Mark Bowytz

Besides contributing at @TheDailyWTF, I write DevDisasters for Visual Studio Magazine, and involved in various side projects including child rearing and marriage. Twitter: @mbowytz

Ride the URL Line

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Michael R. wrote, "So, https://TfL.Gov.UK...does that bus go on the 'Information Superhighway'?"


D.O.A.

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John A. writes, "Um, you know, I don't think this was a brilliant idead."


A Test-imonial

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"You know, usually these statements are just marketing B.S., but I think this guy's got the right idea," wrote Philip K.


The Things That Should Not Be

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"I tried to export my game to HTML5, but I guess it just wasn't meant to be," Edward W. writes.


No Thanks Necessary

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"I guess we're not allowed to thank the postal carriers?!" Brian writes.


Unfortunate Timing

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"Apparently, I viewed the page during one of those special 31 seconds of the year," wrote Richard W.


Unmapped Potential

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"As an Australian, I demand that they replace one of the two Belgiums with something to represent the quarter of the Earth they missed!" writes John A.


Classic WTF: The Proven Fix

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It's a holiday weekend in the US, and I can't think of a better way to celebrate the history of the US than by having something go terribly wrong in a steel foundry. AMERICA! (original)--Remy

Photo Credit: Bryan Ledgard @ flickr There are lots of ways to ruin a batch of steel.

Just like making a cake, add in too much of one ingredient, add an ingredient at the wrong time, or heat everything to the wrong temperature, and it could all end in disaster. But in the case of a steel mill, we're talking about a 150 ton cake made of red-hot molten iron that's worth millions of dollars. Obviously, the risk of messing things up is a little bit higher. So, to help keep potential financial disaster at bay, the plants remove part of the human error factor and rely upon automated systems to keep things humming along smoothly. Systems much like the ones made by the company where Robert M. was a development manager.


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