• Matt (unregistered)

    Somebody should buy one of them quickly, make a tidy profit :p

    Captcha: Atari w00t

  • Zach (unregistered)

    A sidenote WTF is their discounter only calculates up to 100%, which in this case is wrong.

  • vv (unregistered)

    I'll just bring my wallet...

  • Gedoon (unregistered)

    Oooh, you could play James Bond at home with that!

  • K (unregistered)

    How much is shipping? $2,499,850?

  • (cs)

    I'd definitely need a certified copy of the appraisal before I bought something like that. If they really put those values in, it's more like those damn infomercials that spout:

    Similar items sell for $100, $200, even $300! But we are offering it to you for only $29.95 plus S&H!

    As in.. it's similar only in looks and somewhat function. Other than that, it's crap compared to the original.

  • Anon (unregistered)

    If you look at the store's other products, you can tell it's actually only supposed to be $250.00.

  • fmm (unregistered)

    If you look at similar items that the seller is peddling, you'll see original prices around $300.

    captcha: gotcha

  • Eternite (unregistered)

    If you look at the description it says, "Faberge style pendant with frog. Clearly this is not a real Faberge egg and either the price was an accident (other similar items are only $250 and marked down from there) or they really are trying to trick you into thinking it's a real Faberge egg that you're getting an amazing deal on.

  • ceeJay (unregistered) in reply to Zach
    Zach:
    A sidenote WTF is their discounter only calculates up to 100%, which in this case is wrong.

    True, it's only 99.9933333% off - probably a rounding error?

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to Zach
    Zach:
    A sidenote WTF is their discounter only calculates up to 100%, which in this case is wrong.
    What do you mean "only" to 100%. You can't save more than 100%. The correct value is: 2499850/2500000 = 99.994% which is pretty close.
  • (cs) in reply to Eternite
    Eternite:
    If you look at the description it says, "Faberge style pendant with frog. Clearly this is not a real Faberge egg and either the price was an accident (other similar items are only $250 and marked down from there) or they really are trying to trick you into thinking it's a real Faberge egg that you're getting an amazing deal on.

    What is a Faberge egg and why would I want a deal on it? For that matter, why would I want to spend $250 on it in the first place?

    Edit: I know, I know, I could just Google it but that wouldn't be very much fun.

  • Chris (unregistered) in reply to Zach
    Zach:
    A sidenote WTF is their discounter only calculates up to 100%, which in this case is wrong.

    Considering that a discount of 100% means free, I should hope the discounter only goes to 100%. Or are they going to pay you to take it off their hands? No, this is a rounding problem. Selling a $2.5 million item for $150 is, in fact, a 99.994% discount, which their code apparently rounded up to 100%.

    Chris Mattern

  • someone (unregistered) in reply to ssprencel
    ssprencel:
    Eternite:
    If you look at the description it says, "Faberge style pendant with frog. Clearly this is not a real Faberge egg and either the price was an accident (other similar items are only $250 and marked down from there) or they really are trying to trick you into thinking it's a real Faberge egg that you're getting an amazing deal on.

    What is a Faberge egg and why would I want a deal on it? For that matter, why would I want to spend $250 on it in the first place?

    Edit: I know, I know, I could just Google it but that wouldn't be very much fun.

    They can be worth a fortune and used as a heirloom to pass down and sell if money gets tight.

  • (cs) in reply to ssprencel
    ssprencel:
    Eternite:
    If you look at the description it says, "Faberge style pendant with frog. Clearly this is not a real Faberge egg and either the price was an accident (other similar items are only $250 and marked down from there) or they really are trying to trick you into thinking it's a real Faberge egg that you're getting an amazing deal on.

    What is a Faberge egg and why would I want a deal on it? For that matter, why would I want to spend $250 on it in the first place?

    Edit: I know, I know, I could just Google it but that wouldn't be very much fun.

    A Faberge is a kind of gull, they breed mainly in wetlands in the welsh hillsides. Their eggs are often hunted by preditory frogs which also breed in the same wetlands. To collect a Faberge egg is classed as a rite of passage for Welsh teenagers passing into adulthood. Hence buying a Faberge egg with frog would be a simple way for a Welsh teenager to be allowed to drink in pubs. For only $150 it's a bargain!!! ;-))))

  • Mark (unregistered)

    I'm willing to bet that the MSRP is 250. A few zeros sneaked in.

  • wtf (unregistered)

    The real WTF is that there are actually some such rare "eggs" and whatnots that do cost millions...

  • Magus (unregistered) in reply to ceeJay
    ceeJay:
    True, it's only 99.9933333% off - probably a rounding error?

    That's not a rounding error, guys. Look at how many significant digits they're displaying. 100% is the correct number. The rounding error is in your heads, taking 100 to mean 100.000.

    It could be argued that the display should special case discounts which round to 100% but aren't exactly 100%, and display them as >99%. That would certainly be less confusing to people browsing the site. But there's no error here, just another amusing screencap.

  • superpower (unregistered) in reply to wtf

    Just read what Mr Gaylord has to say:

    Brian Gaylord says: You are obviously misinformed. This is clearly the most baller egg ever. If it was originally worth 2.5 million dollars, that means that it must be great. WHAT A VALUE

    --Taken from Amazon

  • NoName (unregistered) in reply to Eternite

    Its faberge compatible :-)

  • Quietust (unregistered) in reply to superpower
    superpower:
    Just read what Mr Gaylord has to say:
    Brian Gaylord says: You are obviously misinformed. This is clearly the most baller egg ever. If it was originally worth 2.5 million dollars, that means that it must be great. WHAT A VALUE

    --Taken from Amazon

    Personally, I prefer Benjamin Hallert's review:

    "Looks fantastic, but not so tasty"

    While the wrapper is artfully done, I was disappointed with the filling. I don't know if the one I got was a factory defect or not, but once I had removed the elaborate wrapper, I found it was empty, without even the smell of chocolate. After this, I'll stick with Cadbury eggs, but my experience may not be representative of the normal presentation. I've given the product 4 stars because of the wrapper, though, while difficult to tear off, it was certainly stunning.

    Best is that "7 of 7 people found the following review helpful".

  • R.K. Owen (unregistered)

    Take a look at the review, which I thought was very helpful:

    While the wrapper is artfully done, I was disappointed with the filling. I don't know if the one I got was a factory defect or not, but once I had removed the elaborate wrapper, I found it was empty, without even the smell of chocolate. After this, I'll stick with Cadbury eggs, but my experience may not be representative of the normal presentation. I've given the product 4 stars because of the wrapper, though, while difficult to tear off, it was certainly stunning.
    I'm still crying from laughing so hard.
  • Phat Wednesday (unregistered)

    from the customer reviews:

    While the wrapper is artfully done, I was disappointed with the filling. I don't know if the one I got was a factory defect or not, but once I had removed the elaborate wrapper, I found it was empty, without even the smell of chocolate. After this, I'll stick with Cadbury eggs, but my experience may not be representative of the normal presentation. I've given the product 4 stars because of the wrapper, though, while difficult to tear off, it was certainly stunning.
  • stinky (unregistered) in reply to wtf
    wtf:
    The real WTF is that there are actually some such rare "eggs" and whatnots that do cost millions...
    If you knew what a real Faberge egg is, you'd understand why they run into the millions.
  • Anonymous (unregistered)

    It's pretty obvious that the seller entered "250000" by accident. My guess is that they meant to enter "250.00" using the side number keypad and accidently hit "0" instead of ".", as they are right next to each other. Then Amazon added the .00 at the end because they thought the seller didn't enter it (which they really didn't, even if they meant to).

    Just a case of typing too fast.

  • superpower (unregistered) in reply to stinky

    FYI:

    A Fabergé egg is any one of fifty (fifty-two, including the unfinished Karelian Birch and Tsarevich Constellation examples) Easter eggs made by Peter Carl Fabergé for the Russian Tsars between 1885 and 1917. The eggs are made of precious metals or hard stones decorated with combinations of enamel and gem stones. The term "Fabergé Egg"' has become a synonym of luxury and the eggs are regarded as masterpieces of the jeweler's art.

    --Wikipedia

  • (cs) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    If you look at the store's other products, you can tell it's actually only supposed to be $250.00.

    Are you sure? If it is the real McCoy, then 2.5 million is probably about right. Faberge Easter Eggs were the treats that the czars would buy each year--not bargain-basement items by any stretch of the imagination.

  • AuMatar (unregistered) in reply to rjnewton
    rjnewton:
    Anon:
    If you look at the store's other products, you can tell it's actually only supposed to be $250.00.

    Are you sure? If it is the real McCoy, then 2.5 million is probably about right. Faberge Easter Eggs were the treats that the czars would buy each year--not bargain-basement items by any stretch of the imagination.

    Yes, but you wouldn't sell one of those on Amazon. They're priceless. You'd sell them at an auction.

    As a side note: note that this isn't an amazon rip off, its a merchant selling on the amazon site. Looks like instead of fixing their price, they put it in as a sale.

  • Stavros (unregistered) in reply to Zach

    It's more like 99.999% off...

  • bobbo (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    Zach:
    A sidenote WTF is their discounter only calculates up to 100%, which in this case is wrong.
    What do you mean "only" to 100%. You can't save more than 100%. The correct value is: 2499850/2500000 = 99.994% which is pretty close.

    I'm glad someone else pointed that out (as well as other posters further down). I would have done it myself, but I was busy wiping the tea off my monitor screen, after spluttering at the mathematical faux-pas of somebody who is ostensibly a professional programmer.

  • T$ (unregistered) in reply to bobbo
    bobbo:
    Anon:
    Zach:
    A sidenote WTF is their discounter only calculates up to 100%, which in this case is wrong.
    What do you mean "only" to 100%. You can't save more than 100%. The correct value is: 2499850/2500000 = 99.994% which is pretty close.

    I'm glad someone else pointed that out (as well as other posters further down). I would have done it myself, but I was busy wiping the tea off my monitor screen, after spluttering at the mathematical faux-pas of somebody who is ostensibly a professional programmer.

    In reality, you could technically take over 100% off, it would just mean that THEY would pay YOU for the product. I'm sure amazon rounds UP to the nearest percent. Thinking from a business perspective, people would rather see 100% than 99.994...%.

  • IV (unregistered)

    I'm glad that someone else made a post about a professional programmer making a mathmatical "faux-pas", because that leads into my comment.

    The real WTF is that people in these comments have calculated 99.999 and 99.993333% off. Obviously some programmers have not figured out how to do math properly on their computers.

    captcha: atari

  • (cs) in reply to IV
    IV:
    I'm glad that someone else made a post about a professional programmer making a mathmatical "faux-pas", because that leads into my comment.

    The real WTF is that people in these comments have calculated 99.999 and 99.993333% off. Obviously some programmers have not figured out how to do math properly on their computers.

    captcha: atari

    We can't, the WTF calculators haven't been released yet.

  • Rob (unregistered)

    I just want to know: Does it come with the Tadpole eggs pictured in the fifth frame?

  • Coyne (unregistered)

    Actually, it looks to me like someone liked the [00] key a bit too much. As in:

    List price ==> [2] [5] [0] [00] [00] [00] [enter]

    If that's the case, then WTF here is software that blindly accepts ridiculous numbers without asking for a confirmation.

    A while back someone scanned a UPC code into a price field, yielding in a charge on the order of $4,055,297,852.27. The point of sale system thought that was just dandy and dutifully passed it to the payroll system.

    Fortunately, it was too big for a payroll field and didn't actually get deducted from the paycheck (caused a failure instead).

  • Sgt D. (unregistered)

    I was more wondering what the section "people that bought this item also bought....." would show.

    Boeing 747-400 : now 105% off for only $99,99?

  • Davey (unregistered) in reply to AuMatar
    AuMatar:
    rjnewton:
    Anon:
    If you look at the store's other products, you can tell it's actually only supposed to be $250.00.

    Are you sure? If it is the real McCoy, then 2.5 million is probably about right. Faberge Easter Eggs were the treats that the czars would buy each year--not bargain-basement items by any stretch of the imagination.

    Yes, but you wouldn't sell one of those on Amazon. They're priceless. You'd sell them at an auction.

    As a side note: note that this isn't an amazon rip off, its a merchant selling on the amazon site. Looks like instead of fixing their price, they put it in as a sale.

    Youre saying i should check ebay?

  • J Random Hacker (unregistered) in reply to ssprencel
    ssprencel:

    What is a Faberge egg and why would I want a deal on it? For that matter, why would I want to spend $250 on it in the first place?

    They are jewelled eggs made as Easter presents for the Russian Tsars. Did you never see Octopussy or Ocean's Twelve?

    As for why you would want to spend $250 on one, let's just say that if you bought one at the list price of $2.5 million, you wouldn't be selling it at a loss.

  • (cs)

    The reviews are funny, but for an extra laugh, mouse-over the "customer images" supplied by other people.

  • (cs)

    Ah... lovely...

    [image]
    Now, these are the green eggs I'm talking about!
  • ambrosen (unregistered) in reply to Sgt D.
    Sgt D.:
    I was more wondering what the section "people that bought this item also bought....." would show.

    Boeing 747-400 : now 105% off for only $99,99?

    For me it shows:

    Write & Learn Spellboard Advanced

    VTech Winnie the Pooh Explore and Learn Table

    V Tech Nitro Vision TV Learning Station

    Thomas & Friends Wooden Railway - Battery Powered Around the Tree Holiday Set

    V Tech - 3-in-1 Smart Wheels

  • David (unregistered)

    Impressive Math skills, must be a MBA graduate

  • Jordanwb (unregistered)

    I love coming here. Keep it up!

  • 855 (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.

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