• belugabob (cs) in reply to jspenguin

    jspenguin:

    Nice one penguin - shame your scanner was out of action though!

  • belugabob (cs) in reply to belugabob

    This also reminds me of the time we recievd a FAX - remember them - with a handwritten footnote asking for the document to be faxed back when we'd finished with it.[:S]

  • Cope with IT (unregistered) in reply to Tin in Australia

    You could, in fact, integrate a mobile phone into the process, e-mail the photo to your mail account and then publish it....

    http://www.randomcrap.net/view.php?loc=sv1&img=mobile1.jpg" target="_blank">[image]http://sv1.randomcrap.net/uploads/files/0/thumbnail/mobile1_tb.jpg" border=0 title="Free Image Hosting by www.randomcrap.net"></A< A>>

     

  • Cope with IT (unregistered) in reply to Cope with IT

    Oh dear, that didn't cut it....

     

    [image]

  • masklinn (cs) in reply to chuck
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:

    The real WTF is that I used Perl :)

    I think that's legal Ruby syntax too, so not to worry ;)

    (CAPTCHA: algebra)

    Yep. Bad style though: you wouldn't use the $prefix (even though it'd work, you'd be creating a class attribute of the Object class.); the parens are not necessary and hinder the reading more than they help, and the ending semicolon isn't necessary either (it even makes fxri barf)

    htonl:
    How can someone with the knowhow to do fancy layout and typesetting in LaTeX, not know how to turn it into a PDF and upload it to a website?

    So much for the digital revolution!

    Goes even better, there are TeX -> HTML and LaTeX -> HTML translators out there, you wouldn't even need to use PDFs...

  • Jasper (unregistered) in reply to Richard Nixon
    Richard Nixon:
    Anonymous:

    Common people, give the person a break. I am sure they were not aware of the best way to do this. Atleast they got the website up and running.

    No WTF here.



    "Come on" != "common"

    Common is what people of your intellect are. "Come on" is the phrase you were looking for. Your mistake is a sign of someone who does not read many books.

    sincerely,
    Richard Nixon


    Wrong!

    print "correct" if "come on" == "common";

    prints correct.

    You were looking for the 'ne' operator.

    Yours,
    Jasper
  • masklinn (cs) in reply to Jasper
    Anonymous:
    Richard Nixon:
    Anonymous:

    Common people, give the person a break. I am sure they were not aware of the best way to do this. Atleast they got the website up and running.

    No WTF here.



    "Come on" != "common"

    Common is what people of your intellect are. "Come on" is the phrase you were looking for. Your mistake is a sign of someone who does not read many books.

    sincerely,
    Richard Nixon


    Wrong!

    print "correct" if "come on" == "common";

    prints correct.

    You were looking for the 'ne' operator.

    Yours,
    Jasper

    WTF?

  • KissTheCode (cs) in reply to FunnyMan

    Anonymous:
    So... we're seeing a photoshop of a screenshot of a scan of a printout of a digital photo of a printout of a flyer made in Word? ... How'd he stumble upon framesets? -FM

    ...that Jack wrote [:D]

  • Maurice (unregistered) in reply to John Hensley

    yeh but frames kill you in google and otehr search engines

  • ParkinT (cs) in reply to belugabob
    belugabob:

    This also reminds me of the time we recievd a FAX - remember them - with a handwritten footnote asking for the document to be faxed back when we'd finished with it.[:S]

    Fax

    A thing of the past.  Some say using a fax is insecure.  But whenever I needed to fax something highly sensitive, I would always FOLD THE PAPER first, then run it through the machine.  That way no one could read it in transit.

  • pinguis (cs) in reply to JulienC

    JulienC posted a picture (fskc the forum software blah blah blah...)

    The never ending WTF! You just made my day :)

    And congratulations to JSPenguin, obviously!

    								</span>
    
  • McCloud! (Chief!) (unregistered)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    One policy that I strictly follow is that the examples I post here come from professionals. I believe it's important to let the learners learn and, therefore, consider school assignments, messageboards, and hobby projects to be "off limits." But really, how fun are rules if you can't break 'em every once in a while? Especially when there's an opportunity to present a website design technique that Justin recently came across. It's called flyer-to-print-to-photo-to-print-to-scan-to-web (or, Web 0.1):

    1. Using your favorite word processing software, design a flyer that contains the information you'd like to convey to your website visitor
    2. Once designed, print the flyer on a color printer
    3. Lay the printed sheet of paper face-up on a table, preferably a clean, wooden table
    4. Take a photograph of the flyer using a camera, preferably a digital
    5. Download and print (or develop) the photograph of the flyer
    6. With a normal scanner, scan the photograph of the flyer
    7. Upload the scanned image to a frame on your website

    Here is a screenshot of one early adopters of this technique ...

    [image]

    Though it may not seem to visible in the screenshot, the designer certainly went with the preferred technique of the wooden table / digital camera.



    This Is Not A Flyer

    (and "This Is Not A Pipe" and all that...)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_map_is_not_the_territory


  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to McCloud! (Chief!)
  • ooop (unregistered) in reply to HawkEyes

        Actually, I don't see, what's the matter with You? ;]

    Didn't You never ever seen an image on the page? Who said he made this flyer himself?
    Maybe he just wanted to show, how it looks on the paper?

    One said, everyone repeated. Sad.

  • ajones (unregistered)

    This design brought to you by Rube Goldberg Consulting, Inc.

  • Joe (unregistered) in reply to Justin
    Anonymous:
    Unfortunately, this is not a joke.

    In the screenshot, notice the shadow in bottom-left corner of the bottom-right frame.

    It really is an html frame, with a jpg, of a scan, of a print, of a digital picture, of a print, of a word document, of the information that needs to go on the web.


    You surely must mean the information that needs to GET OFF the web.
  • virtual void (unregistered)

    Hey guyz, how have you detected that he used scanner, not only print+photo stage?
    And best wishes from russian wooden tables

    [image]
  • yeah! (unregistered)

    Yeah, when I want

    fried eggs, I put my balls  in the hot oven!

     

  • perl monger (unregistered) in reply to fist rulz

    I think you could do with some escaping of the slashes inside that regex...

  • dhromed (unregistered) in reply to Phil
  • Wanderer (unregistered)

    One thing it seems that nobody has picked up on: The original flyer is a pre-printed page or card from a company such as PaperDirect or Geographics. They're commonly used by people who want a full-color flyer but only have a b+w laser printer.

    I'm still trying to imagine why someone would want to build a website that is actively Google-repellant.

  • GalacticCowboy (cs) in reply to Wanderer

    Anonymous:
    I'm still trying to imagine why someone would want to build a website that is actively Google-repellant.

    Mmmm...  Google-Repellant.  Now with extra W01WTF.

  • BACON (cs) in reply to blah
    Anonymous:
    <font face="Arial">Is this what they mean when they say table-based layouts are evil ?</font>


    The real WTF is that no one laughed at this post, because it's too clever and funny to do otherwise (even though so many others did).
  • Gillibert (unregistered) in reply to htonl

    That is pretty easy. Pdflatex cam make that. Or you can uses dvipdf. Latex output file are .dvi files (or .pdf files if you use pdflatex).

  • Gillibert (unregistered) in reply to Gillibert

    My post was a replay to the question about latex and PDF, but it seems the quote did not work...

  • Wadr (unregistered) in reply to jspenguin

    Table with a build-in monitor? ;)

  • scott (unregistered)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    One policy that I strictly follow is that the examples I post here come from professionals. I believe it's important to let the learners learn and, therefore, consider school assignments, messageboards, and hobby projects to be "off limits." But really, how fun are rules if you can't break 'em every once in a while? Especially when there's an opportunity to present a website design technique that Justin recently came across. It's called flyer-to-print-to-photo-to-print-to-scan-to-web (or, Web 0.1):

    1. Using your favorite word processing software, design a flyer that contains the information you'd like to convey to your website visitor
    2. Once designed, print the flyer on a color printer
    3. Lay the printed sheet of paper face-up on a table, preferably a clean, wooden table
    4. Take a photograph of the flyer using a camera, preferably a digital
    5. Download and print (or develop) the photograph of the flyer
    6. With a normal scanner, scan the photograph of the flyer
    7. Upload the scanned image to a frame on your website

    Here is a screenshot of one early adopters of this technique ...

    [image]

    Though it may not seem to visible in the screenshot, the designer certainly went with the preferred technique of the wooden table / digital camera.



    why is this page indexed in google :S
  • Irrelevant (cs) in reply to dhromed

    I know this is a bit late, but I managed to clean off some of the pixellation on that original screenshot. I figured y'all might find this interesting:

    [image]

  • Some Idiot (cs) in reply to Irrelevant

    I still use this approach. Of course now that we live in the age of the paperless office, I take a screenshot of the document, crop it, then use 3D modelling software to model a table, apply a wooden texture to the table, model a piece of paper, apply the cropped screenshot of the document, add some lights and a camera to my 3D world and render the current frame.

  • Bobby (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Todd (unregistered)

    Well, at least they have a documented process

  • tastey (unregistered)

    Dear Author, I love you.

    Sincerely, tastey

  • Velocoraptor (unregistered)

    Are others out there doing steps 5 though 7? I'm just not sure if it will add a whole lot if you're already using a digital camera. Bear with me I a newbie at all of this.

  • Nick H (unregistered)

    Talk about a table layout!

    Har har.

  • x-7 (unregistered)

    i don't get why steps 5-6 were actually thought to have taken place - i can't see anything in the screenshot that implies it (it's all still a bit dumb though)

  • Tyler (unregistered) in reply to lizardfoot
    lizardfoot:
    Oh yeah baby... it has frames... it's just this kind of technology that will win us a Webby award.

    Actually I wouldn't be surprised... some of the worst designed websites win Webby awards. I know because my company won one once for a site that is such an awful pile of crap I hate having to update or fix it.

  • Broccoli Bear (unregistered)

    This is older than dirt and someone's probably beaten me to the punch anyway, but...

    The paper with the pile of books is a template. It comes pre-printed, like letterhead. I've used it before at my old job. Sure, it could've been scanned rather than photographed, but some people have neither the time or need.

  • Aaron (unregistered)

    Actually, I'm inspired. I think I can finally feel okay about putting up a web site with as close to zero html as possible. Photos, perhaps with recursive hints like the computer printed flier...

    No links. Photographed instructions on what other images you can type in the location bar. the hardest to use website EVAR!!!! I'm so excited. Watch this space.

  • Gerrit (unregistered)

    Oh the joy.

    Maybe not that bad as this one but i vividly remember how in the mid nineties i accepted a job as webdeveloper ( a word unknown to me at the time ) in a small startup company.

    The only guy who already worked there in the same position accepted his job a couple of months before i came in. He actually was a computer salesman out of a job which accepted this position after the owner of the company asked him 'since he knew his way around puters' id he'd be able to make websites.

    Well, our guy had never done anything of the likes, but figured he might aswell say yes and obviously would learn about to create websites as soon as the job was his. Needless to say the owner of the company was an absolute computer nono whith little more than managing experience, a bag of money and a great idea ( hey, lets jump on this interweb train everybodies getting rich of ).

    Long story even longer. I came in. Got an assignment and got to it. After a few minutes we started a bit of smalltalk about the project he was working on. Turned out to be a webshop for a popular brand of watches ( nobody gave a damn about the brand itself not having registered a domain yet, so they claimed and used it for their reselling activities as if it was the official website ( i might add the entire housestyle and logo's were ripped of from a brochure whithout the factories consent ( lets not worrie too much about copyrights shall we? ) ) ). People were actually fooled into believing they visited the watch factories own website and even got away with it while it lasted.

    So every single watch in the catalogue needed to be exposed in the website along with images and data of it. So how did my collegue go about that? Well, he showed me this great little feature in excel that would allow you to save your excel file in html format. Just upload that and be done with it :)

    Needless to say the site looked like hell and the html itself was nothing short of a drama, but it remained on the internet for some 2 years without changes nonetheless. :)

    web0.1 people, good times!

  • Arvind (unregistered)

    Maybe the professor wanted it t be done that way? There are quite a few professors there who have their own way with things and they won't let students have it any other way.

  • tory burch shoes (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Visitor (unregistered) in reply to HitScan
    HitScan:
    Richard Nixon:
    "Come on" != "common"Common is what people of your intellect are. "Come on" is the phrase you were looking for. Your mistake is a sign of someone who does not read many books.sincerely,Richard Nixon
    I think you'll find that they were made equivalent in the MySpace English Stupification Act of 2006. It's a come on misconception that they are still two different concepts.

    FTFY

  • Dave Neary (unregistered)

    How do you know he printed the photo and rescanned it? He could have uploaded the photo directly.

    And I've used this technique successfully for presentations where I draw on post-its & take photos... much better than spending hours trying to draw graphs in a presentation program.

    Dave.

  • Joe (unregistered) in reply to HitScan
    HitScan:
    Richard Nixon:
    Anonymous:
    Common people, give the person a break. I am sure they were not aware of the best way to do this. Atleast they got the website up and running. No WTF here.
    "Come on" != "common"Common is what people of your intellect are. "Come on" is the phrase you were looking for. Your mistake is a sign of someone who does not read many books.sincerely,Richard Nixon
    I think you'll find that they were made equivalent in the MySpace English Stupification Act of 2006. It's a common misconception that they are still two different concepts.

    Didn't you mean to say "it's a come on misconception?"

  • Nagesh (cs)

    Fix the screen-shot. It is missing

Leave a comment on “Web 0.1”

Log In or post as a guest

Replying to comment #:

« Return to Article