• nobody (unregistered)

    Let's see - 0.12 but pay inside, so I'd have to go into the store twice if I filled up. And I'd 12 cents if my tank was empty, as it only holds 12 gallons.

    Not worth my time.

  • Zach (cs)

    No wooden table?

  • T$ (unregistered)

    12 cents? Well, a penny saved is a penny earned. Sadly it's expired though.

  • don (unregistered)

    I'd like to see one (probably an example on this site somewhere actually) "You have saved $NaN on this purchase"

  • bsingle (unregistered)

    You can combine up to three of them for up to 30 cents per coupon or 90 cents total, so you can save about a buck overall.

  • SuperousOxide (cs) in reply to nobody
    nobody:
    Let's see - 0.12 but pay inside, so I'd have to go into the store twice if I filled up. And I'd 12 cents if my tank was empty, as it only holds 12 gallons.

    Not worth my time.

    At least it's better than the 1.2 cents you save by paying 3.00 9/10 rather than 3.01.

  • Jon (unregistered)

    that's not an error. they actually do give you one cent off per gallon. Rather, it's one cent off per gallon for every ten dollars you spend in the store. And you can combine multiple discounts on a single purchase.

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to Jon
    bsingle:
    You can combine up to three of them for up to 30 cents per coupon or 90 cents total, so you can save about a buck overall.
    Jon:
    that's not an error. they actually do give you one cent off per gallon. Rather, it's one cent off per gallon for every ten dollars you spend in the store. And you can combine multiple discounts on a single purchase.
    What am I missing? Doesn't it say "Limit 1 per Customer per Visit"? (Curiously capitalized as if it were in German)
  • Random832 (cs) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    bsingle:
    You can combine up to three of them for up to 30 cents per coupon or 90 cents total, so you can save about a buck overall.
    Jon:
    that's not an error. they actually do give you one cent off per gallon. Rather, it's one cent off per gallon for every ten dollars you spend in the store. And you can combine multiple discounts on a single purchase.
    What am I missing? Doesn't it say "Limit 1 per Customer per Visit"? (Curiously capitalized as if it were in German)
    I don't know what bsingle's on about, but I think what Jon is saying is that if you'd spent $100 in the store, they'd have printed the coupon saying 10 cents off per gallon rather than 1 cent.
  • Iago (cs)

    High fuel prices? Don't make me laugh. Man, I wish I was only paying TWICE the average US price for my fuel (I'm actually paying about 3x what Americans pay).

  • Ben (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered)

    I have to admit that a penny off per gallon up to a maximum of twelve pennies is not exactly "Woo-hoo!" material when gasoline costs in the vicinity of $3.00 per gallon in the US (even if it is much more expensive elsewhere). If you were buying twenty gallons of gasoline, your savings would be 0.2%. Don't quit your job yet.

    [digression] Incidentally, US$3.00 per US gallon translates to about 0.82 Canadian dollars per litre. In central Canada, we're paying about 1.05 Canadian dollars per litre (28% more) even as we pump two and a half million barrels per day out of Alberta to feed US demand. I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]

  • B2Ben (cs) in reply to Ben
    Ben:
    Shouldn't that be 1 "cent" instead of 1 "centS"

    Google says yes: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=convert+0.01+dollars+to+cents

    Seems like lazy programming.

    OK... I'm signed in now... I submitted the 1 centS coupon for the grammatical error.

    They should have added some extra logic: if cents = 1 then output "cent" else output "cents"

  • John Doe (unregistered) in reply to Ben
    Ben:
    Seems like lazy programming.

    Of course, otherwise they wouldn't have money for customers benefiting from these excellent savings! </sarcasm>

  • Kev (unregistered)

    Iago - that would be your government at work. The vast majority of governments tax gasoline heavily to pay for all those wonderful benefits you are receiving.

    (Yeah, I get that sour face when thinking about where all my tax dollars go as well...)

  • ParkinT (cs) in reply to B2Ben
    B2Ben:
    Ben:
    Shouldn't that be 1 "cent" instead of 1 "centS"

    Google says yes: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=convert+0.01+dollars+to+cents

    Seems like lazy programming.

    OK... I'm signed in now... I submitted the 1 centS coupon for the grammatical error.

    They should have added some extra logic: if cents = 1 then output "cent" else output "cents"

    But, what if the total was ZERO? Would it be cent or cents?

    It all makes NO CENTS to me !!

  • Anon (unregistered)

    What I love is that Massimo's camera (presumably a camera phone) decided not to focus on the giant yellow sticker he was taking a picture of, but noticed the "Havana Club" can in the background and decided to focus on that instead.

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered)

    The offerta at Massimo's liquor store reminds me of something I see all too often in the pricing of 'specials'. It goes something like, "$2.29 each, or $4.77 for three". The numbers are never nice round ones, because then the mental arithmetic would be easy and everyone would notice exactly how great a deal he was getting.

  • ToxikFetus (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression]I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]

    I don't blame the US consumer for Japanese gasoline demand, either (and how long has Canada had a free trade agreement with Japan?).

  • TimmyT (unregistered)

    The Real WTF© is that those crazy Europeans switch commas and periods - 1,000.00 here is 1.000,00 over there. That's just crazy! No wonder I can't understand anything they say over there....

    captcha: sanitarium, my summer vacation destination!

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to ToxikFetus
    ToxikFetus:
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression]I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]

    I don't blame the US consumer for Japanese gasoline demand, either (and how long has Canada had a free trade agreement with Japan?).

    Your point eludes me, ToxikFetus. Canada does not have a free trade agreement with Japan and the US is a much larger consumer of Canadian oil than is Japan.

    My point is that under the Canada-US free trade agreement, Canadian oil and gasoline suppliers (and the Canadian government) are forbidden to make any distinction between US consumers and Canadian consumers in price or supply, for any reason, be it economic, strategic, or environmental. Since the US economy is huge in comparison with the Canadian economy (in excess of ten to one), the price that the Canadian consumer pays for Canadian gasoline is overwhelmingly decided by demand from across the border. This is what has many Canadians concerned when when they hear talk of bringing water under the terms of the free trade agreement.

  • AC (unregistered) in reply to SuperousOxide
    SuperousOxide:
    nobody:
    Let's see - 0.12 but pay inside, so I'd have to go into the store twice if I filled up. And I'd 12 cents if my tank was empty, as it only holds 12 gallons.

    Not worth my time.

    At least it's better than the 1.2 cents you save by paying 3.00 9/10 rather than 3.01.

    $3? That's nice, I spend 1.40 € per liter today, which google tells me is: 1.40 (Euros per liter) = 7.29645695 U.S. dollars per US gallon

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    The offerta at Massimo's liquor store reminds me of something I see all too often in the pricing of 'specials'. It goes something like, "$2.29 each, or $4.77 for three". The numbers are never nice round ones, because then the mental arithmetic would be easy and everyone would notice exactly how great a deal he was getting.
    I totally buggered up the numbers. That should have been "$1.59 each, or $4.77 for three". Sorry for the confusion.
  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression] Incidentally, US$3.00 per US gallon translates to about 0.82 Canadian dollars per litre. In central Canada, we're paying about 1.05 Canadian dollars per litre (28% more) even as we pump two and a half million barrels per day out of Alberta to feed US demand. I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]

    Is that two and a half million barrels of oil or gasoline? They are not the same thing. Higher prices for gasoline in Canada may also be affected by refinery capacity in Canada. Could be that Canada can't refine enough gasoline and hence end up with higher prices? (I don't know the answer, I'm just asking).

  • Mario (unregistered) in reply to TimmyT

    Hahaha. We've got you. How much do you think 1.000.000 is?

  • HC (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    What I love is that Massimo's camera (presumably a camera phone) decided not to focus on the giant yellow sticker he was taking a picture of, but noticed the "Havana Club" can in the background and decided to focus on that instead.

    The phone just decided to be artistic for the occasion.

    captcha: scooter - I broke mine. :(

  • DWalker59 (cs)

    "$2.29 each, or $4.77 for three".

    Our local grocery store charges about 2.5 times as much for a box of 200 packets of Equal as they do for a box of 100 packets. I have told the store manager, but they don't care.

    The "price per unit" shelf tags use "price per oz" for one size, and "price per unit (packet)" for the other size. Not helpful. But anyone with a lick of sense should be able to multiply the price of the smaller box by 2, to see that it costs less to buy 2 boxes of 100 than one box of 200.

    (10 cents each. Or two for a quarter.)

  • tin (cs)

    Imagine the crazy 4c/L discount that is popular on Australian fuel... How crazy is that?

    We are paying $AU1.30 per litre here, which is less than Europeans, but almost double USA.

  • Eternal Density (cs)

    Converting Australian prices to USD and gallons comes to about $4.80 Complicated Acronym Person Test Computer Has Asked = Burned (then I logged on, or in, or up, or whatever it is) [edit] looks like a countryman beat me too it [edit] TRWTF is that "The symbol for AUD can be written A$, Au$, $Au, Aud$, $Aud, Aus$, and $Aus." while "The symbol for USD can be written $." Not fair that they don't hafta use a prefix (not that we bother to internally).

  • BillyBob (unregistered) in reply to tin
    tin:
    Imagine the crazy 4c/L discount that is popular on Australian fuel... How crazy is that?

    Crazy like a fox. Considering the companies (two of them) who offer that discount own over 80% of both the grocery and fuel market in Australia - the discount has actually resulted in higher fuel and grocery prices overall (even with the discount).

  • Pap (cs)

    1 cent off per $10 spent in the store (according to Jon). The maximum applies to the gallon amount, not the penny amount.

    Hence, spending $50, which is like half a day's worth of food to Americans, is 5*12 = 60 cents off.

    Not much, but it's NOT A WTF.

  • AC (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression] Incidentally, US$3.00 per US gallon translates to about 0.82 Canadian dollars per litre. In central Canada, we're paying about 1.05 Canadian dollars per litre (28% more) even as we pump two and a half million barrels per day out of Alberta to feed US demand. I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]
    Unless you can tell me how much of the difference is due to taxes, you've failed to impress me.
  • bsingle (unregistered)

    I have the Official Rules right here, it says: "Customers may redeem up to 3 Holiday Fuel Rewards in a single fuel purchase. Limit 30¢ per coupon and 90¢ per gas purchase. Discount valid up to 12 gallons. Cub purchase excludes lottery, tobacco, liquor, money order, and gift card purchases."

  • Daniel Beardsmore (cs) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    What I love is that Massimo's camera (presumably a camera phone) decided not to focus on the giant yellow sticker he was taking a picture of, but noticed the "Havana Club" can in the background and decided to focus on that instead.

    I would imagine it's because either a) the camera has no macro focus ability, or b) the operator has no clue what macro focus is. By the looks of it, the subject is too close to the camera.

    With no macro focus, the only thing you can do is stand further back and hope that the resolution is high enough that you can crop the image later. The image shown here on the site is 640x480, or 0.3 MP, so a 1 MP camera would allow you to stand further back, where the subject is better focused, and then crop the resulting image.

  • CastrTroy (unregistered) in reply to DWalker59
    DWalker59:
    "$2.29 each, or $4.77 for three".

    Our local grocery store charges about 2.5 times as much for a box of 200 packets of Equal as they do for a box of 100 packets. I have told the store manager, but they don't care.

    The "price per unit" shelf tags use "price per oz" for one size, and "price per unit (packet)" for the other size. Not helpful. But anyone with a lick of sense should be able to multiply the price of the smaller box by 2, to see that it costs less to buy 2 boxes of 100 than one box of 200.

    (10 cents each. Or two for a quarter.)

    The grocery store I go to sells the big boxes of Cheerios (550 g?) for $3.99 and the smaller boxes (400 g?) for $4.19. Either way I think I'm paying too much, but I can't think of why anybody would buy the smaller box.

    Captcha: digdug. Where do they get this list of words from?

  • fennec (cs) in reply to AC
    AC:
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression] Incidentally, US$3.00 per US gallon translates to about 0.82 Canadian dollars per litre. In central Canada, we're paying about 1.05 Canadian dollars per litre (28% more) even as we pump two and a half million barrels per day out of Alberta to feed US demand. I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]
    Unless you can tell me how much of the difference is due to taxes, you've failed to impress me.

    Yeah, you trade oil with the US, they give you dollars. What do you backwards Canadians end up doing with those dollars anyway, boil them for stew with your squirrel meat? ^^

    (with apologies to Milton Friedman...)

    Anyway, to put things in another perspective, couldn't you just as readily say that a lack of free trade with the big economies of the world would be the distortion? Really, why should two economies be artificially segregated by the 49th parallel? It's an imaginary line in the woods, and it's not even particularly well-mowed!

  • $ (unregistered)

    What? Alberta has taxes? What are you going to do next, claim Texas has elbartes?

    Meanwhile, how much of that 28% difference is due to the rise of the beaver buck? Let's just push it back to last year's level. Down boy, down.

  • NSCoder (cs) in reply to Eternal Density
    Eternal Density:
    TRWTF is that "The symbol for AUD can be written A$, Au$, $Au, Aud$, $Aud, Aus$, and $Aus." while "The symbol for USD can be written $." Not fair that they don't hafta use a prefix (not that we bother to internally).
    Hey, at least you have a symbol.

    Incidentally, I pay CHF650 per year for as much chauffeur-driven transport as I like. I sure am glad I don't have to drive, I get a lot more time to read that way.

  • James (unregistered) in reply to TimmyT
    TimmyT:
    The Real WTF© is that those crazy Europeans switch commas and periods - 1,000.00 here is 1.000,00 over there. That's just crazy! No wonder I can't understand anything they say over there....

    captcha: sanitarium, my summer vacation destination!

    We don't in the UK. I don't think they do in Ireland either...

  • rik (unregistered)

    The real WTF is the fuel prices in England. We're at 2 USD per LITRE. I don't know how much that is relative to american gallons, which are a different size to our gallons, but I'm led to believe it's somewhere between 6 and 8 USD per gallon.

    12 CENT DISCOUNT! ROCK ON.

    captcha: pirates.

  • Thief^ (cs) in reply to rik
    rik:
    The real WTF is the fuel prices in England. We're at 2 USD per LITRE. I don't know how much that is relative to american gallons, which are a different size to our gallons, but I'm led to believe it's somewhere between 6 and 8 USD per gallon.
    Google agrees: UK£1 / litre = 7.68741428 US$ / US gallon
  • Saemus Heaney (unregistered) in reply to rik
    rik:
    The real WTF is the fuel prices in England. We're at 2 USD per LITRE. I don't know how much that is relative to american gallons, which are a different size to our gallons, but I'm led to believe it's somewhere between 6 and 8 USD per gallon.

    12 CENT DISCOUNT! ROCK ON.

    captcha: pirates.

    On the contrary, since moving the UK Petrol is cheaper for me.. I was paying $1.40 AUD / litre, and earning $50,000AUD, now I'm here and paying £0.96/litre and earning £80,000. To my perspective Petrol is a lot cheaper. Of course if I was earning at home what I am now, I would use petrol at the same rate I drink beer and not think about it.

    But all things relative.

    The argument that <such and such country> is better because they have cheaper fuel or lower living costs is often flawed, as they'll usually give lower pay/salaries on average anyway. This of course doesn't always work, apparently |Moscow is the most expensive city on Earth, whilst at the same time having comparitively low rates of income compared to say London, or New York.

    Captcha: Pinball, because I- like solid metallic balls

  • monkey (unregistered) in reply to Saemus Heaney

    In the UK, we're on apprx $7.5 per US Gallon. However, because my small car probably does over double the mileage per unit fuel than the average US car (about 50 to the gallon), the financial cost of travel for me probably isn't that much different.

    It's a pity our US cousins don't have such a good incentive to reduce their fuel usage.

  • htg (unregistered)

    The common supermarket discount in the UK is 5p per litre.

    Which is, err Google ...

    (UK£ 0.05) per litre = 0.384370714 US$ per US gallon

    if you spend a tenner ($20).

    Shame that the price is so high to start off with. However our cars typically have smaller engines and are more economical, and our journeys are shorter.

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression] Incidentally, US$3.00 per US gallon translates to about 0.82 Canadian dollars per litre. In central Canada, we're paying about 1.05 Canadian dollars per litre (28% more) even as we pump two and a half million barrels per day out of Alberta to feed US demand. I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]

    Is that two and a half million barrels of oil or gasoline? They are not the same thing. Higher prices for gasoline in Canada may also be affected by refinery capacity in Canada. Could be that Canada can't refine enough gasoline and hence end up with higher prices? (I don't know the answer, I'm just asking).

    I meant oil. However, it's difficult to distinguish between gasoline refined here and gasoline refined there, because it's a single integrated market. It is the case, none the less, that some of the Alberta oil that is shipped to the US is shipped back to Canada and refined into gasoline, and then some of that is shipped back across the border for sale in the US. Bizarre, but true.

    It reminds me of the situation that came to light last year when melamine contaminated Chinese wheat gluten turned up in pet food. A lot of pets were poisoned and some died. What I found bizarre was that a canning plant in the US, the world's largest wheat exporter, owned by a company based in Canada, the world's second largest wheat exporter, was buying wheat gluten from China, the world's largest wheat importer.

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to $
    $:
    What? Alberta has taxes? What are you going to do next, claim Texas has elbartes?

    Meanwhile, how much of that 28% difference is due to the rise of the beaver buck? Let's just push it back to last year's level. Down boy, down.

    The rise in the value of the loonie vis-a-vis the sawbuck should be making gasoline less expensive in Canada and more expensive in the US. What are "elbartes"?

  • Strider (cs) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    $:
    What? Alberta has taxes? What are you going to do next, claim Texas has elbartes?

    Meanwhile, how much of that 28% difference is due to the rise of the beaver buck? Let's just push it back to last year's level. Down boy, down.

    The rise in the value of the loonie vis-a-vis the sawbuck should be making gasoline less expensive in Canada and more expensive in the US. What are "elbartes"?

    taxes -> texas alberta -> elbartes

    clever? questionable..

    where tf is my wtf...im bored

  • jaykay (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston

    that's okay, it was funnier the first time.

  • snoofle (unregistered)

    A friend of mine owns a gas station, and pumps (what to me seems like) a lot of gas. The markup he makes over what he pays for it is just a few cents a gallon; the rest goes to the various resellers back toward the refinery (thank you NYMEX).

    If a gas station is offering a penny off per gallon, it's probably a respectable percentage of their profit.

    Just a thought.

  • Frenchier than thou (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    Sgt. Preston:
    [digression] Incidentally, US$3.00 per US gallon translates to about 0.82 Canadian dollars per litre. In central Canada, we're paying about 1.05 Canadian dollars per litre (28% more) even as we pump two and a half million barrels per day out of Alberta to feed US demand. I don't blame the US consumer--a lot of the difference is Canadian retail gasoline taxes--but 'free trade' with the second biggest economy in the world can seriously distort the domestic supply and demand balance and consequently distort prices. [/digression]

    Is that two and a half million barrels of oil or gasoline? They are not the same thing. Higher prices for gasoline in Canada may also be affected by refinery capacity in Canada. Could be that Canada can't refine enough gasoline and hence end up with higher prices? (I don't know the answer, I'm just asking).

    I'll give you the straight dope on gas prices in Canada: there is no competition at the bulk level, so they charge whatever they want, and shuffle the prices around a little to hide the upward trend.

    A few years back, the local refinery plastered the media with articles about their new cracking tower, which could produce twice the gasoline for each barrel of oil. Did the prices go down? no. Not even 10%. And they were quick to break out the crude barrel prices as an excuse to jack up the prices later.

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