• Tester (unregistered)

    grep -i "fr1st"

  • Severity One (cs)

    Stuff like JIRA isn't that expensive, you know.

  • MrOli (unregistered)

    Why did no one pull the plug on this after about a month and install one of the many fully working, decent, free off-the-shelf systems?

    Or do you work in one of these "Buy it or re-invent it here - Open Source is BAD, mmkay?" shops?

  • Anon (unregistered)

    The TRWTF is expecting PHP and MySQL to replace post it notes.

  • Bert (unregistered) in reply to Anon

    The real The TRWTF is expecting PHP and structured MySQL query language to replace post-it PIN notes.

  • Marc (unregistered)

    You would be a perfect candidate for something like Salesforce.

    Salesforce is fully customizable and your ticketing system can be built within a month, if you get the right developer on the job.

    We are here to help you.

  • Nagesh (unregistered)

    It is bad practise not to be handling cat exeptions.

  • DOA (cs) in reply to Severity One
    Severity One:
    Stuff like JIRA isn't that expensive, you know.
    Hell, you can get Mantis or Bugzilla for free. The GUI will make your face melt, but it's got to be better than emails post-it notes.
  • MrOli (unregistered)

    Salesforce? Month to configure?

    snigger

    I feel for you corporate boys, I really do.

    How about Zentrack, Bugzilla or a million other free apps you could configure in house in a day or two? Well, 10 mins installing, a day or two playing, learning and training your staff...

  • Tim (unregistered)

    TRWTF is using a language that doesn't support closures or local variabl... hmm, hang on...

    TRWFT is using Javascript

  • Anon (unregistered)
    It had countless odd bugs like forms disappearing, lists not populating correctly, edits not actually saving, and so on.

    But on the bright side, they could use the same system to report problems with itself!

    That's a win-win in my book.

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered)

    Fristl

    Akismeta Akismetb Akismetc

  • WC (unregistered)

    At my last job, it took them a lot longer than a month to configure Salesforce. And they hired a consultant to do it, too.

  • Severity One (cs) in reply to DOA
    DOA:
    Severity One:
    Stuff like JIRA isn't that expensive, you know.
    Hell, you can get Mantis or Bugzilla for free. The GUI will make your face melt, but it's got to be better than emails post-it notes.
    As I said, stuff like JIRA isn't as expensive as having to set up one of these supposedly 'free' ticketing systems that take an inordinate amount of time to set up properly. Unless your company is the IT equivalent of Liechtenstein (but without the banks), a couple of hundreds [insert favourite currency here] should not be a problem.
  • z (unregistered) in reply to Bert
    Bert:
    The real The TRWTF

    I like where this is going!

  • cappeca (unregistered)

    fristaa

    We use RT here.

  • faoileag (unregistered) in reply to WC
    WC:
    At my last job, it took them a lot longer than a month to configure Salesforce. And they hired a consultant to do it, too.

    Perhaps the latter was the reason for the first?

  • Anon (unregistered)

    Step 1: Create a bug ticketing system that doesn't work at all (doesn't actually submit any tickets) Step 2: Tell everybody if they have any problems with the system - submit a ticket on the system Step 3: Claim the system is working perfectly since you have no outstanding tickets Step 4: ???? Step 5: Profit!

  • AP2 (unregistered) in reply to Tim
    Tim:
    TRWTF is using a language that doesn't support closures or local variabl... hmm, hang on...

    TRWFT is using Javascript

    You do know that Javascript supports both, right?

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to AP2
    AP2:
    Tim:
    TRWTF is using a language that doesn't support closures or local variabl... hmm, hang on...

    TRWFT is using Javascript

    You do know that Javascript supports both, right?

    +1

  • bob5k (unregistered)

    1: The cornerstone of maintaining anything is to have a ticketing system to track the issues, and a data repository to store fixes and files in. Failure to do this is a WTF and leads to many WTF's, problems that aren't tracked, etc.

    2: If you're afraid of management backstabbing you for doing #1, or worse, accounting getting involved and trying to quantify your job, either management needs replaced, or you're truely useless.

    3: The above is an example of useless management; 8 months FT work to reinvent the wheel? 10 seconds of thinking would've solved this FSS.

  • the beholder (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    It had countless odd bugs like forms disappearing, lists not populating correctly, edits not actually saving, and so on.

    But on the bright side, they could use the same system to report problems with itself!

    That's a win-win in my book.

    What's the point of flooding the database?

  • Foobar (unregistered) in reply to Severity One

    ReadyDesk is a flat $200 purchase. Bugzilla is free. Either one can be configured by a semi-competent developer in at most a few weeks.

  • dkf (cs) in reply to Severity One
    Severity One:
    DOA:
    Severity One:
    Stuff like JIRA isn't that expensive, you know.
    Hell, you can get Mantis or Bugzilla for free. The GUI will make your face melt, but it's got to be better than emails post-it notes.
    As I said, stuff like JIRA isn't as expensive as having to set up one of these supposedly 'free' ticketing systems that take an inordinate amount of time to set up properly. Unless your company is the IT equivalent of Liechtenstein (but without the banks), a couple of hundreds [insert favourite currency here] should not be a problem.
    What's more, having used JIRA and Bugzilla and Mantis (in the same project no less, which is indeed TRWTF but unrelated), I can report that JIRA is by far the most pleasant and useful. The only thing really wrong with it is the bizarre wiki-like syntax they use (borrowed from Confluence) which is really quite different to every other wiki syntax out there, but that's better than the outright hostility of Mantis and the reporting is significantly easier than with Bugzilla.

    Given that ticketing is important, spending for a good system is reasonable. What's more, you can get JIRA for free if you're doing OSS.

  • Anketam (cs)

    <Sarcasm>If you are part of an anti free software company, you could always go with Rational ClearQuest, that would be better than this code.</Sarcasm>

  • Hououin Kyoma (unregistered) in reply to Nagesh

    How so?

    I am from the future, so I need to know about this before it happens.

  • Hououin Kyoma (unregistered) in reply to Hououin Kyoma

    About the handling of CAT exceptions.

  • airdrik (unregistered) in reply to Hououin Kyoma

    While CAT exceptions will help in reducing the bug population in your code, they can also be a nuisance, getting fur in all of your functions and scratching up the data structures. That is why you need code to properly handle CAT exceptions.

  • QJo (cs) in reply to Severity One
    Severity One:
    DOA:
    Severity One:
    Stuff like JIRA isn't that expensive, you know.
    Hell, you can get Mantis or Bugzilla for free. The GUI will make your face melt, but it's got to be better than emails post-it notes.
    As I said, stuff like JIRA isn't as expensive as having to set up one of these supposedly 'free' ticketing systems that take an inordinate amount of time to set up properly. Unless your company is the IT equivalent of Liechtenstein (but without the banks), a couple of hundreds [insert favourite currency here] should not be a problem.
    You malign Bugzilla unfairly.
  • Nagesh (unregistered) in reply to airdrik
    airdrik:
    While CAT exceptions will help in reducing the bug population in your code, they can also be a nuisance, getting fur in all of your functions and scratching up the data structures. That is why you need code to properly handle CAT exceptions.
    Confusious is saying that having cat in PC wil interfear with mouse.
  • Mr Clever Ideas (unregistered) in reply to airdrik
    airdrik:
    While CAT exceptions will help in reducing the bug population in your code, they can also be a nuisance, getting fur in all of your functions and scratching up the data structures. That is why you need code to properly handle CAT exceptions.
    And bear in mind that although they sleep quite regularly, they're not reliably thread-safe.
  • goldfire (unregistered) in reply to Anketam

    Don't even joke like that. It's not funny.

  • doozerboy (unregistered) in reply to Mr Clever Ideas
    Mr Clever Ideas:
    airdrik:
    While CAT exceptions will help in reducing the bug population in your code, they can also be a nuisance, getting fur in all of your functions and scratching up the data structures. That is why you need code to properly handle CAT exceptions.
    And bear in mind that although they sleep quite regularly, they're not reliably thread-safe.

    +1000

  • jessetechie (unregistered)

    You know, for the purpose of getting a list of useful ticketing software, this was probably more helpful than an Ask Slashdot post would have been. Thanks guys!

    In other news, TRWTF is that I had to post this comment from my phone because the firewall here blocks the "img/jpeg" content type, thus the captcha was blocked. FML.

  • callcopse (unregistered) in reply to QJo
    Comment held for moderation.
  • callcopse (unregistered) in reply to callcopse
    Comment held for moderation.
  • olius (unregistered) in reply to Foobar
    ReadyDesk is a flat $200 purchase. Bugzilla is free. Either one can be configured by a semi-competent developer in at most a few weeks.

    This site wouldn't exist if there were that many semi-competent developers out there.

    Nor would much commercial software out there today.

  • doozerboy (unregistered) in reply to olius
    olius:
    ReadyDesk is a flat $200 purchase. Bugzilla is free. Either one can be configured by a semi-competent developer in at most a few weeks.

    This site wouldn't exist if there were that many semi-competent developers out there.

    Nor would much commercial software out there today.

    Another vote for Bugtracker.NET

  • Nagesh (cs)

    Nobody has mention fogbugz.

    Any case we are not here to list product alternate. I like part where this person play video game at work pretending to work on some system. Then claim in job interview that he work on ticketing system and get high paying job, while the other developer is trying to fix bad stuff.

    Thing like that happen all the time.

  • token_woman (cs) in reply to MrOli
    MrOli:
    Salesforce? Month to configure?

    snigger

    I spend my entire working life configuring salesforce.

    Usually around 3pm I have a little cry.

  • Me Chinese, Me Make Joke (unregistered) in reply to Nagesh
    Nagesh:
    It is bad practise not to be handling cat exeptions.
    I hate when American customer specifically request cat exception. Don't they know cat more nutritious than Big Mac.
  • Meep (unregistered) in reply to Nagesh
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Tractor (unregistered)

    So what about trac?

  • Dirty Dirty Daryl (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • qbolec (unregistered)

    I think we get near to some deep truth about the universe. It's somewhat like the question: how do you compile the first revision of your compiler. Or: where did they store the source code of svn?

    The question is: How one can could hope to develop a good ticketing system without one at hand?

    P.S. we use trello.com, which is like post-it cards on steroids.

  • SteamBoat (cs)

    Get RedMine. If you want it too easy to believe then get the BitNami version.

    bitnami.org/stack/redmine

    MArk B.

  • Joe (unregistered)

    Just litter the code with FIXME: comments.

  • gunther (unregistered) in reply to qbolec
    qbolec:
    The question is: How one can could hope to develop a good ticketing system without one at hand?
    Around here, I always can could hope for the developers to do the needful, I don't even.
  • caper (unregistered)

    I'll bet that anyone even considering using a spreadsheet application does not have the skills to create a working tool.

    The guy instead found a way to learn PHP on company time before leaving.

  • pants (unregistered) in reply to Joe

    No. Litter the code with DELETEME: comments.

    captcha: suscipere

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