• Michael (unregistered)

    Lol! The funniest part about the first picture was not the Coke ad failure, but the McDonalds ad.

    OVER NINE THOUSAAAAAND FA!!!!!

  • True Brit (unregistered)

    That'd be Piccadilly Circus, not Square. Because it's, y'know, round...

    (first-ever comment, btw!)

  • Someone You Know (cs)

    I imagine "childrearing's" is a word ever since Tim added it to Firefox's dictionary.

  • ParkinT (cs)

    The iPhone is bit peculiar but simply a matter of linquistics. It says "since the last FULL charge". I often charge my electronic equipment without providing a full charge. It's like adding gasoline to the car without a complete fill-up (who can afford it nowadays?!)

  • Droll Troll on a roll (unregistered)

    The real WTF is all of those vehicles going the wrong way around that circle in Piccadilly Square. You would not see that sort of craziness in Times Circle, NYC.

  • Robajob (cs)

    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

  • s (unregistered) in reply to ParkinT

    you read the rest of the picture? It says it has been over thousand days since the charge. That's kind of impossible given the iPhone didn't exist then

  • PatrickS (cs) in reply to True Brit
    That'd be Piccadilly Circus, not Square. Because it's, y'know, round...

    Or more of a triangle. Although the fountain is a circle, so there you go.

  • Flash (cs) in reply to Robajob
    Robajob:
    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

    Yep. Here's a sample sentence:

    "She was not looking forward to childbearing's pain."

  • Niels (unregistered)

    The real WTF is that Firefox doesn't suggest the correct spelling of "disappearing" at all. But then, it never seems to be able to find the word you really meant, it always finds something else.

  • Shakje (unregistered)

    Spot the person who doesn't know the difference between a circle and a circus.

  • TGV (cs) in reply to Flash
    Flash:
    Robajob:
    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

    Yep. Here's a sample sentence:

    "She was not looking forward to childbearing's pain."

    Perhaps my sarcasm detector needs recalibrating, but the genitive suffix ('s) can be used when "of" is used in a possessive, or physical part relation, not for general involvement and causative relations (the shock of the accident vs. the accident's shock).

  • True Brit (unregistered) in reply to Shakje

    From Dictionary.com:

    1. British. an open circle, square, or plaza where several streets converge: Piccadilly Circus.

    I was making the point that it's not called Piccadilly Square for a reason - that being, it ain't square. Trafalgar Square is. Leicester Square is. Cadogan Square is. Piccadilly Circus isn't. And in general usage today, we derive the word 'circle' from 'circus', meaning 'circular'.

    Admittedly, the evolution of the area over the last 150 years has resulted in Piccadilly Circus being somewhat un-circus-like, but the fountain which used to be at the centre of the circle (and is now on one edge) is still circular.

  • Aloc Aloc Syawla Ton (unregistered) in reply to Droll Troll on a roll
    Droll Troll on a roll:
    The real WTF is all of those vehicles going the wrong way around that circle in Piccadilly Square. You would not see that sort of craziness in Times Circle, NYC.
    Big deal. Alex probably just put a mirror image of the actual photo on the site by accident.

    (Oh, and did you notice how all the signs are conveniently written to be easy to read in your rear-view mirror?)

  • JPM (unregistered) in reply to Flash
    Flash:
    Robajob:
    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

    Yep. Here's a sample sentence:

    "She was not looking forward to childbearing's pain."

    That's interesting, I thought 'childbearing' would be a verb but according to dictionary.com it's not, it's a noun or an adjective. Just goes to show you learn a new, if completely pointless, thing every day.

  • bstorer (cs) in reply to TGV
    TGV:
    Flash:
    Robajob:
    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

    Yep. Here's a sample sentence:

    "She was not looking forward to childbearing's pain."

    Perhaps my sarcasm detector needs recalibrating, but the genitive suffix ('s) can be used when "of" is used in a possessive, or physical part relation, not for general involvement and causative relations (the shock of the accident vs. the accident's shock).
    Okay, then how about this one: "Childbearing's a bitch."

  • Picky (unregistered) in reply to Aloc Aloc Syawla Ton

    Have you actually looked at the picture? Signs are all correct way around and the comment of going the "wrong way around" is to reflect that the English drive on the "wrong" side of the road.

  • Shinobu (unregistered) in reply to Picky

    Read it again. Basic text comprehension, learn it.

  • Ceiswyn (unregistered) in reply to Picky
    Have you actually looked at the picture? Signs are all correct way around and the comment of going the "wrong way around" is to reflect that the English drive on the "wrong" side of the road.

    Ahem. I think you'll find that we drive on the correct side of the road, and it's you godless heathens overseas that do it wrong :)

    Be that as it may, yes, that is an entirely correct representation of Piccadilly Circus. Except without the crimson haze around the edges of your vision that occurs as you're cut up by a taxi driver yet again...

  • dkf (unregistered) in reply to True Brit
    True Brit:
    I was making the point that it's not called Piccadilly Square for a reason - that being, it ain't square. Trafalgar Square is. Leicester Square is. Cadogan Square is. Piccadilly Circus isn't. And in general usage today, we derive the word 'circle' from 'circus', meaning 'circular'.
    Interestingly, the Circus Maximus (you know, the famous one in Rome) is not even vaguely circular either.
    True Brit:
    Admittedly, the evolution of the area over the last 150 years has resulted in Piccadilly Circus being somewhat un-circus-like, but the fountain which used to be at the centre of the circle (and is now on one edge) is still circular.
    These days, the word "circus" is applicable to that part of London because of the number of clowns. Now, if only they'd stop calling themselves politicians...
  • Picky (unregistered) in reply to Shinobu
    Shinobu:
    Read it again. Basic text comprehension, learn it.

    Didn't click quote for the comment I was referring to.

    Aloc Aloc Syawla Ton:
    Droll Troll on a roll:
    The real WTF is all of those vehicles going the wrong way around that circle in Piccadilly Square. You would not see that sort of craziness in Times Circle, NYC.
    Big deal. Alex probably just put a mirror image of the actual photo on the site by accident.

    (Oh, and did you notice how all the signs are conveniently written to be easy to read in your rear-view mirror?)

    Text comprehension is fine, how are your social skills?

  • Mark B (unregistered)

    I cant help but to think that theres about a 23% chance that thats an Nvidia driver issue.

  • dpm (cs) in reply to Niels
    Niels:
    The real WTF is that Firefox doesn't suggest the correct spelling of "disappearing" at all.
    The real WTF is that anyone would use any browser's spellchecker.
  • Andreas (unregistered) in reply to dpm

    The real WTF is that every program today thinks it needs a spell czech of it's own.

  • WhiskeyJack (cs) in reply to Andreas
    Andreas:
    The real WTF is that every program today thinks it needs a spell czech of it's own.

    Can he cook, too?

  • Erez (unregistered) in reply to Niels

    Firefox here does. It's not a hard Error'd to fabricate.

  • DoctorFriday (cs)

    "Please tell Microsoft about this problem We have created an error report that you can send to us."

    We being Pepsi. Us being 7-UP.

  • Matt (unregistered)

    Damn Mac owners being so smug about their uptime.

    I've got to say, though, nothing's funnier than telling a Mac owner that his 21-day MacBook uptime be damned, he probably has to reboot to get Safari working properly... and BEING RIGHT.

  • John (unregistered) in reply to TGV
    TGV:
    Flash:
    Robajob:
    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

    Yep. Here's a sample sentence:

    "She was not looking forward to childbearing's pain."

    Perhaps my sarcasm detector needs recalibrating, but the genitive suffix ('s) can be used when "of" is used in a possessive, or physical part relation, not for general involvement and causative relations (the shock of the accident vs. the accident's shock).

    It seems to me that "The dog's idea of a good time was..." defies the rule you laid out in regards to physical part relation. As I've understood it, 's is usable on a noun to indicate possession of the next word. In this case, "childbearing's pain" satisfies the rules I've learned growing up, and I suspect that a non-trivial number of other people might also make the same mistake as me, at which point it becomes dangerously close to valid.

  • SNF (unregistered) in reply to Michael
    Michael:
    Lol! The funniest part about the first picture was not the Coke ad failure, but the McDonalds ad.

    OVER NINE THOUSAAAAAND FA!!!!!

    Forgive me, I haven't been to McDonald's in probably ten years. What the hell are FA? And what does "McDonald's Level 1" mean? For a while I was certain that was another error message.

  • Mr Ascii (cs) in reply to John
    John:
    TGV:
    Flash:
    Robajob:
    Doesn't "chilbearing's" just mean "of childbearing"?

    Yep. Here's a sample sentence:

    "She was not looking forward to childbearing's pain."

    Perhaps my sarcasm detector needs recalibrating, but the genitive suffix ('s) can be used when "of" is used in a possessive, or physical part relation, not for general involvement and causative relations (the shock of the accident vs. the accident's shock).

    It seems to me that "The dog's idea of a good time was..." defies the rule you laid out in regards to physical part relation. As I've understood it, 's is usable on a noun to indicate possession of the next word. In this case, "childbearing's pain" satisfies the rules I've learned growing up, and I suspect that a non-trivial number of other people might also make the same mistake as me, at which point it becomes dangerously close to valid.

    Grammar Nazi fight!!

  • th30519 (cs)

    Did anybody else click on the "Don't Send" button when they saw it? Its nearly an reflex for me to immediately click "Don't Sent" when windows gives that message.

  • Michael O (unregistered)

    This post just reinforces the fact that every time a nerd tries to call out WTF on a point of grammar, they should just check themselves and assume they themselves are wrong.

  • Zock (unregistered) in reply to Ceiswyn
    Ceiswyn:
    Ahem. I think you'll find that we drive on the correct side of the road, and it's you godless heathens overseas that do it wrong :)

    Ah, the benefits of living on an island trying desperately to hold on archaic habits. :)

  • Jeroen Brattinga (unregistered)

    Hmmm... Firefox 3 (beta 4) has a whole new set of suggestions: among other -- childrearing (WTF?), God-fearing and ball-bearing!

  • poochner (cs) in reply to DoctorFriday
    DoctorFriday:
    "Please tell Microsoft about this problem We have created an error report that you can send to us."

    We being Pepsi. Us being 7-UP.

    Make 7

    Up yours!

  • unklegwar (unregistered)

    Um. Childbearing's IS indeed a word. It's a contraction of Childbearing Is.

    as in "Childbearing's painful" or "Childbearing's a real word"

    Duh.

  • David (unregistered)

    "It is childbearing's blessing that can bring families together."

  • Frunobulax (unregistered)

    For those who mentioned the potential McDonald's wtf:

    It probably means 9,500 Fat-Asses. Once the McDonald's at that particular location creates its 10,000th Fat-Ass, it will achieve Level 2.

  • AdT (unregistered) in reply to ParkinT
    ParkinT:
    The iPhone is bit peculiar but simply a matter of linquistics. It says "since the last FULL charge". I often charge my electronic equipment without providing a full charge. It's like adding gasoline to the car without a complete fill-up (who can afford it nowadays?!)

    And the charge rate on iPhone and iPod touch slows down when the battery is approaching 100% just as it does on Apple notebooks (well, I can speak of the PowerBook G4 here) because this reduces stress on the battery. So unless you charge it overnight, many users will typically disconnect it when it's let's say at most 95-98% full. So a few users out of several million might actually never charge it to 100% over the entire lifetime of the device.

    Granted, in thic case this means the "Time since last full charge", even if correct, is not very interesting. And it has been pointed out that unless maybe you managed to obtain an early prototype, there's no chance your iPhone will be three years old already.

  • AdT (unregistered)

    Sorry for the bad style, the charge rate doesn't slow down, it's reduced.

  • Frymaster (unregistered) in reply to th30519
    th30519:
    Did anybody else click on the "Don't Send" button when they saw it? Its nearly an reflex for me to immediately click "Don't Sent" when windows gives that message.

    any reason why you don't send bug reports? You got an objection to software getting better?

    for that matter, if you do prefer buggy software why don't you just turn the process off?

  • Dirge (unregistered) in reply to David
    David:
    "It is childbearing's blessing that can bring families together."

    Exactly. Smug nerds are extra sad when they're wrong about things like spell-checkers.

  • zzo38 (cs) in reply to th30519
    th30519:
    Did anybody else click on the "Don't Send" button when they saw it? Its nearly an reflex for me to immediately click "Don't Sent" when windows gives that message.
    Usually I first look at the data the report contains, and then I don't send it.
  • The Vicar (cs)

    Actually, "childbearing's" is just misuse of the apostrophe. It's the plural of childbearing, which is, of course, when you pack your offspring into a wheel to help it roll more smoothly.

  • operagost (cs) in reply to True Brit
    True Brit:
    From Dictionary.com:
    1. British. an open circle, square, or plaza where several streets converge: Piccadilly Circus.

    I was making the point that it's not called Piccadilly Square for a reason - that being, it ain't square. Trafalgar Square is. Leicester Square is. Cadogan Square is. Piccadilly Circus isn't. And in general usage today, we derive the word 'circle' from 'circus', meaning 'circular'.

    Easton, PA's square is circular. We don't care to conform to your petty standards here in the USA!
  • Deron (unregistered)

    I got that same Borders $0.00 coupon too. Only I actually followed the instructions. I printed it out and took it to the store with me. When I tried to redeem it, the cashier was confused at first. Fortunately the manager was standing nearby and overheard me saying I wanted to redeem my "zero dollar coupon". After he realized what had happened they both had a good laugh. Pretty soon the whole row of cashiers and even some of the other customers were grinning my way too. And no, it really wasn't worth the cost of the paper I had printed it on, not even the 1/100th cent of many other coupons. But it was amusing.

  • Mrrix32 (cs) in reply to operagost
    operagost:
    True Brit:
    From Dictionary.com:
    1. British. an open circle, square, or plaza where several streets converge: Piccadilly Circus.

    I was making the point that it's not called Piccadilly Square for a reason - that being, it ain't square. Trafalgar Square is. Leicester Square is. Cadogan Square is. Piccadilly Circus isn't. And in general usage today, we derive the word 'circle' from 'circus', meaning 'circular'.

    Easton, PA's square is circular. We don't care to conform to your petty standards here in the USA!

    Well yeah, you claim to speak "English" yet you don't spell anything correctly or even pronounce them correctly! Oh and stop driving on the wrong side of the road :D

  • Lediur (unregistered)

    Maybe the battery message is because he only partially charged the iPhone and not fully charged it for 3 years.

    Oh wait the iPhone has only been out for a year.

  • ping floyd (unregistered)

    Yeah! Childbearing's not a word..... uhhhh... never mind.

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