Laundry of the New Millennium

« Return to Article
  • everythingdaniel 2009-05-06 09:06
    The best comes with a cost.
  • Zapp Brannigan 2009-05-06 09:09
    I declare shenanigans, everyone knows that Linux users don't wash their clothes or bathe.
  • Meep 2009-05-06 09:09
    Laundry machines crashing with each other, how sad :(
  • deekay 2009-05-06 09:16
    Ahh the German's and their whacky accounting software.
  • Mr B 2009-05-06 09:21
    deekay:
    Ahh the German's and their whacky accounting software.


    Obvious troll is obvious.
  • Lon Wett 2009-05-06 09:22
    I am really getting tired of self-appointed petty bureaucrats dictating that Mac users (true, less than 50% of the population, so who really cares) Linux users (OK, less than 5%) and Windows users with clue enough to stay clear of MSIE (0.5%? because if you have clue, why are you on Windows in the first place?) will be blocked from participating in an increasingly digital life. I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking? Do we have to resort to flogging you in the public square or what? It is far past time to put a painful end to this nonsense!
  • Al 2009-05-06 09:24
    TRWTF is that you can network washing machines.

    CAPTCHA: paratus (prepared indeed)
  • samanddeanus 2009-05-06 09:34
    Sites that only work in IE for the lose.

    Also, it should be Emacs/Linux, not Mac/Linux -- I think you left out a few letters by mistake.
  • Quango 2009-05-06 09:34
    deekay:
    Ahh the German's and their whacky accounting software.


    a) what Germans? I didn't see any reference to Germans?

    b) Drop the apostrophe
  • snoofle 2009-05-06 09:35
    I suppose it could have been worse. They might have tried to network the bathroom facilities as pay-toilets.

    *shudders*
  • amischiefr 2009-05-06 09:36
    "Slowly, the inhabitants were able to access their laundry accounts, except of course for Mac/Linux users who now could be recognized by the swarm of flies surrounding them."

    That's what you get for being one of those stuck up "my mac is so cool, I'm so hip cause I have a mac" college students. Conform like the rest of us!!!
  • DES 2009-05-06 09:37
    Quango:
    I didn't see any reference to Germans?


    "Seriously Annoying Programs"
  • snoofle 2009-05-06 09:37
    Quango:
    deekay:
    German's ...


    b) Drop the apostrophe

    So "German's" becomes "German,s"?

    (I'm feeling giddy today)
  • Jonathan Levy 2009-05-06 09:37
    If the machines are always running, that's 100% efficiency.

    If for each hour's use, you have (on average) half an hour's idle time, isn't that 66% efficiency?
  • Kirt 2009-05-06 09:37
    Lon Wett:
    I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking?

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?
  • krupa 2009-05-06 09:37
    Al:
    TRWTF is that you can network washing machines.


    Amen.

    Why is this system, even if it works perfectly, better than a change machine?

    I can name two things:
    1) Students don't have cash, but they have credit cards. (Thanks VisaMasterCardDiscover!)
    2) The person charged with emptying machines can get robbed. This happened in my town so the laundromat went to prepaid cards that you bought/recharged at a kiosk with cash.

    Seriously... just because you *could* implement a digital "solution" doesn't mean you have to.

  • Steve the Cynic 2009-05-06 09:40
    Zapp Brannigan:
    I declare shenanigans, everyone knows that Linux users don't wash their clothes or bathe.


    Duh. Of course they don't. They can't get access to the machines because they don't use Windows/IE...
  • AlpineR 2009-05-06 09:40
    I thought the reservation problem was going to involve inclusive time periods, like [12:00,1:00] instead of [12:00,1:00). Since the first person blocked the moment of 1:00 by reserving the period of [12:00,1:00], the second person couldn't reserve [1:00,2:00] and would instead take [2:00,3:00]. And then a walk-up user couldn't do a wash between the reservations since there isn't a full hour left. That'd waste a full hour per appointment (whether or not the person with the reservation shows up).
  • pjt33 2009-05-06 09:41
    Jonathan Levy:
    If the machines are always running, that's 100% efficiency.

    If for each hour's use, you have (on average) half an hour's idle time, isn't that 66% efficiency?

    Close. 67% to two s.f.
  • samanddeanus 2009-05-06 09:42
    Kirt:
    Lon Wett:
    I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking?

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    HTML is a web-based platform. It should be easy to make a laundry web site that works in Firefox, especially as Firefox has about 50% usage share and that the UI doesn't require anything except a few links, forms and radio buttons. Then just make sure you don't use any IE specific CSS.

    People who use Firefox on Windows are also annoyed about having to switch to IE.

    Also, IE8's changes or even IE7's changes in rendering might break make it unusable in those browsers.
  • Voodoo Coder 2009-05-06 09:43
    This is an insane case of over engineering...

    Seriously...wtf is wrong with putting a change machine up alongside a set of reliable quarter-fed laundry machines?

    There is a serious problem with what you are doing when you need to configure your washing machine with an IP address.

  • Jonathan Levy 2009-05-06 09:43
    Oh no! I've been out-nit-picked!

    :)
  • Jonathan Levy 2009-05-06 09:44
    pjt33:
    Jonathan Levy:
    If the machines are always running, that's 100% efficiency.

    If for each hour's use, you have (on average) half an hour's idle time, isn't that 66% efficiency?

    Close. 67% to two s.f.


    Oh no! I've been out-nit-picked!

    :)


    (sorry, forgot to quote the first time)
  • Lon Wett 2009-05-06 09:46
    Kirt:
    Lon Wett:
    I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking?

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?

    Yeah, I have "access" to a Windows machine, but I also have access to a fly swatter and it is safer and easier to use. So you better hope I don't meet you in a dark laundry room sometime!
  • Cbuttius 2009-05-06 09:52
    Way forward sounds good in theory, just needs a better trial period before proper rollout. Not sure why they implemented it in a way that works on IE only, it's one thing if they don't quite support every platform yet but that should roll out in time.

    Ideally would of course support paying by mobile phone with a text-back service, so they text you your user-key.

    Although in the green age, the most basic form of drier, "solar powered" the way they dried clothes in the old millennium, i.e. the very old one, might be the way to go.
  • linux user 2009-05-06 09:55
    samanddeanus:
    Sites that only work in IE for the lose.

    Also, it should be Emacs/Linux, not Mac/Linux -- I think you left out a few letters by mistake.


    I very much doubt it. vim is so much better than emacs that I don't think anyone uses it anymore.
  • rpjs 2009-05-06 10:09
    Lon Wett:
    I am really getting tired of self-appointed petty bureaucrats dictating that Mac users (true, less than 50% of the population, so who really cares) Linux users (OK, less than 5%) and Windows users with clue enough to stay clear of MSIE (0.5%? because if you have clue, why are you on Windows in the first place?) will be blocked from participating in an increasingly digital life.


    Not mention the irony of this story coming from Norway, home of Opera. OK, I loathe Opera nearly as much as I loathe IE (actually on reflection I loathe it slightly more than I loathe IE), but it's still pretty funny.
  • brazzy 2009-05-06 10:10
    Quango:
    deekay:
    Ahh the German's and their whacky accounting software.

    a) what Germans? I didn't see any reference to Germans?


    Look at the image. Closely. Then find the corresponding punne, or play on words, in the text.
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-05-06 10:13
    brazzy:
    Quango:
    deekay:
    Ahh the German's and their whacky accounting software.

    a) what Germans? I didn't see any reference to Germans?


    Look at the image. Closely. Then find the corresponding punne, or play on words, in the text.

    No, those Germans don't write crappy accounting software. Actually their products tend to be of rather good quality.
    It's the other Germans who are rightfully scorned here.
  • wds 2009-05-06 10:15
    TRWTF here of course is SAP. How they're still in business, it boggles the mind.
  • Isaac Eiland-Hall 2009-05-06 10:15
    I would have posted this comment sooner, but some moron had all the comments reserved.
  • brazzy 2009-05-06 10:17
    krupa:
    Amen.

    Why is this system, even if it works perfectly, better than a change machine?

    I can name two things:
    1) Students don't have cash, but they have credit cards. (Thanks VisaMasterCardDiscover!)
    2) The person charged with emptying machines can get robbed.

    Besides the possibility of robbery or someone cracking the machine to get at the cash, the person emptying the machines wants to get paid, as does the bank (commercial cash deposits carry a fee, especially for coins). Also, you constantly have to look out for people figuring out what foreign coins or simple discs of metal can be used.

    Ditching the cash can probably lead to substantial savings.


    This happened in my town so the laundromat went to prepaid cards that you bought/recharged at a kiosk with cash.

    Yeah, that's how everyone who doesn't go to a big name consulting company and say "here's $14m, please redo our entire IT" solves this problem...
  • Anonymous 2009-05-06 10:21
    Obligatory link: a non-WTF real-time laundry server:

    http://laundry.mit.edu
  • ubersoldat 2009-05-06 10:21
    Cbuttius:
    Way forward sounds good in theory, just needs a better trial period before proper rollout. Not sure why they implemented it in a way that works on IE only, it's one thing if they don't quite support every platform yet but that should roll out in time.

    Ideally would of course support paying by mobile phone with a text-back service, so they text you your user-key.

    Although in the green age, the most basic form of drier, "solar powered" the way they dried clothes in the old millennium, i.e. the very old one, might be the way to go.


    Have you ever been to Norway? I recall not having a lot of sunshine.
  • iToad 2009-05-06 10:22
    The school may have implemented this to serve as a bad example for the business and IT majors. It teaches them a lesson in enterprise software development that they will not soon forget.
  • brazzy 2009-05-06 10:22
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    brazzy:

    Look at the image. Closely. Then find the corresponding punne, or play on words, in the text.

    No, those Germans don't write crappy accounting software. Actually their products tend to be of rather good quality.
    It's the other Germans who are rightfully scorned here.

    Ahh, THOSE Germans. Silly me for not spotting it.

    Well, here in Germany, we have a saying:

    There are three ways to ruin a company:
    - Business consultants; that's the fastest way
    - wining, dining & whoring; that's the most pleasant way
    - Seriously Annoying Programs; that's the most certain way
  • Thg 2009-05-06 10:23
    Voodoo Coder:
    This is an insane case of over engineering...


    see? ... Germans. ... must be
  • ounos 2009-05-06 10:23
    For 14$m, one could buy a washing machine for each student.

    But the point of course was to charge them, right? Profit!
  • tm 2009-05-06 10:29
    I'm not convinced by this "good old coin-fed machines are better" argument. They may get mechanical failures, and someone WILL try to steal the money.

    At my university campus in Finland, we pay the laundry by mobile phone. Call the number, and the laundry machine activates. The charge appears on your phone bill. Perhaps it's not better than coin-fed machines, but not really worse either. During my 3 years here, I've had one case when it didn't work on the first try, but it worked when I retried a moment later.

    We still write down reservations on a paper time sheet, though. Works fine when there are enough machines per inhabitant.
  • iT_Ti 2009-05-06 10:31
    Amen!
  • brazzy 2009-05-06 10:36
    ounos:
    For 14$m, one could buy a washing machine for each student.


    The $14m was for a system handling all accounting and payment for the entire university. The washing machines were just a tiny peripheral system that was integrated into the new system very, very badly.
  • Herby 2009-05-06 10:38
    The only way this is NOT going to be a WTF incident is to have those responsible for the implementation be required to use the "system" as designed. When the designers are forced to see the problems, only then will the WFT problems be fixed.

    Just remember: when you get a new payroll system (probably one of those "Seriously Annoying Programs") if those responsible for the implementation don't get their paychecks from it, it WILL be doomed.

    As for computer controlled machines, consider the "Prancing Pony".
  • A Gould 2009-05-06 10:40
    Cbuttius:

    Ideally would of course support paying by mobile phone with a text-back service, so they text you your user-key.


    Or, we could use some shiny discs called "currency".

    Or possibly just pay cards - I put $10 in the machine, I get a $10 card. (My old university uses the student ID as a catch-all copier card).

    Not all appliances need to be internet enabled.

    (Personally, I'm waiting for the followup, where the Linux folks just hack the server to get free washes.)
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-05-06 10:42
    brazzy:

    Well, here in Germany, we have a saying:

    There are three ways to ruin a company:
    - Business consultants; that's the fastest way
    - wining, dining & whoring; that's the most pleasant way
    - Seriously Annoying Programs; that's the most certain way

    Nice, den kannt' ich noch nicht.
    However, if you really want to get rid of your business, call in Berger and Hopp. Together, they're irresistible.
  • valerion 2009-05-06 10:49
    Slowly, the inhabitants were able to access their laundry accounts, except of course for Mac/Linux users who now could be recognized by the swarm of flies surrounding them.


    Like the laundry situation had anything to do with that.


    Well somebody had to say it!
  • No 2009-05-06 10:51
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.

    so wtf?
  • Marcel 2009-05-06 10:58
    No:
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.


    26 (letters in the English alphabet) ^ 20 ~= 10^28.
  • kastein 2009-05-06 10:59
    Quango:
    deekay:
    Ahh the German's and their whacky accounting software.


    a) what Germans? I didn't see any reference to Germans?

    b) Drop the apostrophe
    SAP is a German company which writes software that no one knows what it does (to paraphrase The Inquirer). The "Seriously Annoying Programs" phrase is a quite obvious, but legally defensible reference to them.

    ... apparently not obvious enough

    Kirt:
    Lon Wett:
    I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking?

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?
    It was a web interface - and a simple one at that. Only the mentally retarded and the few remaining FrontPage users (redundant, I know) write websites that actually only work with IE.

    Addendum (2009-05-06 11:07):
    ounos:
    For 14$m, one could buy a washing machine for each student.

    But the point of course was to charge them, right? Profit!

    ... and I thought I had seen every braindead permutation of numeric suffixes and monetary symbols... yes, $14m makes no sense, but "14 dollars million"?
  • snoofle 2009-05-06 11:01
    Thinking back to my college dorm days, we had a laundry room full of machines with coin slots. No cash cards. No signup sheets (if all machines were in use, you just came back later). Hell, Tim Berners Lee hadn't even thought up the internet yet. Wait, so THAT's how it all started...
  • Sven 2009-05-06 11:03
    No:
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.

    A 20 character username, with only uppercase LETTERS, as the post said, would allow 26^20 possibilities, which equals approximately 10^28.

    We had a very simple laundry system at my old place: you buy laundry coins from the the building manager, and two days in advance you wrote on a list pinned to the wall of the laundry room which of the pre-defined timeslots you wanted to use. Then you used that. Use of the dryer was free and you automatically got the timeslot after the one you'd reserved for washing. You were limited to two timeslots per day.

    This was 4 machines for 500 users, and it worked perfectly, no complicated system required.
  • Sandor 2009-05-06 11:04
    Brilliant,

    I always hope that some day i can think of such a great way to spend a fortune and end up annoying the hell out of poor and unsuspecting students. I guess, i will be just dreaming to be close to such an extravagant scheme.

    Olaf
  • No 2009-05-06 11:04
    Marcel:
    No:
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.


    26 (letters in the English alphabet) ^ 20 ~= 10^28.


    26^20 = 10^28 + 9,928,148,895,209,409,152,340,197,376 (that's a huge underestimate for one little ~)

    Also, it said I's looked like 1's and O's looked like 0's so that partially implies it's alphanumeric

    Finally, if it were the case, wouldn't it be just as easy to write 26^20 as 10^28? And the author wouldn't have been off by almost 10 gajillion
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-05-06 11:04
    kastein:
    The "Seriously Annoying Programs" phrase is a quite obvious, but legally defensible reference to them.

    ... apparently not obvious enough


    Maybe they haven't yet built their reputation outside Europe?
  • Roy 2009-05-06 11:06
    Good point. Given that they mentioned they take uppercase and lowercase letters (in addition to numbers), the actual number of possible usernames is 62^20 ((26+26+10)^20), which is 704,423,425,546,998,022,968,330,264,616,370,176. The closest power of ten to that is 10^36 (which is approximately 42% larger).
  • Mad Morf 2009-05-06 11:07
    Clearly referring to SAP...

    And I concur.
  • A Gould 2009-05-06 11:08
    tm:
    I'm not convinced by this "good old coin-fed machines are better" argument. They may get mechanical failures, and someone WILL try to steal the money.

    I'm trying to remember if I ever heard of people trying to steal the money out of campus coin-ops. The ones I remember were secured with big padlocks...


    At my university campus in Finland, we pay the laundry by mobile phone. Call the number, and the laundry machine activates. The charge appears on your phone bill. Perhaps it's not better than coin-fed machines, but not really worse either. During my 3 years here, I've had one case when it didn't work on the first try, but it worked when I retried a moment later.


    Can't see that working in North America - by the time I pay for the phone, the airtime, and the extra charge for using an out of network washing machine, I wouldn't be able to afford the laundry!
  • Zapp Brannigan 2009-05-06 11:09
    Few things burn through excess cash like a bungled SAP implementation. They probably could have hired attendants at top union wages for less than the cost of going on-line. I'd like to see their ROI calculations. Just think about the technology required by this system just so you can do your OWN laundry. I'd wash with a bucket and washboard and dry using a clothes line.
  • Who is responsible 2009-05-06 11:10
    I hate stories like that... or rather I hate the fact that they are so prevelent.

    If i was going to that university, I'd really want to know who was responsible for wasting my tuition and *allowing* the "large company" to get away with crap like that. That person or comity has the first line of responsibility.
  • Who is responsible 2009-05-06 11:10
    dang... can't edit a post! arg...
  • Procedural 2009-05-06 11:18

    Half the issues would have evaporated on time if only they had run Lint on the code.
  • Pro 2009-05-06 11:19
    How can anyone "loathe" Opera? I have to use Windows XP at work, and you can be damn sure I always use Opera for web browsing, as it's fast and _very_ ergonomic. At home I use Linux, and alternate between Firefox and Opera.

    Born in the '80s, are you?
  • Neil 2009-05-06 11:19
    I cry foul about these supposed Mac users - they can afford a $3,000 laptop, but still live in the dorms?
  • Thomas Misund 2009-05-06 11:25
    I'm a victim of this system. I had to install Windows in a virtual machine to be able to wash my clothes, but hey, it wasn't enough: The billing system doesn't recognize my credit card's online authorization. Washing my clothes at my girlfriend's ... and moving out in two months.
  • Thomas Misund 2009-05-06 11:27
    A great deal of IT students in Oslo are using different GNU/Linux distributions as their preferred tool.
  • iToad 2009-05-06 11:27
    Herby:
    The only way this is NOT going to be a WTF incident is to have those responsible for the implementation be required to use the "system" as designed. When the designers are forced to see the problems, only then will the WFT problems be fixed.


    In business, this is called "Eating your own dog food".
  • DeepThought 2009-05-06 11:41
    Lon Wett:
    I am really getting tired of self-appointed petty bureaucrats dictating that Mac users (true, less than 50% of the population, so who really cares) Linux users (OK, less than 5%) and Windows users with clue enough to stay clear of MSIE (0.5%? because if you have clue, why are you on Windows in the first place?) will be blocked from participating in an increasingly digital life. I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking? Do we have to resort to flogging you in the public square or what? It is far past time to put a painful end to this nonsense!


    I customize software developed by "really big company" and that company (who shall remain nameless) was thoughtful enough to make sure that the development environment only works on Windows. The production software can be run on virtually any major platform including main-frames (running Z/Linux). Of course, they restricted the ability to access the administrative interfaces to folks using IE browsers only.

    While I'd love nothing more than to toss Windows to the curb, I'm forced to deal with it in order get my work done - or at least done in the most productive way possible.

  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-05-06 11:45
    Who is responsible:
    dang... can't edit a post! arg...

    Well, there's a method to get that ability.

    Captcha: register?
  • operagost 2009-05-06 11:56
    krupa:
    Al:
    TRWTF is that you can network washing machines.


    Amen.

    Why is this system, even if it works perfectly, better than a change machine?

    I can name two things:
    1) Students don't have cash, but they have credit cards. (Thanks VisaMasterCardDiscover!)
    2) The person charged with emptying machines can get robbed. This happened in my town so the laundromat went to prepaid cards that you bought/recharged at a kiosk with cash.

    So instead, the guy emptying the kiosk gets robbed?
  • avflinsch 2009-05-06 12:02
    Anonymous:
    Obligatory link: a non-WTF real-time laundry server:

    http://laundry.mit.edu


    and another http://rutgers.esuds.net
  • Patrik 2009-05-06 12:10
    And I'm thinking that there are better (read: standardized) ways of doing things in 2009 so that anyone, no matter how obscure the system, as long as it conforms to standards (not Microsoft de facto standards) can have as pleasant time as ... well anyone forced to use MSIE ;D
  • krupa 2009-05-06 12:13
    tm:
    I'm not convinced by this "good old coin-fed machines are better" argument. They may get mechanical failures, and someone WILL try to steal the money.


    The question is, "what do we mean by 'better'?".

    True, coin-operated machines suffer mechanical failures in the coin-accepter. And yes, people will try to steal the money either directly or just try to steal washes with fake coins.

    But at the same time, how many more points-of-failure do you introduce by (and I can't believe I'm saying this phrase) networking your washing machines? Also, how much personal information do they need to store on a server somewhere in order to properly charge you?

    It's probably more convenient to you, the customer, to call your washing machine but does that really make it 'better'?

  • krupa 2009-05-06 12:16
    operagost:
    krupa:


    2) The person charged with emptying machines can get robbed. This happened in my town so the laundromat went to prepaid cards that you bought/recharged at a kiosk with cash.

    So instead, the guy emptying the kiosk gets robbed?

    I figured someone would bring that up.

    The primary advantage is that you can *quickly* empty the kiosk. Emptying each machine takes much more time. I'm not saying the guy won't get robbed again, but he's probably lowered the odds quite a bit.
  • vtcodger 2009-05-06 12:21
    ***Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before? ***

    I know this is a radical idea, but washing machine interfacing wouldn't seem to be rocket science exactly. Ten to one, someone who actually knows something about web page design can do the interface in standard W3C compliant HTML in about two hours. It would then be usable on just about any device that supports any web browser. Or via netcat for that matter for those who thinks browsers are too effeminate.

    ====

    BTW, In my youth, about 50 years ago, I actually repaired coin operated washing machines and driers for a while. I can't think of any respect in which they would not be superior to a computer based system.
  • Martin Milan 2009-05-06 12:21

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    No - of course you shouldn't. You shouldn't be coding for any particular platform, but rather to simply dish out lovely, clean, standards compliant HTML, CSS etc, and have it actually work on the market leading browser.

    And really, anyone who sniffs the browser to deny a user these days should be taken out and shot.

    Martin.
  • Matt S 2009-05-06 12:26
    Whatever happened to featured comments?
  • numbers wrong still 2009-05-06 12:27
    10^36 is not 42% larger than 10^26. It's a bit more. Like 1000000000000% more.


  • helix 2009-05-06 12:34
    Voodoo Coder:
    This is an insane case of over engineering...

    Seriously...wtf is wrong with putting a change machine up alongside a set of reliable quarter-fed laundry machines?

    There is a serious problem with what you are doing when you need to configure your washing machine with an IP address.



    why quarter fed machines in Oslo?
  • helix 2009-05-06 12:35
    Matt S:
    Whatever happened to featured comments?

    credit crunch
  • Some coder 2009-05-06 12:39
    Jonathan Levy:
    If the machines are always running, that's 100% efficiency.

    If for each hour's use, you have (on average) half an hour's idle time, isn't that 66% efficiency?


    I think you mean utilization not efficiency, unless these dryers don't use any energy.
  • Someone You Know 2009-05-06 12:43
    numbers wrong still:
    10^36 is not 42% larger than 10^26. It's a bit more. Like 1000000000000% more.


    Okay, but no one said it was. Roy was saying that 10^36 is 42% larger than 62^20.
  • Ratchetr 2009-05-06 12:50

    Let’s say a machine takes 1 hour, and I reserve it from 12:00. This means that after 11:01 nobody could start a new machine, as it would crash with my reservation.

    Why would the machine crash just because there's a schedule clash?
    On average, this would cause a half hour idle period for each reservation, or a 50% drop in efficiency.

    Isn't this only true if there are only 2 machines? If there were say 6 machines, then one should be finishing on average every 10 minutes. So you have ~16% drop in efficiency? (Granted, I'm assuming a random distribution of start times, which probably isn't a good assumption here.)
  • shadowman 2009-05-06 12:54
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    kastein:
    The "Seriously Annoying Programs" phrase is a quite obvious, but legally defensible reference to them.

    ... apparently not obvious enough


    Maybe they haven't yet built their reputation outside Europe?


    No, they're famous in the other hemisphere as well. Some readers here are just a little "more special" than the others.
  • Code Dependent 2009-05-06 12:55
    It was simple enough. Fill your account with a certain amount of money using your credit card, then wash.
    Ah, yes. A lucrative idea, and one that Starbucks has put to good use. Sell a "Starbucks Card" for a prepaid amount, and then the user enjoys the prestige of having a Starbucks Card to pull out in front of coworkers, dates, etc., plus the convenience of simply presenting the card to make a purchase, rather than presenting his debit card.

    Meanwhile, Starbucks enjoys an interest-free loan from the user until the card's value is used up.
  • tekiegreg 2009-05-06 12:55
    From the article:

    Seriously Annoying Programs

    Subtle message here? I think not!
  • Some coder 2009-05-06 12:57
    avflinsch:
    Anonymous:
    Obligatory link: a non-WTF real-time laundry server:

    http://laundry.mit.edu


    and another http://rutgers.esuds.net


    As a Rutgers CS grad, I couldn't be more proud!!!
  • synp 2009-05-06 13:07
    Ratchetr:

    Isn't this only true if there are only 2 machines? If there were say 6 machines, then one should be finishing on average every 10 minutes. So you have ~16% drop in efficiency? (Granted, I'm assuming a random distribution of start times, which probably isn't a good assumption here.)


    I think you reserve a particular machine, and then the random distribution doesn't mean much.
  • Bad Context 2009-05-06 13:07
    samanddeanus:
    Sites that only work in IE for the lose.

    Also, it should be Emacs/Linux, not Mac/Linux -- I think you left out a few letters by mistake.


    Mac/Linux means Apple Macintosh or Linux.

    Also, I have seen quite a few WTF programs written in Emacs LISP. So, that interpretation makes me cringe.
  • dkf 2009-05-06 13:15
    Code Dependent:
    It was simple enough. Fill your account with a certain amount of money using your credit card, then wash.
    Ah, yes. A lucrative idea, and one that Starbucks has put to good use. Sell a "Starbucks Card" for a prepaid amount, and then the user enjoys the prestige of having a Starbucks Card to pull out in front of coworkers, dates, etc., plus the convenience of simply presenting the card to make a purchase, rather than presenting his debit card.

    Meanwhile, Starbucks enjoys an interest-free loan from the user until the card's value is used up.
    The real kicker is that cash is much faster at the point that the sale is being done, and it continues to work even when the network is down. These are real issues when selling coffee to people in a hurry. (The "inner wallet" effect — where someone, usually female, has their purse inside a bag in a handbag in another bag — about balances out, since both money and cards are subject to the same problem.)

    Sorry for the rant. It's a bit of an irritation to me when I miss a connection because someone ahead in the queue is insisting on paying in the slowest fashion possible...
  • samanddeanus 2009-05-06 13:29
    Bad Context:
    samanddeanus:
    Sites that only work in IE for the lose.

    Also, it should be Emacs/Linux, not Mac/Linux -- I think you left out a few letters by mistake.


    Mac/Linux means Apple Macintosh or Linux.

    Also, I have seen quite a few WTF programs written in Emacs LISP. So, that interpretation makes me cringe.


    I know that, but it could also mean a wierd combination of MacOS and Linux, just like GNU/Linux is GNU's stuff and the Linux kernel.
  • Alistair Wall 2009-05-06 13:33
    Sven:
    No:
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.

    A 20 character username, with only uppercase LETTERS, as the post said, would allow 26^20 possibilities, which equals approximately 10^28.


    There are 29 letters in the Norwegian alphabet. Redoing the subsequent calculations is left as an exercise for the reader.
  • Code Dependent 2009-05-06 13:39
    dkf:
    Code Dependent:
    Meanwhile, Starbucks enjoys an interest-free loan from the user until the card's value is used up.
    The real kicker is that cash is much faster at the point that the sale is being done, and it continues to work even when the network is down. These are real issues when selling coffee to people in a hurry. (The "inner wallet" effect — where someone, usually female, has their purse inside a bag in a handbag in another bag — about balances out, since both money and cards are subject to the same problem.)

    Sorry for the rant. It's a bit of an irritation to me when I miss a connection because someone ahead in the queue is insisting on paying in the slowest fashion possible...
    Yeah, customers digging for money in a bag is an annoyance (why not have it out and ready when you give the order?) but if the store has keypads for debit cards, that's quicker because there's no wait while the cashier counts out the change.

    I still think the best part is giving them an interest-free loan. I had a manager once who kept the balance on his Starbucks card at or near $100. To his credit, though, he really did have a valid use for it. Now and then he would hand it to one of us to use for buying the team a round. By having a Starbucks card, he didn't have to go along.
  • Me, myself and I 2009-05-06 13:46
    Thomas Misund:
    A great deal of IT students in Oslo are using different GNU/Linux distributions as their preferred tool.


    So what's the GNU-equivalent to an university-accounting-solution? :D
  • boots 2009-05-06 13:51
    From the rank young folks at MIT, apparently too busy inventing the future to do laundry:

    Fry (Dryer 1) has been off for 6 hours.
    Leela (Dryer 2) has been off for 55 minutes.
    Bender (Dryer 3) has been off for 56 minutes.
    Zoidberg (Dryer 4) has been off for 4 hours.
    Frylock (Washer 1) has been off for 66 days.
    Meatwad (Washer 2) has been off for 96 days.
    Shake (Washer 3) has been off for 80 minutes.

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...
  • null reference 2009-05-06 13:58
    Anonymous:
    Obligatory link: a non-WTF real-time laundry server:

    http://laundry.mit.edu


    And it even has dryers named after Futurama characters!
  • Franz Kafka 2009-05-06 13:59
    boots:
    From the rank young folks at MIT, apparently too busy inventing the future to do laundry:

    Fry (Dryer 1) has been off for 6 hours.
    Leela (Dryer 2) has been off for 55 minutes.
    Bender (Dryer 3) has been off for 56 minutes.
    Zoidberg (Dryer 4) has been off for 4 hours.
    Frylock (Washer 1) has been off for 66 days.
    Meatwad (Washer 2) has been off for 96 days.
    Shake (Washer 3) has been off for 80 minutes.

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...


    According to guys, dry == clean.
  • wee 2009-05-06 14:01
    There are far too many grammar WTFs here to even try enumerate them. My favorite, however, is "dividable".
  • rpresser 2009-05-06 14:19
    Book a washing machine and pay online in all laundries

    Oh, even better:

    Help for the online laundry system

    17.12.2008
    Problems with log in, paying for your laundry or reserving a washing machine? Read these tips that may help you:


    1. Internet Explorer is the best browser to use for the online laundry system
    2. If you choose another browser, make sure you have the latest version, and that all necessary “plug-ins” are installed.
    3. Mac-computers may be used without problems, but make sure the browser is updated to the latest version and that all necessary ”plug-ins” are installed.
    4. If the browser-window is incomplete after logging in, check whether there are popup-blocks. If so, turn them off.
    5. It may be difficult to differ between 0 (zero) and O (capital letter), and between 1(one) and I(capital letter) in your username. Make sure you use CAPITAL letters. Most signs are letters, but some numbers may occur.
    6. The username may be typed in with or without space.
    7. It is very important to differ between CAPITAL letters and normal letters in the password
    8. It is possible to change user name and password. This must be done in each laundry room you wish to use, as the the password is stored locally in each laundry room.
    9. If you forget your personal username and password, you may always log in with the original username and password.
  • Troy 2009-05-06 14:19
    "Every oddball platform no one's ever seen before"

    We call it Javascript, and just about every browser, even in Linux, supports it.
  • Renan_S2 2009-05-06 14:21
    Kirt:

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    What's so hard about making HTML/CSS/JS which works on every browser on every OS?

    Also, at home I currently have no Windows machines. At university I do have access to some, but I tend to avoid those and use the Linux ones (which few people want to use).
  • Christian 2009-05-06 14:24
    Hahaha

    This is definitely something I can relate to. I work as an IT-administrator at another Norwegian student dormitory.

    We have the same system, and the only solution for us was to hack the system and extract data from it!

    We dropped all the reservation and 20-char username nonsense and made our own system.

    We provide our tenants with a live overview of which machines are available. The system is also integrated with the accounting system, and you can actually se WHO is using each machine. (I believe we use the same accounting system as Sogn..) This is WAY better than the reservation scheme, and it works great :D

    Check it out here:
    http://www.bsn.no/portal/vaskeri

    All the machines communicate through UDP packages on a local network. They send out status packets every 30 seconds, and we managed to reverse engineer the proprietary miele protocol :)

    Oh, btw. Laundry machine systems aren't the only systems governed by stupidity and inflexibility. We have a system for remote reading of all the electricity meters. This "automated" system had to go through a guy with a spreadsheet and manual typos at the system "integrator" before we hacked it. We hacked the rs232 protocol it uses, and can now make cool features with that system as well :D

    Happy Hacking!
    - Christian
  • Mike 2009-05-06 14:25
    "TRWTF here of course is SAP. How they're still in business, it boggles the mind."

    True... the wonderful world of SAP, where numerical fields have leading zeros, and writing any interface or export/import is an exercise in futility. WTF is up with that?? At least, the version at my last employer did... thank god I left.

    Just wait until the upgrade happens... which in SAP terms, will require boatloads of consultants, months of planning, months of "implementation", changes to the business processes, fixes, post-implementation follow-up, and then planning for the next upgrade to fix what doesn't work in the existing version. Oh, and the inevitable outages and architecture changes to the infrastructure.

    Sometimes it's just easier to put quarters in a slot for the laundry machine to work, no? ;-)
  • elb01 2009-05-06 14:26
    snoofle:
    Quango:
    deekay:
    German's ...


    b) Drop the apostrophe

    So "German's" becomes "German,s"?

    (I'm feeling giddy today)


    Drop ze apostrophe und schtep avay from ze keybordt.
  • My Name 2009-05-06 14:35
    boots:
    From the rank young folks at MIT, apparently too busy inventing the future to do laundry:

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...


    It's a magical machine. If your shirt is dripping from sweat, just insert it into the magical machine and you will no longer have a wet shirt
  • Christian 2009-05-06 14:38
    Christian:
    Hahaha

    This is definitely something I can relate to. I work as an IT-administrator at another Norwegian student dormitory.

    We have the same system, and the only solution for us was to hack the system and extract data from it!

    We dropped all the reservation and 20-char username nonsense and made our own system.

    We provide our tenants with a live overview of which machines are available. The system is also integrated with the accounting system, and you can actually se WHO is using each machine. (I believe we use the same accounting system as Sogn..) This is WAY better than the reservation scheme, and it works great :D

    Check it out here:
    http://www.bsn.no/portal/vaskeri

    All the machines communicate through UDP packages on a local network. They send out status packets every 30 seconds, and we managed to reverse engineer the proprietary miele protocol :)

    Oh, btw. Laundry machine systems aren't the only systems governed by stupidity and inflexibility. We have a system for remote reading of all the electricity meters. This "automated" system had to go through a guy with a spreadsheet and manual typos at the system "integrator" before we hacked it. We hacked the rs232 protocol it uses, and can now make cool features with that system as well :D

    Happy Hacking!
    - Christian

    Oh, forgot to mention that the accounting is also equally inflexible, and also had to be hacked :) We have to hack everything :p
  • Tom Woolf 2009-05-06 14:40
    I miss my college's high tech washers and dryers. They used these mystical disks called "coins", some of which were "quarters" (although they were whole disks) and "dimes". An alternate method if the mystical disks were not available was to take a sturdy paper clip (MS's assistant was useful for something many years ago), straighten it out, then create an "L" shape at the end with the legs of the "L" being the diameter of the disks. Stick that "L" into the disk slot and go to town.
  • tm 2009-05-06 14:48
    krupa:
    True, coin-operated machines suffer mechanical failures in the coin-accepter. And yes, people will try to steal the money either directly or just try to steal washes with fake coins.

    But at the same time, how many more points-of-failure do you introduce by (and I can't believe I'm saying this phrase) networking your washing machines?
    That's a valid point. However, those points have proven to be quite robust, and since they are quite important for many other things as well, the parties responsible will scramble to fix them quickly. Even on holidays, unlike the coin machine repairs :-)
    krupa:
    Also, how much personal information do they need to store on a server somewhere in order to properly charge you?
    One can always get an anonymous pre-paid cell phone, if one is paranoid enough...
    krupa:
    It's probably more convenient to you, the customer, to call your washing machine but does that really make it 'better'?
    Of course :-)
  • moz 2009-05-06 14:54
    helix:
    why quarter fed machines in Oslo?

    Because, for every inadequate attempt to solve a technical problem someone at a company dreams up, there is a person on this web site who is able to think of a solution which is even worse, and is keen to share it with the group.
  • kastein 2009-05-06 14:55
    boots:
    From the rank young folks at MIT, apparently too busy inventing the future to do laundry:

    Fry (Dryer 1) has been off for 6 hours.
    Leela (Dryer 2) has been off for 55 minutes.
    Bender (Dryer 3) has been off for 56 minutes.
    Zoidberg (Dryer 4) has been off for 4 hours.
    Frylock (Washer 1) has been off for 66 days.
    Meatwad (Washer 2) has been off for 96 days.
    Shake (Washer 3) has been off for 80 minutes.

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...

    Dryers take FOREVER if you pack as many clothes into them as college students pack into washers. A wash cycle always takes the same amount of time, even if it doesn't really wash the clothes because they are packed solid. So all those students are packing the washing machine with 3x the clothes that are supposed to be in it, washing for fixed 20 minutes, then having to dry for 2.5 hours!

    ... not that I ever did that, or anything

    WPI has a (working!) laundry network system (laundryview.com), it would detect what school you were from by using the IP range you came from and give a list of available laundry rooms for that school. If you knew the laundry room ID code you could get to the page for that laundry room from an offcampus IP as well; and they actually did use IPs rather than reverse DNS (I know this because I had my PTR records set to my own domain and it still worked.) I know for a fact that it worked properly with Firefox (on Windows, Linux, and FreeBSD/amd64), MSIE, Opera, and Konqueror. The payment system was to either use quarters or to go to the accounting office and put a deposit of cash on your student ID card, which then could be used to run the washing machines. Just before I graduated they upgraded it to use a 3d representation of the laundry room done with flash, but if you did not have flash installed it would automatically fall back to standard HTML+CSS. Pretty neat, really.
  • Zer0 2009-05-06 15:11
    Lon Wett:
    I am really getting tired of self-appointed petty bureaucrats dictating that Mac users (true, less than 50% of the population, so who really cares) Linux users (OK, less than 5%) and Windows users with clue enough to stay clear of MSIE (0.5%? because if you have clue, why are you on Windows in the first place?) will be blocked from participating in an increasingly digital life. I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking? Do we have to resort to flogging you in the public square or what? It is far past time to put a painful end to this nonsense!


    I'm on Windows because development of high-performance multi-threaded (manycore support) applications is incredibly faster than on any other platform.

    Oh, and I'm a gamer. Ha.
  • iMalc 2009-05-06 15:21
    Ooooh password protect appliances!
    Is it weird that I strangely feel the need to have them?

    Er yes that was sarcasm..
  • Jason 2009-05-06 15:24
    "Organized protest groups are generally considered a sign of bad usability..."

    Man, Facebook must be HORRIBLY unusable then.
  • rpresser 2009-05-06 15:27
    Jason:
    "Organized protest groups are generally considered a sign of bad usability..."

    Man, Facebook must be HORRIBLY unusable then.


    It is!!

    Just because people use it doesn't mean it is usable, nor even worth using.
  • codeman38 2009-05-06 15:38
    Neil:
    I cry foul about these supposed Mac users - they can afford a $3,000 laptop, but still live in the dorms?
    Well, of course! They live in the dorms because they spent all their money on the laptops...
  • codeman38 2009-05-06 15:41
    Alistair Wall:
    There are 29 letters in the Norwegian alphabet. Redoing the subsequent calculations is left as an exercise for the reader.

    Gah, that means you've got to discriminate between O, 0, and Ø?
  • dkf 2009-05-06 15:44
    Code Dependent:
    Yeah, customers digging for money in a bag is an annoyance (why not have it out and ready when you give the order?) but if the store has keypads for debit cards, that's quicker because there's no wait while the cashier counts out the change.
    You might think so, but no. In normal circumstances, cash is fastest. Cards (all of which are about the same) are much slower because of the amount of time spent on verification of the card.
  • Chris 2009-05-06 15:47
    Martin Milan:

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    No - of course you shouldn't. You shouldn't be coding for any particular platform, but rather to simply dish out lovely, clean, standards compliant HTML, CSS etc, and have it actually work on the market leading browser.

    And really, anyone who sniffs the browser to deny a user these days should be taken out and shot.

    Martin.



    This kind of pious attitude has no concept of reality. The standards are not holy scripture but, believe it or not, are written by humans who make mistakes, or miss important details that browser vendors are forced to try to interpret. For instance, you could write a fully standards compliant site and still have it fail in every single browser out there (yes, Firefox too!)

    The fact is, if you're writing web sites or web apps, the only way to make sure they work everywhere is by testing them on each and every version of every browser you want to support. This is very expensive for most companies and this is why many have chosen to pick only 1 or 2 browsers that they're willing to support.
  • zolf 2009-05-06 15:57
    I think students should be grateful to the University administration. When they graduate (and finally wash) they will be ready for 99% of WTFs in their jobs.
  • m0ffx 2009-05-06 16:02
    Franz Kafka:
    boots:
    From the rank young folks at MIT, apparently too busy inventing the future to do laundry:

    Fry (Dryer 1) has been off for 6 hours.
    Leela (Dryer 2) has been off for 55 minutes.
    Bender (Dryer 3) has been off for 56 minutes.
    Zoidberg (Dryer 4) has been off for 4 hours.
    Frylock (Washer 1) has been off for 66 days.
    Meatwad (Washer 2) has been off for 96 days.
    Shake (Washer 3) has been off for 80 minutes.

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...


    According to guys, dry == clean.


    Or the dryers take longer than the washers. Or one wash load makes two drying loads. Or Frylock and Meatwad are broken. Or everyone knows Shake washes for free. Or...you get the point.

    Unrelated: I thought I had it bad where I am. The washing machines and dryers have coin slots, similar to those on vending machines. Now vending machines will take pretty much any combination of coins, and give change. But do these washing machines do that? No! The washing machines charge £1.20, and will ONLY accept pound coins and 20ps. The tumble dryers charge 20p for 40 minutes, and only accept 20ps. And there's no change machine either.
    (For Americans: UK coins are £2, £1, 50p, 20p, 10p, 5p, 2p and 1p. Most vending machines won't take the 2p and 1p but will take anything larger.)
    For even more infuriation, they have a ridiculous coin reject rate. Maybe 1 in 4, even 1 in 3 coins will get rejected. It will reject a coin once, then sometimes accept it on the second try. But not always. So even if I think I've got the money, it won't take it. And if say I've already inserted the pound coin, and it won't take any of my 20ps, I'm screwed. I can't even go and get change because after ten minutes it will forget all about the pound.
    And then there's the driers. They _do_ dry clothes, IF THEY WANT TO. If the sensor reckons the clothes are dry, it will stop drying. Of course sometimes the sensor gets it wrong, not a major surprise. But when it's stopped drying because of the sensor, it carries on counting down the time you've paid for! You can only buy in 40 minute chunks, so if a load takes 60 minutes to try, then unless you remove it and put the next in the moment it finishes, that 20 minutes gets wasted. But there's no way to know how long it's going to take! And if it's stopped drying but the clothes are still damped, then you've basically been robbed by a drying machine.

    I'd better stop now. I have to go and do my laundry.

    /rant
  • lost in the wash 2009-05-06 16:03
    There is also the United Airlines method: one stuffs the dirties into a duffle bag, and flies home with it to have Mom do the wash--a college roommate did that. Of course, boomer moms may not be as cooperative as some boomers' moms were, for one thing. For another thing, you could spend the next few semesters at Guantanamo Bay for endangering the health of the bomb dogs.

  • dkf 2009-05-06 16:04
    codeman38:
    Alistair Wall:
    There are 29 letters in the Norwegian alphabet. Redoing the subsequent calculations is left as an exercise for the reader.

    Gah, that means you've got to discriminate between O, 0, and Ø?
    They have Å, Æ and Ø, and they're all reckoned to be distinct letters from the 26 used in English. Danish is the same in this respect, and Swedish is very similar (except they use Å, Ä and Ö to write them).
  • kastein 2009-05-06 16:11
    Chris:
    Martin Milan:

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    No - of course you shouldn't. You shouldn't be coding for any particular platform, but rather to simply dish out lovely, clean, standards compliant HTML, CSS etc, and have it actually work on the market leading browser.

    And really, anyone who sniffs the browser to deny a user these days should be taken out and shot.

    Martin.



    This kind of pious attitude has no concept of reality. The standards are not holy scripture but, believe it or not, are written by humans who make mistakes, or miss important details that browser vendors are forced to try to interpret. For instance, you could write a fully standards compliant site and still have it fail in every single browser out there (yes, Firefox too!)

    The fact is, if you're writing web sites or web apps, the only way to make sure they work everywhere is by testing them on each and every version of every browser you want to support. This is very expensive for most companies and this is why many have chosen to pick only 1 or 2 browsers that they're willing to support.
    That's all well and good, but most enterprisey software is retarded and uses gobs of custom nonsense (think ActiveX controls, browser specific scripting etc etc) that only works on IE, or they detect your user-agent and refuse to let you even try viewing the site unless you fake it. I have only seen two websites that get it "right" by covering their asses and yet allowing you to attempt to use them - I believe one was H&R Block, which has a screen right after you log in that pretty much says "sorry, your browser is not on the list of browsers we support. Here's what we support (extensive list, rather impressive), do you want to try anyways or leave?" and then has "continue" and "exit" buttons. For what it's worth, it did work quite well on Firefox 2.x running on FreeBSD 6.2/amd64, I was pleasantly surprised.
  • Lego 2009-05-06 16:17
    Franz Kafka:
    boots:
    From the rank young folks at MIT, apparently too busy inventing the future to do laundry:

    Fry (Dryer 1) has been off for 6 hours.
    Leela (Dryer 2) has been off for 55 minutes.
    Bender (Dryer 3) has been off for 56 minutes.
    Zoidberg (Dryer 4) has been off for 4 hours.
    Frylock (Washer 1) has been off for 66 days.
    Meatwad (Washer 2) has been off for 96 days.
    Shake (Washer 3) has been off for 80 minutes.

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...


    According to guys, dry == clean.


    Exactly! Dry cleaning. :-)

    Never underestimate the effectiveness of a couple of dryer sheets to "freshen up" a smelly shirt that otherwise looks clean. Standard bachelor trick.

    -Lego
  • pedro 2009-05-06 16:29
    Follow this link to get to an information page at the university - the link itself is a wtf http://nexus.student.no/wps/portal/!ut/p/kcxml/04_Sj9SPykssy0xPLMnMz0vM0Y_QjzKLN4r3DATJgFjuJvqRyCIG8Y5wAV-P_NxU_YDg1JzU5JKAxPRU_SCgokhzoCJTH0v9qJzU9MTkSv1gfW_9gtzQiHLndEcAiB0W2Q!!/delta/base64xml/L0lDU0lKTTd1aUNTWS9vQW9RQUFJUWdTQUFZeGpHTVl4U21BISEvNEpGaUNvMERyRTVST2dxTkM3OVlRZyEhLzdfMF9QMy8x?WCM_PORTLET=PC_7_0_P3_WCM&WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/wps/wcm/connect/SiO/Housing+Units/Resident/Book+a+washing+machine+and+pay+online
  • random.next 2009-05-06 16:37
    Steve the Cynic:
    Duh. Of course they don't. They can't get access to the machines because they can't use Windows/IE...
    There, fixed the typo. :-)
  • JDeepBeep 2009-05-06 16:57
    Al:
    TRWTF is that you can network washing machines.


    It will be more optimal when each one has an IPv6 addy.
  • v.dog 2009-05-06 17:06
    Zapp Brannigan:
    I declare shenanigans, everyone knows that Linux users don't wash their clothes or bathe.
    And now you know why.
  • Maurits 2009-05-06 17:13
    boots:

    Fry (Dryer 1) has been off for 6 hours.
    Leela (Dryer 2) has been off for 55 minutes.
    Bender (Dryer 3) has been off for 56 minutes.
    Zoidberg (Dryer 4) has been off for 4 hours.
    Frylock (Washer 1) has been off for 66 days.
    Meatwad (Washer 2) has been off for 96 days.
    Shake (Washer 3) has been off for 80 minutes.

    4 dryers have been used today, but only 1 washing machine...


    7 hours ago, someone used Shake and then Fry.
    5 hours ago, someone used Shake and then Zoidberg.
    2 hours ago, someone used Shake and then split the load into Leela and Bender.

    (Splitting your loads across dryers saves time.)

    Alternative, less interesting explanation - someone unplugged the network cable on Frylock and Meatwad.
  • Code Dependent 2009-05-06 17:25
    Lego:
    Never underestimate the effectiveness of a couple of dryer sheets to "freshen up" a smelly shirt that otherwise looks clean. Standard bachelor trick.
    Well I woke up Sunday morning,
    With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt.
    And the beer I had for breakfast wasn't bad,
    So I had one more for dessert.
    Then I fumbled through my closet for my clothes,
    And found my cleanest dirty shirt.
    And I shaved my face and combed my hair,
    And stumbled down the stairs to meet the day.
    - KK
  • Americium 2009-05-06 17:44
    helix:
    Voodoo Coder:
    This is an insane case of over engineering...

    Seriously...wtf is wrong with putting a change machine up alongside a set of reliable quarter-fed laundry machines?

    There is a serious problem with what you are doing when you need to configure your washing machine with an IP address.



    why quarter fed machines in Oslo?


    25 Euro cents is a quarter Euro. I have no idea how many Euros it takes to clean laundry in Oslo, or the Norweigen word for "quarter", but it is a valid concept.
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-05-06 17:56
    Americium:

    25 Euro cents is a quarter Euro.

    Arithmetically, yes, but there's no 25 Lepta coin in Euroland, so quarter-fed washing machines would be kind of out of place there.
    Americium:
    I have no idea how many Euros it takes to clean laundry in Oslo,

    None, zero, null. Norge still has kroner. Those Vikings were clever enough to stay out of the EU.
    Americium:
    or the Norwegian word for "quarter", but it is a valid concept.

    I don't know that word either, but the smallest coin is 50 øre, so it's not a valid concept there.
  • Sam 2009-05-06 18:01
    Sven:
    No:
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.

    A 20 character username, with only uppercase LETTERS, as the post said, would allow 26^20 possibilities, which equals approximately 10^28.

    <snip>


    If it was only upercase letters why was there confusion wuth 0 and O, 1 and l ??

    Must be upercase letters and numbers

    --pedantic Sam
  • halcyon1234 2009-05-06 18:11
    amischiefr:
    "Slowly, the inhabitants were able to access their laundry accounts, except of course for Mac/Linux users who now could be recognized by the swarm of flies surrounding them."

    That's what you get for being one of those stuck up "my mac is so cool, I'm so hip cause I have a mac" college students. Conform like the rest of us!!!


    The Mac users won't do laundry, anyways. They'll just buy a new shirt. Sure, it's not really new, it's the same shirt. But this one has a world-shatteringly new [strike]feature[/strike] colored stripe down the side.
  • AndyC 2009-05-06 19:14
    kastein:

    That's all well and good, but most enterprisey software is retarded and uses gobs of custom nonsense (think ActiveX controls, browser specific scripting etc etc) that only works on IE, or they detect your user-agent and refuse to let you even try viewing the site unless you fake it.


    That's because, in the enterprise world, if you aren't using IE you're wasting money. None of the other major browsers (Firefox, Opera, Safari) have proper enterprise support, they can't even update themselves without administrator intervention. Epic Fail.

    No amount of freetards getting jizzy over how much more standards compliant browser X is counts for a damn out there in the real world.
  • Wearing yesterday's clothes 2009-05-06 19:17
    There are very good reasons to move to a coin-free laundry room. The main one (apart from safety improvements and savings by eliminating the need for collecting the coins), as pointed out in the story, is that students can use their student ID card and put the charge on their college bill for the semester.

    Not only is this more convenient (students may not have coins on hand, but they'll always have their student ID card), but also the coins would come out of the kids' OWN money, while in many cases the college bill is paid for by their parents. Everybody wins!
  • NutDriverLefty 2009-05-06 19:22
    dkf:
    You might think so, but no. In normal circumstances, cash is fastest.


    Up to the moment when some innumerate jackass has to make change for you.
  • hey persto! 2009-05-06 19:35
    A Gould:

    (Personally, I'm waiting for the followup, where the Linux folks just hack the server to get free washes.)


    You mean where they hack it to see if they can, they succeed, then they continue to not wash their clothes anyway?

    What are you going to wear when your only shirt and jeans are in the wash anyway.
  • Peter 2009-05-06 19:49
    IEs4Linux for the win!
  • Procedural 2009-05-06 20:38
    Sam:
    Sven:
    No:
    "as a 20 character username will handle 10^28 users."

    uh ok so I guess this is a numeric username (thus 10 digits)? But a 20 character username, assuming only numbers, would only handle 10^20 users, not 10^28.

    A 20 character username, with only uppercase LETTERS, as the post said, would allow 26^20 possibilities, which equals approximately 10^28.

    <snip>


    If it was only upercase letters why was there confusion wuth 0 and O, 1 and l ??

    Must be upercase letters and numbers

    --pedantic Sam



    As it was so well-thought-out, there was probably no notice on the paper slip that said ("Oh, hey, yes, by the way, those are only letters, so this sucks less") so people might have tried numbers anyway.

    --nerdy oblivious-to-humour Procedural
  • robbak 2009-05-06 22:03
    Anonymous:
    Obligatory link: a non-WTF real-time laundry server:

    http://laundry.mit.edu


    Oh, I think that a laundry with 4 driers functional and 2 of the 3 washers out of action for 2 and 3 months respectively is a fair wtf!

    (That said, it is probably a network issue, and the washers actually work to wash clothes; and maybe there are additional washers not networked.)
  • stevelaudig 2009-05-06 23:53
    Unless there is some compelling reason not to maybe hanging the laundry out to dry should be encouraged. Level of sympathy for the inconvenienced is close to zero.
  • Mike 2009-05-06 23:57
    There's also LaundryView.

    http://www.laundryview.com/lvs.php

    I've always wanted to network my washer and dryer since they don't have buzzers in them. While I'm at it I could network the heater and water heater to see how much they are on and all sorts of other stats.
  • immibis 2009-05-07 01:00
    "This means that after 11:01 nobody could start a new machine, as it would crash with my reservation."

    Is this intentional?
  • Casey 2009-05-07 01:31
    wds:
    TRWTF here of course is SAP. How they're still in business, it boggles the mind.


    No, how SAP's clients are still in business boggles the mind.
  • Real-modo 2009-05-07 03:56
    Zapp Brannigan:
    I declare shenanigans, everyone knows that Linux users don't wash their clothes or bathe.
    ...And Windows users try to bathe in dryers.
  • Meganne 2009-05-07 04:05
    Ilya Ehrenburg:
    Americium:

    25 Euro cents is a quarter Euro.

    Arithmetically, yes, but there's no 25 Lepta coin in Euroland, so quarter-fed washing machines would be kind of out of place there.
    Americium:
    I have no idea how many Euros it takes to clean laundry in Oslo,

    None, zero, null. Norge still has kroner. Those Vikings were clever enough to stay out of the EU.
    Americium:
    or the Norwegian word for "quarter", but it is a valid concept.

    I don't know that word either, but the smallest coin is 50 øre, so it's not a valid concept there.



    Right. But I must remind you that Norway is the most expensive country in the world, so one wash costs 12 NOK (Norwegian Kroner) which is about 1,5 dollars and something like 1,3 Euros. Ant that does not include the so-called drying!
  • Jax 2009-05-07 05:26
    wds:
    TRWTF here of course is SAP. How they're still in business, it boggles the mind.

    Me too.

    When the billing of our dark fiber lines was switched to SAP, we didn't receive any invoices for over half a year!


    A Million Flies Can't Be Wrong
  • dkf 2009-05-07 05:33
    NutDriverLefty:
    dkf:
    You might think so, but no. In normal circumstances, cash is fastest.
    Up to the moment when some innumerate jackass has to make change for you.
    Why would a coffee shop hire an innumerate jackass? It's not like they have to. At the very least they could hold out for someone who is both numerate and not an ass, as it's not as if there's a shortage of people looking for a job and those are actually key requirements...

    (I've never seen a Starbucks with innumerate jackasses for staff. Is it different in North America? It didn't seem to be to me when I've been over there.)
  • pragon 2009-05-07 05:44
    Quango:
    a) what Germans? I didn't see any reference to Germans?


    please read again:


    but the company responsible was building a system for the new Miele-nnium

  • Anonymous 2009-05-07 06:09
    A networked dryer. There is no greater WTF in this story than the delicious absurdity of a networked dryer.
  • wlao 2009-05-07 06:23
    dkf:
    codeman38:
    Alistair Wall:
    There are 29 letters in the Norwegian alphabet. Redoing the subsequent calculations is left as an exercise for the reader.

    Gah, that means you've got to discriminate between O, 0, and Ø?
    They have Å, Æ and Ø, and they're all reckoned to be distinct letters from the 26 used in English. Danish is the same in this respect, and Swedish is very similar (except they use Å, Ä and Ö to write them).

    But everyone living in those countries and using computers have learned to avoid these strange characters in their user name, since most systems will barf at you if you do.
    So redoing the calculation should be an exercise for the developers...
  • wlao 2009-05-07 06:27
    Mike:
    There's also LaundryView.

    http://www.laundryview.com/lvs.php

    I've always wanted to network my washer and dryer since they don't have buzzers in them. While I'm at it I could network the heater and water heater to see how much they are on and all sorts of other stats.

    Bah... I always wanted to network my washer and dryer so that I could scan my dirty laundry, mail it to the machines, and receive clean clothes in my mail that I could print out.
  • Cappuccino wins every time 2009-05-07 06:40
    Jonathan Levy:
    Oh no! I've been out-nit-picked!

    :)


    You wouldn't have those nits if you just used Windows!
  • NSCoder 2009-05-07 07:04
    snoofle:
    Hell, Tim Berners Lee hadn't even thought up the internet yet.
    And he still hasn't! He should be a saint of laundry!
  • Kay Bærulfsen 2009-05-07 07:05
    I aso used a Miele based system when I was a student. The funny thing about that system was that it would broadcast UDP messages over the student network, including the userid and the amount of laundry in kg. I never tried to inject packets, but Im sure its connected directly to the billing system(!).
  • DOLS 2009-05-07 07:07
    Denial Of Laundry Service: Reserve alla the machines :) !
  • Unfortunate Victim 2009-05-07 07:48
    The OP forgot to mention this that while the username is a terribly long string of random letters that cannot be memorized, the password is a simple four digit number. And while the web interface will not let you change your password, it is more than happy to provide you with a new username!
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 2009-05-07 08:13
    Meganne:

    Right. But I must remind you that Norway is the most expensive country in the world, so one wash costs 12 NOK (Norwegian Kroner) which is about 1,5 dollars and something like 1,3 Euros. And that does not include the so-called drying!

    Okay, so the weekly laundry costs you about one beer a month. Doesn't seem exorbitant to me.
    Way back when I was a student, a wash at my beautiful launderette cost six Deutschmarks. Take into account the leap of prices that came with the Euro and inflation on top, that roughly corresponds to €6 - €6.50 in today's money (I've not been to a launderette since then, so I don't know how much they actually charge nowadays in Germany, but heck, it's gotta be much more than in Norway).
  • Josh 2009-05-07 08:34
    TRWFT is no-one hacked it
  • DiverKas 2009-05-07 09:15
    HTML is a web-based platform. It should be easy to make a laundry web site that works in Firefox, especially as Firefox has about 50% usage share and that the UI doesn't require anything except a few links, forms and radio buttons. Then just make sure you don't use any IE specific CSS.


    Firefox 50%??? lol, no.. last check under 23%.
  • Dlareg 2009-05-07 09:17
    elb01:

    Drop ze apostrophe und schtep avay from ze keybordt.


    Oh great now we have vampires making comments..

    go back to taking pictures, otto.
  • Zapp Brannigan 2009-05-07 09:28
    Anonymous:
    A networked dryer. There is no greater WTF in this story than the delicious absurdity of a networked dryer.
    And yet who wouldn't pay to watch a live web cam of Megan Fox's panties fight with her bra in the dryer?
  • rainer 2009-05-07 09:37
    Zapp Brannigan:
    Few things burn through excess cash like a bungled SAP implementation.


    Not quite true. In fact, here we basically can't spend money because of a bungled SAP implementation (no way to account for expenses). Well, there's a workaround in place to keep our University afloat (since 01. Jan !!), but as far as I know, once the system works, all financial transactions will have to be re-entered...
  • Fnord 2009-05-07 09:41
    rpresser:


    Ouch. I can tell from the URL that not only do they use Seriously Annoying Programs, they also use a certain portal server from a different software company. I do not want to work there. EVER.
  • dkf 2009-05-07 09:58
    Dlareg:
    elb01:
    Drop ze apostrophe und schtep avay from ze keybordt.
    Oh great now we have vampires making comments..
    Or perhaps Jägermonsters. Hard to tell from the evidence.
  • m0ffx 2009-05-07 11:01
    stevelaudig:
    Unless there is some compelling reason not to maybe hanging the laundry out to dry should be encouraged. Level of sympathy for the inconvenienced is close to zero.

    Well there's this really weird phenomenon. In some places it's quite common, but in others extremely rare.

    Basically, what happens is you hang your laundry out to dry. However, when you come to take it inside, it's wetter than it started! Everything else outside is wet as well - the ground, walls, benches, etc. all get coated in this mysterious layer of water. It's been known to happen day after day for well over a week sometimes. In winter it can even be frozen!

    No-one's quite sure why this happens. There's a fringe theory that the water falls from the sky, but most people think that's nonsense.
  • AndyL 2009-05-07 13:42
    Lon Wett:
    Mac users (true, less than 50% of the population, so who really cares) Linux users (OK, less than 5%)

    Fascinating. You seem to have multiplied your percentages by 10.
  • Toodle 2009-05-07 13:42
    pedro:
    Follow this link to get to an information page at the university - the link itself is a wtf http://nexus.student.no/wps/portal/!ut/p/kcxml/04_Sj9SPykssy0xPLMnMz0vM0Y_QjzKLN4r3DATJgFjuJvqRyCIG8Y5wAV-P_NxU_YDg1JzU5JKAxPRU_SCgokhzoCJTH0v9qJzU9MTkSv1gfW_9gtzQiHLndEcAiB0W2Q!!/delta/base64xml/L0lDU0lKTTd1aUNTWS9vQW9RQUFJUWdTQUFZeGpHTVl4U21BISEvNEpGaUNvMERyRTVST2dxTkM3OVlRZyEhLzdfMF9QMy8x?WCM_PORTLET=PC_7_0_P3_WCM&WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/wps/wcm/connect/SiO/Housing+Units/Resident/Book+a+washing+machine+and+pay+online


    Hahaha! Classic SAP friendly URL.

    SAP must have the best salespeople in the world, but I don't think those salespeople ever have to actually use anything built by the company. If they did, they would be curled up in a corner of a padded room, caught in an endless feedback loop of self-recrimination for all the horror they've inflicted on their customers.

    Oh, and on $14m? Wow, for SAP that's a steal!

    (I'm not bitter or anything)
  • meh 2009-05-07 14:19
    AndyC:
    kastein:

    That's all well and good, but most enterprisey software is retarded and uses gobs of custom nonsense (think ActiveX controls, browser specific scripting etc etc) that only works on IE, or they detect your user-agent and refuse to let you even try viewing the site unless you fake it.


    That's because, in the enterprise world, if you aren't using IE you're wasting money. None of the other major browsers (Firefox, Opera, Safari) have proper enterprise support, they can't even update themselves without administrator intervention. Epic Fail.

    No amount of freetards getting jizzy over how much more standards compliant browser X is counts for a damn out there in the real world.


    Stop the presses, this post -and the fact the guy actually seems to buy it - was the real WTF.

    captcha: odio (hatred)
  • Taylor 2009-05-07 15:19
    Kirt:
    Lon Wett:
    I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking?

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    This is true for desktop software in many cases. As much as I like my Linux system, I know the business case doesn't always exist to support it. But for web apps there's really no excuse. It's not hard to create a web app that will work on any platform. It also means that the next IE update wont break your app.
  • m0ffx 2009-05-07 18:59
    meh:
    AndyC:
    kastein:

    That's all well and good, but most enterprisey software is retarded and uses gobs of custom nonsense (think ActiveX controls, browser specific scripting etc etc) that only works on IE, or they detect your user-agent and refuse to let you even try viewing the site unless you fake it.


    That's because, in the enterprise world, if you aren't using IE you're wasting money. None of the other major browsers (Firefox, Opera, Safari) have proper enterprise support, they can't even update themselves without administrator intervention. Epic Fail.

    No amount of freetards getting jizzy over how much more standards compliant browser X is counts for a damn out there in the real world.


    Stop the presses, this post -and the fact the guy actually seems to buy it - was the real WTF.

    captcha: odio (hatred)


    Wooosh.

    Key word bolded to help you.
  • stevelaudig 2009-05-08 00:33
    "some compelling reason not to" rain would be such a compelling reason. Irony and satire are among the hardest forms of writing to master. They call for keen observation and honesty and should not be attempted by anyone not capable of either.
  • AndyCanfield 2009-05-08 03:25
    Linux users don't wash their clothes or bathe.


    True. I only wear clothes when meeting Windows users. Upsets the beautiful women licking my naked body, but hey, work is work.
  • Craig 2009-05-08 04:11
    Only $14 mil for a system from SAP? I don't believe it for a seconc!
  • Jimmy Jones 2009-05-08 05:07
    The "dryers don't dry" problem is one I encountered many times when I was a student. It happens when you stuff a dryer absolutely full of clothes, stomp them a bit to pack them tightly together, then add another load of clothes to the tiny gap you just created, finally needing a friend to help you close the door.

    All to save money - because why pay for two loads when it all goes in one machine.

    But yeah, if this story is true it's truly worthy of a WTF award.
  • NorwegianDelight 2009-05-08 09:09
    I've googled (in Norwegian, okay???) and searched and I can't come up with a scrap of verification for this story.

    Seems odd that *no one* would be bitching about
    the "Sogn Studentby vaskerier" on blogs/Twitter/FB. I only find a few twitters about the WTF.

    Is this just an excuse to do some Strange Accounting Purposes bashing?
  • Michael 2009-05-08 10:51
    I've actually used that system for the better part of a year. It was horrible!

    Another issue with the system is that it fully relies on an internet connection. Which went down now and then, resulting in some tenant having to call the janitor, to get the janitor to open the system so we got to wash for free while they fixed the internet. The problem, of course, was that more often than not, the janitor spent 2-3 days before even showing up. Very fun.

    This system is employed at all student villages in Oslo, which are 5-6 places or so.
  • JTSandvik 2009-05-08 16:15
    Thomas Misund:
    A great deal of IT students in Oslo are using different GNU/Linux distributions as their preferred tool.


    I was thinking the same. If you design for students, you have assume they use all kinds of browsers. They are not your aunt.

    Bye the way, you are the first person here I have actually met in real life. And not for IT-related reasons either. (NGMF Veterankorpset.)
  • JTSandvik 2009-05-08 18:36
    DiverKas:
    HTML is a web-based platform. It should be easy to make a laundry web site that works in Firefox, especially as Firefox has about 50% usage share and that the UI doesn't require anything except a few links, forms and radio buttons. Then just make sure you don't use any IE specific CSS.


    Firefox 50%??? lol, no.. last check under 23%.

    Was that amongst your students or amongst the genral population? There is quite a difference, you know. Especially amongst IT students.
  • Heine & Marte 2009-05-09 06:25
    Oh yeah! We have the same system at Bjølsen student village! We have just decided to establish the Bjølsen support group for the WSS (wet smelly students).

    Keep up the good work, we are with you in spirit!
  • Shea 2009-05-10 03:36
    Bill changer. Token machine. Fixed.

    Just because you can IP enable a device, build a network and build an IE interface does not mean you should.

    Shea
  • tgape 2009-05-10 13:23
    DiverKas:
    HTML is a web-based platform. It should be easy to make a laundry web site that works in Firefox, especially as Firefox has about 50% usage share and that the UI doesn't require anything except a few links, forms and radio buttons. Then just make sure you don't use any IE specific CSS.


    Firefox 50%??? lol, no.. last check under 23%.


    Last I checked, the Firefox usage was under 23% world-wide - but it's not evenly distributed. Most specifically pertinent to this particular story, Norway is way up there in Firefox usage. I'm not sure it's 50%, but I think it was around 43% last I checked - and it's been long enough to be 50% now.
  • tgape 2009-05-10 13:26
    Chris:
    Martin Milan:
    You shouldn't be coding for any particular platform, but rather to simply dish out lovely, clean, standards compliant HTML, CSS etc, and have it actually work on the market leading browser.


    This kind of pious attitude has no concept of reality. The standards are not holy scripture but, believe it or not, are written by humans who make mistakes, or miss important details that browser vendors are forced to try to interpret. For instance, you could write a fully standards compliant site and still have it fail in every single browser out there (yes, Firefox too!)

    The fact is, if you're writing web sites or web apps, the only way to make sure they work everywhere is by testing them on each and every version of every browser you want to support. This is very expensive for most companies and this is why many have chosen to pick only 1 or 2 browsers that they're willing to support.


    It may be theoretically possible to write a standards-compliant site and have it fail in all browsers. It does not seem very likely to me.

    In my experience, if one writes in standards compliant HTML, runs their web pages through a validation checker, and tests on just one GUI browser, the site will work, more or less, on everything. Placement may be off on some browsers, and it's possible some might not render everything, but they'll all be able to handle a significant portion of the site.

    Note that if you add on JavaScript and other client-side processing, things change. If you add Active-X, you're IE only. I don't believe I've ever heard anyone point out any real benefits to Active-X (I've heard people point out benefit claims, but they were all things that could be done as well or better in other languages - or they were fundamentally security holes, which I don't think are benefits any way you slice it (and I think those have all been patched out of existence now anyway).)
  • tgape 2009-05-10 13:27
    dkf:
    Code Dependent:
    Yeah, customers digging for money in a bag is an annoyance (why not have it out and ready when you give the order?) but if the store has keypads for debit cards, that's quicker because there's no wait while the cashier counts out the change.
    You might think so, but no. In normal circumstances, cash is fastest. Cards (all of which are about the same) are much slower because of the amount of time spent on verification of the card.


    Actually, dedicated system cards *can* be the fastest, because the entire processing of the card is handled by local systems. That having been said, you *still* need to have an efficient implementation with sufficient hardware to pull that off. It's no cake walk, but it is doable.
  • tgape 2009-05-10 13:32
    Christian:
    The system is also integrated with the accounting system, and you can actually se WHO is using each machine. (I believe we use the same accounting system as Sogn..) This is WAY better than the reservation scheme, and it works great :D

    Check it out here:
    http://www.bsn.no/portal/vaskeri


    I take it Norway is free of stalkers, organized crime, and gangs? Because otherwise, you've just made it a lot easier for specific people to be targeted...

    I'm also fairly astounded at the amount of laundry Jobber Gunvor Helen S has...
  • Ajax 2009-05-10 21:25
    wtf - no SOAP interface?
  • Jonathan Wilson 2009-05-11 00:46
    If you guys figured out the proprietary protocol, why not post it on-line somewhere for others using the same proprietary machines?
    Or are there legal issues (being sued for posting the info) involved?
  • csrster 2009-05-11 07:54
    tgape:
    DiverKas:
    HTML is a web-based platform. It should be easy to make a laundry web site that works in Firefox, especially as Firefox has about 50% usage share and that the UI doesn't require anything except a few links, forms and radio buttons. Then just make sure you don't use any IE specific CSS.


    Firefox 50%??? lol, no.. last check under 23%.


    Last I checked, the Firefox usage was under 23% world-wide - but it's not evenly distributed. Most specifically pertinent to this particular story, Norway is way up there in Firefox usage. I'm not sure it's 50%, but I think it was around 43% last I checked - and it's been long enough to be 50% now.


    Aren't there also a fair number of Opera users in Norway?

    I used to live in an apartment rented from SiO who also run the student accomodation in Norway. I'm not saying they're incompetent, but in three years there we never found out who was paying the electricity and heating bills and frankly we didn't like to ask.
  • csrster 2009-05-11 07:54
    csrster:
    tgape:
    DiverKas:
    HTML is a web-based platform. It should be easy to make a laundry web site that works in Firefox, especially as Firefox has about 50% usage share and that the UI doesn't require anything except a few links, forms and radio buttons. Then just make sure you don't use any IE specific CSS.


    Firefox 50%??? lol, no.. last check under 23%.


    Last I checked, the Firefox usage was under 23% world-wide - but it's not evenly distributed. Most specifically pertinent to this particular story, Norway is way up there in Firefox usage. I'm not sure it's 50%, but I think it was around 43% last I checked - and it's been long enough to be 50% now.


    Aren't there also a fair number of Opera users in Norway?

    I used to live in an apartment rented from SiO who also run the student accomodation in Norway. I'm not saying they're incompetent, but in three years there we never found out who was paying the electricity and heating bills and frankly we didn't like to ask.


    "in Oslo", I should have said.
  • kuba 2009-05-11 12:26
    I my own experience regarding this company producing Seriously Annoying Programs.
    A few years ago, my university (fu berlin) spent several millions euro for a system managing student records. It was intended to make life easier for everybody (and very probably to manage the then-proposed tuition fees and dump the staff managing the paper-versions of students records)
    This turned out as a disaster, and I will surely write several TDWTF contributions. This being a five-stars WTF material, I wont spoil it now. But on the other hand, it might be a reason why there is still no tuition fee on my university. :)
  • Nicole 2009-05-12 01:36
    As a former disgruntled user of the Stupid Ass Program that those "wacky Germans" use, I can safely give it the Worst Program ever award. We implemented it at my job and I can only say awful, negative things about it. Whoever had a hand in designing it is clearly a sadomasochist.
  • rfsmit 2009-05-12 14:11
    Meep:
    Laundry machines crashing with each other, how sad :(

    That's raundly machines, you nincompoop.
  • Unix Dev Head 2009-05-13 16:13
    Kirt:
    Lon Wett:
    I mean, really, W. T. F. are you thinking?

    Chill out dude. I'm thinking that practically everyone has access to a Windows machine somewhere nearby, so why should I be expected to code for every oddball platform no one's ever seen before?


    You're not expected to code for "every oddball platform". you're expected to code to W3C standards. IE just ignores alot of them!
  • Unix Dev Head 2009-05-13 16:18
    brazzy:

    Besides the possibility of robbery or someone cracking the machine to get at the cash, the person emptying the machines wants to get paid, as does the bank (commercial cash deposits carry a fee, especially for coins). Also, you constantly have to look out for people figuring out what foreign coins or simple discs of metal can be used.

    Ditching the cash can probably lead to substantial savings.


    Yeah, I can see how all those fees quickly add up to $14mil in savings....
  • ivy 2009-05-18 01:36
    uggs, with a legendary brand, first to see the snow ugg boots ,Ugg people will not Ben Ben flu cartoon form, and is boots, as a result of many European and American film star has adequate Gordon Street Ugg snow boots and a pretty popular in Europe and America look like the earth, Ugg blowing sustained winds of the popular Madden, in Japan, Taiwan has a lot of fans Ugg.
  • Someone out there 2009-05-27 07:32
    Quango:

    a) what Germans? I didn't see any reference to Germans?


    Miele.
  • Someone out there 2009-05-27 09:09
    Americium:
    25 Euro cents is a quarter Euro. I have no idea how many Euros it takes to clean laundry in Oslo, or the Norweigen word for "quarter", but it is a valid concept.


    Except there is no Euro 25-cent coin.
  • Kristian 2009-06-11 10:32
    You shouldn't. You should code platform-independent web-applications for things like this.