• bstorer (cs)

    Ha! Look at the price on those Wheat Thins. I personally never pay more than $15 for them. Suckers!

  • SilverEyes (unregistered)

    I always wonder why people are insistent that magnetic and infrared fields everywhere can be everything but bad for them?!

    Frist! (well... secnod).

  • Erik (unregistered)

    I'd expect $400 for shipping from an eBay auction, but not Amazon.

  • J Cooper (unregistered)

    That bear is nothing. I have one that protects me from tainted orgone, WiFi radiation, and underpants gnomes.

    Captcha: pseudoscientific bullsh!t

  • Mitch (unregistered)

    Yawn. Anyone who's ever used Amazon's system to publish their product data knows that what's shown here is a minor glitch. I've seen entire storefronts have 100% sales on every item and allow checkouts to occur.

  • bstorer (cs) in reply to J Cooper
    J Cooper:
    That bear is nothing. I have one that protects me from tainted orgone, WiFi radiation, and underpants gnomes.

    Captcha: pseudoscientific bullsh!t

    Quiet, fool! You'll anger Xenu!

  • joe.edwards (cs)

    That helium bubble wrap idea is ingenious.

  • Pony Gumbo (unregistered) in reply to Erik
    Erik:
    I'd expect $400 for shipping from an eBay auction, but not Amazon.

    Amazon's Sellercentral may as well be ebay - it's subject to a comparable amount of oversight.

    While I'm sure most of these are user error, their "Amazon Desktop" application is buggy as hell.

  • snoofle (unregistered) in reply to SilverEyes
    SilverEyes:
    I always wonder why people are insistent that magnetic and infrared fields everywhere can be everything but bad for them?!

    Frist! (well... secnod).

    Um, wait a sec, isn't the Earth enveloped in a magnetic field.... uh oh!

  • Veinor (cs) in reply to snoofle
    snoofle:
    SilverEyes:
    I always wonder why people are insistent that magnetic and infrared fields everywhere can be everything but bad for them?!

    Frist! (well... secnod).

    Um, wait a sec, isn't the Earth enveloped in a magnetic field.... uh oh!

    The earth's magnetic field is 30-60 microteslas. That's pretty weak; a modern high-strength neodymium magnet is about 1 tesla.

  • Phat Wednesday (unregistered)

    Looks like the Advantus Neon Open Sign is all that, and a bag of chips.

    (2003 anyone?)

  • Zecc (cs) in reply to joe.edwards
    joe.edwards@imaginuity.com:
    That helium bubble wrap idea is ingenious.
    Unfortunately, it's available for US shipping only, because in Europe we use incompatible metric helium.
  • Anon (unregistered)

    I bet that bear will sit nicely on their stack of favorite VHS tapes.

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to bstorer
    bstorer:
    Ha! Look at the price on those Wheat Thins. I personally never pay more than $15 for them. Suckers!

    Dude, where do you get them for $15?! They are AT LEAST $25 here. :-/

  • Coincoin (cs) in reply to joe.edwards
    joe.edwards@imaginuity.com:
    That helium bubble wrap idea is ingenious.

    Wait till you see Hydrogen bubble wraps.

    "OMG! bubble wrap!.. ... ... POW!! blood springling everywhere

  • A Troll With a Cause (unregistered) in reply to Zecc
    Zecc:
    Unfortunately, it's available for US shipping only, because in Europe we use incompatible metric helium.
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.
  • Strider (cs) in reply to A Troll With a Cause
    A Troll With a Cause:
    Zecc:
    Unfortunately, it's available for US shipping only, because in Europe we use incompatible metric helium.
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    Yeah, so whats up with that? Why use a measuring system that counts in a different base than your usual counting system. Either count and measure in 10 or do it it something else, no?

    Damn tradition...

  • Someone You Know (cs) in reply to A Troll With a Cause
    A Troll With a Cause:
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    If by "used" you mean "used to the exclusion of all other systems," you are incorrect. We use the metric system for a number of things here in the United States.

    If by "used" you mean "used, possibly in addition to other systems," you are incorrect. Liberia and Myanmar also do not use the metric system officially.

  • Tim (unregistered) in reply to joe.edwards
    Comment held for moderation.
  • R Stamer (unregistered)

    No-one has noticed those "tin wheats" are actually a advantus open sign?

  • Hans (unregistered) in reply to Tim
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Joe (unregistered) in reply to Tim
    Tim:
    I was just wondering about that. Can helium be produced cheaply enough to save enough energy to make it worth it?
    It can be produced fairly cheaply, it just won't help you that much. Bubble wrap filled with He would be fairly pointless, first off because the amount of lift generated would be negligible, and second because the He would diffuse through the plastic in very short order.

    You might be able to get enough helium in something like mylar in a packing container to make a small dent in the weight, but many (most? all?) shippers also charge you for size.

    But wait! Here's an idea! You could compress the helium, so that it doesn't take up as much space! (Yes, I am joking. I leave the physics of why that's a bad idea as an exercise for the reader)

  • Christophe (unregistered) in reply to Someone You Know
    Someone You Know:
    A Troll With a Cause:
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    Liberia and Myanmar also do not use the metric system officially.

    So really, we in the US are in good company!

  • G Money (unregistered) in reply to Someone You Know
    Someone You Know:
    A Troll With a Cause:
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    If by "used" you mean "used to the exclusion of all other systems," you are incorrect. We use the metric system for a number of things here in the United States.

    If by "used" you mean "used, possibly in addition to other systems," you are incorrect. Liberia and Myanmar also do not use the metric system officially.

    Liberia and Myanmar -- true paragons of technological and economic innovation.

  • G Money (unregistered) in reply to Hans
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Applepear (unregistered) in reply to Strider
    Strider:
    A Troll With a Cause:
    Zecc:
    Unfortunately, it's available for US shipping only, because in Europe we use incompatible metric helium.
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    Yeah, so whats up with that? Why use a measuring system that counts in a different base than your usual counting system. Either count and measure in 10 or do it it something else, no?

    Damn tradition...

    As a computer geek I prefer my measuring systems to use base 2. 1 Gallon = 100 Quarts = 1000 Pints = 10000 Cups.

  • John Doe (unregistered) in reply to Coincoin
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Faxmachinen (cs) in reply to John Doe

    That's great and all, but I think you're forgetting about a certain airship and why we don't use hydrogen anymore.

  • NotanEnglishMajor (unregistered) in reply to Hans
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Mcoder (cs) in reply to Erik
    Erik:
    I'd expect $400 for shipping from an eBay auction, but not Amazon.

    I've become used to see over $100 prices for overseas shipping... But $400 is still too much.

    Veinor:
    The earth's magnetic field is 30-60 microteslas. That's pretty weak; a modern high-strength neodymium magnet is about 1 tesla.

    1 tesla!!! Are you sure about that? It seems too much for me.

  • Mcoder (cs) in reply to John Doe
    John Doe:
    Coincoin:
    joe.edwards@imaginuity.com:
    That helium bubble wrap idea is ingenious.

    Wait till you see Hydrogen bubble wraps.

    "OMG! bubble wrap!.. ... ... POW!! blood springling everywhere

    Hydrogen doesn't matter, because hydrogen molecules consist of two hydrogen atoms, so the molecule mass is (about) the same as the helium atom mass, so the density is also the same.

    The molecular mass of hydrogen is half of the atomic mass of helium (take another look at the periodic table). So, its density is half of that of helium.

  • MaGnA (cs)

    YOU KNOW THAT THE PRODUCT MUST BE LEGIT IF THE TEXT IS IN ALL CAPS.

  • Pedant (unregistered) in reply to Hans
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Pedant (unregistered) in reply to Joe
    Joe:
    Tim:
    I was just wondering about that. Can helium be produced cheaply enough to save enough energy to make it worth it?
    It can be produced fairly cheaply, it just won't help you that much. Bubble wrap filled with He would be fairly pointless, first off because the amount of lift generated would be negligible, and second because the He would diffuse through the plastic in very short order.

    You might be able to get enough helium in something like mylar in a packing container to make a small dent in the weight, but many (most? all?) shippers also charge you for size.

    But wait! Here's an idea! You could compress the helium, so that it doesn't take up as much space! (Yes, I am joking. I leave the physics of why that's a bad idea as an exercise for the reader)

    Is a tank of helium heavier empty or full?

  • Shadowman (unregistered) in reply to Someone You Know
    Someone You Know:
    A Troll With a Cause:
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    If by "used" you mean "used to the exclusion of all other systems," you are incorrect. We use the metric system for a number of things here in the United States.

    If by "used" you mean "used, possibly in addition to other systems," you are incorrect. Liberia and Myanmar also do not use the metric system officially.

    You most likely know it as Myanmar, but it will always be Burma to me.

  • John Doe (unregistered) in reply to Mcoder
    Comment held for moderation.
  • John Doe (unregistered) in reply to John Doe
    John Doe:
    <snip/> No, the _atomic_ mass of hydrogen is half of that of helium, but since molecular hydrogen normally occurs as H2, the _molecular_ mass is equal.
    Sorry, my bad, helium has two neutrons. (But I didn't need the periodic table ;))
  • Jon (unregistered)

    I have a great idea: vacuum bubblewrap. It weighs even less than the helium and hydrogen stuff!

  • Andrew (unregistered) in reply to Coincoin
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Andrew (unregistered) in reply to John Doe
    John Doe:
    John Doe:
    <snip/> No, the _atomic_ mass of hydrogen is half of that of helium, but since molecular hydrogen normally occurs as H2, the _molecular_ mass is equal.
    Sorry, my bad, helium has two neutrons. (But I didn't need the periodic table ;))

    Actually, hydrogen has one proton and helium has two. The protons make the element. Neutrons can be added to change the isotope.

    Hydrogen a few useful isotopes, which have more or less neutrons. Deuterium (2n) is nuclear fusion fuel in the Sun. Tritium (3n) help U.S. nuclear warheads get extra bang (I'm not sure how).

  • Jon (unregistered) in reply to Andrew
    Andrew:
    Actually, hydrogen has one *proton* and helium has two. The protons make the element. Neutrons can be added to change the isotope.

    Hydrogen a few useful isotopes, which have more or less neutrons. Deuterium (2n) is nuclear fusion fuel in the Sun. Tritium (3n) help U.S. nuclear warheads get extra bang (I'm not sure how).

    I think they were discussing typical hydrogen and helium, which have mass numbers of 1 and 4 respectively. Ultimately, Wikipedia gives the density of hydrogen gas as being about half the density of helium gas.

    As for H-bombs, I think they use lithium deuteride, which is solid and non-radioactive. Tritium is produced temporarily during detonation.

  • Darien H (unregistered) in reply to Pedant
    Pedant:
    Is a tank of helium heavier empty or full?

    Heavier full. The sealed metal tank displaces the same amount of air in both cases, so it's just as buoyant in terms of displacement.

    As the mass of the compressed helium is likely greater than that of the uncompressed air, it will be heavier when full.

    Captcha: Gotcha

  • SuperousOxide (cs) in reply to Andrew
    Andrew:
    Actually, hydrogen has one *proton* and helium has two. The protons make the element. Neutrons can be added to change the isotope.

    Hydrogen a few useful isotopes, which have more or less neutrons. Deuterium (2n) is nuclear fusion fuel in the Sun. Tritium (3n) help U.S. nuclear warheads get extra bang (I'm not sure how).

    But the amount of Deuterium and Tritium in a sample of Hydrogen is vanishingly small (unless it has been specifically isolated), the same with the amount of Helium 3. So hydrogen gas is going to be very close to half as dense as helium gas (according to the Ideal Gas law, which should apply well enough to Hydrogen and Helium at atmospheric temperatures and pressures)

  • J (unregistered) in reply to Joe
    Joe:
    Tim:
    I was just wondering about that. Can helium be produced cheaply enough to save enough energy to make it worth it?
    It can be produced fairly cheaply, it just won't help you that much. Bubble wrap filled with He would be fairly pointless, first off because the amount of lift generated would be negligible, and second because the He would diffuse through the plastic in very short order.

    You might be able to get enough helium in something like mylar in a packing container to make a small dent in the weight, but many (most? all?) shippers also charge you for size.

    But wait! Here's an idea! You could compress the helium, so that it doesn't take up as much space! (Yes, I am joking. I leave the physics of why that's a bad idea as an exercise for the reader)

    Final paragraph = Best post I've seen in a long time.

  • Izzy (unregistered) in reply to Jon
    Jon:
    I have a great idea: vacuum bubblewrap. It weighs even less than the helium and hydrogen stuff!

    Brilliant! There's no shortage of vacuum either. Just a couple hundred miles up there's enough for everyone. (Non USA folk should feel free to use more familiar units, including but not limited to hands, cubits, parsecs and wavelengths of Cesium light.)

  • operagost (cs)

    For those who are well-versed in neither magnetic, nor infrared therapy, I am pleased to provide the following version of the ad in layman's terms:

    [image]
  • Arancaytar (cs) in reply to Strider
    Strider:
    A Troll With a Cause:
    Zecc:
    Unfortunately, it's available for US shipping only, because in Europe we use incompatible metric helium.
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.

    Yeah, so whats up with that? Why use a measuring system that counts in a different base than your usual counting system. Either count and measure in 10 or do it it something else, no?

    Damn tradition...

    I could not agree more strongly. Still...

    What time is it?

    Oh right, 1185260400.

  • Alan (unregistered) in reply to Jon
    Jon:
    I have a great idea: vacuum bubblewrap. It weighs even less than the helium and hydrogen stuff!

    It's not a totally crazy idea. If you can get a structure strong enough to contain a vacuum without collapsing, yet light enough so the total volume displaces enough air - then you have an airship. In fact, it may be easier to do on a smaller scale, what with nanotechnology and all, so vacuum bubblewrap may be feasible.

    Damn, I have said too much - races to patent office

  • Adrian (unregistered) in reply to A Troll With a Cause
    A Troll With a Cause:
    Zecc:
    Unfortunately, it's available for US shipping only, because in Europe we use incompatible metric helium.
    The metric system is not used only in Europe. The metric system is used EVERYWHERE ON EARTH except in the US.
    And in informal conversation in the UK, as I said to a friend of mine over a pint the other day (there's a pub a mile or two from here).
  • MET (cs) in reply to Alan
    Alan:
    Jon:
    I have a great idea: vacuum bubblewrap. It weighs even less than the helium and hydrogen stuff!

    It's not a totally crazy idea. If you can get a structure strong enough to contain a vacuum without collapsing, yet light enough so the total volume displaces enough air - then you have an airship. In fact, it may be easier to do on a smaller scale, what with nanotechnology and all, so vacuum bubblewrap may be feasible.

    Damn, I have said too much - races to patent office

    Neglecting the fact that bubblewrap is meant to provide a cushioning effect during transportation, and that a vacuum container would necessarily be rigid so being useless. Unless of course you wrapped your vacuum container in an equal weight of normal bubble wrap!

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