Recent Articles

Jul 2017

The Logs Don't Lie

by in Feature Articles on

She'd resisted the call for years. As a senior developer, Makoto knew how the story ended: one day, she'd be drafted into the ranks of the manager, forswearing her true love webdev. When her boss was sacked unexpectedly, mere weeks after the most senior dev quit, she looked around and realized she was holding the short straw. She was the most senior. This is her story.


This or That

by in CodeSOD on

Processing financial transactions is not the kind of software you want to make mistakes in. If something is supposed to happen, it is definitely supposed to happen. Not partially happen. Not maybe happen.

Thus, a company like Charles R’s uses a vendor-supplied accounting package. That vendor has a professional services team, so when the behavior needs to be customized, Charles’s company outsources that development to the vendor.


No Thanks Necessary

by in Error'd on

"I guess we're not allowed to thank the postal carriers?!" Brian writes.


Finding the Lowest Value

by in Feature Articles on

Max’s team moved into a new office, which brought with it the low-walled, “bee-hive” style cubicle partitions. Their project manager cheerfully explained that the new space “would optimize collaboration”, which in practice meant that every random conversation between any two developers turned into a work-stopping distraction for everyone else.

That, of course, wasn’t the only change their project manager instituted. The company had been around for a bit, and their original application architecture was a Java-based web application. At some point, someone added a little JavaScript to the front end. Then a bit more. This eventually segregated the team into two clear roles: back-end Java developers, and front-end JavaScript developers.

An open pit copper mine

A Pre-Packaged Date

by in CodeSOD on

Microsoft’s SQL Server Integration Services is an ETL tool that attempts to mix visual programming (for designing data flows) with the reality that at some point, you’re just going to need to write some code. Your typical SSIS package starts as a straightforward process that quickly turns into a sprawling mix of spaghetti-fied .NET code, T-SQL stored procedures, and developer tears.

TJ L. inherited an SSIS package. This particular package contained a step where a C# sub-module needed to pass a date (but not a date-time) to the database. Now, this could be done easily by using C#’s date-handling objects, or even in the database by simply using the DATE type, instead of the DATETIME type.


The Little Red Button

by in Feature Articles on

Bryan T. had worked for decades to amass the skills, expertise and experience to be a true architect, but never quite made the leap. Finally, he got a huge opportunity in the form of an interview with a Silicon Valley semi-conductor firm project manager who was looking for a consultant to do just that. The discussions revolved around an application that three developers couldn't get functioning correctly in six months, and Bryan was to be the man to reign it in and make it work; he was lured with the promise of having complete control of the software.

The ZF-1 pod weapon system from the Fifth Element

Upon starting and spelunking through the code-base, Bryan discovered the degree of total failure that caused them to yield complete control to him. It was your typical hodgepodge of code slapped together with anti-patterns, snippets of patterns claiming to be the real deal, and the usual Assortment-o-WTF™ we've all come to expect.


Impersonated Programming

by in CodeSOD on

Once upon a time, a long long time ago, I got contracted to show a government office how to build and deliver applications… in Microsoft Access. I’m sorry. I’m so, so sorry. As horrifying and awful as it is, Access is actually built with some mechanisms to actually support that- you can break the UI and behavior off into one file, while keeping the data in another, and you can actually construct linked tables that connect to a real database, if you don’t mind gluing a UI made out of evil and sin to your “real” database.

Which brings us to poor Alex Rao. Alex has an application built in Access. This application uses linked tables, which he wants to convert to local tables. The VBA API exposed by Access doesn’t give him any way to do this, so he came up with this solution…


Unfortunate Timing

by in Error'd on

"Apparently, I viewed the page during one of those special 31 seconds of the year," wrote Richard W.


Changing Requirements

by in CodeSOD on

Requirements change all the time. A lot of the ideology and holy wars that happen in the Git processes camps arise from different ideas about how source control should be used to represent these changes. Which commit changed which line of code, and to what end? But what if your source control history is messy, unclear, or… you’re just not using source control?

For example, let’s say you’re our Anonymous submitter, and find the following block of code. Once upon a time, this block of code enforced some mildly complicated rules about what dates were valid to pick for a dashboard display.


The Defensive Contract

by in Feature Articles on

Working for a contractor within the defense industry can be an interesting experience. Sometimes you find yourself trying to debug an application from a stack trace which was handwritten and faxed out of a secured facility with all the relevant information redacted by overzealous security contractors who believe that you need a Secret clearance just to know that it was a System.NullReferenceException. After weeks of frustration when you are unable to solve anything from a sheet of thick black Sharpie stripes, they may bring you there for on-site debugging.

Security cameras perching on a seaside rock, like they were seagulls

Beforehand, they will lock up your cell phone, cut out the WiFi antennas from your development laptop, and background check you so thoroughly that they’ll demand explanations for the sins of your great-great-great-great grandfather’s neighbor’s cousin’s second wife’s stillborn son before letting you in the door. Once inside, they will set up temporary curtains around your environment to block off any Secret-rated workstation screens to keep you from peeking and accidentally learning what the Top Secret thread pitch is for the lug nuts of the latest black-project recon jet. Then they will set up an array of very annoying red flashing lights and constant alarm whistles to declare to all the regular staff that they need to watch their mouths because an uncleared individual is present.


Questioning Existence

by in CodeSOD on

Michael got a customer call, from a PHP system his company had put together four years ago. He pulled up the code, which thankfully was actually up to date in source control, and tried to get a grasp of what the system does.

There, he discovered a… unique way to define functions in PHP:


Rubbed Off

by in Feature Articles on

Early magnetic storage was simple in its construction. The earliest floppy disks and hard drives used an iron (III) oxide surface coating a plastic film or disk. Later media would use cobalt-based surfaces, providing a smaller data resolution than iron oxide, but wouldn’t change much.

Samuel H. never had think much about this until he met Micah.


Unmapped Potential

by in Error'd on

"As an Australian, I demand that they replace one of the two Belgiums with something to represent the quarter of the Earth they missed!" writes John A.


Build Totally Non-WTF Products at Inedo

by in Announcements on

As our friends at HIRED will attest, finding a good workplace is tough, for both the employee and the employer. Fortunately, when it comes looking for developer talent, Inedo has a bit of an advantage: in addition to being a DevOps products company, we publish The Daily WTF.

Not too long ago, I shared a Support Analyst role here and ended up hiring fellow TDWTF Ben Lubar to join the Inedo team. He's often on the front lines, supporting our customer base; but he's also done some interesting dev projects as well (including a Source Gear Vault to Git migration tool).


Open Sources

by in Feature Articles on

121212 2 OpenSwissKnife

Here's how open-source is supposed to work: A goup releases a product, with the source code freely available. Someone finds a problem. They solve the problem, issue a pull request, and the creators merge that into the product, making it better for everyone.


Swap the Workaround

by in CodeSOD on

Blane D is responsible for loading data into a Vertica 8.1 database for analysis. Vertica is a distributed, column-oriented store, for data-warehousing applications, and its driver has certain quirks.

For example, a common task that you might need to perform is swapping storage partitions around between tables to facilitate bulk data-loading. Thus, there is a SWAP_PARTITIONS_BETWEEN_TABLES() stored procedure. Unfortunately, if you call this function from within a prepared statement, one of two things will happen: the individual node handling the request will crash, or the entire cluster will crash.


Classic WTF: The Proven Fix

by in Feature Articles on
It's a holiday weekend in the US, and I can't think of a better way to celebrate the history of the US than by having something go terribly wrong in a steel foundry. AMERICA! (original)--Remy

Photo Credit: Bryan Ledgard @ flickr There are lots of ways to ruin a batch of steel.

Just like making a cake, add in too much of one ingredient, add an ingredient at the wrong time, or heat everything to the wrong temperature, and it could all end in disaster. But in the case of a steel mill, we're talking about a 150 ton cake made of red-hot molten iron that's worth millions of dollars. Obviously, the risk of messing things up is a little bit higher. So, to help keep potential financial disaster at bay, the plants remove part of the human error factor and rely upon automated systems to keep things humming along smoothly. Systems much like the ones made by the company where Robert M. was a development manager.


Classic WTF: When the Query String is Just Not Enough

by in CodeSOD on
It's a holiday weekend in the US, as as we prepare for the 4th of July, we have some query strings that are worth understanding. (original)--Remy

As Stephen A.'s client was walking him through their ASP.NET site, Stephen noticed a rather odd URL scheme. Instead of using the standard Query String -- i.e., http://their.site/Products/?ID=2 -- theirs used some form of URL-rewriting utilizing the "@" symbol in the request name: http://their.site/Products/@ID=2.aspx. Not being an expert on Search Engine Optimization, Stephan had just assumed it had something to do with that.

A few weeks later, when Stephan finally had a chance to take a look at the code, he noticed something rather different...