• Medinoc (cs)
    minimum of a 32-bit unsigned integer
    -32768
    That's TRWTF.
  • razumny (unregistered)

    Those sprouts are actually chocolates, though. I should know, I went through a net of them...

  • dull (unregistered) in reply to razumny
    razumny:
    Those sprouts are actually chocolates, though. I should know, I went through a net of them...

    Yeah i saw them too.

  • pouzzler (unregistered)

    I wasn't aware unsigned numbers were so negative!

  • Pista (unregistered) in reply to Medinoc
    Medinoc:
    minimum of a 32-bit unsigned integer
    -32768
    That's TRWTF.

    Actually, that was true a long long time ago, but now it's deprecated.

  • Banfa (unregistered) in reply to Pista

    No that is actually the minimum value of a 16-bit signed integer

  • Ben (unregistered)

    "The start elevation is the minimum of a 32-bit unsigned integer. "

    TRWTF is a TRWTF reader who can't tell the difference between 32 bits and 16 nor between signed and unsigned.

    You've kind of missed the point - we are here to read and weep about you.

  • Drak (unregistered)

    The quantum car was would only be quantum if the button read 'Yes AND No'. 'Yes or No' just lets the machine decide which one you get.

    And how can your run be 9.4 miles if the 'climb' alone is 222 and a half miles? :D

  • Tony Green (unregistered)

    The Transport for London mess reminds me of a wonderful result I got many years ago from an early online route planner for British railways.

    Wanting to find out the best way to get to Waterloo International, where I wanted to pick up a Eurostar to Brussels I asked it for a route from Ipswich (home) to that station.

    The recommended route:

    Inter-city Ipswich - London Liverpool Street Tube Liverpool Street - Waterloo East Train Waterloo East - Ashford Eurostar Ashford - Brussels Eurostar Brussels - Waterloo International

    I worked out my own route.

  • Jeff Grigg (unregistered)

    You think that the Transport for London's recommendations are off? Looking for commuter flights between LAX and Ontario, a distance of about 50 miles, I was given a list of flights with connections in Denver, Dallas Texas and even Atlanta Georgia! I decided to take a taxi. (actually a shared ride commuter van)

  • Jeff Grigg (unregistered)

    Brussels Sprouts? I love Brussels Sprouts!

    (Well, I probably would be a bit disappointed if I got Brussels Sprouts when expecting chocolate.)

  • NMe (cs)

    Using a deprecated function is one thing, but why would anyone have written 5 lines in succession that all do their own call to split? Hard to say without actually seeing the code but this reeks of bad design to me.

    Addendum (2014-03-14 06:58): ...and why would a live server have error reporting set to E_STRICT?

  • Dazed (unregistered)

    I think I can see how the Clapham Junction one happened. From the point of view of the passengers it is one station. From the point of view of railway operations it is effectively two stations: one on the Richmond line and one on the Wimbledon line. I would guess that the people who handled the interfacing from the railway schedule database to the passenger information application weren't aware of this special case.

    The real world is always more complicated than you expect.

  • QJo (unregistered) in reply to Tony Green
    Tony Green:
    The Transport for London mess reminds me of a wonderful result I got many years ago from an early online route planner for British railways.

    Wanting to find out the best way to get to Waterloo International, where I wanted to pick up a Eurostar to Brussels I asked it for a route from Ipswich (home) to that station.

    The recommended route:

    Inter-city Ipswich - London Liverpool Street Tube Liverpool Street - Waterloo East Train Waterloo East - Ashford Eurostar Ashford - Brussels Eurostar Brussels - Waterloo International

    I worked out my own route.

    The real WTF is wanting to go via Waterloo International when in fact the best route was via Waterloo East. :-)

  • QJo (unregistered) in reply to Jeff Grigg
    Jeff Grigg:
    Brussels Sprouts? I love Brussels Sprouts!

    (Well, I probably would be a bit disappointed if I got Brussels Sprouts when expecting chocolate.)

    I'd be disappointed if I got chocolate when expecting brussels sprouts. Hmm ... turkey, roast taters, leeks, stuffing, onions, cabbage, grave, CHOCOLATE? Yeeuk!

  • QJo (unregistered) in reply to QJo
    QJo:
    Jeff Grigg:
    Brussels Sprouts? I love Brussels Sprouts!

    (Well, I probably would be a bit disappointed if I got Brussels Sprouts when expecting chocolate.)

    I'd be disappointed if I got chocolate when expecting brussels sprouts. Hmm ... turkey, roast taters, leeks, stuffing, onions, cabbage, grave, CHOCOLATE? Yeeuk!

    Oh, you know what I mean: "gravy".

  • Shinobu (unregistered)

    That last one actually makes sense, since the 2003 revised rules made it illegal to reach Mornington Crescent in the first stage unless you have passed Clapham Junction at least twice.

  • Bernie The Bernie (unregistered)

    Deprecated: function frist() is deprecated in /home/content/b/t/b/BernieTheBernie/html/util/commentfrist.php [CAPTCHA]dolor - what a PITA[/CAPTCHA]

  • ochrist (cs)

    TRWTF is that a website about Java certification is using PHP.

  • ICH (unregistered) in reply to Shinobu

    Unless you are using the Muir variations, but you would have to explicitly state that first.

  • Zacrath (cs)
    The start elevation is the minimum of a 32-bit unsigned integer. The climb......that's just a WTF!
    Craig Hubert is horribly mistaken on the meaning of "32-bit" and "unsigned".

    Addendum (2014-03-14 07:43): An unsigned number can't be negative, and -32768 is the minimum 16-bit signed number.

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to ochrist
    ochrist:
    TRWTF is that a website about Java certification is using PHP.

    Or maybe it simply proves they know Java.... And only Java.

  • Christian (unregistered) in reply to Drak

    Perhaps there's an elevator on the way :D

  • Steve The Cynic (cs) in reply to Tony Green
    Tony Green:
    The Transport for London mess reminds me of a wonderful result I got many years ago from an early online route planner for British railways.

    Wanting to find out the best way to get to Waterloo International, where I wanted to pick up a Eurostar to Brussels I asked it for a route from Ipswich (home) to that station.

    The recommended route:

    Inter-city Ipswich - London Liverpool Street Tube Liverpool Street - Waterloo East Train Waterloo East - Ashford Eurostar Ashford - Brussels Eurostar Brussels - Waterloo International

    I worked out my own route.

    I've seen things like this on the Tube planners. There were two tube stations hiding behind a single entrance south of Finsbury Square. They were "Moorgate" and "Moorgate.". Note the dot at the end of the second one. They were not connected to each other, and each one was connected to different parts of the Tube network. It made planning a journey to or from Moorgate (the area) interesting.

  • Alec Hardison (unregistered) in reply to Medinoc

    That's pretty typical of CrapMyRun.

    The irritating part is that it's hard for end users to distinguish between bugs within the app versus bugs in the underlying GPS infrastructure of the mobile device and carrier. There's usually plausible deniability, so illogical crap like this persists.

  • The Cat in a Box (unregistered) in reply to Drak

    Its schrodinger's car wash ...

  • wlao (unregistered) in reply to razumny
    razumny:
    Those sprouts are actually chocolates, though. I should know, I went through a net of them...
    ...and they taste way better than Crunch frog.
  • Chris (unregistered) in reply to razumny
    razumny:
    Those sprouts are actually chocolates, though. I should know, I went through a net of them...

    In fact, if you squint enough, you can make out that the label says "<something> Milk Chocolate" above "Sprouts"

  • GettinSadda (cs)

    Chocolate sprouts!

    http://blusherandbrownies.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/m-christmas-delight.html

  • dkf (cs) in reply to Chris
    Chris:
    razumny:
    Those sprouts are actually chocolates, though. I should know, I went through a net of them...
    In fact, if you squint enough, you can make out that the label says "<something> Milk Chocolate" above "Sprouts"
    There are better images of them out there. (No, I didn't realise that these were a thing, but apparently so.)
  • Dan Mercer (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Inspector Praline (unregistered) in reply to wlao
    wlao:
    razumny:
    Those sprouts are actually chocolates, though. I should know, I went through a net of them...
    ...and they taste way better than Crunch frog.
    They certainly give Dysentery Ripple a run... for the money...
  • MrBester (unregistered) in reply to Shinobu
    Shinobu:
    That last one actually makes sense, since the 2003 revised rules made it illegal to reach Mornington Crescent in the first stage unless you have passed Clapham Junction at least twice.
    Except that rule doesn't apply as you've already started south of the river, in which case Mornington Crescent is subsequently a valid move (and always has been).

    I do like how it takes 4 mins to get to Imperial Wharf from Clapham Junction but only 6 mins in reverse...

  • Chris Q (unregistered)

    When Microsoft first released Autoroute, I asked for a route between London and Newcastle. It suggested I drive to Dover, get a ferry to Zeebrugge, drive up through Europe to Gothenburg, then get another ferry from there.

  • Nutster (cs) in reply to Jeff Grigg
    Jeff Grigg:
    You think that the Transport for London's recommendations are off? Looking for commuter flights between LAX and Ontario, a distance of about 50 miles, I was given a list of flights with connections in Denver, Dallas Texas and even Atlanta Georgia! I decided to take a taxi. (actually a shared ride commuter van)
    When you asked for Ontario, CA, did it actually think you were referring to the province of Ontario, Canada? Then connections through Denver, CO or Dallas, TX make more sense.

    Of course, the reverse is also true. I looked up Toronto, Ontario, CA on a map site one time and it at first assumed CA is California, not Canada, and was thus looking for Toronto Street in Ontario, California.

  • ben (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • abigail (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Sinan (unregistered) in reply to Medinoc

    This is the highest quality first comment I have ever seen. That is really TRWTF.

  • Dale (unregistered)

    If you look at the image, the problem appears to be that there are two stations in the system, "Clapham Junction" and "Clapham Junction #nrc". I'd love to know what "#nrc" stands for.

  • F (unregistered) in reply to Chris Q
    Chris Q:
    When Microsoft first released Autoroute, I asked for a route between London and Newcastle. It suggested I drive to Dover, get a ferry to Zeebrugge, drive up through Europe to Gothenburg, then get another ferry from there.

    You probably asked it (without realising the fact) for minimum driving distance. The suggested route might well have been, ooh, two or three miles shorter.

    I once had a route planner tell me to take the eighth exit from a roundabout. With five exits. (It would have been the right one, but I'd have gone all the way round).

  • F (unregistered) in reply to Dale
    Dale:
    If you look at the image, the problem appears to be that there are two stations in the system, "Clapham Junction" and "Clapham Junction #nrc". I'd love to know what "#nrc" stands for.

    Not Really Convenient.

  • CigarDoug (unregistered) in reply to Jeff Grigg
    Jeff Grigg:
    You think that the Transport for London's recommendations are off? Looking for commuter flights between LAX and Ontario, a distance of about 50 miles, I was given a list of flights with connections in Denver, Dallas Texas and even Atlanta Georgia! I decided to take a taxi. (actually a shared ride commuter van)
    Not actually a WTF (NAAWTF, perhaps?) All airlines use hubs, it is much more efficient than having a dedicated flight from Seattle to LA, Seattle to San Diego, Seattle to San Francisco. Consider: All three cities have a route to Denver, and they have a route from Seattle to Denver, so you change plans in Denver. Now add a flight from Chicago to Denver. They can now offer 2-hop service from Chicago to LA, San Francisco, and San Diego by adding one route.

    For the smaller cities like Ontario, it makes sense to connect to the nearest hub. As the occasional passenger, it is MUCH cheaper for you to use a hub. It's a longer flight, but hundreds of dollars less.

    Of course, for flying between really big cities like LA, Chicago, New York, they will probably offer direct flights. At a higher rate. And fewer times a day. But the choice is yours as a customer.

  • Jay911 (unregistered)

    The car wash is completely understandable. The upper left answer is "Yes, but I know it'll be dirty again from snowmelt or standing water before I get out of the parking lot, so no." but that wouldn't fit on the screen.

    The London directions: There must be something really important at Imperial Wharf.

    (I thought he was in Starfleet?)

  • too_many_usernames (cs) in reply to Zacrath
    Zacrath:
    Addendum (2014-03-14 07:43): An unsigned number can't be negative, and -32768 is the minimum 16-bit signed number.

    Only for two's complement encoding. There's at least one 16-bit floating point format which has a representation for -Inf...

    Hint: errors like this always crop up if people aren't specific about their data types!

  • HardwareGeek (cs) in reply to ochrist
    ochrist:
    TRWTF is that a website about Java certification is using PHP.
    I can't believe no one has yet reduced this to its proper form: TRWTF is using PHP, period.
  • HardwareGeek (cs) in reply to CigarDoug
    CigarDoug:
    Jeff Grigg:
    ... LAX and Ontario, a distance of about 50 miles, ...
    ...

    For the smaller cities like Ontario, it makes sense to connect to the nearest hub. As the occasional passenger, it is MUCH cheaper for you to use a hub. It's a longer flight, but hundreds of dollars less.

    ...

    Not necessarily. A couple of times a year I fly between Seattle and the San Francisco Bay area (which has three large commercial airports). There are two discount airlines that fly these routes. Depending on the airline and airport, I am offered flights connecting in Los Angeles or Las Vegas. These flights are not only much less convenient, they are NOT "MUCH cheaper;" in fact, they are much MORE expensive than either a direct flight to one of the other two airports, or a direct flight to that airport on their competitor (because my body is taking up a seat on two flights and using twice as much fuel). Why do they even bother offering that option?

    BTW, Jeff was already at a hub, LAX. Expecting a commuter flight to a nearby airport would be reasonable; expecting it to be reasonably priced or more convenient than ground transportation, not so much.

  • OldCoder (unregistered) in reply to abigail
    Comment held for moderation.
  • no laughing matter (cs) in reply to NMe
    NMe:
    Using a deprecated function is one thing, but why would anyone have written 5 lines in succession that all do their own call to split? Hard to say without actually seeing the code but this reeks of bad design to me.
    Obviously yesterdays' Useful Bits have been ported to PHP. And adapted to a country with only five holidays.

    That's the problem with running a site like thedailywtf.com: Sooner or later a "plz send me the codez" developer will use the code snippets as an inspiration!

  • no laughing matter (cs) in reply to ochrist
    ochrist:
    TRWTF is that a website about Java certification is using PHP.
    [image]
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to Dale
    Dale:
    If you look at the image, the problem appears to be that there are two stations in the system, "Clapham Junction" and "Clapham Junction #nrc". I'd love to know what "#nrc" stands for.
    No Route to Crescent.

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