• cklam (cs)
  • Adrian Bool (unregistered) in reply to PseudoNoise

    Much as we complain about Perl's syntax, it seems English is by far the worst language ;-)

    aid

  • Adrian Bool (unregistered) in reply to PseudoNoise
    Indeed, I lose. "One's" isn't a personal possessive, it's an indefinite possessive.

    But it must be somewhere between middle school & rocket science.

    Much as we complain about Perl's syntax, it seems English is by far the worst language ;-)

    aid

  • cklam (cs) in reply to AZ Wildcat
    AZ Wildcat:
    Russ:
    It never ceases to amaze me how many people don't know the constructs that are available to them in the programming language and are too lazy to google what they need.

    The guy was using FORTRAN. This means that Google was probably not invented yet when they first wrote the code. The guy would have to dial into a Wildcat! BBS with his 2400 baud modem to get the answer.

    A Wildcat! BBS with a 2400 baud modem is fast enough for a single terminal session ....

  • cklam (cs) in reply to ssprencel
    ssprencel:
    Steve:
    The supercilious superior tone of many of the comments here really bugs me.

    It's not as if we weren't all newbies at one time in our lives. Perhaps some of use learned Perl and C++ at our father's knee but many of use came to these things later along in life.

    As I mentioned before in another comment, sometimes, when you're new to a programming language or even a whole new software environment (such as making the transition from a Windows box to Unix, which is a pretty radical jump), sometimes you don't know how to frame the right question because you don't have all of the vocabulary down.

    ...

    Well said. Few things piss me off more than to be talked down to by some dork with stunted social skills. It's people like them that give our entire industry the bad image of being nerdy, antisocial, loosers who couldn't get laid with $10,000 in a whore house.

    Don't be quick to call someone a moron or feel that you are better than them in anyway because you've spent more time then the other person learning a particular subject. The real moron is the one who can't understand the difference between ignorance and stupidity. I am ignorant about Pearl because I have not studied it, I am not stupid because I can learn it.

    Their ilk is what keeps people from learning more about computers. Most people don't want to be insulted because they don't know how to open up notepad or because they don't know what 'ls' does, so they just don't bother learning.

    There are no stupid questions, there are only stupid answers.

  • cklam (cs) in reply to diaphanein
    diaphanein:
    dnm:
    ssprencel:
    Steve:
    The supercilious superior tone of many of the comments here really bugs me.

    It's not as if we weren't all newbies at one time in our lives. Perhaps some of use learned Perl and C++ at our father's knee but many of use came to these things later along in life.

    As I mentioned before in another comment, sometimes, when you're new to a programming language or even a whole new software environment (such as making the transition from a Windows box to Unix, which is a pretty radical jump), sometimes you don't know how to frame the right question because you don't have all of the vocabulary down.

    ...

    Well said. Few things piss me off more than to be talked down to by some dork with stunted social skills. It's people like them that give our entire industry the bad image of being nerdy, antisocial, loosers who couldn't get laid with $10,000 in a whore house.

    Don't be quick to call someone a moron or feel that you are better than them in anyway because you've spent more time then the other person learning a particular subject. The real moron is the one who can't understand the difference between ignorance and stupidity. I am ignorant about Pearl because I have not studied it, I am not stupid because I can learn it.

    Their ilk is what keeps people from learning more about computers. Most people don't want to be insulted because they don't know how to open up notepad or because they don't know what 'ls' does, so they just don't bother learning.

    The issue that comes into play here is twofold, however.

    #1: In today's day and age, when you're doing something that stupid, if you're worth your salt, you'll stop, and think, "there must be a smarter way to do this", and ask google.

    The first result in google is the correct one.

    #2: This damned industry is filled with weenies who can't write good code to save their lives, but think that this industry is 'easy money' so they're here, filling our world with crappy unmaintainable code.

    What's most unsettling about these types, is you can try and help and correct them, as I often have, only to be met with resistance as if you've challenged their manhood or something.

    When I work with people smarter than me, I leech every last drop of knowledge I can from them, because it's where I've learned the most.

    And besides, I got laid at the whorehouse, and it only cost me $5. Granted, she only had 1 tooth left...

    When was that ? 1957 ?

  • Anand Muthu (unregistered) in reply to Steve
    Steve:
    The supercilious superior tone of many of the comments here really bugs me.

    It's not as if we weren't all newbies at one time in our lives. Perhaps some of use learned Perl and C++ at our father's knee but many of use came to these things later along in life.

    As I mentioned before in another comment, sometimes, when you're new to a programming language or even a whole new software environment (such as making the transition from a Windows box to Unix, which is a pretty radical jump), sometimes you don't know how to frame the right question because you don't have all of the vocabulary down.

    Yes, Google and other search engines make life much easier these days (think of those of us who learned to program with a copy of the FORTRAN Language Manual, a Programmer's Guide, and the IBM System/360 Principles of Operation as our only guides) but Google also produces a lot of noise, chaff, and downright wrong answers, too.

    Steve , What are you coming to Explain here ? huh , Is it reg The UNIX Philosophy or something that you really dont know and getting educated now ??

  • Veinor (cs) in reply to Smitty

    I know, I mean you would actually have to google 'perl file size' and click on a link to find the answer! I'd much rather try to remember "Is it file_size, or size_of_file, or filesize, or size_on_disk..."

  • bling (unregistered) in reply to Carnildo

    Then i wonder how you determined the improvement was of 75 mins.

  • bling (unregistered) in reply to Carnildo
    Carnildo:
    I've got a password cracker that will take just shy of 14 months to exhaust all reasonable passwords for older *nix systems. Would you consider a 75-minute speedup to be worthwhile?

    Then i wonder how you determined the improvement was of 75 mins.

  • AdT (unregistered) in reply to Smitty
    Smitty:
    Where would you look to find the '-s' operator (or whatever perl twinks call it.)

    $ man perlfunc

    (In other words: RTFM)

  • 855 (unregistered)
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