Not What I Had in Mind

by in Error'd on

Rob writes, "Sorry, but I'm not into Microsoft Office in that way."


The Validation Regex

by in Representative Line on

Regular expressions are a powerful tool for validating inputs, but what if your input is itself a regular expression? Is there a regular expression that can validate regular expressions?

Well, yes, if your regular expression engine supports recursion: /^((?:(?:[^?+*{}()[\]\\|]+|\\.|\[(?:\^?\\.|\^[^\\]|[^\\^])(?:[^\]\\]+|\\.)*\]|\((?:\?[:=!]|\?<[=!]|\?>)?(?1)??\)|\(\?(?:R|[+-]?\d+)\))(?:(?:[?+*]|\{\d+(?:,\d*)?\})[?+]?)?|\|)*)$/.


Analyze This

by in Feature Articles on

When asked to choose among several possible tools to do a job, qualified technical people look at the manual and test to see if the tool actually does what they need it to do. Is it reasonably configurable? Must it have root privilege to launch, or can it be installed as your application login id? Smarter folks will do a load test to see if it will scale beyond a handful of records and work with the expected volumes of data. And all of this will be combined to form an informed opinion as to whether the tool is appropriate for the task at hand.

High Level Managers have a different approach. They are too busy to deal with mere technical details.

Sigmund Freud Anciano

The Bare Minimum

by in CodeSOD on

Let’s say you needed to find the maximum and minimum values for a field in a SQL database. If you’re like most people, you might write a query like SELECT MAX(someval), MIN(someval) FROM table.

That’s the least you could do. That’s the bare minimum. And do you want to be the kind of person who does the bare minimum? Kevin L’s co-worker doesn’t. He’s a Brian.


Logging, Retooled

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OR Route 38 erosion, Jan. 2012 storm

In every company, there is a tendency to value code that was invented in-house over code that was, to put it bluntly, Not Invented Here. There is an eternal struggle to find balance between the convenience of pre-packaged code that is not fully vetted and the trustworthiness of code they themselves have written. As is typical in these tales, Jon's company got it wrong.


It Ain't Over Til It's Over

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"Countdowns are hard, particularly once they run out!" writes Peter.


Dumb's The Word

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Thank-you-word-cloud

Brent's latest software project contained a story for adding a word-cloud to a PDF report that was already being generated on a production server using Java. Instead of being handled by Brent's in-house team, the requirement was assigned—against Brent's wishes—to overseas developers whom the company had recently contracted to "add more horsepower" to things.


Built Up

by in CodeSOD on

In most languages, strings are immutable. As developers, we often need to manipulate strings- for example, constructing output through concatenation.

Constructs like foo += " and then I appended this"; “solve” this immutability issue by creating a new string instance. If you’re doing a long round of concatenation, especially if it happens inside of a loop, this could get very expensive, which is why most languages also have a StringBuilder type, which allows you to append without all that overhead of new instances. Often, the advice is that you should prefer StringBuilder objects to string.


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