Mark Bowytz

Besides contributing at @TheDailyWTF, I write DevDisasters for Visual Studio Magazine, and involved in various side projects including child rearing and marriage. Twitter: @mbowytz

Unfortunate Timing

by in Error'd on

"Apparently, I viewed the page during one of those special 31 seconds of the year," wrote Richard W.


Unmapped Potential

by in Error'd on

"As an Australian, I demand that they replace one of the two Belgiums with something to represent the quarter of the Earth they missed!" writes John A.


Classic WTF: The Proven Fix

by in Feature Articles on
It's a holiday weekend in the US, and I can't think of a better way to celebrate the history of the US than by having something go terribly wrong in a steel foundry. AMERICA! (original)--Remy

Photo Credit: Bryan Ledgard @ flickr There are lots of ways to ruin a batch of steel.

Just like making a cake, add in too much of one ingredient, add an ingredient at the wrong time, or heat everything to the wrong temperature, and it could all end in disaster. But in the case of a steel mill, we're talking about a 150 ton cake made of red-hot molten iron that's worth millions of dollars. Obviously, the risk of messing things up is a little bit higher. So, to help keep potential financial disaster at bay, the plants remove part of the human error factor and rely upon automated systems to keep things humming along smoothly. Systems much like the ones made by the company where Robert M. was a development manager.


Best Null I Ever Had

by in Error'd on

"Truly the best null I've ever had. Definitely would purchase again," wrote Andrew R.


Perfectly Logical

by in Error'd on

"Outlook can't open an attachment because it claims that it was made in Outlook, which Outlook doesn't think is installed...or something," writes Gavin.


@TitleOfErrord

by in Error'd on

"I asked my son, @Firstname, and he is indeed rather @Emotion about going to @ThemePark!" wrote Chris @LASTNAME.


Classic WTF: Hacker Proof Booleans

by in CodeSOD on
We continue our summer break with a classic case of outsmarting oneself in the stupidest way. Original -- Remy

"Years ago, long before I'd actually started programming, I spent my time learning about computers and data concepts by messing around with, believe it or not, cheat devices for video games," wrote Rena K., "The one I used primarily provided a RAM editor and some other tools which allowed me to tool around with the internal game files and I even get into muddling around with the game data all in the interest of seeing what would happen."

"As such, by the time my inflated hacker ego and I got into programming professionally, I was already pretty familiar with basic things like data types and binary. I was feeling pretty darn L33T."


Know Your Bits!

by in Error'd on

"I know software can't always be perfect, but things like this make me want to shut down my PC and say that's enough computering for the day," writes Timothy W.


Archives