• Hector Martin (aka marcan) (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    People seem to think that making and running homebrew is some kind devine right. It's not.
    It is. I bought the damn thing, I might as well do as I please with it as long as I'm not hurting anyone or committing copyright infringement. I'm not renting the console, i'm buying it. I can do whatever I want with it.

    It's the manufacturer's divine right to try to lock the thing down, and it's my divine right to be (legally) able to break it open again.

    I think if you actually look at the real statistics, you'll find that at least 95% of Wii piracy right now is done via modchips, not homebrew. You keep associating homebrew with "modding" and piracy. I think you just don't understand how distant those two fields are, and how they only cross unintentionally (on our side anyway). Usually because the pirates take advantage of our work. Homebrew has nothing to do with modchips, and you don't need a modchip to use it. Currently loading pirate games is much easier, faster, and reliable using a modchip. VC/WiiWare is pretty much a lost cause by now, but Nintendo really screwed up on that one by storing everything in plaintext.

  • Craig (unregistered) in reply to Craig
    Craig:
    I really do just want to make backups.

    Oh, and for anecdotal support, I'm on my 3rd backup of Super Puzzle Fighter. I'm glad I stopped playing with the original disk, or I would've stopped playing it years ago.

  • SomeCoder (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    People seem to think that making and running homebrew is some kind devine right. It's not. Buy the thing. Play the games. Don't get me wrong; go nuts with your soldering iron if you want to. Mod it/pack it/paint it orange, it's your party. Yes. Publishers are bastards with all their regions, tricks and diabolical release schedules but don't pretend modding is innocent.

    You almost had me except for this paragraph. While I will definitely agree that homebrew is not a "divine right" (which I would interpret to mean as a God given right... not sure about the use here), I would say that anyone not allowing homebrew is doing themselves a disservice.

    How is modding NOT innocent if you aren't pirating? What harm does it do to the manufacture if you aren't using it to pirate games? What harm does homebrew do to you? If I buy a Wii, mod it, put homebrew games on it, and still buy your game to play, did modding really hurt you at all?

    I didn't really buy the argument someone else gave that said that you are afraid of homebrew competition but after this post, it sure seems like you are.

  • Herman (unregistered)

    Every piece of software is crackable, so what's the point here.

    The real WTF is someone complaining about one of the most popular consoles ever not being coded with perfection. Neither are the PS3 and the XBOX. The SNES might have been more stable but really, complexity has changed a bit.

    Comparing the game scene today with the time of the SNES is ridiculous. It's like saying it's awful that man no longer goes hunting in the woods for food.

    Worst post ever.

  • FruitLoop (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    Rehevkor:
    JimmyVile:
    For the most part it seems that the homebrew scene caters to the geeks who want to see what they can do with the system. Sure, there are those that use these powers for evil, but the intentions of the majority of the community are pure.

    I don't know if I should laugh or cry. This is completely false. 99% of all users use the hacks to avoid paying for games as much as possible.

    It's very nice and creative when people hack consoles "to see what it can do", "express themselves" or do it "because [s]God[/s] Mario told them to". But it is always used as a means to get free games. Always. I really can't see how people can rationalize the impact they have on piracy with their tinkering.

    \Video Game journalist \Game Developer

    I hear that 99% of statistics are made up on the spot.

    Take a poll, ask your friends, visit/moderate a main-stream game site, visit (informal) game conventions, or just read your local game-dev monthlies. I'm not a researcher and I left my piracy log book is in my other pants.

    Very commendable that the modders try to discourage piracy and I give you all big hugs and kisses from the bottom of my wallet. :D

    ...but for every lawful good modder there is a chaotic evil bastard who puts a hack online and whoops the shit hits the mainstream fan and downloads go through the roof while sales tank.

    There are chaotic evil bastards out there, sure, but I'm not convinced there is a 1-1 ration of evil bastards to good modders. As numerous people have said (many in reply to your post - interestingly uyou pick and choose which responses to reply to) allowing people to make their own Software would probably not affect Nintendo's bottom line - if anyhting, we geeks would be MORE attracted to a console we can do our own thing with.

    Clearly their current attempts against piracy do not work - for great effort. For less effort (and therefore cost) they could be in the exact same position they're in now - with a console that's more attractive to the (good) hacker (something which must increase their bottom line).

    Not to condone Piracy, but clothing manufacturer's have for years not cared if (some) people steal their product (especially young teens), because the image of these types wearing it is cheap advertising. Similarly, if I went to a friends house and played a game he had pirated and enjoyed it, I would be more likely to buy it than had I not been exposed to it. Some might be more likely to pirate it, but a remarkably high proportion would actually buy it (if for no other reason than they don't want to void their warranty by chipping their console).

    There is no question that Piracy is wrong, however any company must accept that: a) it exists b) sometimes fighting it costs mroe than what you lose from it c) sometimes what you lose from it is outweighed by what you gain from it.

  • Yanman.be (unregistered)

    It took me 4 hours to understand the title: Anatomy + Wii = anatomii Brillant!

  • (cs) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    For the most part it seems that the homebrew scene caters to the geeks who want to see what they can do with the system. Sure, there are those that use these powers for evil, but the intentions of the majority of the community are pure.

    I don't know if I should laugh or cry. This is completely false. 99% of all users use the hacks to avoid paying for games as much as possible.

    The only reason I 'hacked' my wii is so that my wife could play some Region 4 games on her US console which we purchased since moving here a few months ago.

    Region locking is one of the biggest things that affects innocent law abiding citizens by treating them like criminals. I brought my entire collection of region 4 DVDs over with me (at least a couple hundred) only to find that I have to play them with my laptop because the new blue ray player we bought will not play them back.

    This affects a lot of people every day and it hurts them a lot more than the dodgy supplier that's trying to sell a dvd imported from Hong Kong for half the retail price. It's about time that the big film studios and game developers realise that they're hurting their customers more than anyone else.</rant>

  • (cs) in reply to Herman
    Herman:
    Every piece of software is crackable, so what's the point here.

    The real WTF is someone complaining about one of the most popular consoles ever not being coded with perfection. Neither are the PS3 and the XBOX. The SNES might have been more stable but really, complexity has changed a bit.

    Comparing the game scene today with the time of the SNES is ridiculous. It's like saying it's awful that man no longer goes hunting in the woods for food.

    Worst post ever.

    I don't think anyone is complaining about the Wii's security flaws. Just laughing at them. I mean, mixing up memcmp() and strncmp()? Seriously?

  • IDBIIP (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • acid (unregistered)

    I have to admit that I'm not a console hacker and never will be, but it seems to me that the community around this sort of activity is more like a gaming modders' community.

    Most modders have no interest in piracy and some even go so far as to build in their own anti-piracy checks into their mods so you can only mod a valid copy of the game. A lot of them seem to know a lot more about game security than the HPCs who build the game security in for the publisher in the first place.

    Hell, some of them probably ARE the HPCs who build in the game security in for the publisher in the first place. It can be a tightly knit community, modding, but I digress.

    My point is this. Most games being released on the PC platform these days have some sort of allowance for modders. They HAVE to. You see, if a game can't be modded, it doesn't build up the community of players that will extend the longevity of the game. Most modders are just highly creative and adept fanatics who love the game they're modding.

    They spend an awful lot of time on the game, on the forums, building their mods, etc. They act as a de facto support line, they release their mods to the community free of charge, they collaborate with each other to build even bigger mods...

    I think you get the idea.

    To date, I've been seriously involved in two gaming communities. The Egosoft community, the name behind XbtF and X2 onwards, and the Freelancer community.

    The X community was the tightest group of gaming fanatics I've ever met in my life. And with good reason, they were playing a very good game. IMHO X-tension is still by far the best game in the X series, but it had one fatal flaw - virtually NO modding capability at all. There were some basic tools et al to help make minor changes, but the game couldn't really be modded. Egosoft realised their mistake when they looked at the gaming boards and the next games in the series all had modding capabilities built in.

    Freelancer on the other hand seems almost built from the ground up with modding in mind. M$ turned off the global servers last year, but Freelancer is still alive and well because the community built their OWN global server system. These are incredibly dedicated and talented people who've extended the life of the game (and therefore M$ revenue) on their own time. The only difference here is that despite creating such a moddable game, M$ hasn't really seemed interested in the community they've built. If they were, a FL2 would be in the works by now. It's a huge community out there loving the game even still.

    So here's my point - Console designers in the long term are more likely to GAIN revenue from hackers than LOSE it through piracy. Even though more of the end users out there are going to want to use this technology to pinch games, the console market is missing in key ingredient to keep the market share they gain - modding. If you can play a game once, beat it then not play it any differently next time, people play your games (and your platform) until they're bored with it. If they (on the other hand) can mod the games, do new things with the hardware making it more useful to them, then everything's new again and they play longer. No need to design a $1k replacement model next year if everyone's happy with what they have.

    That means bigger ROI on your original designs, and if you're the first to allow it, modders will flock to YOUR platforms in droves.

    Will some of them do it for cheap (if not free) games? Yeah, only an idiot would not admit that. BUT, my point is that MOST of the people on the platform will switch to it for the possibilities that modding presents. Once you have the core gamers, the broader community will follow.

    So, to me, the real WTF of this article is why are the console companies fighting this AT ALL? They should be happy about this, it's going to draw more people and more revenue to their platform. I'd be advertising the fact.

    I think the companies have it right to try and stop piracy. That is right and fair, even if they DO charge too much for games. But, confusing hacking with piracy seems to be the typical myopic corporate view that looks great to the shareholders but is ultimately self defeating to the company over the long term.

    Games (and gaming platforms) are made by the communities that support them, not the factories or developers that create them in the first place. Forget that, and the gaming community will forget your game or platform soon enough.

    Acid.

  • slope (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • (cs)

    Just to be pedantic: Super Mario Brothers was released in 1993, not in the 1980s.

    I happened to see it a couple of weeks ago and got a real kick out of Fisher Stevens playing Iggy. You may remember him as The Plague in Hackers.

  • Sanity (unregistered) in reply to Asiago Chow
    Asiago Chow:
    Not seeing a WTF.

    The bigger WTF is that they're attacking the homebrew community in the first place.

    Asiago Chow:
    It is to show due dilligence. It is exactly like the cheap tumbler lock you have on your front door. It's so Nintendo (or you) can stand up in court and say, "yer honer, we were doing our part, we used locks...and these people broke them."

    That's a very good point. The DMCA provides for exactly that.

    Naq V guvax vg'f shpxvat ergneqrq. Ol gur jnl, lbh'er ivbyngvat gur QZPN evtug abj, ol penpxvat guvf. Ubj'f vg srry gb or n pevzvany? Bu, naq vg'f sbe NAL checbfr, nf V haqrefgnaq vg -- juvpu vf jul, sbe fb ybat, vg jnf npghnyyl vyyrtny gb cynl n QIQ (gung lbh bja!) ba Yvahk.

    For what it's worth, I don't agree that this is why you use a cheap tumbler lock. You use a cheap tumbler lock because you're very unlikely to have even one person attempt to break in. If that's not the case -- if you live in a city, say -- you use a deadbolt or five, a peephole, and a chain.

    I suppose what makes it that much more of a WTF is that crypto algorithms -- especially implementations of common, pre-existing algorithms like RSA and SHA1 -- are not particularly difficult to come by.

  • Sanity (unregistered) in reply to DaEagle

    While I'm at it:

    DaEagle:
    Region locking is one of the biggest things that affects innocent law abiding citizens by treating them like criminals....

    This affects a lot of people every day and it hurts them a lot more than the dodgy supplier that's trying to sell a dvd imported from Hong Kong for half the retail price. It's about time that the big film studios and game developers realise that they're hurting their customers more than anyone else.</rant>

    And here I was thinking region locking had nothing to do with protecting the consumer, and everything to do with protecting the corporation.

    Basically, it lets them fix prices in those respective regions. People in the UK pay more than people in the US, who pay more than people in India. Better to sell a DVD at lower profit margins in China, say, than not at all -- although China may be a lost cause, it's still a billion people.

    But if people in the US are willing to pay ten times as much, the region coding lets them gouge us that much.

    Oh, there are other reasons -- the fact that there are often completely different corporations with the rights to distribute in each region, for example. But if there was some benefit to doing so, why wouldn't they consolidate to one global corporation responsible for distribution anywhere?

    Bs pbhefr, vs lbh'er jvyyvat gb ivbyngr gur QZPN (yvxr lbh unir gb, va beqre gb ernq guvf zrffntr), vg'f abg qvssvphyg gb pbzr ol ertvba-serr fbsgjner cynlref. QIQ PFF vf rnfl gb penpx.

  • JimmyVile (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    JimmyVile:
    People seem to think that making and running homebrew is some kind devine right. It's not. Buy the thing. Play the games. Don't get me wrong; go nuts with your soldering iron if you want to. Mod it/pack it/paint it orange, it's your party. Yes. Publishers are bastards with all their regions, tricks and diabolical release schedules but don't pretend modding is innocent.

    You almost had me except for this paragraph. While I will definitely agree that homebrew is not a "divine right" (which I would interpret to mean as a God given right... not sure about the use here), I would say that anyone not allowing homebrew is doing themselves a disservice.

    How is modding NOT innocent if you aren't pirating? What harm does it do to the manufacture if you aren't using it to pirate games? What harm does homebrew do to you? If I buy a Wii, mod it, put homebrew games on it, and still buy your game to play, did modding really hurt you at all?

    I didn't really buy the argument someone else gave that said that you are afraid of homebrew competition but after this post, it sure seems like you are.

    If you don't use it to run games for free, then yes, you are not hurting anyone, except maybe the feelings of the security expert that designed the thing. The problem is that although in the "die-hard" modding communities, a very large portion of people play nice (99%? :D), next to these relatively small modding communities, there is a huge main-stream audience that simply uses teh hax0rs for free games.

    I went to the birthday of my little cousin last week. When I got there, she and her friends were playing on their DS-es. (kids nowadays....)

    As soon as I sat down, one of their parents suddenly started smiling ear-to-ear: "Jim, you are into that whole video-game business, right? Weeheheheellll, look what I got. HEY BRANDINE! SHOW THAT CARD-THING I BOUGHT YA!".

    Turns out, she was playing from a G4 card. In fact, all of them had G4 cards, and none of them, nor their parents are tech-savvy in any way. Just swapping games and using google and banner-ridden download sites to get more. The parents were very happy with themselves, being so smart to buy the little kits, saving them a lot of money on games. Just shows how quickly things go when they hit the casual market.

    (Yes, my family is a hive of scum and villany.)

  • JimmyVile (unregistered) in reply to FruitLoop
    FruitLoop:
    JimmyVile:
    Rehevkor:
    JimmyVile:
    For the most part it seems that the homebrew scene caters to the geeks who want to see what they can do with the system. Sure, there are those that use these powers for evil, but the intentions of the majority of the community are pure.

    I don't know if I should laugh or cry. This is completely false. 99% of all users use the hacks to avoid paying for games as much as possible.

    It's very nice and creative when people hack consoles "to see what it can do", "express themselves" or do it "because [s]God[/s] Mario told them to". But it is always used as a means to get free games. Always. I really can't see how people can rationalize the impact they have on piracy with their tinkering.

    \Video Game journalist \Game Developer

    I hear that 99% of statistics are made up on the spot.

    Take a poll, ask your friends, visit/moderate a main-stream game site, visit (informal) game conventions, or just read your local game-dev monthlies. I'm not a researcher and I left my piracy log book is in my other pants.

    Very commendable that the modders try to discourage piracy and I give you all big hugs and kisses from the bottom of my wallet. :D

    ...but for every lawful good modder there is a chaotic evil bastard who puts a hack online and whoops the shit hits the mainstream fan and downloads go through the roof while sales tank.

    There are chaotic evil bastards out there, sure, but I'm not convinced there is a 1-1 ration of evil bastards to good modders. As numerous people have said (many in reply to your post - interestingly uyou pick and choose which responses to reply to) allowing people to make their own Software would probably not affect Nintendo's bottom line - if anyhting, we geeks would be MORE attracted to a console we can do our own thing with.

    Clearly their current attempts against piracy do not work - for great effort. For less effort (and therefore cost) they could be in the exact same position they're in now - with a console that's more attractive to the (good) hacker (something which must increase their bottom line).

    Not to condone Piracy, but clothing manufacturer's have for years not cared if (some) people steal their product (especially young teens), because the image of these types wearing it is cheap advertising. Similarly, if I went to a friends house and played a game he had pirated and enjoyed it, I would be more likely to buy it than had I not been exposed to it. Some might be more likely to pirate it, but a remarkably high proportion would actually buy it (if for no other reason than they don't want to void their warranty by chipping their console).

    There is no question that Piracy is wrong, however any company must accept that: a) it exists b) sometimes fighting it costs mroe than what you lose from it c) sometimes what you lose from it is outweighed by what you gain from it.

    I didn't reply to all of them because there are so much and most of them were about the 99%-thing, or the exact troll/tard ratio. (I think I'll call it the Jimmy-ratio)

    Security only delays the inevitable, which is still enough reason to put lots of money into it. Apperantly it still "works" for most publishers. If a console caters to the modding community, the lives of most modders would become much easier (and less illegal), and I'm all for it! The problem is that there will always be a group of people who will (try to) use it/twist it/bend it to play games for free. They always do. And they usually succeed. :D

  • Dave (unregistered) in reply to Gorfblot
    What's that in Uniary?

    Dunno about uniary but in base RSA-2048 it's:

  • (cs)

    On a related yet un-related note.

    I take backups of my DVDs. This is because I have kids. Anyone who has kids knows that this statement needs no further elaboration.

    I am currently on burn 15 of "The Knights of Can-a-lot", burn 7 of "Numberjacks 'Calling all agents'".

    I also take backups of DVD films that I own. Not JUST for the sake of a backup, but so that I don't have to sit through:

    a) Copyright notices that you can't get rid of b) Trailers for films I don't want to watch, or have already watched and own the DVD for c) and warnings about why DVD piracy is a crime.

    If they didn't include the warnings and copyright notices and the adverts I'd be less tempted to cut my own version of the disk.

    Irony much?

  • (cs) in reply to Hector Martin (aka marcan)
    Hector Martin (aka marcan):
    VC/WiiWare is pretty much a lost cause by now, but Nintendo really screwed up on that one by storing everything in plaintext.

    So you're suggesting security through obscurity?

    ...

    Could work well enough against piraters, as those don't seem to be particularly good hackers.

  • Herman (unregistered) in reply to Capt. Obvious

    Wrong.

    Nintendo makes profit on the Wii Console. They were the only one making direct profit from the Console itself.

  • JimmyVile (unregistered) in reply to Hector Martin (aka marcan)
    Hector Martin (aka marcan):
    JimmyVile:
    People seem to think that making and running homebrew is some kind devine right. It's not.
    It is. I bought the damn thing, I might as well do as I please with it as long as I'm not hurting anyone or committing copyright infringement. I'm not renting the console, i'm buying it. I can do whatever I want with it.

    It's the manufacturer's divine right to try to lock the thing down, and it's my divine right to be (legally) able to break it open again.

    I think if you actually look at the real statistics, you'll find that at least 95% of Wii piracy right now is done via modchips, not homebrew. You keep associating homebrew with "modding" and piracy. I think you just don't understand how distant those two fields are, and how they only cross unintentionally (on our side anyway). Usually because the pirates take advantage of our work. Homebrew has nothing to do with modchips, and you don't need a modchip to use it. Currently loading pirate games is much easier, faster, and reliable using a modchip. VC/WiiWare is pretty much a lost cause by now, but Nintendo really screwed up on that one by storing everything in plaintext.

    Homebrew and piracy are "distant" on the Wii, that is true. But in general they go hand in hand; executing foreign,unsigned or unsafe code. Again, I applaud modders who discourage piracy.

    It doesn't really matter to me how people break into the system, with a chip, a modded battery pack or their toothbrush. It's the people who play and defend pirated games whilst shouting that they "just want to run homebrew". And the "hackers" that ignore the impact of their efforts (can) have on the industry.

    It's just like release-groups that release 0day cracks of games with the disclaimer "if you like this game, buy it!". Knowing that teenagers (and their parents) aren't gonna do that, and they are seriously hurting the developers of the game with their efforts.

    "Not our problem". yeah...thanks.

  • (cs) in reply to Wizard Stan
    Wizard Stan:
    Different countries have different rules. Rules regarding sales, promotions, content, intellectual property, etc... Some games are rated differently, some need to have changes, and some are flat out banned in certain countries. Region locking puts reasonable restrictions in place for such things.

    The region locks are not that specific - it's basically PAL (Europe and Australia), NTSC-U (USA/Canada, etc.), NTSC-J (Japan) (and China, but that's another story). While you can cover the ratings this way (PEGI/ESRB/CERO), that's about it.

    Differences in hardware also applies. The difference between 50hz and 60hz can really cause some games problems, if they rely on the vsync for any reason.

    Pretty much all games that rely on this (a practice that stopped ages ago) were originally coded for NTSC. The PAL conversion was often just slowed down in comparison with the original NTSC version, and they'd play as such if you tried to play the NTSC version on a PAL console. Additionally, the NTSC versions were almost always released before PAL versions, so the "PAL game running on NTSC" is virtually no issue.

    Most PAL TVs sold within the last 10 years or so support PAL60, and PAL games tend to support both (I think any non-VC PAL Wii game must support it, but I'm not sure). This (at least theoretically) allows them to be run on an NTSC console without technical issues.

    Kanazuchi:
    At least Nintendo has gotten better about region encoding. The SNES was region encoded. In the hardware. Technically. Because a US SNES had these two plastic probes that fit into grooves in a US SNES cartridge. These grooves were absent in a Japanese SNES cartridge, so anyone trying to turn on an American SNES with a Japanese cart in it physically couldn't.

    Of course, hacking an American SNES for region encoding just required a screwdriver and an X-acto knife.

    There was also a region lockout chip (as there have been in all their consoles), but it was identical for both NTSC regions - for PAL, you'll usually want to install a switch to toggle the lockout chip between the two regions, or use a cartridge designed to use the lockout chip from a different cartridge (but due to some of the later games, you'll need a 50/60Hz switch anyhow).

    To make matters worse, I seem to recall there were actually two different PAL chips for the SNES - games from the UK won't run on a Danish SNES. The NES had a similar problem: There was a Mattel version and a Nintendo version, and the games were incompatible with the other one (that may have been the basic SNES issue as well, can't remember).

    It made sense to do the USA/Japan divide like that at the time, though: importing from Japan was much more uncommon than it is today, so it wasn't something you'd expect many people to do.

  • Level 2 (unregistered) in reply to bigtuna
    bigtuna:

    impact on piracy? really? here's a 'statistic' for you, and its probably a bit more accurate than yours. i'll say 99.99999999% of people who own Wiis have never and will never attempt to hack them.

    I'd say you have the same grasp of numbers as the average banker.

  • JimmyVile (unregistered) in reply to Level 2
    Level 2:
    bigtuna:

    impact on piracy? really? here's a 'statistic' for you, and its probably a bit more accurate than yours. i'll say 99.99999999% of people who own Wiis have never and will never attempt to hack them.

    I'd say you have the same grasp of numbers as the average banker.

    I couldn't find bigtunas original post. It is true that a lot of gamers never hack their console. Especially the Wii. Even if they do, Ninteno is making a lot of mony money off the consoles, a big difference from Sony and MS.

    I was talking about the percentage of people that DO hack/mod their Wii, and how many of those people use this to play free games.

  • Steve Logue (unregistered)

    In the final pseudo-code snippet, the line...

    fileLength = (fileLength + 31) & (~31);

    should surely end (-32) (producing the mask FFFFFFE0) whereas -31 is FFFFFFE1.

  • Steve Logue (unregistered) in reply to Steve Logue

    Leaning a bit closer to my monitor, I now see that it's a tilda and not a minus sign. Time for a new pair of specs I think.

  • TrueBrit (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    I don't know if I should laugh or cry. This is completely false. 99% of all users use the hacks to avoid paying for games as much as possible. \Video Game journalist \\Game Developer
    You are Bruce Everiss and I claim my £5.
  • (cs) in reply to Level 2
    Level 2:
    bigtuna:

    impact on piracy? really? here's a 'statistic' for you, and its probably a bit more accurate than yours. i'll say 99.99999999% of people who own Wiis have never and will never attempt to hack them.

    I'd say you have the same grasp of numbers as the average banker.

    Come on you can do better than that Level 2.

    • Wikipedia says around 30 million units have been sold.
    • 99.99999999% of 30 million is less than one person (in fact, 0.003 people)

    Conservatively saying that just 100 people in the whole wide world mod their Wii, that would mean just 99.99667% :-)

    Hoping I got my maths right

  • sumgy (unregistered) in reply to konamiman
    konamiman:
    I don't understand console regions. I don't understand why I can't buy (yes, buy) games released on other countries. It seems sooooo stupid to me...

    Because if you buy them in another country, you'd be able to pay the fair market price for a new game, rather than whatever arbitrary number has been plucked out of the air by someone who wants to sell you the game. Joke's on him, of course, the market will adjust when you don't buy the game at its ridiculous markup.

    Oh, you say you're complaining because you bought the game at the inflated price anyway? (facepalm)

  • skztr (unregistered)

    While I needed to use my U.S.-bought Playstation 2 for many DVDs when my only other option was a U.K.-bought Playstation 2, I've been surprised by how many of my DVDs seem to work just fine on my XBox 360. Which is surprising, considering that it won't even let me sign up for XBox Live due to an error in similar "region lock" protection for games.

    Here's hoping that it's not silently switching the console's region up to a maximum of N times every time I put a dvd from another country in. But perhaps, just perhaps, they realized that DVD regions were stupid and aren't bothering to check on the 360?

  • skztr (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    It's just like release-groups that release 0day cracks of games with the disclaimer "if you like this game, buy it!". Knowing that teenagers (and their parents) aren't gonna do that, and they are seriously hurting the developers of the game with their efforts.

    "Not our problem". yeah...thanks.

    Because teenagers with no money and their parents who refuse to buy games, that's a real key demo that's being blocked-out by the ease of piracy.

  • (cs)
    which is why every major console is full of security measures to lock users out of running unauthorized code on them.
    but for the PS3 there's no large-scale initiative to give development tools to consumers.
    The PS3 lets you run "unauthorized code" out of the box: http://www.playstation.com/ps3-openplatform/index.html. OtherOS gives you access to most of the PS3s hardware (minus the RSX). The Linux kernel, GCC and Binutils all have PPU and SPU code upstream. And Sony are actively releasing libraries to help development: http://www.bulletphysics.com/Bullet/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=4884&f=&t=, http://ftp.linux.org.uk/pub/linux/Sony-PS3/mars/ Pretty sure this is larger scale than ps2linux ever was...
  • Steve (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    I went to the birthday of my little cousin last week. When I got there, she and her friends were playing on their DS-es. (kids nowadays....) ... Turns out, she was playing from a G4 card. In fact, all of them had G4 cards, and none of them, nor their parents are tech-savvy in any way. Just swapping games and using google and banner-ridden download sites to get more.
    This is just ridiculous. You're telling us that your own family are a bunch of pirates yet you ride into our forums on your statistically-challenged high horse and tell us we're criminals for using homebrew. You lost this argument a long time ago and I think it's about time you just fucked off.
  • (cs) in reply to Capt. Obvious
    Capt. Obvious:
    Well, Nintendo, like all console manufacturers, loses money on the hardware and only makes it up on the discs sold.

    Actually Nintendo, unlike Sony and Microsoft, make a profit on every console they sell.

  • (cs)

    Did you guys know that Nintendo actually makes a profit on its console, unlike everyone else?

    I bet you didn't know that, because certainly no one has said it in this very thread.

  • Cacodoxical (unregistered) in reply to JimmyVile
    JimmyVile:
    I don't know if I should laugh or cry. This is completely false. 99% of all users use the hacks to avoid paying for games as much as possible.

    It's very nice and creative when people hack consoles "to see what it can do", "express themselves" or do it "because [s]God[/s] Mario told them to". But it is always used as a means to get free games. Always. I really can't see how people can rationalize the impact they have on piracy with their tinkering.

    \Video Game journalist \Game Developer

    You're mistaking everyone who breaks into a system for a pirate. They are doing different things, for different purposes.

    Personally I modify video games to patch obvious flaws in the gameplay mechanics or add new features. I write patches for games when the developers are too lazy to do so.

    The fact that I have to get past anti-piracy protection is no ethical dilemma since I know that protection was never intended to stop me, only pirates.

    The pirate themselves do it to see if they can... but sure they have an ethical dilemma. However when the only people you're hurting is a company which punishes you for using their applications in the form of ever more restrictive DRM then it's pretty easy for them to justify: an eye for an eye.

    BTW. The WTF is the really shoddy code Nintendo are trying to use to stop those who they know are highly skilled software engineers from modifying their environment.

    \Game Developer \Software Security Analyst

  • panzi (unregistered)

    It's awesome to play your old Lucas Arts games on the Wii (ScummVM) and watch XviD movies in the living room (MPlayerWii; my crappy DVD player does not support XviD). It would be great if the Wii would support DVD playback including menus. Navigating DVD menus with the WiiMote would be a treat.

  • JimmyVile (unregistered) in reply to Steve
    Steve:
    JimmyVile:
    I went to the birthday of my little cousin last week. When I got there, she and her friends were playing on their DS-es. (kids nowadays....) ... Turns out, she was playing from a G4 card. In fact, all of them had G4 cards, and none of them, nor their parents are tech-savvy in any way. Just swapping games and using google and banner-ridden download sites to get more.
    This is just ridiculous. You're telling us that your own family are a bunch of pirates yet you ride into our forums on your statistically-challenged high horse and tell us we're criminals for using homebrew. You lost this argument a long time ago and I think it's about time you just fucked off.
    ...ok. Or you could just read my posts. I'm not accusing you of anything. I'm just saying that most console hacks are mostly used to run pirated games, not to run homebrew. And that I get pissed when people act as if this isn't happening. A lot. I was just giving an example of how things can get ugly.

    Lighten up Francis ehm...Steve.

  • JimmyVile (unregistered) in reply to Cacodoxical
    Cacodoxical:
    JimmyVile:
    I don't know if I should laugh or cry. This is completely false. 99% of all users use the hacks to avoid paying for games as much as possible.

    It's very nice and creative when people hack consoles "to see what it can do", "express themselves" or do it "because [s]God[/s] Mario told them to". But it is always used as a means to get free games. Always. I really can't see how people can rationalize the impact they have on piracy with their tinkering.

    \Video Game journalist \Game Developer

    You're mistaking everyone who breaks into a system for a pirate. They are doing different things, for different purposes.

    Personally I modify video games to patch obvious flaws in the gameplay mechanics or add new features. I write patches for games when the developers are too lazy to do so.

    The fact that I have to get past anti-piracy protection is no ethical dilemma since I know that protection was never intended to stop me, only pirates.

    The pirate themselves do it to see if they can... but sure they have an ethical dilemma. However when the only people you're hurting is a company which punishes you for using their applications in the form of ever more restrictive DRM then it's pretty easy for them to justify: an eye for an eye.

    BTW. The WTF is the really shoddy code Nintendo are trying to use to stop those who they know are highly skilled software engineers from modifying their environment.

    \Game Developer \Software Security Analyst

    I know the difference, and I'm not accusing homebrewers of piracy. Just saying that people who think the piracy issues that come with modding/hacking aren't a big deal are a bit naive.

    And I don't agree with the eye for an eye deal. Yes the security measures are annoying, yes it sucks, but it is absolutely no reason to just start stealing/downloading everything.

    But that is a different discussion, with more yelling and screaming, seeing how this one is going. :D

  • Crabs (unregistered) in reply to Capt. Obvious
    Capt. Obvious:
    Smash King:
    The guy already bought the Wii and the Twilight Princess. He might as well destroy the console while attempting to hack it, and obviously there wiill be no refund. If he has to buy a new console to replace the one he screwed, is Nintendo going to be not-too-pleased?
    Well, Nintendo, like all console manufacturers, loses money on the hardware and only makes it up on the discs sold. So

    a) being able to make games that run on their hardware without giving them their cut and b) buying and discarding consoles

    are both bad for them.

    Wonder if anyone's jumped on this, but I couldn't let it sit. Nintendo, unlike all the rest of the Console Manufacturers, actually makes money on every console they sell. They have never sold any current console at a loss.

  • (cs) in reply to Crabs
    Crabs:
    Wonder if anyone's jumped on this, but I couldn't let it sit. Nintendo, unlike all the rest of the Console Manufacturers, actually makes money on every console they sell. They have never sold any current console at a loss.
    I hear that Nintendo are making a profit on every console they've sold. I bet nobody's said that before in this thread, so it must be important to get it down in black-and-white pixels!
  • Ronco (unregistered)

    What I don't understand, is why video game makers don't take advantage of this sort of thing. A lot of game designers go to some great lengths to design a game that has a lot of tight limitations, or rules to conform to and play by. Which is fine, initially. But, once most people have played the game they're tired of it. Why design games with unlockable features that "free it" or open it up for "hacking" by the user. I use the term "hacking" loosely, but what I mean is allow the user to play around with the game without the limitations of normal game play.

    Console designers could do the same. Open the system by offering/selling a modified firmware, albeit unsupported that the people who want can have to play with to their heart's desire. Then offer a forum in which they can access, for a fee of course, to sell and/or trade mods. Users who weren't as tech-savy, could subscribe as well, and download the mods.

  • PIercy (unregistered)
    My point is this. Most games being released on the PC platform these days have some sort of allowance for modders. They HAVE to. You see, if a game can't be modded, it doesn't build up the community of players that will extend the longevity of the game. Most modders are just highly creative and adept fanatics who love the game they're modding.

    This is so true, Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory still has a massive community today, a) because it free, b)cos a lot of user development has gone into the mods(etpro + etpub being the most succesful ones). There were complete full games written around the code(True Combat Elite). Not to mention user scripted menu, sounds, graphics. Theres even anti-cheat technology being developed for a new competition mod.

    Its the same with other games. if there modable they last longer!

  • Thunder (unregistered) in reply to Asiago Chow
    Asiago Chow:
    Not seeing a WTF.

    The encryption isn't for security in the "control access to this information for its useful life" sense. It is to show due dilligence. It is exactly like the cheap tumbler lock you have on your front door. It's so Nintendo (or you) can stand up in court and say, "yer honer, we were doing our part, we used locks...and these people broke them."

    Wait, what? Why? Their copyrights don't need to be protected to remain valid. So why do they need to do this?
  • (cs) in reply to Nikkelitous
    Nikkelitous:
    Am I the only one that knows that you can install Linux on an unmodified PS3? It even has instructions in the PS3's manual. You just can't get hardware acceleration.
    I've got YDL running on my PS3. :) Haven't gotten around to experimenting with the Cell's SPEs yet, but it's on my list of things to do. 8-) Then again, I'd like to get the controllers and my wireless Media Board Pro working with YDL too... :-/
  • Alex G. (unregistered)

    Just so you know, the playstation 3 runs Linux natively, without the kit. It doesn't let you access the full hardware though, and runs in an hypervisor.

  • Worf (unregistered) in reply to bitpirate
    Comment held for moderation.
  • (cs)

    To all of the people claiming a need to "backup" their discs because of damaged discs, all I can say is take better care of your discs. I still have original PlayStation games that work flawlessly.

  • (cs)

    For those of us with a DS that can play unofficial code, I wholly recommend my Nintendo DS Port of Lemmings, which includes all the original Lemmings levels, Oh No More Lemmings! levels and the holiday expansions.

    From The People Who Brought You Magenta Kong™

  • Dr_Barnowl (unregistered) in reply to Craig
    I'd rather jump through the hoops required to make a disc backup than explain to my 4 year old why he can't play his favorite game today

    Dammit, teach the kid some responsiblility.

    My 4 year old already habitually handles optical discs by the edges only, because that's the way daddy showed her. She puts the discs back in the box carefully. And she knows for a fact that if she scratches one, she isn't getting a new one.

    And it's the same for anything. Yes, you want to protect your children. And the best way to do it is to teach them to make their way in the world by themselves. You may end up with a few tears, and a busted copy of Toy Story, but it won't happen twice, and your child will learn a valuable lesson about taking care of their property, instead of learning that it doesn't matter if you are careless, because Mommy will fix it. This attitude probably turns into vandalism later on in life.

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