Chris 2008-11-20 10:53
    TRWTF is that you are using a version of IE thats > 7 years old
  • Chris 2008-11-20 10:55
    dave:
    Could be worse -


    Somehow it lost the quote ><.

    TRWTF is that you are using a version of IE > 7 years old
  • pink_fairy 2008-11-20 10:55
    DaveAronson:
    ParkinT:
    They were standard #2 pencils, with an eraser, unsharpened.
    The text I had printed on them was:
    Y2K tested - Passed
    Wouldn't surprise me if that humor was exactly the point. (And before you say it, yes, I saw that they were unsharpened and thus didn't have a point. You know what I mean.)

    Also, I have a "Mencil" (a Mensa pencil)... with erasers on both ends.
    From what I know about Mensa (second hand), I believe you actually need a pencil with rubbers on both ends.

    I am now going to give my second hand a cold shower.
  • Fuzzy 2008-11-20 10:58
    Oddly enough, I know the This American Life web developer and he just likes the word pickles.
  • jcoehoorn 2008-11-20 10:59
    For the ASP.Net error:

    I'm going to use my psychic debugging powers to guess that Pickles is the name of one of their database server. It sounds like an update just failed to put a required dll file in the right place.

    What's of more concern is the line below the error: "Dim sql As String". That smells of an sql injection vulnerability. I mean, they might be using query parameters, but something about the way it's set up tells me that's probably not the case.
  • pink_fairy 2008-11-20 10:59
    John:
    TRWTF is that a production website was compile with debug="true" and customErrors mode="Off"

    As an aside, I remember going to HSBC's site and getting a server error which indicated the location of the access db it was trying to open.

    Even worse was that the fact that the mdb was store inside htdocs, and therefore available to download.

    Even worse that that, it wasn't password protected (if it were it would have taken less than a second to crack it anyway).

    It turned out to be a list of all their branches, sort codes, addresses, phone numbers & direct branch phone number & fax, so nothing too juicy.
    Still very handy to be able to call somebody in the branch rather than a call centre
    Is there any way you could make the list public?

    I'm a customer of theirs, and something like this would be really handy. (Don't try their website unless you're in a particularly forgiving mood. Bank websites are notoriously feeble, but the HSBC one is quite astonishingly useless.)
  • jcoehoorn 2008-11-20 11:07
    For the ASP.Net error:

    I'm going to use my psychic debugging powers to guess that Pickles is either the name of a database server or a dumb name for a constants class. It sounds like an update just failed to put a required dll file in the right place.

    What's of more concern is the line a couple below the error: "Dim sql As String". That smells of an sql injection vulnerability. I mean, they might be using query parameters, but something about the way it's set up tells me that's probably not the case. Maybe it's the lack of a Try or Using statement protecting the sql connection.
  • dave 2008-11-20 11:18
    lol hell no, that's IE3! I use Firefox but have multiple IEs installed. Always nice to see just how much you can break a site with an old version of IE :P
  • Spoe 2008-11-20 11:28
    #1 reminds me of a radio story I heard on NPR a couple years back. It was a report on the high demand in the People's Republic of China for Rabbis to certify products kosher. Makes a certain amount of sense with all the food products coming from China these days.

    However, one of the Rabbis interviewed mentioned regularly getting requests to certify furniture, electronics, toys and so forth Kosher.
  • Mizchief 2008-11-20 11:31
    Mickey Blue Eyes:
    Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doo? That is either the second movie (what a load of excrement that was!) or the fourth movie (according to South Park).


    The Temple of Doo would have been a much more entertaining movie than the last one they put out.
  • Montoya 2008-11-20 11:46
    Clearly the CAPTCHA is just O00O in one of those boxy fonts.

    my CAPTCHA: secundum. It only took me a secund to think of this dum comment.
  • Steve 2008-11-20 12:18
    Yay! I'm the guy that wrote the code for the This American Life web site. Pickles is one of our custom classes that handles database connectivity, and other miscellaneous functions.

    Here's another This American Life easter egg... if you select all, you'll see hidden text on the bottom of the page that says Choppity chop chop cha-pow!

    Pickles pickles, whoopy doo!
  • Autocracy 2008-11-20 12:32
    Pickles == Foo == Bar. I personally use Llamas sometimes. Seriously.
  • operagost 2008-11-20 12:38
    Looks fine to me:
  • operagost 2008-11-20 12:39
    Spoe:
    #1 reminds me of a radio story I heard on NPR a couple years back. It was a report on the high demand in the People's Republic of China for Rabbis to certify products kosher. Makes a certain amount of sense with all the food products coming from China these days.

    However, one of the Rabbis interviewed mentioned regularly getting requests to certify furniture, electronics, toys and so forth Kosher.

    Maybe we can train a few of these guys to detect lead.
  • Anonymous TAL Web Site Programmer 2008-11-20 12:48
    This is obviously a client side error. His browser is not Kosher compatible.
  • beau29 2008-11-20 12:49
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    TopC0d3r, I suspect you're being generous (as always) to your colleagues. I bet you personally handle the machine language portions of those sites, which you've lovingly crafted into a nine-tier architectural framework. That way, instead of having to worry about gibberish like MOVSB and PUSH, your colleagues (underlings?) get to use easily understood high-level classes with names like "SecureSessionOptimizationStorePlugIn" and "PersistanceMediumWidgetMarshaller<UrlSnippetManager>."

    Am I wrong?
  • beau29 2008-11-20 12:56
    Steve:
    Yay! I'm the guy that wrote the code for the This American Life web site. Pickles is one of our custom classes that handles database connectivity, and other miscellaneous functions.

    Here's another This American Life easter egg... if you select all, you'll see hidden text on the bottom of the page that says Choppity chop chop cha-pow!

    Pickles pickles, whoopy doo!


    He's not lying. The "choppity chop chop cha-pow" is real!
  • Sven 2008-11-20 13:01
    Man that ASP.NET site is full of WTF-y goodness. Besides the weirdness of the pickles, the first question is why they are apparently compiling a live site with custom errors off (which is why you see the ASP.NET detailed error page) and debugging on (which is why you see the source code).

    Furthermore, they are using a SqlConnection withou putting it in a Using block, and the warning about a variable declaration without an As class means they are compiling with Option Explicit Off, which tends to be a good way to turn compilation errors into runtime errors (and isn't even the default, so they set it explicitly).
  • Bob 2008-11-20 13:06
    dave:
    Could be worse -


    Who still uses ie3?
  • DWalker59 2008-11-20 13:08
    Rick:
    In 1999 I was working for a company that made thermal management products, in other words, heatsinks. Big finned blocks of aluminum. For each of the heatsink products they used GE made us fill out forms verifying that our big inert chunks of metal were ready for Y2K. They were very serious about it too, there were penalties for not filing the paperwork.


    How do you know that the aluminum in the blocks wasn't going to transmute into something else (like mercury) on January 1, 2000? Did you do any testing to make sure it wouldn't?

    GE was only trying to be safe!
  • SuperousOxide 2008-11-20 13:11
    Vincent Curry:
    Cap This:
    The solution to the CAPTCHA should be obvious to any human. Simply count the number of boxes.

    But then again, maybe you should add up the length of all the lines.

    Or maybe it wants you to total the area of the boxes. Hint: there's a possible optimization here...


    The answer to all three is in fact the same...


    How can they be all the same? You can't compare number of boxes to length or area.
  • beau29 2008-11-20 13:14
    Sven:
    Man that ASP.NET site is full of WTF-y goodness. Besides the weirdness of the pickles, the first question is why they are apparently compiling a live site with custom errors off (which is why you see the ASP.NET detailed error page) and debugging on (which is why you see the source code).

    Furthermore, they are using a SqlConnection withou putting it in a Using block, and the warning about a variable declaration without an As class means they are compiling with Option Explicit Off, which tends to be a good way to turn compilation errors into runtime errors (and isn't even the default, so they set it explicitly).


    You can flame the creator of that site directly. He's posted on this thread.

    Name was Russell (I mean Steve).

  • J 2008-11-20 13:17
    Shouldn't it be the "Temple of D'oh"?
  • Deke 2008-11-20 14:23
    The "Y2k Ready" stickers were clearly a tongue-in-cheek marketing gimmick, not a WTF.


  • bbb 2008-11-20 15:05
    jamface:
    Pickling is a way of serializing data in python... so maybe that's what the guy was doing.
    Yes, he was serializing data in python with visual basic.
  • Code Dependent 2008-11-20 15:07
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.
    Somewhere in the spirit realm, P.T. Barnum is chuckling to himself.
  • Jollymorphic 2008-11-20 15:10
    Related to the Python serialization library, perhaps?

    http://www.python.org/doc/2.5.2/lib/module-pickle.html
  • Jollymorphic 2008-11-20 15:11
    Sorry. Didn't read before posting.
  • notme 2008-11-20 15:59
    Synchronos:

    **) Actually I really hate the epicene way to say he/she with the word 'they'.


    Then say "hu", possessive form "hus".
  • WhiskeyJack 2008-11-20 16:03
    pink_fairy:
    From what I know about Mensa (second hand), I believe you actually need a pencil with rubbers on both ends.


    Rubbers at both ends? Sorry, I don't swing that way.
  • Jess Wilburn 2008-11-20 16:10
    I tell ya what dude, Biking is starting to sound like a very good idea.

    Jess
    http://www.privacy.de.tc
  • pink_fairy 2008-11-20 16:20
    Code Dependent:
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.
    Somewhere in the spirit realm, P.T. Barnum is chuckling to himself.
    What, because "those who really desire to attain an independence, have only set their minds upon it, and adopt the proper means, as they do in regard to any other object which they wish to accomplish, and the thing is easily done?"

    Am I missing something here, or was P.T.Barnum an early advocate of machine code as opposed to ludicrous and unwieldy frameworks?
  • EXH 2008-11-20 16:24
    The Google page works fine in Firefox + Safari + Opera. The real WTF is Stephen Shwarz and whatever retarded browser he's using.
  • convicted felon 2008-11-20 16:25
    pink_fairy:
    Code Dependent:
    cthulhu:
    T0pC0d3r:
    The real WTF is ASP. When we make websites, we make them in machine code. That way no nasty errors like that pop up for the user to see.


    Hmm I find that very hard to believe.

    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?

    These days we have proper editors to drag and drop html into place, we don't need to use notepad, etc.

    You say you would get no nasty errors by using machine codes, but I guarantee you would get EVEN MORE nasty errors because it's harder to understand. Your comment is really a WTF in itself.
    Somewhere in the spirit realm, P.T. Barnum is chuckling to himself.
    What, because "those who really desire to attain an independence, have only set their minds upon it, and adopt the proper means, as they do in regard to any other object which they wish to accomplish, and the thing is easily done?"

    Am I missing something here, or was P.T.Barnum an early advocate of machine code as opposed to ludicrous and unwieldy frameworks?


    "There's a sucker born every minute."

    The implication being that cthulhu got trolled.
  • Code Dependent 2008-11-20 16:39
    pink_fairy:
    Am I missing something here, or was P.T.Barnum an early advocate of machine code as opposed to ludicrous and unwieldy frameworks?
    He was an early advocate of playing people for suckers.
  • ChrisWF 2008-11-20 17:14
    I rather code my websites using Good Ol' Assembler...

    (RLY? ASM to IL)
  • Bob 2008-11-20 18:41
    ChrisWF:
    I rather code my websites using Good Ol' Assembler...

    (RLY? ASM to IL)

    Well you could write server-side scripts in ASM (using the Common Gateway Interface), you would still need XHTML and CSS and possibly Javascript.
  • phx 2008-11-20 18:59
    What gets me about pickles is that its not just some random throwaway "foo" local variable thats being declared. "Pickles" is the name of the class. Da fuck?
  • icelava 2008-11-20 19:01
    Why can't Tyler see the three whitespaces in the captcha image??? pfffft
  • Carnildo 2008-11-20 19:32
    Bob:
    Who still uses ie3?


    I do. I've got a couple of old computers still running Win98, and since Microsoft Update requires IE 5.5 or later, it's not possible to upgrade.
  • anonymous_coder() 2008-11-20 19:35
    bbb:
    jamface:
    Pickling is a way of serializing data in python... so maybe that's what the guy was doing.
    Yes, he was serializing data in python with visual basic.

    Although you could probably do that with VB.NET and IronPython, that involves so many screaming WTFs the mind boggles...
  • Glen Fingerholz 2008-11-20 20:58
    Windows 98 shipped with IE 4. Why not use it (or better yet, do some searching to find installers for IE 5 and 5.5, and then use Windows Upgrade to get the latest IE 6)?

    (I never imagined I would be telling someone to install IE 6)
  • 008 2008-11-21 00:22
    Dish Network, where we never have user visible software bugs. Eve
  • Anonymous Cow-Herd 2008-11-21 04:17
    cthulhu:
    You could do it in theory by opening up a text editor (say notepad) and typing the machine codes to file before compiling them. But seriously why would anyone ever need (or want!) to do that?


    Agreed. Why would anyone want to type teh codes when they can have it emailed to them instead?
  • Argghhhhh 2008-11-21 07:48
    What is that, IE4?

    Captcha: haero - to be brought to a standstill. Seems appt.
  • cthulhu 2008-11-21 08:00
    The real WTF is that people are actually defending TopCoder's argument.
  • PSWorx 2008-11-21 08:30
    Well, so this just leaves to ask... how do you scratch your head on several levels? Isn't that painful?

    *pa-tching!*
  • OhDear 2008-11-21 09:52
    I witnessed the Canadian military Y2K testing a ship. They were putting stickers on every item in the inventory that was Y2K compliant. There were stickers on fire-extinguishers and tools like drills.
    Where they had trouble though was when manufacturers(one was a wall clock) told them to bugger-off when asked about their tool's Y2K status.
  • Virtually Brillant 2008-11-21 11:57
    My favourite Y2K story is from the Rinkworks Computer Stupidites pages - it's about an Intranet page with the messages:

    29.12.99 (...some headline...)
    29.12.99 (...some headline...)
    30.12.99 (...some headline...)
    02.01.100 Success! No Y2K bugs!

  • Mrrix32 2008-11-21 12:10
    Pickle

    Got a Mugglecast listener doing your code?
  • Semaj 2008-11-21 17:16
    And I thought finding a "Y2K Ready" sticker on a telephone cable terminal was odd

    CAPTCHA: luptatum
  • Stefan T. 2008-11-24 04:02
    The bike could have an onboard computer displaying the time and date.
  • Wyrdone 2008-11-25 14:51
    Yeah but your using what IE 4 in that example. IE4 didn't know a modern CSS style if it walked up and sucker punched him.
  • George 2008-12-01 16:45
    The web gurus for This American Life are particularly notorious, apparently, for silliness. Not much of a surprise considering the show and its very entertaining cast.

    Links to their show MP3s, for instance, look like this:

    http://audio.thisamericanlife.org/jomamashouse/ismymamashouse/314.mp3

    Speaking of their show MP3s:

    http://www.dirtygreek.org/journal/journalId/2006
  • Obloodyhell 2008-12-04 23:01
    Rick:
    In 1999 I was working for a company that made thermal management products, in other words, heatsinks. Big finned blocks of aluminum. For each of the heatsink products they used GE made us fill out forms verifying that our big inert chunks of metal were ready for Y2K. They were very serious about it too, there were penalties for not filing the paperwork.


    Process run amok.

    One more reason not to work for any behemoth company.
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  • kastein 2009-01-19 10:18
    (old thread, I know)
    ... something else rather WTF-y from This American Life is their keypress handling javascript:

    function checkCR(evt) {
    var evt = (evt) ? evt : ((event) ? event : null);
    var node = (evt.target) ? evt.target : (evt.srcElement) ? evt.srcElement : null);
    if ((evt.keyCode == 13) && (node.type=="text")) {return false;}
    }
    document.onkeypress = checkCR;


    whoa. I like ?: as much as (probably more than) your average coder, but that is mind-bending. Reminds me of the eleven-ary operator article from a while ago...
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