• Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to chubertdev
    chubertdev:
    The government shutdown has gone too far. #ALCS
    Or maybe not far enough. One infamous agency that is supposedly shut down still found the resources it needed to violate a court order.
  • Cheong (unregistered) in reply to Ten Khompson
    Ten Khompson :
    Now that's ENTERPRISE QUALITY!
    Yup. I don't think code analysis tools used by enterprise can find this out.

    The programmer successfully increased the LOC on simple task.

  • (cs)

    I'm tired, so the first thought that comes to mind is that "TheDao" should be "The Tao" or something. Clearly, there is a "philosophy" (loosely speaking) behind this mess.

    But otherwise, I don't really know what to make of it. Single-method classes that delegate their single methods to other single-method classes. Mappers that map anonymously-named parameters to anonymously-named parameters.

    Basically lots of classes, each signifying nothing; a wrap-wrap-wrapper potpourri, with whole classes taking over the purpose of methods, for methods of other classes.

    Where did the programmer learn this? From a toy in a Cracker Jack box? Nah. That's probably demeaning to Cracker Jack toys.

  • (cs) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    Climate change deniers say they can truncate the temperature data without anyone noticing, but guess what, climate change is permanent.

    I think you are confusing climate change deniers with the University of East Anglia. You know, those guys who "lost" the original data that most of the predictions of doom and gloom are based on?

  • ubercoder (unregistered)

    "if the next person can't figure out what you did without your help, you didn't do as good a job as you might think!"

    Actually translates to "the next person is inferior coder"

  • GWO (unregistered) in reply to daveime

    [citation needed]

    A not a "claim made in skeptic blog" - I mean actual evidence that any data was lost. http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/data

  • fyi (unregistered) in reply to Coyne
    Coyne:
    I'm tired, so the first thought that comes to mind is that "TheDao" should be "The Tao" or something. Clearly, there is a "philosophy" (loosely speaking) behind this mess.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taoism#Spelling_and_pronunciation

    "The root Chinese word 道 "way, path" is romanized tao in the older Wade–Giles system and dào in the modern Pinyin system."

  • (cs) in reply to Dogsworth
    Dogsworth:
    Needs Hibernate to be more enterprisey.
    agreed in wholesale!
  • lollncf37 (unregistered) in reply to Roby McAndrew
    Roby McAndrew:
    No:
    This has nothing to do with evolution.

    Well it certainly isn't intelligent design

    It's nice of you to talk about design at this level ...

  • (cs) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    chubertdev:
    The first step in fixing code that's wrong is understanding how it's wrong...
    Not necessarily. If you know what the code was supposed to do in the first place, you can write new wrong code from scratch instead of trying to fix old wrong code.

    In fact you can even do that if you don't know what the code was supposed to do in the first place.

    That's how you get users yelling at you for everything working differently. If something's been broken for a while, they expect it to be broken. You have to transition them.

  • (cs) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    chubertdev:
    The government shutdown has gone too far. #ALCS
    Or maybe not far enough. One infamous agency that is supposedly shut down still found the resources it needed to violate a court order.

    Another whoosh. The most important part of my comment was the hash tag. #FearTheBeard

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to chubertdev
    chubertdev:
    Another whoosh. The most important part of my comment was the hash tag. #FearTheBeard

    TRWTF is hash tags. Unless you use them to jump to a bookmark within the html on the page.

  • anonymous (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    chubertdev:
    Another whoosh. The most important part of my comment was the hash tag. #FearTheBeard

    TRWTF is hash tags. Unless you use them to jump to a bookmark within the html on the page.

    I tried to make a post with a link to comment #419119, but Akismet thought the post was spam.

  • (cs) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    chubertdev:
    Another whoosh. The most important part of my comment was the hash tag. #FearTheBeard

    TRWTF is hash tags. Unless you use them to jump to a bookmark within the html on the page.

    Yeah, I only used them to invoke an image of an annoying Sox fan.

  • Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to chubertdev
    chubertdev:
    Norman Diamond:
    chubertdev:
    The government shutdown has gone too far. #ALCS
    Or maybe not far enough. One infamous agency that is supposedly shut down still found the resources it needed to violate a court order.
    Another whoosh. The most important part of my comment was the hash tag. #FearTheBeard
    OK, I am whooshed by these. What's ALCS and what's FearTheBeard?

    I understand that Twitter hashes are different from Perl hashes (which predate Perl of course) and Colorado hashes (which predate Colorado (or maybe not, depending on how hash is made from its underlying ingredient)) but what's ALCS and what's FearTheBeard?

  • (cs)

    baseball

  • Norman Diamond (unregistered)

    I give up. I live in a country where baseball is played and in the ancient past I lived in a different country were baseball is played, one of them had a government shutdown for the past 16 days, but the cnly connections I see are 4 points where the line segments of # intersect each other.

  • Development Hell (unregistered) in reply to Roby McAndrew

    That's nothing. I just got handed a standard where this isn't valid:

    System.String String_Happy = “happy”;
    System.String String_Birthday = “birthday”;
    System.String String_Message = System.String.Format(“{0} {1} {2}!”, String_Happy, String_Birthday, “Frosty”);

    But this is:

    string happy;
    string birthday;
    string message = (birthday = "happy" + (happy = "birthday")).PadRight(14, '!').Insert(5, " ").Insert(14, "Frosty".PadLeft(7, ' '));

    And so is this:

    string    happy;
    
                                string birthday;
    string message =
     (birthday = "happy"
     + (happy = "birthday")).              PadRight(14, '!').Insert(5, " ")
    .Insert(14, 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    "Frosty".PadLeft(7, ' '));
  • (cs) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    I give up. I live in a country where baseball is played and in the ancient past I lived in a different country were baseball is played, one of them had a government shutdown for the past 16 days, but the cnly connections I see are 4 points where the line segments of # intersect each other.

    I live in a country that hosts the World Series for a league where all but one team is located in this country.

  • Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to Development Hell
    Development Hell:
    That's nothing. I just got handed a standard where this isn't valid:
    System.String String_Happy = “happy”;
    System.String String_Birthday = “birthday”;
    System.String String_Message = System.String.Format(“{0} {1} {2}!”, String_Happy, String_Birthday, “Frosty”);

    But this is:

    [various quotations of code using standard quotation marks snipped from this quotation after clicking the quote button]

    Would that be the C# standard? I only recall it allowing " for strings and ' for chars.

    Sometimes I use languages that use ` for executions.

    A recent WTF had someone using MS Word to edit code but I doubt their compiler accepted “ and ”.

  • The Stupid, It Burns (unregistered) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    Development Hell:
    That's nothing. I just got handed a standard where this isn't valid:
    System.String String_Happy = “happy”;
    System.String String_Birthday = “birthday”;
    System.String String_Message = System.String.Format(“{0} {1} {2}!”, String_Happy, String_Birthday, “Frosty”);

    But this is:

    [various quotations of code using standard quotation marks snipped from this quotation after clicking the quote button]

    Would that be the C# standard? I only recall it allowing " for strings and ' for chars.

    Wow. Maybe you should work for my boss. It's OK to vomit incomprehensible symbols all over the screen but don't you dare use type prefixes or qualify your type names.

  • anonymous (unregistered) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    Development Hell:
    That's nothing. I just got handed a standard where this isn't valid:
    System.String String_Happy = “happy”;
    System.String String_Birthday = “birthday”;
    System.String String_Message = System.String.Format(“{0} {1} {2}!”, String_Happy, String_Birthday, “Frosty”);

    But this is:

    [various quotations of code using standard quotation marks snipped from this quotation after clicking the quote button]

    Would that be the C# standard? I only recall it allowing " for strings and ' for chars.

    Sometimes I use languages that use ` for executions.

    A recent WTF had someone using MS Word to edit code but I doubt their compiler accepted “ and ”.

    Quite frankly, that's dumb and it probably should (at least) generate a compiler warning and do the right thing. The main question should be, ought an embedded straight quote (or a curly quote that goes the wrong direction) terminate a string that started with a curly quote. It probably should.

  • Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to anonymous
    anonymous:
    Norman Diamond:
    Development Hell:
    That's nothing. I just got handed a standard where this isn't valid:
    System.String String_Happy = “happy”;
    System.String String_Birthday = “birthday”;
    System.String String_Message = System.String.Format(“{0} {1} {2}!”, String_Happy, String_Birthday, “Frosty”);
    Would that be the C# standard? I only recall it allowing " for strings and ' for chars.

    Sometimes I use languages that use ` for executions.

    A recent WTF had someone using MS Word to edit code but I doubt their compiler accepted “ and ”.

    Quite frankly, that's dumb and it probably should (at least) generate a compiler warning and do the right thing. The main question should be, ought an embedded straight quote (or a curly quote that goes the wrong direction) terminate a string that started with a curly quote. It probably should.
    If a string starts with « and ends with 」 you want the compiler to accept it?

    If a bash script execs an `` expression containing '' strings or "" strings, I wouldn't expect the first ' or " to terminate the first `.

  • Essex Kitten (unregistered)

    "if the next person can't figure out what you did without your help, you didn't do as good a job as you might think!"

    I beg to differ. If you get the call when your cheaper replacement can't figure out what you did, and you get to charge hourly rates as punishment for being let go in the first place, you did an excellent job :)

  • Anonymous (unregistered)

    I knew things would go wrong when I saw "decided to use Spring".

  • Peter Wolff (unregistered)

    Now I've read all the comments just to see whether "if the next person can't figure out what you did without your help, you didn't do as good a job as you might think!" had been already sufficiently commented. Which it was, btw - maybe except for a short reminiscence of the (in)famous BrillantPaula (sic!) (TM) (I feel a bit sorry for the original Paula meanwhile).

    But I can't resist to comment a bit on "design" ...

    lollncf37:
    Roby McAndrew:
    No:
    This has nothing to do with evolution.

    Well it certainly isn't intelligent design

    It's nice of you to talk about design at this level ...

    ... in Germany, it is said that "Design" is short for "Was soll'n des sein?" - "Whut's that suppoz'd ta be?"

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