• Anonymouse Coder (unregistered)

    What a terrible way to introduce oneselves.

  • doctor (unregistered)

    Yeah. I support Amy's anonymous boyfriend bench-pressing Alex. And his pipsqueak friends in one setting, if he has any.

    The only question is where is this setting?

  • Kell S (unregistered)

    Project Information: 5000 hours worth of work in a 6 month time frame

    Team Dynamics: Lead Developer 1 other developer

    Let's see: 2 developers in 6 months = 1 man year = 52 man weeks. 5000 hours in 52 man weeks is about 100 hours/week!

    I think, I'll pass, too.

  • A. Nother (unregistered)

    Ha ha - looks like we got that one in triplicate:

    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity.

    Sounds like fun!

  • El_Heffe (cs) in reply to Kell S
    Kell S:
    Project Information: 5000 hours worth of work in a 6 month time frame

    Team Dynamics: Lead Developer 1 other developer

    Let's see: 2 developers in 6 months = 1 man year = 52 man weeks. 5000 hours in 52 man weeks is about 100 hours/week!

    What else are you going to do in Monroe, Louisiana?
  • Steve The Cynic (cs)

    Whenever I see SDLC in a piece of text, I feel compelled to see if it actually makes sense...

    Let's see:

    "Participates in the full SDLC of planning, coding, testing and deploying applications"

    (Let's ignore the fact that there's no design phase mentioned...)

    "Participates in the full Synchronous Data Link Control of planning, coding, testing and deploying applications"

    No, that doesn't make sense.

    "Full SDLC skills"

    "Full Synchronous Data Link Control skills"

    OK, that might make some sense, although it doesn't seem too relevant compared to all the other guff.

    Yes, I know that meanings change, but that doesn't make interpreting repurposed abbreviations easier.

    Oh, yes, and 5000 hours is just over 29 weeks if one person works 24x7, so it doesn't easily fit into 6 months. Even if you have one team lead, one other dev, and the contractor, that's 56 hours a week per person for almost seven months. Ha Ha, fooled you! It's a death march...

  • Black Bart (unregistered)

    The problem connecting to VPN and SSL over the hotel wireless network was likely caused by accidentally connecting to a malicious node broadcast from another room, the lobby, or a nearby building. They were hoping to frustrate users into connecting without a VPN or SSL so that they could steal credentials.

    (The "bad guy"'s signal was stronger than the hotel's Wifi, so he got the connection)

  • nisl (unregistered)

    I don't often get to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula.

    But when I do, I do it three times in the same article.

    Sound like fun?

  • Snowman25 (unregistered) in reply to Black Bart
    Black Bart:
    (The "bad guy"'s signal was stronger than the hotel's Wifi, so he got the connection)

    This is commonly called an "evil twin".

    captcha: eros - That evil twin sure looks HOT!

  • foxyshadis (unregistered) in reply to Black Bart
    Black Bart:
    The problem connecting to VPN and SSL over the hotel wireless network was likely caused by accidentally connecting to a malicious node broadcast from another room, the lobby, or a nearby building. They were hoping to frustrate users into connecting without a VPN or SSL so that they could steal credentials.

    (The "bad guy"'s signal was stronger than the hotel's Wifi, so he got the connection)

    Most hotel wireless sucks so much that using a hijacker in the next room would still be better. The good ones will go reboot the access point as soon as you complain, since often that's the problem, the bad ones just give a deer-in-the-headlights look or "Um...." If it's anything a reboot can't fix, especially if they did a shitty site survey or contract with a shitty access management company, you're out of luck.

    Even my own still hangs up or goes crazy from time to time, and it's 15 years since wifi showed up. Can't anyone make these things just work?

  • faoileag (unregistered)

    The Sears email is bad. Very bad. The language insinuates that delivery of my ordered items might not be successful unless I order more items.

    That sort of language might be legal, but it is not far from bullying.

    A good response to that email would be to cancel the original order and take one's business elsewhere.

  • Peter (unregistered) in reply to foxyshadis
    foxyshadis:
    Black Bart:
    The problem connecting to VPN and SSL over the hotel wireless network was likely caused by accidentally connecting to a malicious node broadcast from another room, the lobby, or a nearby building. They were hoping to frustrate users into connecting without a VPN or SSL so that they could steal credentials.

    (The "bad guy"'s signal was stronger than the hotel's Wifi, so he got the connection)

    Most hotel wireless sucks so much ... if they did a shitty site survey or contract with a shitty access management company, you're out of luck.

    IF???

  • Peter (unregistered) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    The Sears email is bad. Very bad. The language insinuates that delivery of my ordered items might not be successful unless I order more items.

    That sort of language might be legal, but it is not far from bullying.

    A good response to that email would be to cancel the original order and take one's business elsewhere.

    Seconded. Sounds disturbingly like the "Brooklyn Bargain Cameras" scam...

  • faoileag (unregistered)
    initechrecruiting.com wrote:
    Development Methodology: Spiral
    Interesting model, didn't know of it before. Sounds like you talk about risks until the stakeholders give up in frustration and the project is abandoned.
  • Alex Papadimoulis (unregistered)
    Mark Bowytz:
    The Origins of a WTF (from Mark M.)

    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity.

    Sounds like fun! ... Just plain wrong... (from Mark M.)

    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity.

    Sounds like fun! ... An Epic Opportunity (from Tim D.)

    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity.

    Sounds like fun!

    Your negligence has cost you your job. Pack you're things and get out.

    You're FIRED!!

  • no laughing matter (cs) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    initechrecruiting.com wrote:
    Development Methodology: Spiral
    Interesting model, didn't know of it before. Sounds like you talk about risks until the stakeholders give up in frustration and the project is abandoned.
    It's a modification of the classic waterfall model proposed by M.C.Escher: [image]
  • m (unregistered) in reply to A. Nother
    A. Nother:
    Ha ha - looks like we got that one in triplicate:
    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity.

    Sounds like fun!

    TRWTF
  • The Fury (unregistered)

    "You will be coding every day as well as overseeing other developers in a relaxed environment where you start work at 9 and finish at 5."

    Doesn't sound too bad!

  • Trouble at 't mill (unregistered)

    The IT boss once sent an email to the whole company boasting about her new security training and how nothing was going to escape her now - except that she and I knew that she had not sent it!

  • Shoreline (cs)

    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with 3 which were identical.

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to Steve The Cynic
    Steve The Cynic:
    "Participates in the full Synchronous Data Link Control of planning, coding, testing and deploying applications"
    That was exactly what I was thinking when I got one a couple of months ago using that acronym. "Stop using decades-old IBM lock-in technologies!" I did eventually figure it out a couple of weeks later.

    I would have figured out PDLC a lot sooner.

  • Kevin (unregistered) in reply to El_Heffe
    El_Heffe:
    Kell S:
    Project Information: 5000 hours worth of work in a 6 month time frame

    Team Dynamics: Lead Developer 1 other developer

    Let's see: 2 developers in 6 months = 1 man year = 52 man weeks. 5000 hours in 52 man weeks is about 100 hours/week!

    What else are you going to do in Monroe, Louisiana?

    According to the article you apparently misspell Lousiana while in Monroe.

  • spathi (unregistered)

    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity. Sounds like fun!


  • lol (unregistered)

    I remember the days when you could telnet onto port 25 and craft your own emails.

    What was most fun was sending an email to someone, demanding they respond immediately... but with their own email address in the from field. Oh the hilarity, some would assume they'd got it wrong first time and try again using 'reply all' instead.

  • MrBester (unregistered) in reply to The Fury

    And the pay isn't too shabby either

  • faoileag (unregistered) in reply to The Fury
    The Fury:
    "You will be coding every day as well as overseeing other developers in a relaxed environment where you start work at 9 and finish at 5." Doesn't sound too bad!
    Neither does £55K-£60K per annum.

    However, £60K p.a. in London? Where bedsits easily cost £250 per week?

    But of course TRWTF is that it is a PHP opportunity.

  • faoileag (unregistered) in reply to lol
    lol:
    I remember the days when you could telnet onto port 25 and craft your own emails.
    You can't do that anymore?
  • dpm (unregistered) in reply to Kell S
    Kell S:
    2 developers in 6 months = 1 man year = 52 man weeks. 5000 hours in 52 man weeks is about 100 hours/week!
    Good thing that you don't take holidays off, that you have no vacation plans, that you never get sick, that you never have any family emergencies . . . which is exactly how Microsoft planned the schedule for "Excel for Macintosh". True story, told by the project manager years later.
  • notme (unregistered) in reply to lol
    lol:
    I remember the days when you could telnet onto port 25 and craft your own emails.

    What do you mean you "remember the days"?

    As patchy as support for for SPF and/or DKIM is these days, you can usually still do that.

  • Dave H (unregistered) in reply to dpm

    Assuming one works 5 days a week there are approximately 120 working days in 6 months. 5000/120=41hrs/day. Divided by 2 gives 20hrs/day. If you're in addition to the 2 developers mentioned it's a much more reasonable 14hrs/day.

  • Zacrath (cs)

    Looks like "the way this website sucks" decided he wasn't getting enough attention on the forums.

    Addendum (2014-04-10 09:17): [image]

  • faoileag (unregistered) in reply to dpm
    dpm:
    Kell S:
    2 developers in 6 months = 1 man year = 52 man weeks. 5000 hours in 52 man weeks is about 100 hours/week!
    Good thing that you don't take holidays off, that you have no vacation plans, that you never get sick, that you never have any family emergencies . . . which is exactly how Microsoft planned the schedule for "Excel for Macintosh". True story, told by the project manager years later.
    That's why books like Frederick Brooks "The Mythical Man-Month" exist.

    And witticisms like "9 women can't deliver a baby in one month".

  • Rudolf (unregistered) in reply to foxyshadis
    foxyshadis:
    Even my own still hangs up or goes crazy from time to time, and it's 15 years since wifi showed up. Can't anyone make these things just work?

    That's because you (and probably the hotel) are using crappy APs which can't cope. At home, I went through 5 or 6 cheap APs before I gave up and bought a decent Cisco AP for £120. Never had a problem since.

    You may think "there's just four of us, how can that overload an access point?", but with four people each with a laptop, phone, iPod, tablet etc along with a TV, printer, music system, XBox etc it ends up being a lot of wireless clients. When I monitored one of the cheap APs you could see the clients connecting, then at a certain point (10-15 clients) it would start repeatedly disassociating and reassociating with them and then it would grind to a halt and die. You'd then reset it, and it would go through the same cycle. Sometimes it'd work for a while if people had things turned off or were away, but as soon as the device count got too high, it would die.

    Hotels often go for the cheap solution, rather than a proper high capacity system which may cost many thousands to buy, never mind install. I've seen hotels with a £15 TPLink access point sitting behind the reception desk - it's no wonder they never work properly.

  • Andrew (unregistered) in reply to Steve The Cynic
    Steve The Cynic:
    Whenever I see SDLC in a piece of text, I feel compelled to see if it actually makes sense...

    inane blathering

    Even the most cynical of us should be able to tell what a particular initialism stands for based on context clues.

  • nitePhyyre (unregistered) in reply to Steve The Cynic
    Comment held for moderation.
  • DCRoss (cs) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    initechrecruiting.com wrote:
    Development Methodology: Spiral
    Interesting model, didn't know of it before. Sounds like you talk about risks until the stakeholders give up in frustration and the project is abandoned.

    I believe that the full name for that is "Downward Spiral".

    You start with a vague project plan, watch it fall to pieces in meeting after meeting, and then end by sitting alone at your desk listening to 90s industrial music.

  • faoileag (unregistered) in reply to nitePhyyre
    nitePhyyre:
    Steve The Cynic:
    <snip> Yes, I know that meanings change, but that doesn't make interpreting repurposed abbreviations easier.
    Can't tell if you are trolling, a massive idiot, or older than dinosaurs.
    Look again at the last sentence. It should answer your question.
  • OldCoder (unregistered) in reply to foxyshadis
    foxyshadis:
    Even my own still hangs up or goes crazy from time to time, and it's 15 years since wifi showed up. Can't anyone make these things just work?
    Assume a spherical hotel room...
  • I forsee a lot of interresting support calls in the future. (unregistered)

    I recognize the email from Monroe. ".... Systems Inc" is one of our clients. I can only assume the recruiter eejit mangled the job description.

  • QJo (unregistered) in reply to m
    m:
    A. Nother:
    Ha ha - looks like we got that one in triplicate:
    It's not often that one gets to witness the formation of the universe, a star, or even a nebula. This week, however, I was gifted with a glimpse of what can only become a WTF. I will, of course, pass on this great opportunity.

    Sounds like fun!

    TRWTF

    Give him a break, he's been working for 6 months on 100 hour weeks trying to get 5000 manhours of work done. He's knackered, poor sod.

  • DrPepper (cs) in reply to The Fury
    The Fury:
    "You will be coding every day as well as overseeing other developers in a relaxed environment where you start work at 9 and finish at 5."

    Doesn't sound too bad!

    Where you start at 9AM and finish at 5AM each day...

  • chubertdev (cs) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    Steve The Cynic:
    "Participates in the full Synchronous Data Link Control of planning, coding, testing and deploying applications"
    That was exactly what I was thinking when I got one a couple of months ago using that acronym. "Stop using decades-old IBM lock-in technologies!" I did eventually figure it out a couple of weeks later.

    I would have figured out PDLC a lot sooner.

    I knew what SDLC meant right away. I've never heard of PDLC. Is that a common term across the pond or something?

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to nitePhyyre
    Comment held for moderation.
  • chubertdev (cs)

    Sears.com and Live.com/Google are probably just using that idea that anyone who's smart enough to be put off by the poor quality of the email is not the ideal target for the scam.

    Epic Opportunity looks like Markov chains.

  • slavdude (cs)
    One of my large telecommunications clients in Monroe, Lousiana

    Ah, CenturyLink. Thanks for eating Qwest and annoying me with bundling options when all I want is a cable modem.

    [/snark]

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to chubertdev
    chubertdev:
    I knew what SDLC meant right away. I've never heard of PDLC. Is that a common term across the pond or something?
    P = product

    I work on embedded systems stuff. We go all the way from PC board design to manufacturing our stuff, all under one roof.

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to Kevin
    Kevin:
    According to the article you apparently misspell Lousiana while in Monroe.
    That's lousy-ana to you!
  • nitePhyyre (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    The first result you got there isn't the acronym as used here.

    The second result isn't even the acronym.

    Looks like I found TRWTF in this thread.

    Err, yes, it is.

    No but when the first result starts with all the same letters as the acronym, and the next couple of results all deal with the same general topic, it is a good indication that the first result is the thing you were looking for. Most likely because they link to each other, that's kinda how search engines work. Hence why I included it.

    Yeah, you.

    chubertdev:
    Sears.com and Live.com/Google are probably just using that idea that anyone who's smart enough to be put off by the poor quality of the email is not the ideal target for the scam.
    This is actually very true. Phishers make their their scams as obvious as they can. That way the only replies they get are from the most oblivious users.

    If they made their emails look more legitimate, more people would respond to the first email, but then catch on when they asked for the bank details.

    They make their scams obvious to actually increase their ROI. (The investment here being their time)

  • chubertdev (cs) in reply to nitePhyyre
    nitePhyyre:
    This is actually very true. Phishers make their their scams as obvious as they can. That way the only replies they get are from the most oblivious users.

    If they made their emails look more legitimate, more people would respond to the first email, but then catch on when they asked for the bank details.

    They make their scams obvious to actually increase their ROI. (The investment here being their time)

    New law:

    When receiving spam, you are obligated to respond with a ton of questions with the full knowledge that you will never give them anything that they want.

  • Whoops (unregistered)

    Probably the prank I am most proud of is based on the Outlook one. We were actually aware of this feature, and used it extensively (Assistants for example could send e-mail as whoever they were assisting). As an admin however, I could/can send as anyone. So, one day while our analyst, lets call him "Ted", was out to lunch, I sent him an e-mail from, lets say "Bob", saying simply "Could you come talk to me when you get back from lunch? I could use your help".

    Needless to say when Ted got back from lunch there was much confusion, with Bob insisting he didn't send a e-mail, and Ted showing him the e-mail insisting he did. Things started to get a little heated until our sys admin walked by and asked what was going on, and quickly guessed what happened.

    Even after coming clean, Ted and Bob (normally great friends) were snippy with each other for a few days, yet neither seemed annoyed with me.

Leave a comment on “Best of Email: (Un)Helpful Support, An Epic Opportunity, and more!”

Log In or post as a guest

Replying to comment #:

« Return to Article